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Sample records for activated b-cell abc

  1. Cerdulatinib, a novel dual SYK/JAK kinase inhibitor, has broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB types of diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiao; Xing, Wei; Coffey, Greg; Dresser, Karen; Lu, Kellie; Guo, Ailin; Raca, Gordana; Pandey, Anjali; Conley, Pamela; Yu, Hongbo; Wang, Y. Lynn

    2015-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) and JAK/STAT pathways play critical roles in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Herein, we investigated the anti-lymphoma activity of cerdulatinib, a novel compound that dually targets SYK and JAK/STAT pathways. On a tissue microarray of 62 primary DLBCL tumors, 58% expressed either phosphorylated SYK or STAT3 or both. SYK and STAT3 are also phosphorylated in a panel of eleven DLBCL cell lines although ABC and GCB subtypes exhibited different JAK/STAT and BCR signaling profiles. In both ABC and GCB cell lines, cerdulatinib induced apoptosis that was associated with caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The compound also blocked G1/S transition and caused cell cycle arrest, accompanied by inhibition of RB phosphorylation and down-regulation of cyclin E. Phosphorylation of BCR components and STAT3 was sensitive to cerdulatinib in both ABC and GCB cell lines under stimulated conditions. Importantly, JAK/STAT and BCR signaling can be blocked by cerdulatinib in primary GCB and non-GCB DLBCL tumor cells that were accompanied by cell death. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the actions of cerdulatinib, suggesting that the drug has a broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB DLBCL, at least in part by inhibiting SYK and JAK pathways. PMID:26575169

  2. Exploiting Synthetic Lethality for the Therapy of ABC Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yibin; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Emre, N.C. Tolga; Ceribelli, Michele; Zhang, Meili; Wright, George; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Platig, John; Kohlhammer, Holger; Young, Ryan M.; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Buggy, Joseph J.; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Mathews, Lesley A.; Shinn, Paul; Guha, Rajarshi; Ferrer, Marc; Thomas, Craig; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of oncogenic mutations can inspire therapeutic strategies that are synthetically lethal, affecting cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Lenalidomide is an active agent in the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but its mechanism of action is unknown. Lenalidomide kills ABC DLBCL cells by augmenting interferon β (IFNβ) production, owing to the oncogenic MYD88 mutations in these lymphomas. In a cereblon-dependent fashion, lenalidomide downregulates IRF4 and SPIB, transcription factors that together prevent IFNβ production by repressing IRF7 and also amplify pro-survival NF-κB signaling by transactivating CARD11. Blockade of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling using the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib also downregulates IRF4 and consequently synergizes with lenalidomide in killing ABC DLBCLs, suggesting attractive therapeutic strategies. PMID:22698399

  3. STAT3 inhibition is a therapeutic strategy for ABC-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Scuto, Anna; Kujawski, Maciej; Kowolik, Claudia; Krymskaya, Ludmila; Wang, Lin; Weiss, Lawrence M; Digiusto, David; Yu, Hua; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Persistent STAT3 signaling contributes to malignant progression in many diverse types of human cancer. STAT3 is constitutively active in activated B-cell (ABC)-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), a class of nongerminal center derived DLBCL cells for which existing therapy is weakly effective. In this report, we provide a preclinical proof of concept that STAT3 is an effective molecular target for ABC-like DLBCL therapy. Direct inhibition of STAT3 with short hairpin RNA suppressed the growth of human ABC-like DLBCL in mouse models in a manner associated with apoptosis, repression of STAT3 target genes, and inhibition of a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Together, these results suggest that STAT3 is essential to maintain the pathophysiology of ABC-like DLBCL and therefore that STAT3 inhibition may offer a promising approach in its therapy.

  4. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W; Dave, Sandeep S; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Kuehl, W Michael; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2007-03-19

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell-like (ABC), germinal center B cell-like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch mu (Smu) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sgamma and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Smu deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Smu in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  5. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Thome, Margot

    2009-01-01

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity is relevant for tumor growth. Here we report that MALT1 is constitutively active in DLBCL lines of the ABC but not the GCB subtype. Inhibition of the MALT1 proteolytic activity led to reduced expression of growth factors and apoptosis inhibitors, and specifically affected the growth and survival of ABC DLBCL lines. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in DLBCL of the ABC subtype, and provide a rationale for the development of pharmacological inhibitors of MALT1 in DLBCL therapy. PMID:19897720

  6. Constitutively activated STAT3 promotes cell proliferation and survival in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ding, B. Belinda; Yu, J. Jessica; Yu, Raymond Y.-L.; Mendez, Lourdes M.; Shaknovich, Rita; Zhang, Yonghui; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) consists of at least 2 phenotypic subtypes; that is, the germinal center B-cell–like (GCB-DLBCL) and the activated B-cell–like (ABC-DLBCL) groups. It has been shown that GCB-DLBCL responds favorably to chemotherapy and expresses high levels of BCL6, a transcription repressor known to play a causative role in lymphomagenesis. In comparison, ABC-DLBCL has lower levels of BCL6, constitutively activated nuclear factor-κB, and tends to be refractory to chemotherapy. Here, we report that the STAT3 gene is a transcriptional target of BCL6. As a result, high-level STAT3 expression and activation are preferentially detected in ABC-DLBCL and BCL6-negative normal germinal center B cells. Most importantly, inactivating STAT3 by either AG490 or small interference RNA in ABC-DLBCL cells inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis. These phenotypes are accompanied by decreased expression of several known STAT3 target genes, including c-Myc, JunB, and Mcl-1, and increased expression of the cell- cycle inhibitor p27. In addition to identifying STAT3 as a novel BCL6 target gene, our results define a second oncogenic pathway, STAT3 activation, which operates in ABC-DLBCL, suggesting that STAT3 may be a new therapeutic target in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:17951530

  7. ROBUST: Lenalidomide-R-CHOP versus placebo-R-CHOP in previously untreated ABC-type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Chiappella, Annalisa; Witzig, Thomas E; Spina, Michele; Gascoyne, Randy D; Zhang, Lei; Flament, Jocelyne; Repici, Jacqueline; Vitolo, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    Activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the major constituent of nongerminal center B-cell-like (non-GCB) DLBCL, is associated with poorer survival outcomes than GCB-type DLBCL. In Phase II studies, lenalidomide combined with R-CHOP (R(2)-CHOP) improved outcomes relative to historical R-CHOP in newly diagnosed DLBCL, particularly in non-GCB cases. ROBUST (CC-5013-DLC-002) is a randomized, double-blind, global, Phase III study of oral lenalidomide (15 mg, days 1-14) plus R-CHOP21 × 6 versus placebo-R-CHOP21 × 6 in patients with previously untreated ABC-type DLBCL. Subtyping is done within 3 calendar days by central laboratory gene-expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy tissue. The primary end point is progression-free survival. Secondary end points include response rates, overall survival and health-related quality of life. PMID:27089170

  8. NFκB expression is a feature of both activated B-cell-like and germinal center B-cell-like subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Odqvist, Lina; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Sánchez-Pacheco, Roxana E; Young, Ken H; Martín-Sánchez, Esperanza; Cereceda, Laura; Sánchez-Verde, Lydia; Pajares, Raquel; Mollejo, Manuela; Fresno, Manuel F; Mazorra, Francisco; Ruíz-Marcellán, Carmen; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita; Piris, Miguel A

    2014-10-01

    The activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcription factor family is considered to have a key role in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) pathogenesis and is associated with a specific molecular subtype, the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype. We evaluated the expression of NFκB by immunohistochemistry in a large series of DLBCL cases. The five different NFκB family members (NFκB1, NFκB2, RELA, RELB, and REL) showed a heterogeneous expression pattern with the vast majority of cases being positive for at least one factor. Two independent series of tumor samples were classified into germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) or ABC subtypes using different approaches, immunohistochemistry, or gene expression profiling, and the expression of NFκB family members was assessed. Notably, no significant differences regarding the expression of the different NFκB members were detected between the two subtypes, suggesting that NFκB signaling is a prominent feature not only in the ABC subtype, but also in the GCB tumors. Of the five transcription factors, only REL expression had a significant clinical impact on R-CHOP-treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, identifying a subgroup of patients with superior clinical outcome.

  9. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  10. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell–like diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V.; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Kuehl, W. Michael; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell–like (ABC), germinal center B cell–like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch μ (Sμ) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sγ and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Sμ deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase–dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Sμ in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  11. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease. PMID:27698858

  12. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease.

  13. Blockade of oncogenic IκB kinase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by bromodomain and extraterminal domain protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, Michele; Kelly, Priscilla N; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George W; Xiao, Wenming; Yang, Yibin; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Patel, Paresma R; Ferrer, Marc; Joshi, Shivangi; Nerle, Sujata; Sandy, Peter; Normant, Emmanuel; Thomas, Craig J; Staudt, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    In the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), NF-κB activity is essential for viability of the malignant cells and is sustained by constitutive activity of IκB kinase (IKK) in the cytoplasm. Here, we report an unexpected role for the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins BRD2 and BRD4 in maintaining oncogenic IKK activity in ABC DLBCL. IKK activity was reduced by small molecules targeting BET proteins as well as by genetic knockdown of BRD2 and BRD4 expression, thereby inhibiting downstream NF-κB-driven transcriptional programs and killing ABC DLBCL cells. Using a high-throughput platform to screen for drug-drug synergy, we observed that the BET inhibitor JQ1 combined favorably with multiple drugs targeting B-cell receptor signaling, one pathway that activates IKK in ABC DLBCL. The BTK kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which is in clinical development for the treatment of ABC DLBCL, synergized strongly with BET inhibitors in killing ABC DLBCL cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of BET protein inhibitors in ABC DLBCL, particularly in combination with other modulators of oncogenic IKK signaling.

  14. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  15. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  16. Autoimmunity, polyclonal B-cell activation and infection.

    PubMed

    Granholm, N A; Cavallo, T

    1992-02-01

    It is widely believed that autoimmunity is an integral part of the immune system, and that genetic, immunologic, hormonal, environmental and other factors contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Thus, autoimmune disease may represent an abnormal expression of immune functions instead of loss of tolerance to self, and it can be organ specific or systemic in its manifestations. We review the various factors that contribute to the development of autoimmune disease; we also review the mechanisms of polyclonal B-cell activation, with emphasis on the role of infectious agents. We consider systemic lupus erythematosus in humans and in experimental animals as prototypic autoimmune disease, and we summarize data to indicate that polyclonal B-cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease. The effect of polyclonal B-cell activation, brought about by injections of a B-cell activator-lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria-is sufficient to cause autoimmune disease in an immunologically normal host. In fact, autoimmune disease can be arrested if excessive polyclonal B-cell activation is suppressed; alternatively, autoimmune disease can be exacerbated if polyclonal B-cell activation is enhanced. We explore the mechanism of tissue injury when autoimmune disease is induced or exacerbated, and we consider the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies, immune complexes, complement, the blood cell carrier system, and the mononuclear phagocyte system. Although polyclonal B-cell activation may be the mechanism whereby various factors can cause or exacerbate systemic autoimmune disease, polyclonal B-cell activation may cause autoimmune disease on its own.

  17. The B-Cell-Specific src-Family Kinase Blk Is Dispensable for B-Cell Development and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Texido, Gemma; Su, I-hsin; Mecklenbräuker, Ingrid; Saijo, Kaoru; Malek, Sami N.; Desiderio, Stephen; Rajewsky, Klaus; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The B-cell lymphocyte kinase (Blk) is a src-family protein tyrosine kinase specifically expressed in B-lineage cells of mice. The early onset of Blk expression during B-cell development in the bone marrow and the high expression levels of Blk in mature B cells suggest a possible important role of Blk in B-cell physiology. To study the in vivo function of Blk, mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the blk gene were generated. In homozygous mutant mice, neither blk mRNA nor Blk protein is expressed. Despite the absence of Blk, the development, in vitro activation, and humoral immune responses of B cells to T-cell-dependent and -independent antigens are unaltered. These data are consistent with functional redundancy of Blk in B-cell development and immune responses. PMID:10648608

  18. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  19. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B.; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL. PMID:26668357

  20. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  1. AUY922 effectively targets against activated B cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and low-grade lymphoma cells harboring genetic alteration-associated nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Jen; Shih, Neng-Yao; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Lin, Hui-You; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Chang, Kung-Chao; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Chang, Jeffrey S; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent genetic alterations that are frequently observed in some low-grade lymphomas, such as activated B cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type lymphoma (MALT lymphoma) are usually associated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and confer resistance to therapy. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of AUY922, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, in representative cell lines OCI-Ly3 (ABC-DLBCL) and MA-1 (a low-grade lymphoma cell line with t(14;18)/IgH-MALT1translocation) to explore its potential use in the treatment of refractory B-cell lymphoma. Our results showed that AUY922 effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of OCI-Ly3 and MA-1 cells, which were accompanied by down-regulation of the expression levels of NF-κB and Bcl-2 family proteins, as well as molecules of multiple signaling pathways involving cell proliferation, growth and survival. The growth inhibitory effect of AUY922 was further confirmed in a mouse xenograft model. These findings indicate the potential use of AUY922 in B cell lymphomas.

  2. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco–Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  3. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  4. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  5. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  6. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  7. Cooperative signaling through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB pathways in subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lloyd T.; Wright, George; Davis, R. Eric; Lenz, Georg; Farinha, Pedro; Dang, Lenny; Chan, John W.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2008-01-01

    The activated B cell–like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we showed that the NF-κB pathway induced the expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which also have high levels of total and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 protein, suggesting autocrine signaling. Using RNA interference for STAT3, we defined a gene expression signature of IL-6 and IL-10 signaling through STAT3. Based on this signature, we constructed a molecular predictor of STAT3 signaling that defined a subset of ABC DLBCL tumors with high expression of STAT3, IL-6, and/or IL-10 and their downstream targets. Although the STAT3-high and STAT3-low subsets had equivalent expression of genes that distinguish ABC DLBCL from germinal center B cell–like DLBCL, STAT3-high ABC DLBCLs had higher expression of signatures that reflected NF-κB activity, proliferation, and glycolysis. A small-molecule inhibitor of Janus kinase signaling, which blocked STAT3 signature expression, was toxic only for ABC DLBCL lines and synergized with an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. These findings suggest that the biological interplay between the STAT3 and NF-κB pathways may be exploited for the treatments of a subset of ABC DLBCLs. PMID:18160665

  8. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G.; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  9. NEMO Binding Domain peptide inhibits constitutive NF-κB activity and reduces tumor burden in a canine model of relapsed, refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Patel, Reema; Baldwin, Albert S.; May, Michael J.; Mason, Nicola J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Activated B-Cell Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) is an aggressive, poorly chemoresponsive lymphoid malignancy characterized by constitutive canonical NF-κB activity that promotes lymphomagenesis and chemotherapy resistance via over-expression of anti-apoptotic NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of the canonical NF-κB pathway may therefore have therapeutic relevance in ABC-DLBCL. Here we set out to determine whether dogs with spontaneous DLBCL have comparative aberrant constitutive NF-κB activity and to determine the therapeutic relevance of NF-κB inhibition in dogs with relapsed, resistant DLBCL. Experimental Design Canonical NF-κB activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses, and NF-κB target gene expression was measured by qRT-PCR. Primary malignant canine B lymphocytes were treated with the selective IKK complex inhibitor Nemo Binding Domain (NBD) peptide, and evaluated for NF-κB activity and apoptosis. NBD peptide was administered intra-nodally to dogs with relapsed B-cell lymphoma and NF-κB target gene expression and tumor burden were evaluated pre and post treatment. Results Constitutive canonical NF-κB activity and increased NF-κB target gene expression was detected in primary DLBCL tissue. NBD peptide inhibited this activity and induced apoptosis of primary malignant B cells in vitro. Intra-tumoral injections of NBD peptide to dogs with relapsed DLBCL inhibited NF-κB target gene expression and reduced tumor burden. Conclusions This work shows that dogs with spontaneous DLBCL represent a clinically relevant, spontaneous, large animal model for human ABC-DLBCL and demonstrates the therapeutic relevance of NF-κB inhibition in the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. These results have important translational relevance for ABC-DLBCL treatment in human patients. PMID:21610150

  10. A mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 enable survival of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M; Turton, K B; Zhu, F; Li, Y; Grindle, K M; Annis, D S; Lu, L; Drennan, A C; Tweardy, D J; Bharadwaj, U; Mosher, D F; Rui, L

    2016-01-01

    Activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL) is characterized by increased expression and activator of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). ABC DLBCL cells require STAT3 for growth in culture. In ABC DLBCL cells, eosinophils and perhaps all cells, four variant STAT3 mRNAs (Sα, ΔSα, Sβ and ΔSβ) are present as a result of two alternative splicing events, one that results in the inclusion of a 55-residue C-terminal transactivation domain (α) or a truncated C-terminal domain with 7 unique residues (β) and a second that includes (S) or excludes (ΔS) the codon for Ser-701 in the linker between the SH2 and C-terminal domains. A substantial literature indicates that both α and β variants are required for optimal STAT3 function, but nothing is known about functions of ΔS variants. We used a knockdown/re-expression strategy to explore whether survival of ABC DLBCL cells requires that the four variants be in an appropriate ratio. No single variant rescued survival as well as STAT3Sα-C, Sα with activating mutations (A661C and N663C) in the SH2 domain. Better rescue was achieved when all four variants were re-expressed or Sα and ΔSα or Sβ and ΔSβ were re-expressed in pairs. Rescue correlated with expression of STAT3-sensitive genes NFKBIA and NFKBIZ. We consider a variety of explanations why a mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 should enable survival of ABC DLBCL cells. PMID:26727576

  11. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  13. A role for TLR signaling during B cell activation in antiretroviral-treated HIV individuals.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART(+)). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART(+) and HIV(-) subjects. However, B cells of HIVART(+) subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART(+) individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV(-) subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV(-) subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART(+) individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV(-) subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART(+) subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART(+) subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  14. A Role for TLR Signaling During B Cell Activation in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART+). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART+ and HIV− subjects. However, B cells of HIVART+ subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART+ individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV− subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV− subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART+ individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV− subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART+ subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART+ subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  15. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  16. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells.

  17. Expansion of Activated Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Impact of B Cell Depletion Therapy, and Biomarkers of Response

    PubMed Central

    Adlowitz, Diana G.; Barnard, Jennifer; Biear, Jamie N.; Cistrone, Christopher; Owen, Teresa; Wang, Wensheng; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ezealah, Ezinma; Campbell, Debbie; Wei, Chungwen; Looney, R. John; Sanz, Inaki; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Although B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is effective in a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, both mechanisms and biomarkers of response are poorly defined. Here we characterized abnormalities in B cell populations in RA and the impact of BCDT in order to elucidate B cell roles in the disease and response biomarkers. In active RA patients both CD27+IgD- switched memory (SM) and CD27-IgD- double negative memory (DN) peripheral blood B cells contained significantly higher fractions of CD95+ and CD21- activated cells compared to healthy controls. After BCD the predominant B cell populations were memory, and residual memory B cells displayed a high fraction of CD21- and CD95+ compared to pre-depletion indicating some resistance of these activated populations to anti-CD20. The residual memory populations also expressed more Ki-67 compared to pre-treatment, suggesting homeostatic proliferation in the B cell depleted state. Biomarkers of clinical response included lower CD95+ activated memory B cells at depletion time points and a higher ratio of transitional B cells to memory at reconstitution. B cell function in terms of cytokine secretion was dependent on B cell subset and changed with BCD. Thus, SM B cells produced pro-inflammatory (TNF) over regulatory (IL10) cytokines as compared to naïve/transitional. Notably, B cell TNF production decreased after BCDT and reconstitution compared to untreated RA. Our results support the hypothesis that the clinical and immunological outcome of BCDT depends on the relative balance of protective and pathogenic B cell subsets established after B cell depletion and repopulation. PMID:26047509

  18. Dissociation of two signals required for activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Julius, M H; von Boehmer, H; Sidman, C L

    1982-01-01

    Cellular interactions involved in the T cell-dependent activation of B cells were analyzed by using lines and clones of helper T cells specific for determinants expressed on the B cell surface. Activation of male antigen-, M locus-, and H-2-specific T cells was shown to support polyclonal Ig production by a population of B cells that did not require T-cell-B-cell interaction for induction/amplification. However, these T cells alone did not activate gradient-purified small (resting) B cells. The activation of small B cells was shown to require not only a signal derived through an antigen-specific T-helper cell-B cell interaction but in addition a second signal that could be provided by anti-Ig antibodies. PMID:6979046

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors activate CIITA and MHC class II antigen expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cycon, Kelly A; Mulvaney, Kathleen; Rimsza, Lisa M; Persky, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) diagnosed in the USA, consists of at least two distinct subtypes: germinal centre B (GCB) and activated B-cell (ABC). Decreased MHC class II (MHCII) expression on the tumours in both DLBCL subtypes directly correlates with significant decreases in patient survival. One common mechanism accounting for MHCII down-regulation in DLBCL is reduced expression of the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of MHCII transcription. Furthermore, reduced CIITA expression in ABC DLBCL correlates with the presence of the transcriptional repressor positive regulatory domain-I-binding factor-1 (PRDI-BF1). However, the mechanisms underlying down-regulation of CIITA in GCB DLBCL are currently unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that neither PRDI-BF1 nor CpG hypermethylation at the CIITA promoters are responsible for decreased CIITA in GCB DLBCL. In contrast, histone modifications associated with an open chromatin conformation and active transcription were significantly lower at the CIITA promoters in CIITA− GCB cells compared with CIITA+ B cells, which suggests that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to repression of CIITA transcription. Treatment of CIITA− or CIITAlow GCB cells with several different histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) activated modest CIITA and MHCII expression. However, CIITA and MHCII levels were significantly higher in these cells after exposure to the HDAC-1-specific inhibitor MS-275. These results suggest that CIITA transcription is repressed in GCB DLBCL cells through epigenetic mechanisms involving HDACs, and that HDACi treatment can alleviate repression. These observations may have important implications for patient therapy. PMID:23789844

  20. Clonal B cells in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia exhibit functional features of chronic active B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, K V; Vogel, R; Ziegler, C; Altan-Bonnet, G; Velardi, E; Calafiore, M; Dogan, A; Arcila, M; Patel, M; Knapp, K; Mallek, C; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; van den Brink, M R M; Palomba, M L

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) characterized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and the medullary expansion of clonal lymphoplasmacytic cells. Neoplastic transformation has been partially attributed to hyperactive MYD88 signaling, secondary to the MYD88 L265P mutation, occurring in the majority of WM patients. Nevertheless, the presence of chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a feature of multiple IgM+ B-NHL, remains a subject of speculation in WM. Here, we interrogated the BCR signaling capacity of primary WM cells by utilizing multiparametric phosphoflow cytometry and found heightened basal phosphorylation of BCR-related signaling proteins, and augmented phosphoresponses on surface IgM (sIgM) crosslinking, compared with normal B cells. In support of those findings we observed high sIgM expression and loss of phosphatase activity in WM cells, which could both lead to signaling potentiation in clonal cells. Finally, led by the high-signaling heterogeneity among WM samples, we generated patient-specific phosphosignatures, which subclassified patients into a ‘high' and a ‘healthy-like' signaling group, with the second corresponding to patients with a more indolent clinical phenotype. These findings support the presence of chronic active BCR signaling in WM while providing a link between differential BCR signaling utilization and distinct clinical WM subgroups. PMID:26867669

  1. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, promotes cell differentiation, and reduces telomerase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LINA; CHEN, ZHENZHU; ZUO, WENLI; ZHU, XINGHU; LI, YUFU; LIU, XINJIAN; WEI, XUDONG

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerts beneficial effects on acute myelogenous leukemia. It has been suggested that omacetaxine mepesuccinate, used alone or with interferon-α or cytarabine, induces remission in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. These effects are possibly mediated by its ability to induce apoptosis of leukemia cells and inhibit the activity of telomerase. To determine whether omacetaxine mepesuccinate is beneficial in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), two DLBCL cell lines [a germinal center B cell-like subtype (GCB) and an activated B cell-like subtype (ABC)] were treated with omacetaxine mepesuccinate at various concentrations for different durations. The present study indicated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerts proapoptotic effects in the two cell types in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ABC subtype demonstrated increased sensitivity compared with the GCB subtype. At 40 ng/ml, omacetaxine mepesuccinate exhibited a marked proapoptotic effect on DLBCL cells compared with the other tumor cells investigated. Furthermore, omacetaxine mepesuccinate induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and promoted cell terminal differentiation of pro-B cells. The present study also demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerted its antitumor effect by reducing telomerase activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, promote cell differentiation, and reduce telomerase activity in DLBCL cells, thus aiding the development of omacetaxine mepesuccinate-based DLBCL therapeutic strategies. PMID:26935769

  2. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  3. Activation of the STAT3 Signaling Pathway Is Associated With Poor Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With R-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Meng, Bin; Iqbal, Javeed; Ding, B. Belinda; Perry, Anamarija M.; Cao, Wenfeng; Smith, Lynette M.; Bi, Chengfeng; Jiang, Chunsun; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Armitage, James O.; Vose, Julie M.; Staudt, Louis M.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.; Ye, B. Hilda; Fu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported that constitutive STAT3 activation is a prominent feature of the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL). In this study, we investigated whether STAT3 activation can risk stratify patients with DLBCL. Patients and Methods By an immunohistochemical method, we investigated phosphotyrosine STAT3 (PY-STAT3) expression from 185 patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone). Cell line-based siRNA experiments were also performed to generate an 11-gene, PY-STAT3 activation signature, which was used to study a previously published cohort of 222 patients with DLBCL. The STAT3 activation status determined by these two methods and by STAT3 mRNA levels were then correlated with survival. Results PY-STAT3 was detected in 37% of DLBCL and enriched in ABC-DLBCL cases (P = .03). PY-STAT3 positivity significantly correlated with poor overall survival (OS; P = .01) and event-free survival (EFS; P = .006). Similar observations were made for high levels of STAT3 mRNA. In multivariable analysis, PY-STAT3 status (P = .02), International Prognostic Index (P = .02), and BCL2 expression (P = .046) were independent prognosticators of OS in this cohort. Among the cell-of-origin subgroups, PY-STAT3 was associated with poor EFS among non–germinal center B-cell DLBCL cases only (P = .027). Similarly, the 11-gene STAT3 activation signature correlated with poor survival in the entire DLBCL cohort (OS, P < .001; EFS, P < .001) as well as the ABC-DLBCL subgroup (OS, P = .029; EFS, P = .025). Conclusion STAT3 activation correlated with poor survival in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP, especially those with tumors of the ABC-DLBCL subtype. PMID:24220563

  4. Liver Fibrosis Occurs Through Dysregulation of MyD88-dependent Innate B cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Manoj; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Velazquez, Victoria M.; Tedesco, Dana; Elrod, Elizabeth; Han, Jin-Hwan; Sharma, Prachi; Ibegbu, Chris; Gewirtz, Andrew; Anania, Frank; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.; Grakoui, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease mediated by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) leads to liver fibrosis. Here, we postulated that the immune regulatory properties of HSCs might promote the profibrogenic activity of B cells. Fibrosis is completely attenuated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated B cell deficient μMT mice showing that B cells are required. The retinoic acid produced by HSCs augmented B cell survival, plasma cell marker CD138 expression, and IgG production. These activities were reversed following the addition of the retinoic acid inhibitor, LE540. Transcriptional profiling of fibrotic liver B cells revealed an increased expression of genes related to NF-κB activation, proinflammatory cytokine production and CD40 signaling suggesting that these B cells are activated and may be acting as inflammatory cells. Biological validation experiments also revealed increased activation (CD44 and CD86 expressions), constitutive IgG production and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP1-α. Likewise targeted deletion of B-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signaling, an innate adaptor with involvement in RA signaling, resulted in reduced infiltration of migratory CD11c+ dendritic cells and Ly6C++ monocytes, and hence reduced liver pathology. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that liver fibrosis occurs through a mechanism of HSC-mediated augmentation of innate B cell activity and highlight B cells as an important ‘first responders’ of the intrahepatic immune environment. PMID:25711908

  5. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Ley, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers.

  6. Activation of resting human B cells by helper T-cell clone supernatant: characterization of a human B-cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Diu, A; Gougeon, M L; Moreau, J L; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1987-01-01

    The effects of helper T-cell clone supernatants on resting human B cells were investigated. Four different helper T-cell clones (two T4+ and two T8+) were stimulated by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies on Sepharose beads or anti-T11(2) plus anti-T11(3) monoclonal antibodies. The supernatants from these activated clones induced the proliferation of highly purified resting B lymphocytes from the peripheral blood. The B cells exhibited a cell size and a surface-antigen pattern (4F2 antigen and transferrin receptor) of phase G0 B cells, and they were functionally resting. In response to T-cell supernatants a large fraction of the B cells enlarged and expressed 4F2 antigens and transferrin receptors. In gel filtration, the corresponding activity migrated with an apparent Mr of 12,000-15,000. Our findings strongly support the existence of a human B-cell-activating factor acting on resting B cells and causing them to enter phase G1 of the cell cycle. PMID:2962196

  7. CD27-CD70 interactions regulate B-cell activation by T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kobata, T; Jacquot, S; Kozlowski, S; Agematsu, K; Schlossman, S F; Morimoto, C

    1995-01-01

    CD27, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family, binds to its ligand CD70, a member of the TNF family, and subsequently induces T-cell costimulation and B-cell activation. CD27 is expressed on resting T and B cells, whereas CD70 is expressed on activated T and B cells. Utilizing transfected murine pre-B-cell lines expressing human CD27 or CD70, we have examined the effect of such transfectant cells on human B-cell IgG production and B-cell proliferation. We show that the addition of CD27-transfected cells to a T-cell-dependent, pokeweed mitogen-driven B-cell IgG synthesis system resulted in marked inhibition of IgG production, whereas the addition of CD70-transfected cells enhanced IgG production. The inhibition and enhancement of pokeweed mitogen-driven IgG production by CD27 and CD70 transfectants were abrogated by pretreatment with anti-CD27 and anti-CD70 monoclonal antibodies, respectively. In contrast, little or no inhibition of IgG production and B-cell proliferation was noted with CD27-transfected cells or either anti-CD27 or CD70 monoclonal antibody in a T-cell-independent Staphylococcus aureus/interleukin 2-driven B-cell activation system. In this same system CD70-transfected cells enhanced B-cell IgG production and B-cell proliferation, and this enhancement could be gradually abrogated by addition of increasing numbers of CD27-transfected cells. These results clearly demonstrate that interactions among subsets of T cells expressing CD27 and CD70 play a key role in regulating B-cell activation and immunoglobulin synthesis. PMID:7479974

  8. Synergistic activation of cells by Epstein-Barr virus and B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, L M

    1987-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is initiated by virus binding to the C3dg-C3d receptor CR2. Several workers have implicated this receptor in the control of B-cell activation by examining the effects of antibodies to CR2 and isolated C3d on B-cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here on the activating effects of irradiated EBV, which retains its capacity to bind to CR2 but loses its ability to function as a T-independent B-cell activator. EBV synergized with B-cell growth factor in the induction of uptake of tritiated thymidine by T cell-depleted leukocytes from seronegative donors but did not induce secretion of immunoglobulin. Synergism could be inhibited with an anti-viral antibody that inhibited binding of EBV to CR2. No similar synergism was found between EBV and recombinant interleukin 2, interleukin 1 alpha, or gamma interferon or with the lipid A fraction of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. EBV may thus initiate B-cell activation as it binds to CR2. Infectious virus may, under normal circumstances, induce the cell to make those growth factors necessary to support B-cell proliferation; the difficulty of transforming cells with transfected EBV DNA may in part reflect the absence of an activation event provided by intact virus as it attaches to CR2. The synergism of EBV and B-cell growth factor more clearly distinguishes the effects of B-cell growth factor from those of interleukin 1 and interleukin 2 in other models of B-cell activation. Thus, this may be a useful model for further delineation of unique effects of B-cell growth factor on B-cell function. PMID:3027404

  9. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies.

  10. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  11. TSPAN33 is a novel marker of activated and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Van Phi; Hevezi, Peter; Vences-Catalan, Felipe; Maravillas-Montero, Jose Luis; White, Clayton Alexander; Casali, Paolo; Llorente, Luis; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Lima, Guadalupe; Vilches-Cisneros, Natalia; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    We have identified Tspan33 as a gene encoding a transmembrane protein exhibiting a restricted expression pattern including expression in activated B cells. TSPAN33 is a member of the tetraspanin family. TSPAN33 is not expressed in resting B cells, but is strongly induced in primary human B cells following activation. Human 2E2 cells, a Burkitt’s lymphoma-derived B cell model of activation and differentiation, also upregulate TSPAN33 upon activation. TSPAN33 is expressed in several lymphomas including Hodgkin’s and Diffuse large B Cell Lymphoma. TSPAN33 is also expressed in some autoimmune diseases where B cells participate in the pathology, including rheumatoid arthritis patients, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and in spleen B cells from MRL/Faslpr/lpr mice (a mouse model of SLE). We conclude that TSPAN33 may be used as a diagnostic biomarker or as a target for therapeutic antibodies for treatment of certain B cell lymphomas or autoimmune diseases. PMID:24211713

  12. Dysfunctional B-cell activation in cirrhosis due to hepatitis C infection associated with disappearance of CD27+ B-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Iyer, Tara K.; Carpenter, Erica; Li, Hong; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Kaplan, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both advanced solid tumors and hepatitis C have previously been associated with memory B-cell dysfunction. In this study we sought to dissect the impact of viral infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer on memory B-cell frequency and function in the spectrum of HCV disease. Methods Peripheral blood from healthy donors, HCV-infected patients with F1–F2 liver fibrosis, HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis, patients with HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma and non-HCV-infected cirrhotics were assessed for B-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Isolated B-cells were stimulated with anti-CD40 antibodies and TLR9 agonist for assessment of costimulation marker expression, cytokine production, immunoglobulin production and CD4+ T-cell allostimulatory capacity. Results CD27+ memory B-cells, and more specifically CD27+IgM+ B-cells, were markedly less frequent in cirrhotic patients independent of HCV infection. Circulating B-cells in cirrhotics were hyporesponsive to CD40/TLR9 activation as characterized by CD70 upregulation, TNFβ secretion, IgG production and T-cell allostimulation. Lastly, blockade of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling abrogated the activation of normal donor B-cells by cirrhotic plasma suggesting a role for bacterial translocation in driving B-cell changes in cirrhosis. Conclusion Profound abnormalities in B-cell phenotype and function occur in cirrhosis independent of hepatitis C viral infection. These B-cell defects may explain in part the vaccine hyporesponsiveness and susceptibility to bacterial infection in this population. PMID:21932384

  13. B cell follicle-like structures in multiple sclerosis-with focus on the role of B cell activating factor.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Morten; Frederiksen, Jette L; Degn, Matilda

    2014-08-15

    B lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Follicle-like structures (FLS) have recently been found in the subarachnoid space in the leptomeninges in some patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They contain proliferating B lymphocytes, plasma cells, helper T lymphocytes and a network of follicular dendritic cells. FLS have been shown to correlate with increased cortical demyelination, neuronal loss, meningeal infiltration and central nervous system inflammation, as well as lower age at disease onset and progression to severe disability and death. In this review, we will discuss the role of FLS in MS pathogenesis and disease course and the possible influence by B cell activating factor (BAFF) and C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13).

  14. High-throughput combinatorial screening identifies drugs that cooperate with ibrutinib to kill activated B-cell–like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Young, Ryan M.; Keller, Jonathan M.; Liu, Dongbo; Goldlust, Ian S.; Yasgar, Adam; McKnight, Crystal; Boxer, Matthew B.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Michael, Sam; Mierzwa, Tim; Huang, Wenwei; Walsh, Martin J.; Mott, Bryan T.; Patel, Paresma; Leister, William; Maloney, David J.; Leclair, Christopher A.; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Peyser, Brian D.; Austin, Christopher P.; Martin, Scott E.; Simeonov, Anton; Ferrer, Marc; Staudt, Louis M.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical development of drug combinations is typically achieved through trial-and-error or via insight gained through a detailed molecular understanding of dysregulated signaling pathways in a specific cancer type. Unbiased small-molecule combination (matrix) screening represents a high-throughput means to explore hundreds and even thousands of drug–drug pairs for potential investigation and translation. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform capable of testing compounds in pairwise matrix blocks for the rapid and systematic identification of synergistic, additive, and antagonistic drug combinations. We use this platform to define potential therapeutic combinations for the activated B-cell–like subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We identify drugs with synergy, additivity, and antagonism with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which targets the chronic active B-cell receptor signaling that characterizes ABC DLBCL. Ibrutinib interacted favorably with a wide range of compounds, including inhibitors of the PI3K-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade, other B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors, Bcl-2 family inhibitors, and several components of chemotherapy that is the standard of care for DLBCL. PMID:24469833

  15. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  16. The role of cell surface receptors in the activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    2000-08-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODN) containing the CpG motif or TCG repeats induce T cell-independent polyclonal activation of human B cells. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, the role of cell surface receptors was investigated. Sepharose beads coated with stimulatory but not nonstimulatory sODNs induced B cell proliferation comparably with soluble sODNs. The B cell stimulatory activity of Sepharose-bound sODN did not result from free sODN released from the beads since media incubated with coated beads were inactive. Using FITC-labeled sODNs as probes, binding to human B cells could be detected by flow cytometry. Binding was rapid, saturable, initially temperature independent, but with a rapid off-rate. Competition studies indicated that both stimulatory sODNs and minimally stimulatory sODNs bound to the same receptor. By contrast, phosphodiester oligonucleotides with the same nucleotide sequence as sODNs and bacterial DNA inhibited the binding of sODNs to B cells minimally. Charge appeared to contribute to the binding of sODNs to B cells since binding of sODNs was competitively inhibited by negatively charged molecules, including fucoidan, poly I, and polyvinyl sulfate. These data indicate that human B cells bind sODNs by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is necessary but not sufficient for polyclonal activation.

  17. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  18. Suppression of Human B Cell Activation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Involves Altered Regulation of B Cell Lymphoma-6

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S.; Crawford, Robert B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD. PMID:25543051

  19. The molecular biology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Frick, Mareike; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of malignant lymphoma. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this entity. Gene expression profiling has identified three molecular DLBCL subtypes, termed germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the biology of these DLBCL subtypes with a special emphasis on novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23556103

  20. The ABCs of Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Containment and Reallocation Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes activity-based costing (ABC) and how this tool may help management understand the costs of major activities and identify possible alternatives. Also discussed are the traditional costing systems used by higher education and ways of applying ABC to higher education. (GLR)

  1. Human B cells have an active phagocytic capability and undergo immune activation upon phagocytosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qi; Zhang, Min; Shi, Ming; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Wenjing; Zhang, Guangyun; Yang, Longxiu; Zhi, Jin; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Gengyao; Chen, Pin; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Feng, Guodong; Zhao, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The paradigm that B cells are nonphagocytic was taken for granted for a long time until phagocytic B cells were found in early vertebrate animals. Thereafter, limited evidence has shown that human B cells may also internalize bacteria. However, whether human B cells can actively phagocytose bacteria has been less extensively investigated; in particular, the mechanisms and significance of the phagocytosis require clarification. Here, we show that the human Raji B cell line can phagocytose both live and dead Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the phagocytosed Mtb in turn affects the immune functions of the B cells. After incubation of Raji cells with Mtb, our confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and flow cytometry data showed that Raji cells effectively engulfed Mtb as well as latex beads. The phagocytic rate was proportional to the incubation time and the amount of Mtb or beads added. Additionally, we found that normal human serum could enhance the ability of Raji cells to phagocytose Mtb, while heat-inactivated serum reversed this promoting effect. The phagocytic process of B cells could partially be inhibited by cytochalasin B, an actin inhibitor. Importantly, the phagocytosed Mtb could regulate B cell immune functions, such as stimulating IgM production and upregulating the expression of the antigen-presenting costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Therefore, our results provide the first evidence that human B cells can phagocytose Mtb in an active manner that is independent of bacterial viability, and phagocytosed Mtb can in turn regulate the immune activation of B cells.

  2. Immunomodulatory activity of a methionine aminopeptidase-2 inhibitor on B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Priest, R C; Spaull, J; Buckton, J; Grimley, R L; Sims, M; Binks, M; Malhotra, R

    2009-03-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase-2 (MetAP-2) inhibitors have potent anti-angiogenesis activity and are being developed for the treatment of solid tumours. The recently observed specific expression of MetAP-2 in germinal centre B cells suggests that it has a role in regulating B cell function. We have demonstrated a potent MetAP-2-dependent inhibitory effect on the antibody secretion from B cell receptor and CD40 co-stimulated primary human B cells in the presence of interleukin-21. The effect of MetAP-2 inhibition on antibody secretion was due to a block in differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of germinal centres from human, mouse and marmoset spleen showed a similar expression pattern of MetAP-2 in the marmoset and man, whereas mouse spleen showed no detectable expression. In a marmoset, T dependent immunization model, the MetAP-2 inhibitor suppressed an antigen-specific antibody response. Furthermore, histological analysis showed loss of B cells in the spleen and disrupted germinal centre formation. These results provide experimental evidence to support a novel role for MetAP-2 in immunomodulation. These effects of MetAP-2 are mediated by disruption of the germinal centre reaction and a block in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells.

  3. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  4. Interleukin-7 and Toll-Like Receptor 7 Induce Synergistic B Cell and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bikker, Angela; Kruize, Aike A.; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M. G.; Peters, Rogier P.; Kleinjan, Marije; Redegeld, Frank; de Jager, Wilco; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Roon, Joël A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the potential synergy of IL-7-driven T cell-dependent and TLR7-mediated B cell activation and to assess the additive effects of monocyte/macrophages in this respect. Methods Isolated CD19 B cells and CD4 T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with TLR7 agonist (TLR7A, Gardiquimod), IL-7, or their combination with or without CD14 monocytes/macrophages (T/B/mono; 1 : 1 : 0,1). Proliferation was measured using 3H-thymidine incorporation and Ki67 expression. Activation marker (CD19, HLA-DR, CD25) expression was measured by FACS analysis. Immunoglobulins were measured by ELISA and release of cytokines was measured by Luminex assay. Results TLR7-induced B cell activation was not associated with T cell activation. IL-7-induced T cell activation alone and together with TLR7A synergistically increased numbers of both proliferating (Ki67+) B cells and T cells, which was further increased in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. This was associated by up regulation of activation markers on B cells and T cells. Additive or synergistic induction of production of immunoglobulins by TLR7 and IL-7 was associated by synergistic induction of T cell cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17A, IL-22), which was only evident in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions IL-7-induced CD4 T cell activation and TLR7-induced B cell activation synergistically induce T helper cell cytokine and B cell immunoglobulin production, which is critically dependent on monocytes/macrophages. Our results indicate that previously described increased expression of IL-7 and TLR7 together with increased numbers of macrophages at sites of inflammation in autoimmune diseases like RA and pSS significantly contributes to enhanced lymphocyte activation. PMID:24740301

  5. Heat shock protein 60 activates B cells via the TLR4-MyD88 pathway.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Sfady, Michal; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Mor, Felix; Carmi, Pnina; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Lider, Ofer; Cohen, Irun R

    2005-09-15

    We recently reported that soluble 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) can directly activate T cells via TLR2 signaling to enhance their Th2 response. In this study we investigated whether HSP60 might also activate B cells by an innate signaling pathway. We found that human HSP60 (but not the Escherichia coli GroEL or the Mycobacterial HSP65 molecules) induced naive mouse B cells to proliferate and to secrete IL-10 and IL-6. In addition, the HSP60-treated B cells up-regulated their expression of MHC class II and accessory molecules CD69, CD40, and B7-2. We tested the functional ability of HSP60-treated B cells to activate an allogeneic T cell response and found enhanced secretion of both IL-10 and IFN-gamma by the responding T cells. The effects of HSP60 were found to be largely dependent on TLR4 and MyD88 signaling; B cells from TLR4-mutant mice or from MyD88 knockout mice showed decreased responses to HSP60. Care was taken to rule out contamination of the HSP60 with LPS as a causative factor. These findings add B cells to the complex web of interactions by which HSP60 can regulate immune responses. PMID:16148103

  6. The Role of Activity Based Costing (ABC) in Educational Support Services: A White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edds, Daniel B.

    Many front-line managers who are assuming more financial responsibility for their organizations find traditional cost accounting inadequate for their needs and are turning to Activity Based Costing (ABC). ABC is not a financial reporting system to serve the needs of regulatory agencies, but a tool that tracks costs from the general ledger…

  7. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  8. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries.

  9. Crosslinking of membrane immunoglobulins and B-cell activation: a simple model based on percolation theory.

    PubMed

    Faro, J; Velasco, S

    1993-11-22

    In immune network models it is assumed that membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) crosslinking leads to B-cell activation. To analyse further the implications of this idea, a model of B-cell activation by ligand-induced mIg crosslinking in the absence of cell-to-cell interactions is proposed. The present model, based on a simple crosslinking mechanism previously proposed by other authors, assumes that activation of B-cells is possible once crosslinks of mIgs percolate and that percolation of crosslinks can only happen within a relatively short time tau. Given a lattice (regular or not), a molecular cluster is said to percolate or to become a percolating cluster if it spans the whole lattice (this is the case, for instance, of a polymer in a gel phase). From this model of B-cell activation we define the activation function fa (LK) as the fraction of B-cells activated after tau minutes of interaction with a ligand at concentration L and with affinity K. Numerical calculations show that, for current estimates of kinetic constants involved in the interaction of a given ligand with a B-cell clone, the activation function fa shifts when k-, the dissociation rate constant, is varied below 10(-3) s-1, this shift being linearly proportional to the variation of k-. This result contradicts and, therefore, challenges the assumption in immune network models that the activation function is identical for all ligands. This is important because the behaviour of at least some of those immune network models is quite sensitive to the relative values of the activation function thresholds.

  10. Applying Activity Based Costing (ABC) Method to Calculate Cost Price in Hospital and Remedy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, A; Dabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Activity Based Costing (ABC) is one of the new methods began appearing as a costing methodology in the 1990’s. It calculates cost price by determining the usage of resources. In this study, ABC method was used for calculating cost price of remedial services in hospitals. Methods: To apply ABC method, Shahid Faghihi Hospital was selected. First, hospital units were divided into three main departments: administrative, diagnostic, and hospitalized. Second, activity centers were defined by the activity analysis method. Third, costs of administrative activity centers were allocated into diagnostic and operational departments based on the cost driver. Finally, with regard to the usage of cost objectives from services of activity centers, the cost price of medical services was calculated. Results: The cost price from ABC method significantly differs from tariff method. In addition, high amount of indirect costs in the hospital indicates that capacities of resources are not used properly. Conclusion: Cost price of remedial services with tariff method is not properly calculated when compared with ABC method. ABC calculates cost price by applying suitable mechanisms but tariff method is based on the fixed price. In addition, ABC represents useful information about the amount and combination of cost price services. PMID:23113171

  11. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy. PMID:23998255

  12. B Cell Adaptor Containing Src Homology 2 Domain (Bash) Links B Cell Receptor Signaling to the Activation of Hematopoietic Progenitor Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Sachiyo; Okamoto, Mariko; Yamada, Koichi; Okamoto, Noriaki; Goitsuka, Ryo; Arnold, Rudiger; Kiefer, Friedemann; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2001-01-01

    The B cell adaptor containing src homology 2 domain (BASH; also termed BLNK or SLP-65), is crucial for B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-mediated activation, proliferation, and differentiation of B cells. BCR-mediated tyrosine-phosphorylation of BASH creates binding sites for signaling effectors such as phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)2 and Vav, while the function of its COOH-terminal src homology 2 domain is unknown. We have now identified hematopoietic progenitor kinase (HPK)1, a STE20-related serine/threonine kinase, as a protein that inducibly interacts with the BASH SH2 domain. BCR ligation induced rapid tyrosine-phosphorylation of HPK1 mainly by Syk and Lyn, resulting in its association with BASH and catalytic activation. BCR-mediated activation of HPK1 was impaired in Syk- or BASH-deficient B cells. The functional SH2 domain of BASH and Tyr-379 within HPK1 which we identified as a Syk-phosphorylation site were both necessary for interaction of both proteins and efficient HPK1 activation after BCR stimulation. Furthermore, HPK1 augmented, whereas its kinase-dead mutant inhibited IκB kinase β (IKKβ) activation by BCR engagement. These results reveal a novel BCR signaling pathway leading to the activation of HPK1 and subsequently IKKβ, in which BASH recruits tyrosine-phosphorylated HPK1 into the BCR signaling complex. PMID:11514608

  13. Mitochondrial function provides instructive signals for activation-induced B-cell fates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung-Jin; Mano, Hiroto; Aoki, Koji; Hayashi, Tatsunari; Muto, Akihiko; Nambu, Yukiko; Takahashi, Katsu; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Taketani, Shigeru; Nutt, Stephen L; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Akira; Sugai, Manabu

    2015-04-10

    During immune reactions, functionally distinct B-cell subsets are generated by stochastic processes, including class-switch recombination (CSR) and plasma cell differentiation (PCD). In this study, we show a strong association between individual B-cell fates and mitochondrial functions. CSR occurs specifically in activated B cells with increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, which augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS), whereas PCD occurs in cells with decreased mitochondrial mass and potential. These events are consequences of initial slight changes in mROS in mitochondria(high) B-cell populations. In CSR-committed cells, mROS attenuates haeme synthesis by inhibiting ferrous ion addition to protoporphyrin IX, thereby maintaining Bach2 function. Reduced mROS then promotes PCD by increasing haeme synthesis. In PCD-committed cells, Blimp1 reduces mitochondrial mass, thereby reducing mROS levels. Identifying mROS as a haeme synthesis regulator increases the understanding of mechanisms regulating haeme homeostasis and cell fate determination after B-cell activation.

  14. Acidic phospholipids govern the enhanced activation of IgG-B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangjun; Pan, Weiling; Sui, Yinqiang; Li, Hua; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Qi, Hai; Xu, Chenqi; Liu, Wanli

    2015-10-06

    B cells that express the isotype-switched IgG-B cell receptor (IgG-BCR) are one of the driving forces for antibody memory. To allow for a rapid memory IgG antibody response, IgG-BCR evolved into a highly effective signalling machine. Here, we report that the positively charged cytoplasmic domain of mIgG (mIgG-tail) specifically interacts with negatively charged acidic phospholipids. The key immunoglobulin tail tyrosine (ITT) in mIgG-tail is thus sequestered in the membrane hydrophobic core in quiescent B cells. Pre-disruption of such interaction leads to excessive recruitment of BCRs and inflated BCR signalling upon antigen stimulation, resulting in hyperproliferation of primary B cells. Physiologically, membrane-sequestered mIgG-tail can be released by antigen engagement or Ca(2+) mobilization in the initiation of B cell activation. Our studies suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for how dynamic association of mIgG-tail with acidic phospholipids governs the enhanced activation of IgG-BCR.

  15. B cells from patients with chronic GVHD are activated and primed for survival via BAFF-mediated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Fore, Matthew S.; Wooten, Jenna; Roehrs, Philip A.; Bhuiya, Nazmim S.; Hoffert, Todd; Sharf, Andrew; Deal, Allison M.; Armistead, Paul; Coghill, James; Gabriel, Don A.; Irons, Robert; Essenmacher, Amber; Shea, Thomas C.; Richards, Kristy; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome; Serody, Jonathan; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent data reveal an important role for B cells in the pathogenesis of chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Patients with cGVHD have delayed B-cell reconstitution and elevated BAFF to B-cell ratios compared to patients without cGVHD. The mechanisms promoting and sustaining B-cell activation in this disease, however, remain unknown. As BAFF increases murine B-cell metabolism and survival and maintains autoreactive B-cell clones, we performed ex vivo analyses of peripheral B cells from 51 patients who either had or did not have active cGVHD and were greater than 1 year from the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We found that B cells from patients with active cGVHD were in a heightened metabolic state and were resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF treatment amplified cell size and survival in B cells from these patients. We found significantly increased signaling through ERK and AKT that associated with decreased levels of proapoptotic Bim, suggesting a mechanistic link between elevated BAFF levels and aberrant B-cell survival. Thus, we identify a role for BAFF in the pathogenesis of cGVHD and define B-cell activation and survival pathways suitable for novel therapeutic development in cGVHD. PMID:22896003

  16. Genomic Regions Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Are Active in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Berlanga-Taylor, Antonio J.; Morahan, Julia M.; Dobson, Ruth; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50 genomic regions have now been shown to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanisms of action, and the cell types in which these associated variants act at the molecular level remain largely unknown. This is especially true for associated regions containing no known genes. Given the evidence for a role for B cells in MS, we hypothesized that MS associated genomic regions co-localized with regions which are functionally active in B cells. We used publicly available data on 1) MS associated regions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 2) chromatin profiling in B cells as well as three additional cell types thought to be unrelated to MS (hepatocytes, fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Genomic intervals and SNPs were tested for overlap using the Genomic Hyperbrowser. We found that MS associated regions are significantly enriched in strong enhancer, active promoter and strong transcribed regions (p = 0.00005) and that this overlap is significantly higher in B cells than control cells. In addition, MS associated SNPs also land in active promoter (p = 0.00005) and enhancer regions more than expected by chance (strong enhancer p = 0.0006; weak enhancer p = 0.00005). These results confirm the important role of the immune system and specifically B cells in MS and suggest that MS risk variants exert a gene regulatory role. Previous studies assessing MS risk variants in T cells may be missing important effects in B cells. Similar analyses in other immunological cell types relevant to MS and functional studies are necessary to fully elucidate how genes contribute to MS pathogenesis. PMID:22396755

  17. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  18. Maintenance of Serological Memory by Polyclonal Activation of Human Memory B Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Nadia L.; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2002-12-01

    Production of antibodies can last for a lifetime, through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we show that human memory B lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells in response to polyclonal stimuli, such as bystander T cell help and CpG DNA. Furthermore, plasma cells secreting antibodies to recall antigens are produced in vivo at levels proportional to the frequency of specific memory B cells, even several years after antigenic stimulation. Although antigen boosting leads to a transient increase in specific antibody levels, ongoing polyclonal activation of memory B cells offers a means to maintain serological memory for a human lifetime.

  19. Enhanced Follicular Dendritic Cell-B Cell Interaction in HIV and SIV Infections and its Potential Role in Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark. G.; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H.

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections have been characterized by both polyclonal Bcell activation and enhanced responsiveness to B-cell growth factors on one hand and the loss of specific antibody (Ab) responses and refractoriness to the normal signals for B-cell activation on the other. Histopathological studies of lymph node from HIV- and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected individuals have indicated initial follicular hyperplasia and the appearance of large irregular germinal centers that undergo progressive involution concomitant with follicular dendritic-cell (FDC) disruption. During this process, follicular dendritic-cell -enriched lymph-node-cell cultures exhibit increased ability to induce cluster formation (“in vitro germinal centers”), lymphocyte proliferation and antibody production compared to uninfected controls. This paper discusses how enhanced FDC-B-cell interaction within SIV-infected germinal centers may result in a reduced ability to select high-affinity B cells and alter the dynamics of antibodyproducing- cell and memory-cell generation resulting in the observed hyperactivity. PMID:9716906

  20. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  1. Agonist-Mediated Activation of STING Induces Apoptosis in Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chih-Hang Anthony; Zundell, Joseph A; Ranatunga, Sujeewa; Lin, Cindy; Nefedova, Yulia; Del Valle, Juan R; Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew

    2016-04-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses through the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway are required for the function of STING (TMEM173), an ER-resident transmembrane protein critical for cytoplasmic DNA sensing, IFN production, and cancer control. Here we show that the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway functions downstream of STING and that STING agonists selectively trigger mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in normal and malignant B cells. Upon stimulation, STING was degraded less efficiently in B cells, implying that prolonged activation of STING can lead to apoptosis. Transient activation of the IRE-1/XBP-1 pathway partially protected agonist-stimulated malignant B cells from undergoing apoptosis. In Eμ-TCL1 mice with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, injection of the STING agonist 3'3'-cGAMP induced apoptosis and tumor regression. Similarly efficacious effects were elicited by 3'3'-cGAMP injection in syngeneic or immunodeficient mice grafted with multiple myeloma. Thus, in addition to their established ability to boost antitumoral immune responses, STING agonists can also directly eradicate malignant B cells. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2137-52. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26951929

  2. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  3. Molecular characteristics of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and -uninfected patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy and pre-rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Morton, Lindsay M; Kim, Clara J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bhatia, Kishor; Cockburn, Myles; Hawes, Debra; Wang, Sophia S; Chang, Cindy; Altekruse, Sean F; Engels, Eric A; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection substantially elevates diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) risk, but its impact on the distinct DLBCL subtypes defined by cell of origin is unclear. We compared DLBCL molecular characteristics and prognosis in 51 HIV-infected and 116 HIV-uninfected cases diagnosed during 1977-2003. Using immunohistochemistry to classify cell of origin based on the Tally algorithm, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL was substantially more common in HIV-infected (83%) than in HIV-uninfected (54%) cases (p < 0.001). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 63% of DLBCLs in HIV-infected cases, occurring almost exclusively in ABC-DLBCL (74% vs. 13% of germinal center B-cell [GCB]-DLBCL, p = 0.002), but was rarely detected in DLBCLs among HIV-uninfected cases (3%). Among HIV-uninfected cases, MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] and IgH/BCL2 [t(14;18)(q32;q21)] translocations were significantly more common and BCL6/IgH [t(3;14)(q27;q32)] significantly less common in GCB-DLBCL than in ABC-DLBCL (p = 0.010, < 0.001 and = 0.039, respectively). Among HIV-infected cases, translocations other than MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] (21%) were rare (≤ 6%) and unrelated to cell of origin. ABC-DLBCL was associated with adverse overall survival compared with GCB-DLBCL regardless of HIV status (pHIV-infected = 0.066; pHIV-uninfected = 0.038). Our data demonstrate key differences in the molecular characteristics, cell of origin and prognosis of DLBCL by HIV status in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and pre-rituximab era, supporting biologic differences in lymphomagenesis in the presence of HIV. PMID:23772639

  4. Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis: IgM and Polyclonal B-Cell Activation Lead to Disease Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Eszter; Jayakumar, Asha; Wing Cho, Ka; Goldsmith-Pestana, Karen; Dondji, Blaise; Lambris, John D.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the draining lymph node (DLN) is the initial site for colonization and establishment of infection after intradermal transmission by the sand fly vector; however, little is known about the developing immune response within this site. Using an intradermal infection model, which allows for parasite visceralization, we have examined the ongoing immune responses in the DLN of BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Although not unexpected, at early times post-infection there is a marked B cell expansion in the DLN, which persists throughout infection. However, the characteristics of this response were of interest; as early as day 7 post-infection, polyclonal antibodies (TNP, OVA, chromatin) were observed and the levels appeared comparable to the specific anti-leishmania response. Although B-cell-deficient JHD BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to infection, neither B-cell-derived IL-10 nor B-cell antigen presentation appear to be primarily responsible for the elevated parasitemia. However, passive transfer and reconstitution of JHD BALB/c with secretory immunoglobulins, (IgM or IgG; specific or non-specific immune complexes) results in increased susceptibility to L. infantum infection. Further, JHD BALB/c mice transgenetically reconstituted to secrete IgM demonstrated exacerbated disease in comparison to wild type BALB/c mice as early as 2 days post-infection. Evidence suggests that complement activation (generation of C5a) and signaling via the C5aR (CD88) is related to the disease exacerbation caused by IgM rather than cytokine levels (IL-10 or IFN-γ). Overall these studies indicate that polyclonal B cell activation, which is known to be associated with human visceral leishmaniasis, is an early and intrinsic characteristic of disease and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20213734

  5. Activation and trafficking of peritoneal B1a B-cells in response to amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Hurley, Kristina; Peterson, Cody; Coker, Lindsey; Fowers, Cody; Marcum, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    B1a B-cells are concentrated in peritoneal and pleural cavities, are producers of 'natural auto-antibodies', and have been implicated in autoimmune responses. Their numbers are increased in humans and mice with systemic autoimmune diseases, but their role in the immune pathology is not known. Asbestos causes pulmonary, pleural, and peritoneal pathologies by accessing these tissues after inhalation. Amphibole asbestos has been shown to elicit immune dysfunction, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and autoantibody production. This study tested the hypothesis that asbestos affects immune dysfunction by activating B1a B-cells to traffic to secondary lymphatic tissue. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) either endotracheally or intraperitoneally, and the B1a B-cells in pleural or peritoneal compartments were tested by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal lymphocytes from CD45.1 transgenic to wild-type mice was used to track the migration. The percentage and numbers of B1a B-cells in pleural and peritoneal cavities decreased 3-6 days following exposure. During that time, asbestos exposure led to a decrease in cells expressing alpha-4 (α4) integrin and MHC II antigen. Peritoneal cells treated in vitro showed decreased α4 integrin with no change in CD5, IgM, or MHC II antigen. Therefore, B1a cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), MHC II(+)) traffic from the peritoneal cavity following loss of α4 integrin expression. Following adoptive transfer into the peritoneum of asbestos-exposed mice, CD45.1(+) B1a cells were detected in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes after 3 days, peaking at 6 days. Interestingly, the percentage of splenic suppressor B-cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), CD11b(+), CD1d(+)) decreased following amphibole exposure, demonstrating that the B1a cells did not contribute to an increased pool of suppressive B-cells. These results show that B1a B-cells respond to asbestos exposure by trafficking to secondary lymphatic

  6. Reduced Levels of Hspa9 Attenuates Stat5 Activation in Mouse B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Kilannin; Tibbitts, Justin F.; Shao, Jin; Liu, Tuoen; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    HSPA9 is located on chromosome 5q31.2 in humans, a region that is commonly deleted in patients with myeloid malignancies [del(5q)], including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). HSPA9 expression is reduced by 50% in patients with del(5q)-associated MDS, consistent with haploinsufficient levels. Zebrafish mutants and knockdown studies in human and mouse cells have implicated a role for HSPA9 in hematopoiesis. To comprehensively evaluate the effects of Hspa9 haploinsufficiency on hematopoiesis, we generated an Hspa9 knockout mouse model. While homozygous knockout of Hspa9 is embryonic lethal, mice with heterozygous deletion of Hspa9 (Hspa9+/−) are viable and have a 50% reduction in Hspa9 expression. Hspa9+/− mice have normal basal hematopoiesis and do not develop MDS. However, Hspa9+/− mice have a cell- intrinsic reduction in bone marrow CFU-PreB colony formation without alterations in the number of B-cell progenitors in vivo, consistent with a functional defect in Hspa9+/− B-cell progenitors. We further reduced Hspa9 expression (<50%) using RNAi and observe reduced B-cell progenitors in vivo, indicating that appropriate levels (≥50%) of Hspa9 are required for normal B- lymphopoiesis in vivo. Knockdown of Hspa9 in an IL-7 dependent mouse B-cell line reduced Stat5 phosphorylation following IL-7 receptor stimulation, supporting a role for Hspa9 in Stat5 signaling in B-cells. Collectively, these data implicate a role for Hspa9 in B-lymphopoiesis and Stat5 activation downstream of IL-7 signaling. PMID:25550197

  7. Lipoxin A4 protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis by promoting innate response activator B cells generation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiong; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Ruihua; Chen, Yongtao; Yan, Yan; Miao, Shuo; Jiao, Jingyu; Cheng, Xue; Kong, Lingfei; Ye, Duyun

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is a serious disease that leads to severe inflammation, dysregulation of immune system, multi-organ failure and death. Innate response activator (IRA) B cells, which produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), protect against microbial sepsis. Lipid mediator lipoxin A4 (LXA4) exerts anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects, and it has been reported that LXA4 receptor ALX/FPR2 is expressed on B cells. Here, we investigated the potential role of LXA4 on IRA B cells in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. We found that LXA4 significantly promoted the expansion of splenic IRA B cells and increased GM-CSF expression in splenic B cells with LPS stimulation. After splenectomy, LXA4 treatment did not change the serum or peritoneal IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in LPS-induced sepsis. LXA4 accelerated the migration of peritoneal B cells to spleen for their differentiation into IRA B cells, whereas this effect was independent of peritoneal macrophage. Furthermore, LXA4 enhanced the phosphorylation level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in splenic B cells. These results suggest that LXA4 protects against LPS-induced sepsis by promoting the generation and migration of splenic IRA B cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism may be related to STAT5 activation. It might provide new insights and therapeutic approaches for treating sepsis.

  8. Lipoxin A4 protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis by promoting innate response activator B cells generation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiong; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Ruihua; Chen, Yongtao; Yan, Yan; Miao, Shuo; Jiao, Jingyu; Cheng, Xue; Kong, Lingfei; Ye, Duyun

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is a serious disease that leads to severe inflammation, dysregulation of immune system, multi-organ failure and death. Innate response activator (IRA) B cells, which produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), protect against microbial sepsis. Lipid mediator lipoxin A4 (LXA4) exerts anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects, and it has been reported that LXA4 receptor ALX/FPR2 is expressed on B cells. Here, we investigated the potential role of LXA4 on IRA B cells in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. We found that LXA4 significantly promoted the expansion of splenic IRA B cells and increased GM-CSF expression in splenic B cells with LPS stimulation. After splenectomy, LXA4 treatment did not change the serum or peritoneal IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in LPS-induced sepsis. LXA4 accelerated the migration of peritoneal B cells to spleen for their differentiation into IRA B cells, whereas this effect was independent of peritoneal macrophage. Furthermore, LXA4 enhanced the phosphorylation level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in splenic B cells. These results suggest that LXA4 protects against LPS-induced sepsis by promoting the generation and migration of splenic IRA B cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism may be related to STAT5 activation. It might provide new insights and therapeutic approaches for treating sepsis. PMID:27494686

  9. Cbl Suppresses B Cell Receptor–Mediated Phospholipase C (Plc)-γ2 Activation by Regulating B Cell Linker Protein–Plc-γ2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomoharu; Maeda, Akito; Kurosaki, Mari; Tezuka, Tohru; Hironaka, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the Cbl protein plays a negative role in immune receptor signaling; however, the mode of Cbl action in B cell receptor (BCR) signaling still remains unclear. DT40 B cells deficient in Cbl showed enhanced BCR-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)-γ2 activation, thereby leading to increased apoptosis. A possible explanation for the involvement of Cbl in PLC-γ2 activation was provided by findings that Cbl interacts via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain with B cell linker protein (BLNK) after BCR ligation. BLNK is a critical adaptor molecule for PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation through its binding to the PLC-γ2 SH2 domains. As a consequence of the interaction between Cbl and BLNK, the BCR-induced recruitment of PLC-γ2 to BLNK and the subsequent PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation were inhibited. Thus, our data suggest that Cbl negatively regulates the PLC-γ2 pathway by inhibiting the association of PLC-γ2 with BLNK. PMID:10684856

  10. Global phosphoproteomics of activated B cells using complementary metal ion functionalized soluble nanopolymers.

    PubMed

    Jayasundera, Keerthi B; Iliuk, Anton B; Nguyen, Andrew; Higgins, Renee; Geahlen, Robert L; Tao, W Andy

    2014-07-01

    Engagement of the B cell receptor for antigen (BCR) leads to immune responses through a cascade of intracellular signaling events. Most studies to date have focused on the BCR and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Because spleen tyrosine kinase, Syk, is an upstream kinase in multiple BCR-regulated signaling pathways, it also affects many downstream events that are modulated through the phosphorylation of proteins on serine and threonine residues. Here, we report a novel phosphopeptide enrichment strategy and its application to a comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of Syk-dependent downstream signaling events in B cells, focusing on serine and threonine phosphorylation. Using a combination of the Syk inhibitor piceatannol, SILAC quantification, peptide fractionation, and complementary PolyMAC-Ti and PolyMAC-Zr enrichment techniques, we analyzed changes in BCR-stimulated protein phosphorylation that were dependent on the activity of Syk. We identified and quantified over 13,000 unique phosphopeptides, with a large percentage dependent on Syk activity in BCR-stimulated B cells. Our results not only confirmed many known functions of Syk, but more importantly, suggested many novel roles, including in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, that warrant further exploration.

  11. Global Phosphoproteomics of Activated B Cells Using Complementary Metal Ion Functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of the B cell receptor for antigen (BCR) leads to immune responses through a cascade of intracellular signaling events. Most studies to date have focused on the BCR and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Because spleen tyrosine kinase, Syk, is an upstream kinase in multiple BCR-regulated signaling pathways, it also affects many downstream events that are modulated through the phosphorylation of proteins on serine and threonine residues. Here, we report a novel phosphopeptide enrichment strategy and its application to a comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of Syk-dependent downstream signaling events in B cells, focusing on serine and threonine phosphorylation. Using a combination of the Syk inhibitor piceatannol, SILAC quantification, peptide fractionation, and complementary PolyMAC-Ti and PolyMAC-Zr enrichment techniques, we analyzed changes in BCR-stimulated protein phosphorylation that were dependent on the activity of Syk. We identified and quantified over 13 000 unique phosphopeptides, with a large percentage dependent on Syk activity in BCR-stimulated B cells. Our results not only confirmed many known functions of Syk, but more importantly, suggested many novel roles, including in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, that warrant further exploration. PMID:24905233

  12. Anti-cancer activity of withaferin A in B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M K; Gachuki, B W; Alhakeem, S S; Oben, K N; Rangnekar, V M; Gupta, R C; Bondada, S

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide from the plant, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) used in Ayurvedic medicine, has been found to be valuable in the treatment of several medical ailments. WA has been found to have anticancer activity against various solid tumors, but its effects on hematological malignancies have not been studied in detail. WA strongly inhibited the survival of several human and murine B cell lymphoma cell lines. Additionally, in vivo studies with syngeneic-graft lymphoma cells suggest that WA inhibits the growth of tumor but does not affect other proliferative tissues. We demonstrate that WA inhibits the efficiency of NF-κB nuclear translocation in diffuse large B cell lymphomas and found that WA treatment resulted in a significant decrease in protein levels involved in B cell receptor signaling and cell cycle regulation. WA inhibited the activity of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 as reflected by a sharp increase in Hsp70 expression levels. Hence, we propose that the anti-cancer effects of WA in lymphomas are likely due to its ability to inhibit Hsp90 function and subsequent reduction of critical kinases and cell cycle regulators that are clients of Hsp90. PMID:26020511

  13. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  14. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kato, Yasutaka; Tanino, Mishie; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Obara, Masato; Endo, Tomoyuki; Koike, Takao; Tanaka, Shinya

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines, Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.

  15. GIMAP1 is essential for the survival of naïve and activated B cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Louise M.C.; Datta, Preeta; Bell, Sarah E.; Kitamura, Daisuke; Turner, Martin; Butcher, Geoffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    An effective immune system depends upon regulation of lymphocyte function and homeostasis. In recent years members of the GTPases of the Immune Associated Protein (GIMAP) family have been proposed to regulate T cell homeostasis. In contrast, little is known about their function and mode of action in B cells. We have used a combination of transgenic mice and in vivo and in vitro techniques to conditionally and electively ablate GIMAP1 in resting and activated peripheral B cells. Our data suggest that GIMAP1 is absolutely essential for the survival of peripheral B cells, irrespective of their activation state. Together with recent data showing increased expression of GIMAP1 in B cell lymphomas, our work points to the possible potential of GIMAP1 as a target for manipulation in a variety of B cell-mediated diseases. PMID:26621859

  16. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase induces reproducible DNA breaks at many non-Ig loci in activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Ori; Baker, Richard E.; Ucher, Anna J.; Martier, Raygene; Stavnezer, Janet; Guikema, Jeroen E.J.

    2011-01-01

    After immunization or infection, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates diversification of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in B cells, introducing mutations within the antigen binding V regions (somatic hypermutation, SHM) and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) into switch (S) regions, leading to antibody class switch recombination (CSR). We asked if during B cell activation, AID also induces DNA breaks at genes other than IgH genes. Using a non-biased genome-wide approach, we have identified hundreds of reproducible AID-dependent DSBs in mouse splenic B cells shortly after induction of CSR in culture. Most interestingly, AID induces DSBs at sites syntenic with sites of translocations, deletions, and amplifications found in human B cell lymphomas, including within the oncogene B cell lymphoma11a (bcl11a)/evi9. Unlike AID-induced DSBs in Ig genes, genome-wide AID-dependent DSBs are not restricted to transcribed regions, and frequently occur within repeated sequence elements, including CA-repeats and non-CA tandem repeats, and SINEs. PMID:21255732

  17. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase induces reproducible DNA breaks at many non-Ig Loci in activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Staszewski, Ori; Baker, Richard E; Ucher, Anna J; Martier, Raygene; Stavnezer, Janet; Guikema, Jeroen E J

    2011-01-21

    After immunization or infection, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates diversification of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in B cells, introducing mutations within the antigen-binding V regions (somatic hypermutation, SHM) and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) into switch (S) regions, leading to antibody class switch recombination (CSR). We asked if, during B cell activation, AID also induces DNA breaks at genes other than IgH genes. Using a nonbiased genome-wide approach, we have identified hundreds of reproducible, AID-dependent DSBs in mouse splenic B cells shortly after induction of CSR in culture. Most interestingly, AID induces DSBs at sites syntenic with sites of translocations, deletions, and amplifications found in human B cell lymphomas, including within the oncogene B cell lymphoma11a (bcl11a)/evi9. Unlike AID-induced DSBs in Ig genes, genome-wide AID-dependent DSBs are not restricted to transcribed regions and frequently occur within repeated sequence elements, including CA repeats, non-CA tandem repeats, and SINEs.

  18. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment. PMID:25853502

  19. A Computational Study of the Effects of Syk Activity on B Cell Receptor Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Reginald L.; Krisenko, Mariya O.; Geahlen, Robert L.; Rundell, Ann E.; Buzzard, Gregery T.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase Syk is intricately involved in early signaling events in B cells and is required for proper response when antigens bind to B cell receptors (BCRs). Experiments using an analog-sensitive version of Syk (Syk-AQL) have better elucidated its role, but have not completely characterized its behavior. We present a computational model for BCR signaling, using dynamical systems, which incorporates both wild-type Syk and Syk-AQL. Following the use of sensitivity analysis to identify significant reaction parameters, we screen for parameter vectors that produced graded responses to BCR stimulation as is observed experimentally. We demonstrate qualitative agreement between the model and dose response data for both mutant and wild-type kinases. Analysis of our model suggests that the level of NF-κB activation, which is reduced in Syk-AQL cells relative to wild-type, is more sensitive to small reductions in kinase activity than Erkp activation, which is essentially unchanged. Since this profile of high Erkp and reduced NF-κB is consistent with anergy, this implies that anergy is particularly sensitive to small changes in catalytic activity. Also, under a range of forward and reverse ligand binding rates, our model of Erkp and NF-κB activation displays a dependence on a power law affinity: the ratio of the forward rate to a non-unit power of the reverse rate. This dependence implies that B cells may respond to certain details of binding and unbinding rates for ligands rather than simple affinity alone. PMID:26525178

  20. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  1. Canine olfactory ensheathing cells from the olfactory mucosa can be engineered to produce active chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Carwardine, Darren; Wong, Liang-Fong; Fawcett, James W; Muir, Elizabeth M; Granger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    A multitude of factors must be overcome following spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to achieve clinical improvement in patients. It is thought that by combining promising therapies these diverse factors could be combatted with the aim of producing an overall improvement in function. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present in the glial scar that forms following SCI present a significant block to axon regeneration. Digestion of CSPGs by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) leads to axon regeneration, neuronal plasticity and functional improvement in preclinical models of SCI. However, the enzyme activity decays at body temperature within 24-72h, limiting the translational potential of ChABC as a therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have shown huge promise as a cell transplant therapy in SCI. Their beneficial effects have been demonstrated in multiple small animal SCI models as well as in naturally occurring SCI in canine patients. In the present study, we have genetically modified canine OECs from the mucosa to constitutively produce enzymatically active ChABC. We have developed a lentiviral vector that can deliver a mammalian modified version of the ChABC gene to mammalian cells, including OECs. Enzyme production was quantified using the Morgan-Elson assay that detects the breakdown products of CSPG digestion in cell supernatants. We confirmed our findings by immunolabelling cell supernatant samples using Western blotting. OECs normal cell function was unaffected by genetic modification as demonstrated by normal microscopic morphology and the presence of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NGF)) following viral transduction. We have developed the means to allow production of active ChABC in combination with a promising cell transplant therapy for SCI repair. PMID:27423610

  2. RNA Exosome Regulates AID DNA Mutator Activity in the B Cell Genome.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin diversification processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination critically rely on transcription-coupled targeting of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig loci in activated B lymphocytes. AID catalyzes deamination of cytidine deoxynucleotides on exposed single-stranded DNA. In addition to driving immunoglobulin diversity, promiscuous targeting of AID mutagenic activity poses a deleterious threat to genomic stability. Recent genome-wide studies have uncovered pervasive AID activity throughout the B cell genome. It is increasingly apparent that AID activity is frequently targeted to genomic loci undergoing early transcription termination where RNA exosome promotes the resolution of stalled transcription complexes via cotranscriptional RNA degradation mechanisms. Here, we review aspects and consequences of eukaryotic transcription that lead to early termination, RNA exosome recruitment, and ultimately targeting of AID mutagenic activity.

  3. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  4. Autoantibody activity of immunoglobulins isolated from B-cell follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dighiero, G; Hart, S; Lim, A; Borche, L; Levy, R; Miller, R A

    1991-08-01

    Previous work with monoclonal Igs (MIgs) has demonstrated that a high proportion of paraproteins bind to self-antigens such as the Fc fragment of IgG, Ii blood group antigens, cytoskeleton proteins, DNA, and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Recent work in CLL indicates that CD5+ B lymphocytes are frequently committed to production of autoantibodies. We have examined the antibody specificity of MIgs derived from the tumor cells of 31 different patients with CD5- B-cell lymphomas. Our results indicate that the tumor cells from 8 of these 31 patients (25.8%) express Igs with autoantibody activity. In two cases antibody activity was multispecific. In four cases, antibody activity was exclusively directed against the Fc fragment of IgG, whereas the two other cases bound to both Fc fragment of IgG and nuclear antigens. Most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are derived from CD5- B cells. These results indicate that like CLL, NHL also express Igs that frequently have autoantibody activity.

  5. Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Immune Complex Activation of B Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Krishna L; Uccellini, Melissa B; Avalos, Ana M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    High titers of autoantibodies reactive with DNA/RNA molecular complexes are characteristic of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the endosomal Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in the activation of the corresponding autoantibody producing B cells. Importantly, TLR9/TLR7-deficiency results in the inability of autoreactive B cells to proliferate in response to DNA/RNA-associated autoantigens in vitro, and in marked changes in the autoantibody repertoire of autoimmune-prone mice. Uptake of DNA/RNA-associated autoantigen immune complexes (ICs) also leads to activation of dendritic cells (DCs) through TLR9 and TLR7. The initial studies from our lab involved ICs formed by a mixture of autoantibodies and cell debris released from dying cells in culture. To better understand the nature of the mammalian ligands that can effectively activate TLR7 and TLR9, we have developed a methodology for preparing ICs containing defined DNA fragments that recapitulate the immunostimulatory activity of the previous "black box" ICs. As the endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 function optimally from intracellular acidic compartments, we developed a facile methodology to monitor the trafficking of defined DNA ICs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. These reagents reveal an important role for nucleic acid sequence, even when the ligand is mammalian DNA and will help illuminate the role of IC trafficking in the response.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma B cell-specific deficient mice have an impaired antibody response1

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Murant, Thomas I.; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M.; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative functions and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring and atherosclerosis among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote antibody production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. Here, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development as well as the levels of circulating antigen-specific antibodies during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of antigen-specific antibodies and low numbers of antigen-experienced antibody-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within neither primary nor secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report to show under physiological conditions that PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and antibody production. PMID:23041568

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ B cell-specific-deficient mice have an impaired antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H; Murant, Thomas I; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2012-11-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative functions, and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring, and atherosclerosis, among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow-derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote Ab production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. In this article, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development, as well as the levels of circulating Ag-specific Abs during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of Ag-specific Abs and low numbers of Ag-experienced, Ab-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within primary or secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report, to our knowledge, to show that, under physiological conditions, PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and Ab production.

  8. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  9. RNA exosome regulates AID DNA mutator activity in the B cell genome

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin diversification processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination critically rely on transcription coupled targeting of AID to Ig loci in activated B lymphocytes. AID catalyzes deamination of cytidine deoxynucleotides on exposed single stranded DNA. In addition to driving immunoglobulin diversity, promiscuous targeting of AID mutagenic activity poses a deleterious threat to genomic stability. Recent genome-wide studies have uncovered pervasive AID activity throughout the B cell genome. It is increasingly apparent that AID activity is frequently targeted to genomic loci undergoing early transcription termination where RNA exosome promotes the resolution of stalled transcription complexes via co-transcriptional RNA degradation mechanisms. Here we review aspects and consequences of eukaryotic transcription that lead to early termination, RNA exosome recruitment, and ultimately targeting of AID mutagenic activity. PMID:26073986

  10. A role for Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cell antigen receptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C-gamma 2

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Defects in the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) result in a disease called X-linked agammaglobulinemia, in which there is a profound decrease of mature B cells due to a block in B cell development. Recent studies have shown that Btk is tyrosine phosphorylated and activated upon B cell antigen receptor (BCR) stimulation. To elucidate the functions of this kinase, we examined BCR signaling of DT40 B cells deficient in Btk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma 2 upon receptor stimulation was significantly reduced in the mutant cells, leading to the loss of both BCR-coupled phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis and calcium mobilization. Pleckstrin homology and Src-homology 2 domains of Btk were required for PLC-gamma 2 activation. Since Syk is also required for the BCR-induced PLC-gamma 2 activation, our findings indicate that PLC-gamma 2 activation is regulated by Btk and Syk through their concerted actions. PMID:8691147

  11. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression and bioactivity of B cell activating factor (BAFF) in African ostrich.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keli; Xiao, Ke; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Shun; Zhong, Juming; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Liu, Huazhen; Peng, Kemei

    2015-09-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, is testified to play a critical role in B cell survival, proliferation, maturation and immunoglobulin secretion. In the present study, the cDNA of open reading frame (ORF) in African ostrich (Struthio camelus) BAFF (designated OsBAFF) was cloned by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The OsBAFF gene encodes a 288-amino acid protein containing a predicted transmembrane domain and a putative furin protease cleavage site like BAFFs from chicken (cBAFF), quail (qBAFF), duck (dBAFF), goose (gBAFF) and dove (doBAFF). RT-PCR analysis showed that the OsBAFF gene is strongly expressed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. The soluble OsBAFF had been cloned into pET28a. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis confirmed that the soluble fusion protein His-OsBAFF was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Rosset (DE3). In vitro, purified OsBAFF was not only able to promote the survival of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, but also able to co-stimulate proliferation of mouse splenic B cells. The expression of OsBAFF in lymphocyte cells was higher than the control after LPS stimulation. These findings indicated that OsBAFF plays an important role in survival and proliferation of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, which may provide valuable information for research into the immune system of African ostrich and OsBAFF may serve as a potential immunologic factor for enhancing immunological efficacy in African ostrich and any other birds. PMID:26256697

  13. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} impairs NF-{kappa}B activation in human naive B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geldmeyer-Hilt, Kerstin; Heine, Guido; Hartmann, Bjoern; Baumgrass, Ria; Radbruch, Andreas; Worm, Margitta

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} In naive B cells, VDR activation by calcitriol results in reduced NF-{kappa}B p105 and p50 protein expression. {yields} Ligating the VDR with calcitriol causes reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Reduced nuclear amount of p65 after calcitriol incubation results in reduced binding of p65 on the p105 promoter. {yields} Thus, vitamin D receptor signaling may reduce or prevent activation of B cells and unwanted immune responses, e.g. in IgE dependent diseases such as allergic asthma. -- Abstract: 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (calcitriol), the bioactive metabolite of vitamin D, modulates the activation and inhibits IgE production of anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulated human peripheral B cells. Engagement of CD40 results in NF-{kappa}B p50 activation, which is essential for the class switch to IgE. Herein, we investigated by which mechanism calcitriol modulates NF-{kappa}B mediated activation of human naive B cells. Naive B cells were predominantly targeted by calcitriol in comparison with memory B cells as shown by pronounced induction of the VDR target gene cyp24a1. Vitamin D receptor activation resulted in a strongly reduced p105/p50 protein and mRNA expression in human naive B cells. This effect is mediated by impaired nuclear translocation of p65 and consequently reduced binding of p65 to its binding site in the p105 promoter. Our data indicate that the vitamin D receptor reduces NF-{kappa}B activation by interference with NF-{kappa}B p65 and p105. Thus, the vitamin D receptor inhibits costimulatory signal transduction in naive B cells, namely by reducing CD40 signaling.

  14. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  15. Polyclonal B cell activation, circulating immune complexes and autoimmunity in human american visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Galvão-Castro, B; Sá Ferreira, J A; Marzochi, K F; Marzochi, M C; Coutinho, S G; Lambert, P H

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study, serum and plasma samples from 17 patients with kala-azar were collected in Rio de Janeiro. High levels of immune complexes (IC) were detected in serum by means of 125I-Clq and conglutinin binding assays. The Clq binding material had a sedimentation coefficient of 19-25S, as determined by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient. Plasma levels of C3 and C3 breakdown products were measured and the C3d levels were increased in six out of 11 patients. The occurrence of polyclonal B cell activation was suggested by (a) a marked increase of serum IgG and IgM levels and (b) of the presence of antibodies against various proteins and haptens (SRBC, DNP-BSA, FITC-BSA,KLH). There was a close association between the presence of IC and anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Anti-smooth muscle antibodies were also observed. These data are consistent with a major role of polyclonal B cell activation in the induction of IC during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:6424987

  16. B lymphocytes and B-cell activating factor promote collagen and profibrotic markers expression by dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction B lymphocytes might play a pathogenic role in dermal fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc). B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a key cytokine for B-cell activation, is increased in the serum and the skin of patients with SSc. However, the ability of B cells directly to stimulate dermal fibroblasts and the role of BAFF are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of B cells and BAFF in the expression of collagen and profibrotic markers by dermal fibroblasts. Methods Cocultures of blood B cells from healthy blood donors and normal or SSc dermal fibroblasts stimulated with anti-IgM and BAFF were performed. Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, MMP9, COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1 mRNA expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Soluble collagen, BAFF, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL2 protein secretion were assessed. Results Coculture of blood B cells and dermal fibroblasts isolated from SSc patients induced IL-6, TGF-β1, CCL2, and collagen secretion, as well as Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, and MMP9 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Transwell assays demonstrated that this induction was dependent on cell-cell contact. Addition of anti-IgM and BAFF to the coculture increased IL-6, CCL2, TGF-β1, and collagen secretion. B cell- and BAFF-induced collagen secretion was highly reduced by anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. Conclusions Our results showed for the first time a direct role of B cells on the production of collagen by dermal fibroblasts, which is further enhanced by BAFF. Thus, these results demonstrate a new pathogenic role of B cells and BAFF in fibrosis and systemic sclerosis. PMID:24289101

  17. B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) is elevated in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matharu, Kabir; Zarember, Kol A.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Spalding, Christine; Garofalo, Mary; Dimaggio, Thomas; Estwick, Tyra; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Fink, Danielle; Priel, Debra L.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Holland, Steven M.; Malech, Harry L.; Gallin, John I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited defect in superoxide production leading to life-threatening infections, granulomas, and, possibly, abnormal immunoglobulin concentrations. We investigated whether factors controlling antibody production, such as B-cell activating factor (BAFF), were altered in CGD. CGD subjects had significantly increased mean (2.3-fold, p<0.0001) plasma concentrations of BAFF compared to healthy donors. Patients on IFN-γ treatment had significantly higher BAFF concentrations compared with CGD patients not taking IFN-γ (1.6-fold, p<0.005). Leukocytes from CGD subjects produced normal amounts of BAFF in response to IFN-γ or G-CSF in vitro. Expression of BAFF-R and TACI were significantly reduced on CGD B cells. Elevated BAFF in CGD correlated with CRP (R=0.44), ESR (R=0.49), and IgM (R=0.47) and increased rapidly in healthy subjects following intravenous endotoxin administration. These findings suggest that elevated BAFF in CGD subjects and healthy donors is a consequence of acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:23773925

  18. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1. PMID:27568820

  19. The TACI receptor regulates T-cell-independent marginal zone B cell responses through innate activation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Figgett, William A; Fairfax, Kirsten; Vincent, Fabien B; Le Page, Mélanie A; Katik, Indzi; Deliyanti, Devy; Quah, Pin Shie; Verma, Pali; Grumont, Raelene; Gerondakis, Steve; Hertzog, Paul; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Strasser, Andreas; Mackay, Fabienne

    2013-09-19

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) plays a critical role in immune homeostasis and tolerance. In T-cell-dependent humoral responses, AICD of B cells is initiated by Fas ligand (FasL) on T cells, stimulating the Fas receptor on B cells. In contrast, T-cell-independent B cell responses involve innate-type B lymphocytes, such as marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and little is known about the mechanisms that control AICD during innate B cell responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. Here, we show that MZ B cells undergo AICD in response to TLR4 activation in vivo. The transmembrane activator, calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) receptor and TLR4 cooperate to upregulate expression of both FasL and Fas on MZ B cells and also to repress inhibitors of Fas-induced apoptosis signaling. These findings demonstrate an unappreciated role for TACI and its ligands in the regulation of AICD during T-cell-independent B cell responses.

  20. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  1. Constitutive STAT6 activation in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guiter, Chrystelle; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Gaulard, Philippe; Leroy, Karen; Castellano, Flavia

    2004-07-15

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), currently recognized as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) subtype, shows increased expression of interleukin 4 (IL-4)/IL-13 signaling effectors and targets, suggesting constitutive activation of these pathways. We therefore investigated the functional state of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6), mediating IL-4/IL-13 transcriptional effects. Constitutive STAT6 phosphorylation and DNA-binding activity were detected in PMBL cell lines but not DLBCL cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed nuclear phosphorylated STAT6 (P-STAT6) in 8 of 11 PMBL, compared with 1 of 10 DLBCL primary tumors (P =.01). IL-4 and IL-13 transcripts were absent in PMBL cell lines and expressed at low levels in tumors, indicating that, contrary to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), STAT6 activation is not due to an autocrine IL-4/IL-13 secretion. We demonstrated an amplification of the JAK2 gene in 2 of 6 PMBL cases, and showed higher JAK2 mRNA levels in PMBL compared with DLBCL (P =.005). The Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) was constitutively phosphorylated in the PMBL MedB1 cell line. MedB1 treatment with JAK2 inhibitor AG490 partially decreased STAT6 phosphorylation, suggesting that JAK2 is partially involved in STAT6 activation in these cells. Our findings highlight phosphorylated STAT6 as a characteristic distinguishing PMBL from DLBCL, but a common feature to PMBL and cHL, supporting the hypothesis of common pathogenic events in these 2 lymphomas. PMID:15044251

  2. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  3. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  4. Immunoglobulin G subclasses secreted by human B cells in vitro in response to interleukin-2 and polyclonal activators.

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, J E; Johnstone, R; Duggan-Keen, M F; Bird, P

    1990-01-01

    The IgG subclasses secreted by human B cells in vitro in response to IL-2 have been analysed. B cells were prepared from tonsil, blood and spleen, and cultured with recombinant IL-2 in the presence or absence of two polyclonal activators: Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 (SAC) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Secretion of all four subclasses and of IgM was stimulated by IL-2, but the relative amounts varied according to (i) the tissue source of the B cells, and (ii) which polyclonal activator was used. The amount of IgG1 tended to be higher and IgG2 tended to be lower when SAC was the polyclonal activator (compared to LPS). This difference was most marked for tonsil B cells, and it was found that SAC had a negative effect on secretion of IgM and IgG2 in these cultures, whilst synergizing with IL-2 to stimulate the production of IgG1, 3 and 4. When the degree of stimulation of different pairs of isotypes was analysed, several interesting positive correlations emerged. In tonsil B-cell cultures, stimulation of IgM and IgG2 was linked with each other, but not with IgG1, whilst in blood B-cell cultures all isotypes appeared to be stimulated co-ordinately. Stimulation of IgG1 and IgG3 were positively correlated in cultures of B cells from all tissues. The results emphasize that the effects of a single cytokine on immunoglobulin isotype production can be influenced by the source of the B cells, and by other signals delivered to the cells. PMID:2373516

  5. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host. PMID:26649443

  6. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  7. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  8. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  9. Schistosoma japonicum soluble egg antigens activate naive B cells to produce antibodies: definition of parasite mechanisms of immune deviation.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, T; Watanabe, T; Saito, S; Araki, Y; Sendo, F

    1993-01-01

    This study analysed the effect of Schistosoma japonicum egg antigens (SEA) on the activation of lymphocytes from naive mice. T cells were found to be unaffected by SEA. B cells, however, were activated by SEA without participation of adherent cells such as macrophages. B-cell activating factor(s) in SEA were distributed into a fraction of M(r) 120,000 and a fraction of M(r) 650,000 by gel filtration. However, a fraction of M(r) 120,000 demonstrated the presence of a limited number of components by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under non-denaturing conditions. These activating factor(s) were destroyed by peroxidase oxidation, heat treatment, chymotrypsin and trypsin digestion. These results indicate that the B-cell activating factor(s) in SEA contain both carbohydrate and protein. IgM antibodies were detected in the culture supernatant of SEA-activated B cells after 48 hr in culture, but IgG antibodies were undetected in culture. These antibodies did not react with SEA but reacted with sheep, horse, mouse red blood cells, carbonic anhydrase and autoantigens in myelinated nerve fibres of cerebrum as well as luminal surface and parietal cells of the stomach of naive mice. Thus our data demonstrated that SEA directly stimulates naive B cells to produce antibodies against heterophile and autologous antigens. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8344698

  10. DC-SIGN–expressing macrophages trigger activation of mannosylated IgM B-cell receptor in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rada; Mourcin, Frédéric; Uhel, Fabrice; Pangault, Céline; Ruminy, Philippe; Dupré, Loic; Guirriec, Marion; Marchand, Tony; Fest, Thierry; Lamy, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) results from the accumulation of malignant germinal center (GC) B cells leading to the development of an indolent and largely incurable disease. FL cells remain highly dependent on B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and on a specific cell microenvironment, including T cells, macrophages, and stromal cells. Importantly, FL BCR is characterized by a selective pressure to retain surface immunoglobulin M (IgM) BCR despite an active class-switch recombination process, and by the introduction, in BCR variable regions, of N-glycosylation acceptor sites harboring unusual high-mannose oligosaccharides. However, the relevance of these 2 FL BCR features for lymphomagenesis remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that IgM+ FL B cells activated a stronger BCR signaling network than IgG+ FL B cells and normal GC B cells. BCR expression level and phosphatase activity could both contribute to such heterogeneity. Moreover, we underlined that a subset of IgM+ FL samples, displaying highly mannosylated BCR, efficiently bound dendritic cell–specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), which could in turn trigger delayed but long-lasting BCR aggregation and activation. Interestingly, DC-SIGN was found within the FL cell niche in situ. Finally, M2 macrophages induced a DC-SIGN–dependent adhesion of highly mannosylated IgM+ FL B cells and triggered BCR-associated kinase activation. Interestingly, pharmacologic BCR inhibitors abolished such crosstalk between macrophages and FL B cells. Altogether, our data support an important role for DC-SIGN–expressing infiltrating cells in the biology of FL and suggest that they could represent interesting therapeutic targets. PMID:26272216

  11. Target sequence accessibility limits activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Popov, Sergey W; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Wotschke, Beate; Brüderlein, Silke; Barth, Thomas F; Dorsch, Karola; Ritz, Olga; Möller, Peter; Leithäuser, Frank

    2007-07-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) in activated B lymphocytes and is potentially implicated in genomic instability of B-cell malignancies. For unknown reasons, B-cell neoplasms often lack SHM and CSR in spite of high AID expression. Here, we show that primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), an immunoglobulin (Ig)-negative lymphoma that possesses hypermutated, class-switched Ig genes, expresses high levels of AID with an intact primary structure but does not do CSR in 14 of 16 cases analyzed. Absence of CSR coincided with low Ig germ-line transcription, whereas high level germ-line transcription was observed only in those two cases with active CSR. Interleukin-4/CD40L costimulation induced CSR and a marked up-regulation of germ-line transcription in the PMBL-derived cell line MedB-1. In the PMBL cell line Karpas 1106P, CSR was not inducible and germ-line transcription remained low on stimulation. However, Karpas 1106P, but not MedB-1, had ongoing SHM of the Ig gene and BCL6. These genes were transcribed in Karpas 1106P, whereas transcription was undetectable or low in MedB-1 cells. Thus, accessibility of the target sequences seems to be a major limiting factor for AID-dependent somatic gene diversification in PMBL. PMID:17638864

  12. LLT1 and CD161 Expression in Human Germinal Centers Promotes B Cell Activation and CXCR4 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Alba; López-Macías, Constantino; Marafioti, Teresa; Mehta, Hema; Partridge, Amy; Kanzig, Carina; Rivellese, Felice; Galson, Jacob D.; Walker, Lucy J.; Milne, Paul; Phillips, Rodney E.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are microanatomical structures critical for the development of high-affinity Abs and B cell memory. They are organized into two zones, light and dark, with coordinated roles, controlled by local signaling. The innate lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) is known to be expressed on B cells, but its functional role in the GC reaction has not been explored. In this study, we report high expression of LLT1 on GC-associated B cells, early plasmablasts, and GC-derived lymphomas. LLT1 expression was readily induced via BCR, CD40, and CpG stimulation on B cells. Unexpectedly, we found high expression of the LLT1 ligand, CD161, on follicular dendritic cells. Triggering of LLT1 supported B cell activation, CD83 upregulation, and CXCR4 downregulation. Overall, these data suggest that LLT1–CD161 interactions play a novel and important role in B cell maturation within the GC in humans. PMID:26829983

  13. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W; Emre, N C Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S; Davis, R Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T; Shaffer, A L; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Rimsza, Lisa M; Fisher, Richard I; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2008-09-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17-92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  14. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W.; Emre, N. C. Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S.; Davis, R. Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T.; Shaffer, A. L.; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2008-01-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17–92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  15. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  16. Temporal regulation of Lsp1 O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation during apoptosis of activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jung-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Chiang, Ming-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ju; Gao, Shijay; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Kuo-I.

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking of B-cell receptor (BCR) sets off an apoptosis programme, but the underlying pathways remain obscure. Here we decipher the molecular mechanisms bridging B-cell activation and apoptosis mediated by post-translational modification (PTM). We find that O-GlcNAcase inhibition enhances B-cell activation and apoptosis induced by BCR crosslinking. This proteome-scale analysis of the functional interplay between protein O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation in stimulated mouse primary B cells identifies 313 O-GlcNAcylation-dependent phosphosites on 224 phosphoproteins. Among these phosphoproteins, temporal regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of lymphocyte-specific protein-1 (Lsp1) is a key switch that triggers apoptosis in activated B cells. O-GlcNAcylation at S209 of Lsp1 is a prerequisite for the recruitment of its kinase, PKC-β1, to induce S243 phosphorylation, leading to ERK activation and downregulation of BCL-2 and BCL-xL. Thus, we demonstrate the critical PTM interplay of Lsp1 that transmits signals for initiating apoptosis after BCR ligation. PMID:27555448

  17. Meningeal Infiltration of the Spinal Cord by Non-Classically Activated B Cells is Associated with Chronic Disease Course in a Spontaneous B Cell-Dependent Model of CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Amy K.; Tesfagiorgis, Yodit; Jain, Rajiv W.; Craig, Heather C.; Kerfoot, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We characterized B cell infiltration of the spinal cord in a B cell-dependent spontaneous model of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that develops in a proportion of mice with mutant T and B cell receptors specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. We found that, while males are more likely to develop disease, females are more likely to have a chronic rather than monophasic disease course. B cell infiltration of the spinal cord was investigated by histology and FACs. CD4+ T cell infiltration was pervasive throughout the white and in some cases gray matter. B cells were almost exclusively restricted to the meninges, often in clusters reminiscent of those described in human multiple sclerosis. These clusters were typically found adjacent to white matter lesions and their presence was associated with a chronic disease course. Extensive investigation of these clusters by histology did not identify features of lymphoid follicles, including organization of T and B cells into separate zones, CD35+ follicular dendritic cells, or germinal centers. The majority of cluster B cells were IgD+ with little evidence of class switch. Consistent with this, B cells isolated from the spinal cord were of the naïve/memory CD38hi CD95lo phenotype. Nevertheless, they were CD62Llo and CD80hi compared to lymph node B cells suggesting that they were at least partly activated and primed to present antigen. Therefore, if meningeal B cells contribute to CNS pathology in autoimmunity, follicular differentiation is not necessary for the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26441975

  18. Nitrite Transport Activity of the ABC-Type Cyanate Transporter of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type nitrate/nitrite-bispecific transporter, which has a high affinity for both substrates (Km, ∼1 μM), Synechococcus elongatus has an active nitrite transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) value of 20 μM. We found that this activity depends on the cynABD genes, which encode a putative cyanate (NCO−) ABC-type transporter. Accordingly, nitrite transport by CynABD was competitively inhibited by NCO− with a Ki value of 0.025 μM. The transporter was induced under conditions of nitrogen deficiency, and the induced cells showed a Vmax value of 11 to 13 μmol/mg of chlorophyll per h for cyanate or nitrite, which could supply ∼30% of the amount of nitrogen required for optimum growth. Its relative specificity for the substrates and regulation at transcriptional and posttranslational levels suggested that the physiological role of the bispecific cyanate/nitrite transporter in S. elongatus is to allow nitrogen-deficient cells to assimilate low concentrations of cyanate in the medium. Its contribution to nitrite assimilation was significant in a mutant lacking the ABC-type nitrate/nitrite transporter, suggesting a possible role for CynABD in nitrite assimilation by cyanobacterial species that lack another high-affinity mechanism(s) for nitrite transport. PMID:19286804

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi cytosolic alkaline antigens (FI) induce polyclonal activation in murine normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1996-08-01

    Several reports have described polyclonal activation in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyse the participation of one T. cruzi antigenic fraction in this immunological event. The antigen selected was FI, an antigenic fraction of pI 7-9 obtained from T. cruzi cytosol separated by isoelectricfocusing. FI is constituted by molecules with molecular weights of around 60 and 20 KDa. The authors assayed the ability of this antigenic fraction to induce polyclonal activation of spleen mononuclear cells from normal (NSMC) BALB/c mice. NSMC showed a marked lymphoproliferative response measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 3 days of culture in presence of FI. The values reached by FI-stimulated cells were 10 times higher than the controls (non-stimulated cells). This effect was dose-dependent. Furthermore, the authors observed that a purified T-cell population in the presence of adherent cells was unaffected by FI. Additionally, in a culture of NSMC, FI stimulated the proliferation of B cells as observed by the increase of the percentage of B220+ cells determined by FACS using FITC-conjugated anti-mouse B220. The authors noticed that the percentage of B220+Ly1+(CD5) populations in the presence of FI did not change with respect to the control (non-stimulated cells), indicating that FI expanded both conventional and CD5+ B cells. The isotypic pattern of the antibodies produced after 6 days of culture of NSMC in the presence of FI was predominantly IgM, which reacted with highly conserved antigens such as actin, myosin, myoglobin, thyroglobulin and carbonic anhydrase, but did not react with FI. A slight increase of IgG1 and IgG3 with respect to the control was observed but no changes on the levels of IgG2 was noticed. These results indicate that FI promotes activation, proliferation and differentiation in antibody-secreting cells of normal murine B lymphocytes.

  20. Human type II Fcgamma receptors inhibit B cell activation by interacting with the p21(ras)-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sármay, G; Koncz, G; Gergely, J

    1996-11-29

    Co-ligation of antigen receptors and type II Fcgamma receptors (FcgammaRIIb) on B cells interrupts signal transduction and ultimately inhibits antibody production. We have identified p52 Shc in the FcgammaRIIb1-specific immunoprecipitates isolated from the membrane fraction of BL41 Burkitt lymphoma cells following B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-ligation. The insolubilized synthetic peptide representing the phosphorylated form of the tyrosine-based inhibitory motif of FcgammaRIIb also binds Shc from the lysates of activated but not from resting BL41 cells. This suggests that the binding does not depend on the interaction of FcgammaRIIb1-phosphotyrosine with the SH2 domain of Shc. Tyr phosphorylation of FcgammaRIIb1-associated Shc is low, indicating an impaired function. Shc is implicated in regulating p21(ras) activation; thus, we have compared p21(ras) activities in BL41 cells treated in different ways. p21(ras) activity is reduced when B cell receptor and FcgammaRIIb1 are co-ligated. p21(ras) couples protein-tyrosine kinase-dependent events to the Ser/Thr kinase-mediated signaling pathway leading to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Our results show that B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-cross-linking partially inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. We conclude that FcgammaRIIb1-dependent inhibition of human B cell activation may be based on interrupting signal transduction between protein-tyrosine kinases and the p21(ras)/mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent activation pathway.

  1. Changes in potassium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1994-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and microelectrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to investigate the changes in ionic currents and action potential shape that follow axotomy of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion B-cells. 2. Axotomy increased M-conductance (gM; muscarine-sensitive, voltage- and time-dependent K+ conductance) by 35% at -30 mV and slowed its deactivation kinetics. 3. The delayed rectifier K+ current (IK; at +50 mV) was reduced in axotomized neurones to 61% of control without any change in activation or deactivation kinetics. Steady-state intracellular Ca2+ levels and leak conductance were unchanged. 4. The fast, voltage-sensitive, Ca(2+)-activated K+ current (IC), evoked from -40 mV, was decreased to about 71% of control (at +30 mV) in axotomized neurones, whereas that evoked from -80 mV was largely unaffected. IC kinetics were also similar in control and axotomized neurones. This suggests that IC channels are not changed after axotomy. 5. In axotomized neurones, commands to +10 from -40 mV had to be extended by 16 ms to evoke voltage-insensitive Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IAHP) responses that were similar in magnitude to those observed in control cells. 6. The previously documented, axotomy-induced decrease in Ca2+ current (ICa) due to increased resting inactivation can account for the reduction in IC and IAHP and for the change in the shape of the action potential. PMID:7837094

  2. Pin1 is required for sustained B cell proliferation upon oncogenic activation of Myc

    PubMed Central

    D'Artista, Luana; Bisso, Andrea; Piontini, Andrea; Doni, Mirko; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Kress, Theresia R.; Morelli, Marco J.; Del Sal, Giannino; Amati, Bruno; Campaner, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is activated by translocation in Burkitt's lymphoma and substitutions in codon 58 stabilize the Myc protein or augment its oncogenic potential. In wild-type Myc, phosphorylation of Ser 62 and Thr 58 provides a landing pad for the peptidyl prolyl-isomerase Pin1, which in turn promotes Ser 62 dephosphorylation and Myc degradation. However, the role of Pin1 in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis remains unknown. We show here that genetic ablation of Pin1 reduces lymphomagenesis in Eμ-myc transgenic mice. In both Pin1-deficient B-cells and MEFs, the proliferative response to oncogenic Myc was selectively impaired, with no alterations in Myc-induced apoptosis or mitogen-induced cell cycle entry. This proliferative defect wasn't attributable to alterations in either Ser 62 phosphorylation or Myc-regulated transcription, but instead relied on the activity of the ARF-p53 pathway. Pin1 silencing in lymphomas retarded disease progression in mice, making Pin1 an attractive therapeutic target in Myc-driven tumors. PMID:26943576

  3. Antitumor activity of fucoidan against diffuse large B cell lymphoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Qianqiao; Kong, Yuanyuan; Xie, Bingqian; Gao, Minjie; Tao, Yi; Xu, Hongwei; Zhan, Fenghuang; Dai, Bojie; Shi, Jumei; Wu, Xiaosong

    2015-11-01

    Fucoidan is one of the major sulfated polysaccharides isolated from brown seaweeds. In this study, we determined the anti-cancer activity of fucoidan on diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Fucoidan inhibited the growth of DLBCL cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and fucoidan treatment provoked G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, which was accompanied by p21 up-regulation and cyclin D1, Cdk4, and Cdk6 down-regulation. Fucoidan also induced caspase-dependent cell apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary DLBCL cell. In addition, fucoidan treatment caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol. Fucoidan also potentiated the activities of carfilzomib in killing DLBCL cells. Oral administration of fucoidan effectively inhibited tumor growth in xenograft mouse models. Our findings reveal the novel function of fucoidan as an anti-DLBCL agent, which can be used in the clinical treatment of DLBCL.

  4. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  5. Using biologic predictive factors to direct therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Cliona; Wilson, Wyndham H.

    2013-01-01

    While diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was once considered to be a single disease entity, recent biological insights have demonstrated that it can be divided up into at least three molecular subtypes. Gene expression profiling has revealed that DLBCL consists of a germinal center B-cell like subtype (GCB), an activated B-cell like subtype (ABC) and a primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma subtype (PMBL). These three entities arise from different stages of B-cell differentiation and are characterized by distinct mechanisms of oncogenic activation. In GCB DLBCL, the BCL6 transcription factor may play an important role in tumor survival and treatment resistance and strategies that target this are under investigation. ABC DLBCL is characterized by high expression of target genes of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family of transcription factors and strategies that target NF-κB are in clinical trials. PMBL is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that shares many molecular features with nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and may benefit from dose intensity approaches and inhibition of the Janus kinases. Other biologic predictive factors such as MYC and BCL2 may be overexpressed in both the GCB and ABC subtypes and strategies that target these complexes are also being tested. PMID:23610613

  6. Using biologic predictive factors to direct therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Grant, Cliona; Wilson, Wyndham H

    2013-02-01

    While diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was once considered to be a single disease entity, recent biological insights have demonstrated that it can be divided up into at least three molecular subtypes. Gene expression profiling has revealed that DLBCL consists of a germinal center B-cell like subtype (GCB), an activated B-cell like subtype (ABC) and a primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma subtype (PMBL). These three entities arise from different stages of B-cell differentiation and are characterized by distinct mechanisms of oncogenic activation. In GCB DLBCL, the BCL6 transcription factor may play an important role in tumor survival and treatment resistance and strategies that target this are under investigation. ABC DLBCL is characterized by high expression of target genes of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)/Rel family of transcription factors and strategies that target NF-κB are in clinical trials. PMBL is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that shares many molecular features with nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and may benefit from dose intensity approaches and inhibition of the Janus kinases. Other biologic predictive factors such as MYC and BCL2 may be overexpressed in both the GCB and ABC subtypes and strategies that target these complexes are also being tested. PMID:23610613

  7. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody.

  8. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  9. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  10. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated disruption of the CD40 ligand-induced activation of primary human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haitian Crawford, Robert B. Kaplan, Barbara L.F. Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2011-09-15

    Suppression of the primary antibody response is particularly sensitive to suppression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mice; however, surprisingly little is known concerning the effects of TCDD on humoral immunity or B cell function in humans. Results from a limited number of previous studies, primarily employing in vitro activation models, suggested that human B cell effector function is suppressed by TCDD. The present study sought to extend these findings by investigating, in primary human B cells, the effects of TCDD on several critical stages leading to antibody secretion including activation and plasmacytic differentiation using an in vitro CD40 ligand activation model. These studies revealed important differences in the response of human and mouse B cells to TCDD, the most striking being altered expression of plasmacytic differentiation regulators, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 and paired box protein 5, in mouse but not human B cells. The activation of human B cells was profoundly impaired by TCDD, as evidenced by decreased expression of activation markers CD80, CD86, and CD69. The impaired activation correlated with decreased cell viability, which prevented the progression of human B cells toward plasmacytic differentiation. TCDD treatment also attenuated the early activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling in human B cells. Collectively, the present study provided experimental evidence for novel mechanisms by which TCDD impairs the effector function of primary human B cells. - Highlights: > In this study primary human and mouse B cell toxicity to TCDD was compared. > TCDD altered the expression of Blimp-1 and Pax5 in mouse but not human B cells. > TCDD markedly suppressed human B cell activation as characterized by CD80, CD86 and CD69 expression. > TCDD inhibited ERK, p38, and Akt phosphorylation in human B cells.

  11. B cell activating factor is central to bleomycin- and IL-17-mediated experimental pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    François, Antoine; Gombault, Aurélie; Villeret, Bérengère; Alsaleh, Ghada; Fanny, Manoussa; Gasse, Paméla; Adam, Sylvain Marchand; Crestani, Bruno; Sibilia, Jean; Schneider, Pascal; Bahram, Seiamak; Quesniaux, Valérie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Wachsmann, Dominique; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Couillin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive devastating, yet untreatable fibrotic disease of unknown origin. We investigated the contribution of the B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a TNF family member recently implicated in the regulation of pathogenic IL-17-producing cells in autoimmune diseases. The contribution of BAFF was assessed in a murine model of lung fibrosis induced by airway administered bleomycin. We show that murine BAFF levels were strongly increased in the bronchoalveolar space and lungs after bleomycin exposure. We identified Gr1(+) neutrophils as an important source of BAFF upon BLM-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis. Genetic ablation of BAFF or BAFF neutralization by a soluble receptor significantly attenuated pulmonary fibrosis and IL-1β levels. We further demonstrate that bleomycin-induced BAFF expression and lung fibrosis were IL-1β and IL-17A dependent. BAFF was required for rIL-17A-induced lung fibrosis and augmented IL-17A production by CD3(+) T cells from murine fibrotic lungs ex vivo. Finally we report elevated levels of BAFF in bronchoalveolar lavages from IPF patients. Our data therefore support a role for BAFF in the establishment of pulmonary fibrosis and a crosstalk between IL-1β, BAFF and IL-17A.

  12. Actin-Binding Protein 1 Regulates B Cell Receptor-Mediated Antigen Processing and Presentation in Response to B Cell Receptor Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Seeley, Margaret K.; Kale, Amruta; Qualmann, Britta; Kessels, Michael; Han, Jin; Tan, Tse-Hua; Song, Wenxia

    2010-01-01

    The BCR serves as both signal transducer and Ag transporter. Binding of Ags to the BCR induces signaling cascades and Ag processing and presentation, two essential cellular events for B cell activation. BCR-initiated signaling increases BCR-mediated Ag-processing efficiency by increasing the rate and specificity of Ag transport. Previous studies showed a critical role for the actin cytoskeleton in these two processes. In this study, we found that actin-binding protein 1 (Abp1/HIP-55/SH3P7) functioned as an actin-binding adaptor protein, coupling BCR signaling and Ag-processing pathways with the actin cytoskeleton. Gene knockout of Abp1 and overexpression of the Src homology 3 domain of Abp1 inhibited BCR-mediated Ag internalization, consequently reducing the rate of Ag transport to processing compartments and the efficiency of BCR-mediated Ag processing and presentation. BCR activation induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Abp1 and translocation of both Abp1 and dynamin 2 from the cytoplasm to plasma membrane, where they colocalized with the BCR and cortical F-actin. Mutations of the two tyrosine phosphorylation sites of Abp1 and depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton interfered with BCR-induced Abp1 recruitment to the plasma membrane. The inhibitory effect of a dynamin proline-rich domain deletion mutant on the recruitment of Abp1 to the plasma membrane, coimmunoprecipitation of dynamin with Abp1, and coprecipitation of Abp1 with GST fusion of the dyanmin proline-rich domain demonstrate the interaction of Abp1 with dynamin 2. These results demonstrate that the BCR regulates the function of Abp1 by inducing Abp1 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, and that Abp1 facilitates BCR-mediated Ag processing by simultaneously interacting with dynamin and the actin cytoskeleton. The Journal of Immunology, 2008, 180: 6685–6695. PMID:18453588

  13. STS-1 promotes IFN-α induced autophagy by activating the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Fan, Hongye; Ding, Liang; Sun, Lingyun; Hou, Yayi

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the overexpression of IFN-α. IFN-α induces autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway, contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. Recent studies reported that B cells from patients with SLE and NZB/W F1 mice had enhanced autophagy activity; however, the mechanism still remains unknown. Here, we show that the protein tyrosine phosphatase STS-1 (suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling 1) was significantly overexpressed in B cells from patients with SLE and MRL/lpr mice. Notably, STS-1 promoted IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells by enhancing the JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. STS-1 inhibited the phosphorylation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase c-cbl, and subsequently promoted IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine kinase 2, leading to JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. Furthermore, STAT1 and JAK1 inhibitors blocked the IFN-α-induced autophagy promoted by STS-1, indicating that STS-1 promotes IFN-α-induced autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling. Our results demonstrate the importance of STS-1 in regulating IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells, and this could be used as a therapeutic approach to treat SLE.

  14. GCN5 is essential for IRF-4 gene expression followed by transcriptional activation of Blimp-1 in immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Masami; Kuribayashi, Futoshi; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Nishitoh, Hideki; Takami, Yasunari; Nakayama, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    During B-cell differentiation, the gene expression of B-cell differentiation-related transcription factors must be strictly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone acetylation and deacetylation, to complete the differentiation pathway. GCN5, one of the most important histone acetyltransferases, is involved in epigenetic events for transcriptional regulation through alterations in the chromatin structure. In this study, by analyzing the homozygous DT40 mutants GCN5(-/-), generated with gene targeting techniques, we found that GCN5 was necessary for transcriptional activation of IRF-4, an essential transcription factor for plasma cell differentiation. GCN5 deficiency caused drastic decreases in both the mRNA and the protein levels of Blimp-1 and IRF-4. The ectopic expression of Blimp-1 and IRF-4 suggests that IRF-4, but not Blimp-1, is the target gene of GCN5 in immature B cells. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that GCN5 bound to the IRF-4 gene around its 5'-flanking region and acetylated H3K9 residues within chromatin surrounding the region in vivo, suggesting that gene expression of IRF-4 is certainly regulated by GCN5. These results reveal that GCN5 is essential for IRF-4 gene expression, followed by transcriptional activation of Blimp-1, and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation.

  15. Activation of HLA-A2-specific memory B cells in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Niguma, T; DeVito, L D; Grailer, A P; Fechner, J H; Sollinger, H W; Burlingham, W J

    1993-05-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes of all five HLA-A2-sensitized patients produced significant levels of human IgG (> or = 0.25 micrograms/ml) following polyclonal activation in vitro, but PBLs from only one patient (K.H.) who had been transfused recently (< 4 weeks) produced detectable anti-HLA-A2 IgG. PBLs from this in vitro responder and from one in vitro nonresponder (L.G.) were transferred intraperitoneally into SCID mice. A low level (range, 5-40 ng/ml) of human anti-HLA-A2 IgG was detected in the serum of the mice without additional stimulation. This anti-HLA-A2 IgG response was boosted (range, 40-200 ng/ml) when mice received a human skin xenograft or an early challenge with x-irradiated human leukocytes intraperitoneally. Although the anti-HLA antibodies produced were specific for HLA-A2, the boosting of anti-HLA-A2 IgG production did not require the expression of the HLA-A2 protein, since either HLA-A2-negative skin xenografts or HLA-identical x-irradiated PBLs enhanced the production of anti-HLA-A2 IgG. Dose-response of transferred PBLs and kappa:lambda composition of individual mouse anti-HLA-A2 production suggested that low-frequency human memory B-cell clones were stimulated to proliferate and/or triggered to become high Ab secretors by skin graft or PBL boost. PMID:8376189

  16. STK38 is a Critical Upstream Regulator of MYC’s Oncogenic Activity in Human B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisikirska, Brygida C.; Adam, Stacey J.; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Rajbhandari, Presha; Cox, Rachel; Lefebvre, Celine; Wang, Kai; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E.; Felsher, Dean W.; Califano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The MYC proto-oncogene is associated with the pathogenesis of most human neoplasia. Conversely, its experimental inactivation elicits oncogene addiction. While MYC constitutes a formidable therapeutic target, it also plays an essential role in normal physiology, thus creating the need for context--specific targeting strategies. The analysis of post-translational MYC activity modulation yields novel targets for MYC inactivation. Specifically, following regulatory network analysis in human B cells, we identify a novel role of the STK38 kinase as a regulator of MYC activity and a candidate target for abrogating tumorigenesis in MYC addicted lymphoma. We found that STK38 regulates MYC protein stability and turnover in a kinase-activity-dependent manner. STK38 kinase inactivation abrogates apoptosis following B-cell receptor (BCR) activation, while its silencing significantly decreases MYC levels and increases apoptosis. Moreover, STK38 knockdown suppresses growth of MYC addicted tumors in vivo thus providing a novel viable target for treating these malignancies. PMID:23178486

  17. Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Transcription Factor X Box-Binding Protein-1 Occurs in a Subset of Normal Germinal-Center B Cells and in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas with Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Balague, Olga; Mozos, Ana; Martinez, Daniel; Hernandez, Luis; Colomo, Lluis; Mate, Jose Luis; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Lin, Oscar; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Martinez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    X box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) is a transcription factor that is required for the terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasma cells. The Xbp-1 gene is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress signals, which generate a 50-kDa nuclear protein that acts as a potent transactivator and regulates the expression of genes related to the unfolded protein response. Activated Xbp-1 is essential for cell survival in plasma-cell tumors but its role in B-cell lymphomas is unknown. We analyzed the expression of activated Xbp-1 in reactive lymphoid tissues, 411 lymphomas and plasma-cell neoplasms, and 24 B-cell lines. In reactive tissues, Xbp-1 was only found in nuclear extracts. Nuclear expression of Xbp-1 was observed in occasional reactive plasma cells and in a subpopulation of Irf-4+/Bcl-6−/Pax-5− B cells in the light zones of reactive germinal centers, probably representing cells committed to plasma-cell differentiation. None of the low-grade lymphomas showed evidence of Xbp-1 activation; however, Xbp-1 activation was found in 28% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, independent of germinal or postgerminal center phenotype, as well as in 48% of plasmablastic lymphomas and 69% of plasma-cell neoplasms. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with nuclear Xbp-1 expression had a significantly worse response to therapy and shorter overall survival compared with negative tumors. These findings suggest that Xbp-1 activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:19389935

  18. Discovery and synthesis of novel allylthioaralkylthiopyridazines: their antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and Hep3B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Sun; Kim, Chaewon; Park, Myung-Sook

    2015-01-01

    A new series of 6-allylthio-3-aralkylthio-4,5-dimethylpyridazines 5a-5k and 1-allylthio-4-alkylthio-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrophthalazine 6a-6j was synthesized from maleic anhydride derivatives for development of new anticancer agents. The process involves the formation of pyridazine and phthalazine rings, dichlorination, allylthiolation, and aralkylthiolation. These new compounds showed antiproliferative activities against breast cancer (MCF-7) and hepatocarcinoma (Hep3B) cells in CCK-8 assays, and could be promising candidates for chemotherapy of carcinomas. Among 21 synthesized compounds, five compounds (5a, 5b, 6b, 6d, and 6f) showed higher potency than 5-FU for inhibiting the growth of cell line. The results indicated that compound 6f had the highest activity towards MCF-7 and Hep3B cells. These results suggest the potential anticancer activity of compounds 5a, 5b, 6b, 6d, and 6f.

  19. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  20. Negative role of TAK1 in marginal zone B-cell development incidental to NF-κB noncanonical pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Hisaaki; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is crucial in B-cell physiology. One key molecule regulating this pathway is the serine/threonine kinase TAK1 (MAP3K7). TAK1 is responsible for positive feedback mechanisms in B-cell receptor signaling that serve as an NF-κB activation threshold. This study aimed to better understand the correlation between TAK1-mediated signaling and B-cell development and humoral immune responses. Here we showed that a B-cell conditional deletion of TAK1 using mb1-cre resulted in a dramatic elimination of the humoral immune response, consistent with the absence of the B-1 B-cell subset. When monitoring the self-reactive B-cell system (the immunoglobulin hen egg lysozyme/soluble hen egg lysozyme double-transgenic mouse model), we found that TAK1-deficient B cells exhibited an enhanced susceptibility to cell death that might explain the disappearance of the B1 subset. In contrast, these mice gained numerous marginal zone (MZ) B cells. We consequently examined the basal and B-cell receptor-induced activity of NF-κB2 that is reported to regulate MZ B-cell development, and demonstrated that the activity of NF-κB2 increased in TAK1-deficient B cells. Thus, our results present a novel in vivo function, the negative role of TAK1 in MZ B-cell development that is likely associated with NF-κB2 activation. PMID:27121163

  1. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate. PMID:25377891

  2. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  3. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGES

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  4. Implementation of activity-based costing (ABC) to drive cost reduction efforts in a semiconductor manufacturing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Hussein; Bol, Igor I.; Lora, J.; Chowdhry, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a case study on the implementation of ABC to calculate the cost per wafer and to drive cost reduction efforts for a new IC product line. The cost reduction activities were conducted through the efforts of 11 cross-functional teams which included members of the finance, purchasing, technology development, process engineering, equipment engineering, production control, and facility groups. The activities of these cross functional teams were coordinated by a cost council. It will be shown that these activities have resulted in a 57% reduction in the wafer manufacturing cost of the new product line. Factors contributed to successful implementation of an ABC management system are discussed.

  5. Activation-induced B cell fates are selected by intracellular stochastic competition.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Ken R; Wellard, Cameron J; Markham, John F; Zhou, Jie H S; Holmberg, Ross; Hawkins, Edwin D; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Dowling, Mark R; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2012-01-20

    In response to stimulation, B lymphocytes pursue a large number of distinct fates important for immune regulation. Whether each cell's fate is determined by external direction, internal stochastic processes, or directed asymmetric division is unknown. Measurement of times to isotype switch, to develop into a plasmablast, and to divide or to die for thousands of cells indicated that each fate is pursued autonomously and stochastically. As a consequence of competition between these processes, censorship of alternative outcomes predicts intricate correlations that are observed in the data. Stochastic competition can explain how the allocation of a proportion of B cells to each cell fate is achieved. The B cell may exemplify how other complex cell differentiation systems are controlled. PMID:22223740

  6. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  7. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javeed; Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C; Vose, Julie M; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M; Cook, James R; Tubbs, Raymond R; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Staudt, Louis M; Gascoyne, Randy D; McKeithan, Timothy W; Chan, Wing C

    2015-02-12

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)-DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the "gold standard" GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  8. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M.; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C.; Vose, Julie M.; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Armitage, James O.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Staudt, Louis M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)–DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)–DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the “gold standard” GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  9. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  10. Differential efficacy of bortezomib plus chemotherapy within molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavy, Kieron; Pittaluga, Stefania; Czuczman, Myron S.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Wright, George; Grant, Nicole; Shovlin, Margaret; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Janik, John E.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has revealed distinct molecular subtypes that include germinal center B cell–like (GCB) and activated B cell–like (ABC) DLBCL. ABC DLBCL has a worse survival after upfront chemotherapy and is characterized by constitutive activation of the antiapoptotic nuclear factor–kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, which can inhibit chemotherapy. We hypothesized that inhibition of NF-κB might sensitize ABC but not GCB DLBCL to chemotherapy and improve outcome. As the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib can inhibit NF-κB through blocking IκBα degradation, we investigated bortezomib alone followed by bortezomib and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in recurrent DLBCL. Tumor tissue was analyzed by gene expression profiling and/or immunohistochemistry to identify molecular DLBCL subtypes. As a control, we showed that relapsed/refractory ABC and GCB DLBCL have equally poor survivals after upfront chemotherapy. Bortezomib alone had no activity in DLBCL, but when combined with chemotherapy, it demonstrated a significantly higher response (83% vs 13%; P < .001) and median overall survival (10.8 vs 3.4 months; P = .003) in ABC compared with GCB DLBCL, respectively. These results suggest bortezomib enhances the activity of chemotherapy in ABC but not GCB DLBCL, and provide a rational therapeutic approach based on genetically distinct DLBCL subtypes. This trial is registered with http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT00057902. PMID:19380866

  11. Virus-induced polyclonal B cell activation improves protective CTL memory via retained CD27 expression on memory CTL.

    PubMed

    Matter, Matthias; Mumprecht, Sabine; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Pavelic, Viktor; Yagita, Hideo; Krautwald, Stefan; Borst, Jannie; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2005-11-01

    Different viruses elicit distinct phenotypes of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This is reflected in differential expression of homing receptors and costimulatory molecules like CD27. Memory CTL retained CD27 following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, but not after immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus or tumor cells expressing LCMV glycoprotein. Stable CD27 expression on memory CTL required ligation by CD70 expressed on polyclonally activated B cells during the contraction phase. The functional consequence of CD27 expressed on virus-specific CTL was analyzed in CD27-deficient mice. LCMV infection of CD27(-/-) mice revealed that primary CTL activation and expansion as well as elimination of the virus were independent of CD27 expression. In contrast, ligation of CD27 on memory CTL upon secondary antigen encounter increased clonal expansion and improved protection against re-infection. This points to novel B cell-CTL interactions during viral infection and to a beneficial role of polyclonal B cell activation that represents a characteristic of murine LCMV, human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis B and C virus infection. PMID:16231287

  12. Induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes ex vivo by CD40-activated B cells loaded with myeloma tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Nguyen Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Nguyen Hoang, Tuyet Minh; Kang, Hyun-Kyu; Jin, Chun-Ji; Nam, Jong-Hee; Chung, Sang-Young; Choi, So-Jin-Na; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2009-11-01

    We investigated to establish CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) as alternative antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for the induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). To generate CD40-B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were co-cultured with CD40L-transfected J558 cells in the presence of IL-4, insulin, transferrin, and cyclosporine for 14 days, and pulsed with myeloma lysates. The CD40-B cells consistently expressed high levels of CD80, CD86, CD54, CCR7, and HLA-DR. The CD40-B cells produced IL-12, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 during the culture period, but not IL-10. In addition, the CD40-B cells showed potent allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacities that depended on the dose ratio and had the potential to polarize naïve T cells into Th1 subsets. The CD40-B cells loaded with tumor lysates induced strong target-specific CTLs, based on large numbers of IFN-gamma secreting cells and higher cytotoxic activity against target cells compared to the CD40-B cells without the tumor lysates. These results suggest that CD40-B cells loaded with myeloma lysates might provide alternative APCs for cellular immunotherapy in patients with myeloma. PMID:19277657

  13. Activated T cells induce expression of B7/BB1 on normal or leukemic B cells through a CD40-dependent signal

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Cognate interactions between antigen-presenting B and T cells play crucial roles in immunologic responses. T cells that have been activated via the crosslinking of CD3 are able to induce B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted and contact-dependent manner. We find that such activated human CD4+ T cells, but not control Ig- treated T cells, may induce normal or leukemic B cells to express B7/BB1 and significantly higher levels of CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 via a process that also requires direct cell-cell contact. To discern what cell surface molecule(s) may be responsible for signalling B cells to express B7/BB1, we added various monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for T or B cell accessory molecules or control mAbs to cocultures of alpha-CD3-activated T cells and resting B cells. We find that only alpha-CD40 mAbs can significantly inhibit the increased expression of B7/BB1, suggesting that the ligand for CD40 expressed on activated T cells may be an important inducer of B7/BB1 expression. Subsequent experiments in fact demonstrate that alpha-CD40 mAbs, but not control mAbs, induce changes in B cell phenotype similar to those induced by activated T cells when the mAbs are presented on Fc gamma RII (CDw32)-expressing L cells. These phenotypic changes have significant effects on B cell function. Whereas chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells normally are very poor stimulators in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), CLL-B cells preactivated via CD40 crosslinking are significantly better presenters of alloantigen, affecting up to 30-fold-greater stimulation of T cell proliferation than that induced by control treated or nontreated CLL-B cells. Similarly, the MLR of T cells stimulated by allogeneic nonleukemic B cells can be enhanced significantly if the stimulator B cells are preactivated via CD40 crosslinking. The enhanced MLR generated by such preactivated B cells may be inhibited

  14. Soluble, but not immobilized, anti-IgM antibody inhibits post-activation events leading to T-cell-dependent B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, J; Rivas, D; Gayo, A; Mozo, L; Gutiérrez, C

    1995-01-01

    The potential for surface immunoglobulin-binding ligands to modify B-cell differentiation responses induced by activated T cells has been investigated. Activated T cells in human splenic mononuclear cells cultured on anti-CD3-coated plates induced B cells to produce large amounts of IgM and IgG. In this experimental system, cross-linking of B-cell antigen receptors by soluble, bivalent monoclonal or polyclonal anti-IgM antibodies completely inhibited IgM production, and greatly diminished IgG production, in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained using a F(ab')2 fragment of a goat anti-IgM antibody. Inhibition of B-cell differentiation by bivalent cross-linking reagents did not require the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC), as comparable results were obtained in co-cultures of purified T and B cells. In contrast, enhanced immunoglobulin secretion was seen when surface IgM was cross-linked using anti-IgM antibody immobilized on the culture plate. Interestingly, activated T cells induced similar levels of expression on B cells of the activation antigens CD23, CD25 and CD71, and of class II molecules, irrespective of any treatment with soluble or immobilized anti-IgM antibody. This indicates that soluble anti-IgM specifically inhibits B-cell differentiation without altering initial events of T-cell-dependent B-cell activation. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7642212

  15. The role of somatic structure of the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis upon B cell activation in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, M F; Silva, C L

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we report an increase of the number of antibody-secreting cells and the augmentation of antibody production against unrelated antigens in mice infected with the fungus P. brasiliensis, as well as in mice inoculated with cell wall preparation isolated from P. brasiliensis (CW). The immunomodulatory effect of the live fungus and the CW preparation was dose-dependent, and their actions were mainly restricted to the i.v. or i.p. inoculation simultaneously with the sheep erythrocyte challenge by the i.v. route or restricted to i.p. inoculation of CW when bovine serum albumin (BSA) antigen was used. The dependence of antibody production on different routes of CW inoculation was correlated with the number of antigen-specific B cells in the spleen as determined by direct and reverse plaque-forming cell assays. The immunization schedules using CW preparation caused a preferential production of IgM and IgG3 antibodies. The results also showed that the hyperactive humoral immune response of mice induced by i.p. inoculation of CW was devoid of polyclonal B cell activation compared with the effects observed for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated groups. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis CW components may have potent immunological properties related to the non-specific B cell activation found in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:7648716

  16. Cutting Edge: DNase II deficiency prevents activation of autoreactive B cells by double-stranded DNA endogenous ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawaria, Sudesh; Moody, Krishna; Busto, Patricia; Nündel, Kerstin; Choi, Chee-Ho; Ghayur, Tariq; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2015-02-15

    In mice that fail to express the phagolysosomal endonuclease DNase II and the type I IFN receptor, excessive accrual of undegraded DNA results in a STING-dependent, TLR-independent inflammatory arthritis. These double-knockout (DKO) mice develop additional indications of systemic autoimmunity, including anti-nuclear autoantibodies and splenomegaly, that are not found in Unc93b1(3d/3d) DKO mice and, therefore, are TLR dependent. The DKO autoantibodies predominantly detect RNA-associated autoantigens, which are commonly targeted in TLR7-dominated systemic erythematosus lupus-prone mice. To determine whether an inability of TLR9 to detect endogenous DNA could explain the absence of dsDNA-reactive autoantibodies in DKO mice, we used a novel class of bifunctional autoantibodies, IgM/DNA dual variable domain Ig molecules, to activate B cells through a BCR/TLR9-dependent mechanism. DKO B cells could not respond to the IgM/DNA dual variable domain Ig molecule, despite a normal response to both anti-IgM and CpG ODN 1826. Thus, DKO B cells only respond to RNA-associated ligands because DNase II-mediated degradation of self-DNA is required for TLR9 activation.

  17. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  18. Interdomain regulation of the ATPase activity of the ABC transporter haemolysin B from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Sven; Poschmann, Gereon; Kanonenberg, Kerstin; Stühler, Kai; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-08-15

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) transport a wide range of substrates across both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are composed of an outer membrane protein, a membrane fusion protein and an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter. The ABC transporter HlyB (haemolysin B) is part of a T1SS catalysing the export of the toxin HlyA in E. coli HlyB consists of the canonical transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. Additionally, HlyB contains an N-terminal CLD (C39-peptidase-like domain) that interacts with the transport substrate, but its functional relevance is still not precisely defined. In the present paper, we describe the purification and biochemical characterization of detergent-solubilized HlyB in the presence of its transport substrate. Our results exhibit a positive co-operativity in ATP hydrolysis. We characterized further the influence of the CLD on kinetic parameters by using an HlyB variant lacking the CLD (HlyB∆CLD). The biochemical parameters of HlyB∆CLD revealed an increased basal maximum velocity but no change in substrate-binding affinity in comparison with full-length HlyB. We also assigned a distinct interaction of the CLD and a transport substrate (HlyA1), leading to an inhibition of HlyB hydrolytic activity at low HlyA1 concentrations. At higher HlyA1 concentrations, we observed a stimulation of the hydrolytic activities of both HlyB and HlyB∆CLD, which was completely independent of the interaction of HlyA1 with the CLD. Notably, all observed effects on ATPase activity, which were also analysed in detail by mass spectrometry, were independent of the HlyA1 secretion signal. These results assign an interdomain regulatory role for the CLD modulating the hydrolytic activity of HlyB. PMID:27279651

  19. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion. PMID:27609568

  20. B cells activated in lymph nodes in response to ultraviolet irradiation or by interleukin-10 inhibit dendritic cell induction of immunity.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Halliday, Gary M

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses systemic immunity. We explored these cellular mechanisms by exposing mice to systemically immunosuppressive doses of UV radiation and then analyzing cell phenotype and function in the lymphoid organs. Although UV radiation increased total cell number in the draining lymph nodes (DLN), it did not alter the activation state of dendritic cells (DC). Rather, UV radiation selectively activated lymph node B cells, with these cells being larger and expressing higher levels of both anti-major histocompatibility complex II and B220 but not co-stimulatory molecules. This phenotype resembled that of a B cell geared toward immune tolerance. To test whether UV radiation-activated B cells were responsible for immunosuppression, DC and B cells were conjugated to antigen ex vivo and transferred into naive hosts. Although DC by themselves activated T cells, when the B cells from UV radiation-irradiated mice were co-injected with DC, they suppressed DC activation of immunity. Interleukin (IL)-10-activated B cells also suppressed DC induction of immunity, suggesting that IL-10 may be involved in this suppressive effect of UV radiation. These results demonstrate a new mechanism of UV radiation immunosuppression whereby UV radiation activates B cells in the skin-DLN that can suppress DC activation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15737198

  1. Numerical analysis of a model of ligand-induced B-cell antigen-receptor clustering. Implications for simple models of B-cell activation in an immune network.

    PubMed

    Faro, J; Velasco, S

    1994-03-01

    B-cell activation driven by ligand-induced crosslinking of membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) is one of the most important processes in experimental and theoretical immunology. Although the activation of B cells through mIgs involves a complex series of intracellular processes, in immune network models it is usually assumed that there is a correlation between the degree of mIg crosslinking and the probability of B-cell activation. We explore the implications of this hypothesis by studying a model of ligand-induced B-cell receptor clustering proposed by Bell and further elaborated by Delisi and Perelson (BDP model). In this model, a critical time (tc) is defined at which the probability of infinite size complex formation (i.e., percolation) becomes non-zero. We use this variable, tc, as a means to characterize the degree of mIg crosslinking. To study the dependence of tc with respect to ligand valence, kinetic constants and ligand-receptor affinity x ligand concentration (K x C), we perform a systematic numerical study of the BDP model for parameter ranges including current empirical estimates for the kinetic constants. Concerning tc, we find that, for ranges of immunological interest (namely, those including current estimates of dissociation and receptor crosslinking rate constants), the curves obtained by plotting 1/tc vs. log(K x C) shift sensibly towards higher values of log(K x C), broadening and increasing its maximum amplitude, as the dissociation rate constant increases. As this finding suggests important consequences for immune network models, we further study the BDP model in an extended version for the case of two different ligands interacting simultaneously with a given B cell.3+

  2. Social Experiences of Beginning Braille Readers in Literacy Activities: Qualitative and Quantitative Findings of the ABC Braille Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Sharon Z.; Kamei-Hannan, Cheryl; Erin, Jane N.; Barclay, Lizbeth; Sitar, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    This mixed-design investigation examined the social experiences of beginning braille readers who were initially taught contracted or alphabetic braille in literacy activities as part of the ABC Braille Study. No differences in the quality or quantity of social experiences were found between the two groups over time. (Contains 4 tables.)

  3. The unexpected evolution of a case of diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Găman, Amelia; Bold, Adriana; Găman, G

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with a heterogeneous morphology, biology and clinical presentation. Gene expression profiling studies identified three distinct molecular subtypes of DLCBL arisen from B-cells at different stages of differentiation: germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). The most relevant oncogenic pathways in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are: deregulated B-cell receptor/proliferation signaling, BCL6 and NF-kB constitutive expression, defects in apoptosis and neoangiogenesis. The treatment of DLBCL has been completely modified in the last ten years by combination of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) and CHOP chemotherapy, which is now the first line therapy. In the last years, there have been reported several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) at patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with rituximab. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is possible as an adverse reaction to rituximab at patients treated with R-CHOP for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:21655667

  4. Modulation of Expression and Activity of ABC Transporters by the Phytoestrogen Genistein. Impact on Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in drug absorption, distribution and elimination. They also mediate multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Isoflavones, such as genistein (GNT), belong to a class of naturally-occurring compounds found at high concentrations in commonly consumed soya based-foods and dietary supplements. GNT and its metabolites interact with ABC transporters as substrates, inhibitors and/or modulators of their expression. This review compiles information about regulation of ABC transporters by GNT with special emphasis on the three major groups of ABC transporters involved in excretion of endo- and xenobiotics as follows: Pglycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1), a group of multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs, ABCC subfamily) and ABCG2 (BCRP), an ABC half-transporter. The impact of these regulations on potential GNT-drug interactions is further considered. PMID:27048380

  5. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  6. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  7. Production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early-developing B cells in a mouse model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Umiker, Benjamin R; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG antinuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG antinucleic acid Abs. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicda(tg) ), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here, we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early-developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early-developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation, contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early-developing B cells.

  8. Activation of human B cells by the agonist CD40 antibody CP-870,893 and augmentation with simultaneous toll-like receptor 9 stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L; Mick, Rosemarie; Rüter, Jens; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Background CD40 activation of antigen presenting cells (APC) such as dendritic cells (DC) and B cells plays an important role in immunological licensing of T cell immunity. Agonist CD40 antibodies have been previously shown in murine models to activate APC and enhance tumor immunity; in humans, CD40-activated DC and B cells induce tumor-specific T cells in vitro. Although clinical translation of these findings for patients with cancer has been previously limited due to the lack of a suitable and available drug, promising clinical results are now emerging from phase I studies of the agonist CD40 monoclonal antibody CP-870,893. The most prominent pharmacodynamic effect of CP-870,893 infusion is peripheral B cell modulation, but direct evidence of CP-870,893-mediated B cell activation and the potential impact on T cell reactivity has not been reported, despite increasing evidence that B cells, like DC, regulate cellular immunity. Methods Purified total CD19+ B cells, CD19+ CD27+ memory, or CD19+ CD27neg subsets from peripheral blood were stimulated in vitro with CP-870,893, in the presence or absence of the toll like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligand CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). B cell surface molecule expression and cytokine secretion were evaluated using flow cytometry. Activated B cells were used as stimulators in mixed lymphocyte reactions to evaluate their ability to induce allogeneic T cell responses. Results Incubation with CP-870,893 activated B cells, including both memory and naïve B cells, as demonstrated by upregulation of CD86, CD70, CD40, and MHC class I and II. CP-870,893-activated B cells induced T cell proliferation and T cell secretion of effector cytokines including IFN-gamma and IL-2. These effects were increased by TLR9 co-stimulation via a CpG ODN identical in sequence to a well-studied clinical grade reagent. Conclusion The CD40 mAb CP-870,893 activates both memory and naïve B cells and triggers their T cell stimulatory capacity. Simultaneous TLR9

  9. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of natural killer cells by BALL-1, a B cell lymphoma line.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, M; Yoshida, N; Seki, M; Okada, H; Takamura, S; Mihara, Y

    1998-04-01

    The anti-tumor activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) against various tumor cell line cells (K562, Daudi, KMG-2, and KATOIII) was enhanced by coculture with irradiated BALL-1, but not with other irradiated B cell line cells (NALM-1, Namalwa, and Daudi). PBMC cocultured with BALL-1, however, failed to exhibit evident cytotoxicity against autologous concanavalin A-induced lymphoblasts. The enhancement of the anti-tumor activity seemed not to be correlated with EBNA and HLA-DR expression on B cell line cells. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and lymphotoxin showed little or no suppression of the anti-tumor activity of PBMC treated with irradiated BALL-1. Furthermore, the culture supernatants of BALL-1 failed to enhance the anti-tumor activity of PBMC, suggesting no involvement of soluble factors in the induction of the anti-tumor activity. The anti-tumor activity of PBMC treated with BALL-1 was synergistically enhanced by an additional IL-2 stimulation. Periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde-fixed, but not ethanol- or acetone-fixed, BALL-1 could significantly enhance the anti-tumor activity. Furthermore, BALL-1-derived membrane fraction, but not that of Daudi, enhances the anti-tumor activity. It was thus suggested that some membrane glycoproteins on the cell surface of BALL-1 play a crucial role in the induction of the anti-tumor activity. By analysis using mAbs against human leukocytes, we found that depletion of CD11b, CD16, and CD56-positive cells resulted in decreased anti-tumor activity, suggesting that the main effector cells in the BALL-1-induced anti-tumor activity were natural killer (NK) cells. The present results thus raise the possibility that BALL-1, probably via membrane glycoproteins, modulates NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. PMID:9617349

  10. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter.

  11. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  12. Protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin selectively inhibits the growth of CD79 mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tara L; Tang, Huaping; Ratsch, Boris A; Enns, Andreas; Loo, Alice; Chen, Liqing; Lenz, Peter; Waters, Nigel J; Schuler, Walter; Dörken, Bernd; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Lenz, Georg; Stegmeier, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The ABC subtype of DLBCL is associated with constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, and oncogenic lesions have been identified in its regulators, including CARD11/CARMA1 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11), A20/TNFAIP3, and CD79A/B. In this study, we offer evidence of therapeutic potential for the selective PKC (protein kinase C) inhibitor sotrastaurin (STN) in preclinical models of DLBCL. A significant fraction of ABC DLBCL cell lines exhibited strong sensitivity to STN, and we found that the molecular nature of NF-κB pathway lesions predicted responsiveness. CD79A/B mutations correlated with STN sensitivity, whereas CARD11 mutations rendered ABC DLBCL cell lines insensitive. Growth inhibitory effects of PKC inhibition correlated with NF-κB pathway inhibition and were mediated by induction of G₁-phase cell-cycle arrest and/or cell death. We found that STN produced significant antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft model of CD79A/B-mutated DLBCL. Collectively, our findings offer a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of STN in ABC DLBCL patients who harbor CD79 mutations also illustrating the necessity to stratify DLBCL patients according to their genetic abnormalities.

  13. Microarray gene expression analysis of fixed archival tissue permits molecular classification and identification of potential therapeutic targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Howarth, Christopher; Wappett, Mark; Newton, Gillian; Lachel, Cynthia; Iqbal, Javeed; Pepper, Stuart; Byers, Richard; Chan, Wing John; Radford, John

    2012-01-01

    Refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has a poor prognosis. Novel drugs targeting the constitutively activated NF-κB pathway characteristic of ABC-DLBCL are promising, but evaluation depends on accurate activated B cell-like (ABC)/germinal center B cell-like (GCB) molecular classification. This is traditionally performed on gene microarray expression profiles of fresh biopsies, which are not routinely collected, or by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, which lacks reproducibility and classification accuracy. We explored the possibility of using routine archival FFPE tissue for gene microarray applications. We examined Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 gene expression profiles from paired archival FFPE and fresh-frozen tissues of 40 ABC/GCB-classified DLBCL cases to compare classification accuracy and test the potential for this approach to aid the discovery of therapeutic targets and disease classifiers in DLBCL. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of unselected present probe sets distinguished ABC/GCB in FFPE with remarkable accuracy, and a Bayesian classifier correctly assigned 32 of 36 cases with >90% probability. Enrichment for NF-κB genes was appropriately seen in ABC-DLBCL FFPE tissues. The top discriminatory genes expressed in FFPE separated cases with high statistical significance and contained novel biology with potential therapeutic insights, warranting further investigation. These results support a growing understanding that archival FFPE tissues can be used in microarray experiments aimed at molecular classification, prognostic biomarker discovery, and molecular exploration of rare diseases.

  14. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity.

  15. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-09-27

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. PMID:7524079

  16. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7524079

  17. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents. PMID:26158513

  18. Spatial coupling of JNK activation to the B cell antigen receptor by tyrosine-phosphorylated ezrin1

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Neetha; Enyindah-Asonye, Gospel; Bagheri, Nayer; Shah, Neilay B.; Gupta, Neetu

    2013-01-01

    The Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins regulate B lymphocyte activation via their effect on BCR diffusion and microclustering. This relies on their ability to dynamically tether the plasma membrane with actin filaments that is in turn facilitated by phosphorylation of the conserved threonine residue in the actin-binding domain. Here, we describe a novel function of ezrin in regulating JNK activation that is mediated by phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y353) residue that is unconserved with moesin and radixin. BCR, but not CD40, TLR4 or CXCR5 stimulation, induced phosphorylation of ezrin at Y353 in mouse splenic B cells. Ezrin existed in a preformed complex with Syk in unstimulated B cells and underwent Syk-dependent phosphorylation upon anti-IgM stimulation. Y353-phosphorylated ezrin co-localized with the BCR within minutes of stimulation and co-trafficked with the endocytosed BCRs through the early and late endosomes. The T567 residue of ezrin was rephosphorylated in late endosomes and at the plasma membrane at later times of BCR stimulation. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable Y353F mutant of ezrin specifically impaired JNK activation. BCR crosslinking induced the association of Y353-phosphorylated ezrin with JNK and its kinase MKK7, and spatial co-localization with phosphorylated JNK in the endosomes. The YFP-tagged Y353F mutant displayed reduced co-localization with the endocytosed BCR as compared to wild type Ezrin-YFP. Taken together, our data identify a novel role for ezrin as a spatial adaptor that couples JNK signaling components to the BCR signalosome, thus facilitating JNK activation. PMID:23338238

  19. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents. PMID:26158513

  20. A Gene Panel, Including LRP12, Is Frequently Hypermethylated in Major Types of B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Nicole; Honne, Hilde; Andresen, Kim; Hilden, Vera; Trøen, Gunhild; Liestøl, Knut; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Lind, Guro E.; Smeland, Erlend B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications and DNA methylation in particular, have been recognized as important mechanisms to alter gene expression in malignant cells. Here, we identified candidate genes which were upregulated after an epigenetic treatment of B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Burkitt's lymphoma, BL; Follicular lymphoma, FL; Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, DLBCL activated B-cell like, ABC; and germinal center like, GCB) and simultaneously expressed at low levels in samples from lymphoma patients. Qualitative methylation analysis of 24 candidate genes in cell lines revealed five methylated genes (BMP7, BMPER, CDH1, DUSP4 and LRP12), which were further subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in clinical samples from 59 lymphoma patients (BL, FL, DLBCL ABC and GCB; and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, PMBL). The genes LRP12 and CDH1 showed the highest methylation frequencies (94% and 92%, respectively). BMPER (58%), DUSP4 (32%) and BMP7 (22%), were also frequently methylated in patient samples. Importantly, all gene promoters were unmethylated in various control samples (CD19+ peripheral blood B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tonsils) as well as in follicular hyperplasia samples, underscoring a high specificity. The combination of LRP12 and CDH1 methylation could successfully discriminate between the vast majority of the lymphoma and control samples, emphasized by receiver operating characteristic analysis with a c-statistic of 0.999. These two genes represent promising epigenetic markers which may be suitable for monitoring of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25226156

  1. A gene panel, including LRP12, is frequently hypermethylated in major types of B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bethge, Nicole; Honne, Hilde; Andresen, Kim; Hilden, Vera; Trøen, Gunhild; Liestøl, Knut; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Lind, Guro E; Smeland, Erlend B

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications and DNA methylation in particular, have been recognized as important mechanisms to alter gene expression in malignant cells. Here, we identified candidate genes which were upregulated after an epigenetic treatment of B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Burkitt's lymphoma, BL; Follicular lymphoma, FL; Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, DLBCL activated B-cell like, ABC; and germinal center like, GCB) and simultaneously expressed at low levels in samples from lymphoma patients. Qualitative methylation analysis of 24 candidate genes in cell lines revealed five methylated genes (BMP7, BMPER, CDH1, DUSP4 and LRP12), which were further subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in clinical samples from 59 lymphoma patients (BL, FL, DLBCL ABC and GCB; and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, PMBL). The genes LRP12 and CDH1 showed the highest methylation frequencies (94% and 92%, respectively). BMPER (58%), DUSP4 (32%) and BMP7 (22%), were also frequently methylated in patient samples. Importantly, all gene promoters were unmethylated in various control samples (CD19+ peripheral blood B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tonsils) as well as in follicular hyperplasia samples, underscoring a high specificity. The combination of LRP12 and CDH1 methylation could successfully discriminate between the vast majority of the lymphoma and control samples, emphasized by receiver operating characteristic analysis with a c-statistic of 0.999. These two genes represent promising epigenetic markers which may be suitable for monitoring of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25226156

  2. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Regulates the Activation of Gene Rearrangements at the λ Light Chain Locus in Precursor B Cells in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Gemma M.; Middendorp, Sabine; Dahlenborg, Katarina; Maas, Alex; Grosveld, Frank; Hendriks, Rudolf W.

    2001-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase involved in precursor B (pre-B) cell receptor signaling. Here we demonstrate that Btk-deficient mice have an ∼50% reduction in the frequency of immunoglobulin (Ig) λ light chain expression, already at the immature B cell stage in the bone marrow. Conversely, transgenic mice expressing the activated mutant BtkE41K showed increased λ usage. As the κ/λ ratio is dependent on (a) the level and kinetics of κ and λ locus activation, (b) the life span of pre-B cells, and (c) the extent of receptor editing, we analyzed the role of Btk in these processes. Enforced expression of the Bcl-2 apoptosis inhibitor did not alter the Btk dependence of λ usage. Crossing 3-83μδ autoantibody transgenic mice into Btk-deficient mice showed that Btk is not essential for receptor editing. Also, Btk-deficient surface Ig+ B cells that were generated in vitro in interleukin 7-driven bone marrow cultures manifested reduced λ usage. An intrinsic defect in λ locus recombination was further supported by the finding in Btk-deficient mice of reduced λ usage in the fraction of pre-B cells that express light chains in their cytoplasm. These results implicate Btk in the regulation of the activation of the λ locus for V(D)J recombination in pre-B cells. PMID:11369788

  3. A Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline antigen induces polyclonal B-cell activation of normal murine spleen cells by T-cell-independent, BCR-directed stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Zuñiga, E; Minoprio, P; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported that a cytosolic alkaline fraction (FI) obtained from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi promotes the activation, proliferation and differentiation of normal murine B cells into antibody-secreting plasmocytes. Neither the mechanism nor the cells involved in the FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation were established. In this work we report that accessory cells are required for FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation as no proliferative responses were obtained following treatment of normal spleen mononuclear cells (NSMC) with L-leucine methyl ester. Furthermore, FI did not induce the expression of CD25 on T cells and it promoted the proliferation of a T-cell-depleted population, indicating that it acts in a T-independent manner. We observed that NSMC were stimulated in vitro by FI-released cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and IL-10, which are involved in B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, while significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were found in culture supernatants we did not observe detectable levels of IL-2. Additionally, we found that B-cell receptor (BCR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens were involved in the proliferative response induced by FI because antibodies directed against cell-surface immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD45 and MHC class II molecules inhibited the FI-induced B-cell proliferation. CD40 ligand (CD40L) did not participate in such a phenomenon.

  4. CD22 associates with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C, Syk, and phospholipase C-gamma(1) upon B cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cross-linking B cell antigen receptor (BCR) elicits early signal transduction events, including activation of protein tyrosine kinases, phosphorylation of receptor components, activation of phospholipase C- gamma (PLC-gamma), and increases in intracellular free Ca2+. In this article, we report that cross-linking the BCR led to a rapid translocation of cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1C to the particulate fraction, where it became associated with a 140-150-kD tyrosyl-phosphorylated protein. Western blotting analysis identified this 140-150-kD protein to be CD22. The association of PTP-1C with CD22 was mediated by the NH2-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of PTP-1C. Complexes of either CD22/PTP-1C/Syk/PLC-gamma(1) could be isolated from B cells stimulated by BCR engagement or a mixture of hydrogen peroxidase and sodium orthovanadate, respectively. The binding of PLC- gamma(1) and Syk to tyrosyl-phosphorylated CD22 was mediated by the NH2- terminal SH2 domain of PLC-gamma(1) and the COOH-terminal SH2 domain of Syk, respectively. These observations suggest that tyrosyl- phosphorylated CD22 may downmodulate the activity of this complex by dephosphorylation of CD22, Syk, and/or PLC-gamma(1). Transient expression of CD22 and a null mutant of PTP-1C (PTP-1CM) in COS cells resulted in an increase in tyrosyl phosphorylation of CD22 and its interaction with PTP-1CM. By contrast, CD22 was not tyrosyl phosphorylated or associated with PTP-1CM in the presence of wild-type PTP-1C. These results suggest that tyrosyl-phosphorylated CD22 may be a substrate for PTP-1C regulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of CD22. PMID:8627166

  5. TRPC3 amplifies B-cell receptor-induced ERK signalling via protein kinase D-dependent Rap1 activation.

    PubMed

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Nishida, Motohiro; Putney, James W; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-15

    Sustained activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has an important role in the decision regarding the cell fate of B-lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated that the diacylglycerol-activated non-selective cation channel canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) is required for the sustained ERK activation induced by the B-cell receptor. However, the signalling mechanism underlying TRPC3-mediated ERK activation remains elusive. In the present study, we have shown that TRPC3 mediates Ca(2+) influx to sustain activation of protein kinase D (PKD) in a protein kinase C-dependent manner in DT40 B-lymphocytes. The later phase of ERK activation depends on the small G-protein Rap1, known as a downstream target of PKD, whereas the earlier phase of ERK activation depends on the Ras protein. It is of interest that sustained ERK phosphorylation is required for the full induction of the immediate early gene Egr-1 (early growth response 1). These results suggest that TRPC3 reorganizes the BCR signalling complex by switching the subtype of small G-proteins to sustain ERK activation in B-lymphocytes.

  6. Activity of the type II JAK2 inhibitor CHZ868 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Li, Loretta S.; Kopp, Nadja; Montero, Joan; Chapuy, Bjoern; Yoda, Akinori; Christie, Amanda L.; Liu, Huiyun; Christodoulou, Alexandra; van Bodegom, Diederik; van der Zwet, Jordy; Layer, Jacob V.; Tivey, Trevor; Lane, Andrew A.; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Ng, Samuel Y.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Stone, Richard M.; Steensma, David; Wadleigh, Martha; Harris, Marian; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Sterker, Dario; Zender, Michael; Rodig, Scott J.; Murakami, Masato; Hofmann, Francesco; Kuo, Frank; Eck, Michael J.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Letai, Anthony; Baffert, Fabienne; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Radimerski, Thomas; Gaul, Christoph; Weinstock, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A variety of cancers depend on JAK2 signaling, including the high-risk subset of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs) with CRLF2 rearrangements. Type I JAK2 inhibitors induce paradoxical JAK2 hyperphosphorylation in these leukemias and have limited activity. To improve the efficacy of JAK2 inhibition in B-ALL, we developed the type II inhibitor CHZ868, which stabilizes JAK2 in an inactive conformation. CHZ868 potently suppressed the growth of CRLF2-rearranged human B-ALL cells, abrogated JAK2 signaling, and improved survival in mice with human or murine B-ALL. CHZ868 and dexamethasone synergistically induced apoptosis in JAK2-dependent B-ALLs and further improved in vivo survival compared to CHZ868 alone. These data support the testing of type II JAK2 inhibition in patients with JAK2-dependent leukemias and other disorders. PMID:26175414

  7. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  8. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Eloy F.; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V.; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M.; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  9. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eloy F; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2016-06-14

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas.

  10. Jacalin, an IgA-binding lectin, inhibits differentiation of human B cells by both a direct effect and by activating T-suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Saxon, A; Tsui, F; Martinez-Maza, O

    1987-01-01

    Jacalin, a lectin extracted from the seeds of Artocarpus intergifolia (jackfruit), has been reported to bind specifically to IgA while inducing B-cell polyclonal immunoglobulin secretion. We confirmed that jacalin only binds to IgA and not to IgG or IgM and extended these findings by showing that it does not bind to IgE. Addition of jacalin to either unfractioned peripheral blood lymphocytes or purified B cells failed to induce immunoglobulin synthesis; indeed immunoglobulin production was diminished in the presence of jacalin. We found that jacalin directly inhibited the induction of immunoglobulin synthesis from B cells in the presence of T-cell replacing factor. Cell lines making IgG, IgM, and IgA were inhibited by jacalin. Furthermore, T cells incubated with jacalin also inhibited immunoglobulin production by stimulated B cells. Under these conditions jacalin was found to be a potent mitogen for T cells but to induce little or no activation of B cells. Jacalin appears to be a potent T-cell mitogen which can induce suppressor T cells for Ig production. It also has a direct inhibitory effect on B-cell Ig production.

  11. Novel activating JAK2 mutation in a patient with Down syndrome and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinge, Sebastien; Ben-Abdelali, Raouf; Settegrana, Catherine; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Debre, Marianne; Beldjord, Kheira; Macintyre, Elizabeth A; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Vainchenker, William; Berger, Roland; Bernard, Olivier A; Delabesse, Eric; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie

    2007-03-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase genes is a frequent event in human hematologic malignancies. Because gene activation could be associated with gene dysregulation, we attempted to screen for activating gene mutation based on high-level gene expression. We focused our study on the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene in 90 cases of acute leukemia. This strategy led to the identification of a novel JAK2-acquired mutation in a patient with Down syndrome (DS) with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). This mutation involves a 5-amino acid deletion within the JH2 pseudokinase domain (JAK2DeltaIREED). Expression of JAK2DeltaIREED in Ba/F3 cells induced constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway and growth factor-independent cell proliferation. These results highlight the JAK2 pseudokinase domain as an oncogenic hot spot and indicate that activation of the JAK-STAT pathway may contribute to lymphoid malignancies and hematologic disorders observed in children with DS.

  12. Complement receptor 2, natural antibodies and innate immunity: Inter-relationships in B cell selection and activation.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael; Kulik, Liudmila

    2007-01-01

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2) is a receptor that serves as an important interface between the complement system and adaptive immunity. Recent studies have shown that CR2 is also centrally involved in innate immunity, and one key area is the development of potentially pathogenic natural antibodies that target neo-epitopes revealed in ischemic tissue undergoing reperfusion. Mice lacking either total immunoglobulins or CR2 alone are protected from the development of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and this effect can be reversed by introducing CR2-sufficient B-1 cells or by transferring polyclonal natural IgM antibody from wild type mice as well as monoclonal antibodies that recognize phospholipids, DNA or non-muscle myosin. We will report at the XXI ICW an additional membrane-associated protein to which pathogenic IgM antibodies are directed. Whether B cells producing these natural antibodies are differentially selected in CR2-deficient mice is as yet not well understood, and the complement-related mechanism(s) whereby this differential repertoire selection process could occur have yet to be explored in any detail. In addition to this important role in innate immunity, CR2 can also act as a receptor for other components or activators of innate immunity. One such component is interferon-alpha, an anti-viral cytokine that binds CR2 and induces a component of its mRNA signature in B cells through this receptor. Other potential CR2 ligands are DNA and DNA-containing complexes such as chromatin. The biologic role of these CR2 interactions with interferon-alpha and DNA-containing complexes is not well understood, but may be important in the development of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus that is characterized by enhanced interferon-alpha levels and loss of self tolerance to DNA-containing self antigens. PMID:16876864

  13. Memory B cells from older people express normal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 upon in vitro activation

    PubMed Central

    Bancos, Simona; Phipps, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide the elderly population is increasing. The elderly show deficiencies in immune function. B lymphocytes are essential elements of the immune system responsible for antibody production. This laboratory previously showed that activated human B cells isolated from young adults express cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and that Cox-2 is essential for optimal antibody responses. Recent data suggests that Cox-2 expression decreases with age in mouse bone tissue. There is no information regarding Cox-2 expression in B cells from older human subjects. We investigated the expression and activity of Cox-2 in naïve and memory B cells from older people. We show that B cells from older subjects show similar Cox-2 protein expression and activity, antibody production and proliferation compared to younger people. However, we found that activated memory B cells from older people produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to young adults. Therefore, the dysregulated cytokine production could contribute to immune senescence in the elderly. PMID:20889146

  14. Memory B cells from older people express normal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 upon in vitro activation.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Simona; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide the elderly population is increasing. The elderly show deficiencies in immune function. B lymphocytes are essential elements of the immune system responsible for antibody production. This laboratory previously showed that activated human B cells isolated from young adults express cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and that Cox-2 is essential for optimal antibody responses. Recent data suggests that Cox-2 expression decreases with age in mouse bone tissue. There is no information regarding Cox-2 expression in B cells from older human subjects. We investigated the expression and activity of Cox-2 in naïve and memory B cells from older people. We show that B cells from older subjects show similar Cox-2 protein expression and activity, antibody production and proliferation compared to younger people. However, we found that activated memory B cells from older people produce higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 compared to young adults. Therefore, the dysregulated cytokine production could contribute to immune senescence in the elderly.

  15. Coriolus versicolor mushroom polysaccharides exert immunoregulatory effects on mouse B cells via membrane Ig and TLR-4 to activate the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-fa; Zhuang, Tai-feng; Si, Yan-mei; Qi, Ke-yan; Zhao, Juan

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the immunopotentiating effects and immune receptors for Coriolus versicolor mushroom polysaccharides (CVP), a Chinese medicinal fungus that exerts anti-tumor activities by enhancing host immunity. Proliferation assays were used to determine whether CVP could activate splenocytes. Flow cytometry analysis and IgM and IgG detection were used to characterize CVP-binding cells. Immune receptors were analyzed in immunoprecipitation and western blot assays. The downstream signaling pathways were identified by western blotting or immunostaining. CVP significantly stimulated the proliferation of mouse splenocytes. Fluorescence-labeled CVP (fl-CVP) selectively stained mouse B cells, but not T cells. CVP induced the production of IgM and IgG1 with or without exogenous IL-4. Membrane Ig (B cell antigen-receptor, BCR) was identified as a CVP-binding protein in immunoprecipitation and western blot experiments. CVP-induced B cell proliferation could be significantly inhibited by anti-mouse immunoglobulin (Ig) blocking antibody (Fab) or in cells from TLR4-mutant mice (C3H/HeJ). Phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and p38 MAPK were clearly increased in a time-dependent manner, as was the nuclear translocation of the cytosolic NF-κB p65 subunit after CVP stimulation. Together, we demonstrate that CVP can bind and induce B cell activation using membrane Ig and TLR-4 as potential immune receptors. CVP activates mouse B cells through the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  16. [Regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu

    2015-01-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in clinical research using human samples. PMID:26725860

  17. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  18. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  19. The frequency of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cell subsets dictates the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine against prescription opioid abuse

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, Megan; Baruffaldi, Federico; Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Distefano, Mark D; Titcombe, Philip J; Mueller, Daniel L; Tubo, Noah J; Griffith, Thomas S; Pravetoni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Translation of therapeutic vaccines for addiction, cancer or other chronic non-communicable diseases has been slow because only a small subset of immunized subjects achieved effective antibody levels. We hypothesize that individual variability in the number of naïve and early-activated hapten-specific B cells determines post-vaccination serum antibody levels and vaccine efficacy. Using a model vaccine against the highly abused prescription opioid oxycodone, the polyclonal B cell population specific for an oxycodone-based hapten (6OXY) was analyzed by flow cytometry paired with antigen-based magnetic enrichment. A higher frequency of 6OXY-specific B cells in either spleen biopsies or blood, before and after immunization, correlated to subsequent greater oxycodone-specific serum antibody titers and their efficacy in blocking oxycodone distribution to the brain and oxycodone-induced behavior in mice. The magnitude of 6OXY-specific B cell activation and vaccine efficacy was tightly correlated to the size of the CD4+ T cell population. The frequency of enriched 6OXY-specific B cells was consistent across various mouse tissues. These data provide novel evidence that variations in the frequency of naïve or early-activated vaccine-specific B and T cells can account for individual responses to vaccines and may predict the clinical efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine. PMID:25972483

  20. Analysis of the apoptotic and therapeutic activities of histone deacetylase inhibitors by using a mouse model of B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, R. K.; Newbold, A.; Whitecross, K. F.; Cluse, L. A.; Frew, A. J.; Ellis, L.; Williams, S.; Wiegmans, A. P.; Dear, A. E.; Scott, C. L.; Pellegrini, M.; Wei, A.; Richon, V. M.; Marks, Paul A.; Lowe, S. W.; Smyth, M. J.; Johnstone, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can elicit a range of biological responses that affect tumor growth and survival, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of tumor cell-selective apoptosis, suppression of angiogenesis, and modulation of immune responses, and show promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials. Using the Eμ-myc model of B cell lymphoma, we screened tumors with defined genetic alterations in apoptotic pathways for therapeutic responsiveness to the HDACi vorinostat. We demonstrated a direct correlation between induction of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo and therapeutic efficacy. Vorinostat did not require p53 activity or a functional death receptor pathway to kill Eμ-myc lymphomas and mediate a therapeutic response but depended on activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway with the proapoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim playing an important role. Our studies provide important information regarding the mechanisms of action of HDACi that have broad implications regarding stratification of patients receiving HDACi therapy alone or in combination with other anticancer agents. PMID:17470784

  1. Sodium periodate-induced human suppressor cells for polyclonal B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M

    1982-09-01

    Sodium periodate (SP) induces proliferation of mature T cells. In this study, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) pretreated for 10 minutes at room temperature with increasing concentrations (0.1 to 5 mM) of SP before culture for 7 days in the presence of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IgG production, contrasting with an increase in 3H-thymidine uptake. When MNC from 70 normal individuals were pretreated with 1 and 2 mM SP, IgG production in culture was suppressed by 46.8 +/- 4.5% and 60.4 +/- 4.4% (mean +/- S.E.M.), respectively, as compared to IgG synthesis in the presence of PWM alone. Longitudinal studies of MNC obtained from the same normal individuals over 6-10 months showed similar degrees of suppression, indicating that the level of SP-inducible suppressor cell activity remains relatively constant, although the degree of suppression varies among normal persons. Both T cells and monocytes were required for PWM-driven IgG production and for SP-induced suppression. A soluble factor elaborated by SP-treated monocytes was also able to suppress IgG production. This model should provide useful information about abnormal regulation of IgG synthesis in various pathological conditions. PMID:6290661

  2. Viral Double-Stranded RNA Triggers Ig Class Switching by Activating Upper Respiratory Mucosa B Cells through an Innate TLR3 Pathway Involving BAFF1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A.; Matthews, Allysia J.; Chiu, April; Plebani, Alessandro; He, Bing; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) from IgM to IgG and IgA is crucial for antiviral immunity. Follicular B cells undergo CSR upon engagement of CD40 by CD40 ligand on CD4+ T cells. This T cell-dependent pathway requires 5–7 days, which is too much of a delay to block quickly replicating pathogens. To compensate for this limitation, extrafollicular B cells rapidly undergo CSR through a T cell-independent pathway that involves innate Ag receptors of the TLR family. We found that a subset of upper respiratory mucosa B cells expressed TLR3 and responded to viral dsRNA, a cognate TLR3 ligand. In the presence of dsRNA, mucosal B cells activated NF-κB, a transcription factor critical for CSR. Activation of NF-κB required TRIF (Toll/IL-1R domain-containing protein inducing IFN-β), a canonical TLR3 adapter protein, and caused germline transcription of downstream CH genes as well as expression of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), a DNA-editing enzyme essential for CSR. Subsequent IgG and IgA production was enhanced by BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the TNF family), an innate mediator released by TLR3-expressing mucosal dendritic cells. Indeed, these innate immune cells triggered IgG and IgA responses upon exposure to dsRNA. By showing active TLR3 signaling and ongoing CSR in upper respiratory mucosa B cells from patients with CD40 signaling defects, our findings indicate that viral dsRNA may initiate frontline IgG and IgA responses through an innate TLR3-dependent pathway involving BAFF. PMID:18566393

  3. Cutting Edge: IL-4, IL-21, and IFN-γ Interact To Govern T-bet and CD11c Expression in TLR-Activated B Cells.

    PubMed

    Naradikian, Martin S; Myles, Arpita; Beiting, Daniel P; Roberts, Kenneth J; Dawson, Lucas; Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Bengsch, Bertram; Linderman, Susanne L; Stelekati, Erietta; Spolski, Rosanne; Wherry, E John; Hunter, Christopher; Hensley, Scott E; Leonard, Warren J; Cancro, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    T-bet and CD11c expression in B cells is linked with IgG2c isotype switching, virus-specific immune responses, and humoral autoimmunity. However, the activation requisites and regulatory cues governing T-bet and CD11c expression in B cells remain poorly defined. In this article, we reveal a relationship among TLR engagement, IL-4, IL-21, and IFN-γ that regulates T-bet expression in B cells. We find that IL-21 or IFN-γ directly promote T-bet expression in the context of TLR engagement. Further, IL-4 antagonizes T-bet induction. Finally, IL-21, but not IFN-γ, promotes CD11c expression independent of T-bet. Using influenza virus and Heligmosomoides polygyrus infections, we show that these interactions function in vivo to determine whether T-bet(+) and CD11c(+) B cells are formed. These findings suggest that T-bet(+) B cells seen in health and disease share the common initiating features of TLR-driven activation within this circumscribed cytokine milieu.

  4. A lymphocyte-specific CC chemokine, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC), is a highly efficient chemoattractant for B cells and activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Nagira, M; Imai, T; Yoshida, R; Takagi, S; Iwasaki, M; Baba, M; Tabira, Y; Akagi, J; Nomiyama, H; Yoshie, O

    1998-05-01

    Secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) is a CC chemokine expressed mainly in lymph nodes, appendix and spleen, and specifically chemotactic for lymphocytes (Nagira et al., J. Biol. Chem. 1997. 272: 19518-19524). Here, we carried out transendothelial migration assays to determine the classes and subsets of lymphocytes migrating toward SLC. SLC attracted freshly isolated B cells with high efficiency and T cells modestly. Thus, SLC is the first CC chemokine with a strong chemotactic activity on fresh B cells. Among T cell types and subsets, SLC broadly attracted CD4+ and CD8+ cells, CD45RO- (naive) and CD45RO+ (memory) cells, and CD26high (activated) and CD26low- (resting) cells. SLC also attracted both L-selectin+ and L-selectin- subpopulations of various T cell subsets and B cells. Furthermore, mitogenic stimulation strongly enhanced migratory responses of T cells and B cells toward SLC. By in situ hybridization, SLC mRNA was detected in the cortical parafollicular regions (the T cell areas) of a lymph node and an appendix. Collectively, SLC may be a basic chemokine supporting homeostatic migration of a broad spectrum of lymphocytes into the secondary lymphoid tissues. SLC may also be involved in immune responses by inducing highly efficient migration of T and B cells following antigenic stimulation.

  5. Pioneering Activity of the C-Terminal Domain of EBF1 Shapes the Chromatin Landscape for B Cell Programming.

    PubMed

    Boller, Sören; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Akbas, Duygu; Nechanitzky, Robert; Burger, Lukas; Murr, Rabih; Schübeler, Dirk; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-03-15

    Lymphopoiesis requires the activation of lineage-specific genes embedded in naive, inaccessible chromatin or in primed, accessible chromatin. The mechanisms responsible for de novo gain of chromatin accessibility, known as "pioneer" function, remain poorly defined. Here, we showed that the EBF1 C-terminal domain (CTD) is required for the regulation of a specific gene set involved in B cell fate decision and differentiation, independently of activation and repression functions. Using genome-wide analysis of DNaseI hypersensitivity and DNA methylation in multipotent Ebf1(-/-) progenitors and derivative EBF1wt- or EBF1ΔC-expressing cells, we found that the CTD promoted chromatin accessibility and DNA demethylation in previously naive chromatin. The CTD allowed EBF1 to bind at inaccessible genomic regions that offer limited co-occupancy by other transcription factors, whereas the CTD was dispensable for EBF1 binding at regions that are occupied by multiple transcription factors. Thus, the CTD enables EBF1 to confer permissive lineage-specific changes in progenitor chromatin landscape. PMID:26982363

  6. SMI of Bcl-2 TW-37 is active across a spectrum of B-cell tumors irrespective of their proliferative and differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Al-Katib, Ayad M; Sun, Yuan; Goustin, Anton Scott; Azmi, Asfar Sohail; Chen, Ben; Aboukameel, Amro; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2009-02-16

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins is critical to the life and death of malignant B-lymphocytes. Interfering with their activity using small-molecule inhibitors (SMI) is being explored as a new therapeutic strategy for treating B-cell tumors. We evaluated the efficacy of TW-37, a non-peptidic SMI of Bcl-2 against a range spectrum of human B-cell lines, fresh patient samples and animal xenograft models. Multiple cytochemical and molecular approaches such as acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay for apoptosis, co-immunoprecipitation of complexes and western blot analysis, caspase luminescent activity assay and apoptotic DNA fragmentation assay were used to demonstrate the effect of TW-37 on different B-cell lines, patient derived samples, as well as in animal xenograft models. Nanomolar concentrations of TW-37 were able to induce apoptosis in both fresh samples and established cell lines with IC50 in most cases of 165-320 nM. Apoptosis was independent of proliferative status or pathological classification of B-cell tumor. TW-37 was able to block Bim-Bcl-XL and Bim-Mcl-1 heterodimerization and induced apoptosis via activation of caspases -9, -3, PARP and DNA fragmentation. TW-37 administered to tumor-bearing SCID mice led to significant tumor growth inhibition (T/C), tumor growth delay (T-C) and Log10kill, when used at its maximum tolerated dose (40 mg/kg x 3 days) via tail vein. TW-37 failed to induce changes in the Bcl-2 proteins levels suggesting that assessment of baseline Bcl-2 family proteins can be used to predict response to the drug. These findings indicate activity of TW-37 across the spectrum of human B-cell tumors and support the concept of targeting the Bcl-2 system as a therapeutic strategy regardless of the stage of B-cell differentiation.

  7. B lymphocyte binding to E- and P-selectins is mediated through the de novo expression of carbohydrates on in vitro and in vivo activated human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, A A; Marazuela, M; Sánchez-Madrid, F; de Landázuri, M O

    1994-01-01

    Cell adhesion to endothelium regulates the trafficking and recruitment of leukocytes towards lymphoid organs and sites of inflammation. This phenomenon is mediated by the expression of a number of adhesion molecules on both the endothelium and circulating cells. Activation of endothelial cells (EC) with different stimuli induces the expression of several adhesion molecules (E- and P-selectins, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), involved in their interaction with circulating cells. In this report, we have studied the binding of nonactivated and activated B cells to purified E- and P-selectins. Activated but not resting B cells were able to interact with both selectins. This binding capacity of activated B cells paralleled the induction of different carbohydrate epitopes (Lewisx, sialyl-Lewisx, CD57 and CDw65) as well as other molecules bearing these or related epitopes in myeloid cells (L-selectin, alpha L beta 2 and alpha X beta 2 integrins, and CD35) involved in the interaction of different cell types with selectins. B cells infiltrating inflamed tissues like in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, also expressed these selectin-binding carbohydrates in parallel with the expression of E-selectin by surrounding follicular dendritic cells. Moreover, the crosslinking of these selectin-binding epitopes resulted in an increased binding of B cells to different integrin ligands. Thus, in addition to the involvement of integrins, E- and P-selectins could play an important role in the interaction of B lymphocytes with the endothelium during B cell extravasation into lymphoid tissues and inflammatory foci as well as in their organization into lymphoid organs. Images PMID:7523454

  8. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; and others

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys{sup 38} to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. - Highlights: • Current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. • Piperlongumine inhibits NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import via directly binding to p65. • Piperlongumine selectively inhibits proliferation of ABC-DLBCL cells. • This study provides a novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy.

  9. Transient expression of Bcl6 is sufficient for oncogenic function and induction of mature B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael R; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Liu, Chih Long; Dai, Bo; González-Herrero, Inés; García-Ramírez, Idoia; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Blanco, Oscar; Jiménez, Rafael; Martínez-Climent, Jose Angel; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lossos, Izidore S; Majeti, Ravindra; Melnick, Ari; Cobaleda, César; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma and can be separated into two subtypes based upon molecular features with similarities to germinal center B-cells (GCB-like) or activated B-cells (ABC-like). Here we identify gain of 3q27.2 as being significantly associated with adverse outcome in DLBCL and linked with the ABC-like subtype. This lesion includes the BCL6 oncogene, but does not alter BCL6 transcript levels or target-gene repression. Separately, we identify expression of BCL6 in a subset of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We therefore hypothesize that BCL6 may act by hit-and-run oncogenesis. We model this by transiently expressing Bcl6 within murine HSPCs, and find it causes mature B-cell lymphomas that lack Bcl6 expression and target-gene repression, are transcriptionally similar to post-GCB cells, and show epigenetic changes that are conserved from HSPCs to mature B-cells. Together these results suggest that Bcl6 may function in a hit-and-run role in lymphomagenesis. PMID:24887457

  10. Transient expression of Bcl6 is sufficient for oncogenic function and induction of mature B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Long Liu, Chih; Dai, Bo; González-Herrero, Inés; García-Ramírez, Idoia; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Blanco, Oscar; Jiménez, Rafael; Martínez-Climent, Jose Angel; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lossos, Izidore S; Majeti, Ravindra; Melnick, Ari; Cobaleda, César; Alizadeh, Ash A; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2014-06-02

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma and can be separated into two subtypes based upon molecular features with similarities to germinal centre B-cells (GCB-like) or activated B-cells (ABC-like). Here we identify gain of 3q27.2 as being significantly associated with adverse outcome in DLBCL and linked with the ABC-like subtype. This lesion includes the BCL6 oncogene, but does not alter BCL6 transcript levels or target-gene repression. Separately, we identify expression of BCL6 in a subset of human haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We therefore hypothesize that BCL6 may act by 'hit-and-run' oncogenesis. We model this hit-and-run mechanism by transiently expressing Bcl6 within murine HSPCs, and find that it causes mature B-cell lymphomas that lack Bcl6 expression and target-gene repression, are transcriptionally similar to post-GCB cells, and show epigenetic changes that are conserved from HSPCs to mature B-cells. Together, these results suggest that BCL6 may function in a 'hit-and-run' role in lymphomagenesis.

  11. Decreased B cell activating factor receptor expression on peripheral lymphocytes associated with increased disease activity in primary Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sellam, Jérémie; Miceli‐Richard, Corinne; Gottenberg, Jacques‐Eric; Ittah, Marc; Lavie, Frédéric; Lacabaratz, Christine; Gestermann, Nicolas; Proust, Alexis; Lambotte, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyse B cell activating factor (BAFF) receptor (BAFF‐R) expression on peripheral lymphocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients and methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 patients with pSS, 19 patients with SLE and 15 controls were examined by flow cytometry to investigate BAFF‐R mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) on lymphocytes. BAFF‐R mRNA level from isolated blood B cells of nine patients with pSS and eight controls was assessed by real‐time quantitative reverse transcription‐PCR. BAFF serum level was determined by ELISA. Results In all subjects, BAFF‐R was expressed on all naïve CD27− and memory CD27+ B‐cells and was present on <0.5% of T cells. The expression of BAFF‐R on B cells was significantly decreased in patients with pSS as compared with controls (MFI = 7.8 vs 10.6, p = 0.001), and was intermediate in patients with SLE (MFI = 9.5). Serum BAFF level was inversely correlated with BAFF‐R MFI (p = 0.007), but not because of competition between endogenous BAFF (at observed concentrations in patients) and the monoclonal antibody (11C1) detecting BAFF‐R. BAFF‐R mRNA levels did not differ between patients with pSS and controls (p = 0.48). BAFF‐R MFI decreased after overnight culture with recombinant human BAFF (from 32.5 to 25.4, p = 0.03). Contrary to the serum BAFF level, BAFF‐R expression was correlated with extraglandular involvement in pSS and SLE Disease Activity Index. Conclusions BAFF‐R expression is reduced on peripheral B cells of patients with pSS and SLE. This down‐regulation occurs through a post‐transcriptional mechanism and could be the consequence of chronic increase in BAFF. BAFF‐R levels on B cells could be a novel activity biomarker in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17185325

  12. Speckled-like Pattern in the Germinal Center (SLIP-GC), a Nuclear GTPase Expressed in Activation-induced Deaminase-expressing Lymphomas and Germinal Center B Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Kathleen; Brar, Sukhdev; Ray, Madhumita; Pisitkun, Prapaporn; Bolland, Silvia; Verkoczy, Laurent; Diaz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    We identified a novel GTPase, SLIP-GC, with expression limited to a few tissues, in particular germinal center B cells. It lacks homology to any known proteins, indicating that it may belong to a novel family of GTPases. SLIP-GC is expressed in germinal center B cells and in lymphomas derived from germinal center B cells such as large diffuse B cell lymphomas. In cell lines, SLIP-GC is expressed in lymphomas that express activation-induced deaminase (AID) and that likely undergo somatic hypermutation. SLIP-GC is a nuclear protein, and it localizes to replication factories. Reduction of SLIP-GC levels in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Raji and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines resulted in an increase in DNA breaks and apoptosis that was AID-dependent, as simultaneous reduction of AID abrogated the deleterious effects of SLIP-GC reduction. These results strongly suggest that SLIP-GC is a replication-related protein in germinal center B cells whose reduction is toxic to cells through an AID-dependent mechanism. PMID:19734146

  13. Nickel compounds induce apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells by activation of c-Myc through ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Suen, T.-C.; Sun Hong; Arita, Adriana; Costa, Max

    2009-03-01

    Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and have been shown to alter epigenetic homeostasis. The c-Myc protein controls 15% of human genes and it has been shown that fluctuations of c-Myc protein alter global epigenetic marks. Therefore, the regulation of c-Myc by nickel ions in immortalized but not tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells was examined in this study. It was found that c-Myc protein expression was increased by nickel ions in non-tumorigenic Beas-2B and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The results also indicated that nickel ions induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells. Knockout of c-Myc and its restoration in a rat cell system confirmed the essential role of c-Myc in nickel ion-induced apoptosis. Further studies in Beas-2B cells showed that nickel ion increased the c-Myc mRNA level and c-Myc promoter activity, but did not increase c-Myc mRNA and protein stability. Moreover, nickel ion upregulated c-Myc in Beas-2B cells through the MEK/ERK pathway. Collectively, the results demonstrate that c-Myc induction by nickel ions occurs via an ERK-dependent pathway and plays a crucial role in nickel-induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells.

  14. Purification and NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of a T-cell-derived lymphokine with growth factor activity for B-cell hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Van Snick, J; Cayphas, S; Vink, A; Uyttenhove, C; Coulie, P G; Rubira, M R; Simpson, R J

    1986-01-01

    A T-cell-derived lymphokine was identified by its ability to support the growth of a subset of B-cell hybridomas. Hybrids that failed to survive in the absence of this molecule represented a major proportion of rat-mouse hybridomas but were very rare among mouse-mouse B-cell hybrids. Stable factor-dependent B-cell hybridomas were used to monitor the purification of the growth factor from the supernatant of a clonotypically stimulated mouse helper T-cell clone. Sequential fractionation using gel filtration, anion-exchange chromatography, and reversed-phase HPLC resolved the factor from other B-cell growth factors and yielded a single-chain protein characterized by a major charge (pI = 5-7) and molecular mass (22- to 29-kDa) heterogeneity, probably due to variations in glycosylation. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein, which is active on B-cell hybridomas in the 0.1 pM range, showed no significant homology with that of known lymphokines. Because the purified factor also supported the growth and survival in vitro of murine plasmacytomas (to be published elsewhere), it was provisionally designated interleukin-HP1 (where H stands for hybridoma and P stands for plasmacytoma). Images PMID:2948184

  15. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production.

  16. Reduced CD5+CD24hiCD38hi and interleukin-10+ regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19+CD24hiCD38hi and CD19+CD24hiCD27+ Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5+ subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine–phosphate–guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells and IL-10+ B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10+ and CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5+ subset of CD24hiCD38hi B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5+ B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5neg B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs. The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  17. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  18. In vitro reactivity to implant metals demonstrates a person-dependent association with both T-cell and B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hallab, Nadim James; Caicedo, Marco; Epstein, Rachel; McAllister, Kyron; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2010-02-01

    Hypersensitivity to metallic implants remains relatively unpredictable and poorly understood. We initially hypothesized that metal-induced lymphocyte proliferation responses to soluble metal challenge (ions) are mediated exclusively by early T-cell activation (not B-cells), typical of a delayed-type-hypersensitivity response. We tested this by comparing proliferation (6 days) of primary lymphocytes with early T-cell and B-cell activation (48 h) in three groups of subjects likely to demonstrate elevated metal reactivity: group 1 (n = 12) history of metal sensitivity with no implant; group 2a (n = 6) well performing metal-on-metal THRs, and group 2b (n = 20) subjects with poorly performing metal-on-polymer total joint arthroplasties (TJA). Group 1 showed 100% (12/12) metal reactivity (stimulation index > 2) to Ni. Groups 2a and 2b were 83% (5/6) and 75% (15/22) metal reactive (to Co, Cr, or Ni), respectively. Of the n = 32 metal-reactive subjects to Co, Cr, or Ni (SI > 2), n = 22/32 demonstrated >2-fold elevations in % of T-cell or B-cell activation (CD25+, CD69+) to metal challenge when compared with untreated control. 18/22 metal-activated subjects demonstrated an exclusively T-cell or B-cell activation response to metal challenge, where 6/18 demonstrated exclusively B-cell activation and 12/18 demonstrated a T-cell only response, as measured by surface activation markers CD25+ and CD69+. However, there was no direct correlation (R(2) < 0.1) between lymphocyte proliferation and % T-cell or B-cell activation (CD25+:CD69+). Proliferation assays (LTT) showed greater ability to detect metal reactivity than did subject-dependent results of flow-cytometry analysis of T-cell or B-cell activation. The high incidence of lymphocyte reactivity and activation indicate that more complex than initially hypothesized immune responses may contribute to the etiology of debris-induced osteolysis in metal-sensitive individuals.

  19. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  20. B Cell Receptor Activation Predominantly Regulates AKT-mTORC1/2 Substrates Functionally Related to RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Dara K.; Ali, Raja H.; Turunen, Janne J.; Nore, Beston F.; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylates numerous substrates on the consensus motif RXRXXpS/T, a docking site for 14-3-3 interactions. To identify novel AKT-induced phosphorylation events following B cell receptor (BCR) activation, we performed proteomics, biochemical and bioinformatics analyses. Phosphorylated consensus motif-specific antibody enrichment, followed by tandem mass spectrometry, identified 446 proteins, containing 186 novel phosphorylation events. Moreover, we found 85 proteins with up regulated phosphorylation, while in 277 it was down regulated following stimulation. Up regulation was mainly in proteins involved in ribosomal and translational regulation, DNA binding and transcription regulation. Conversely, down regulation was preferentially in RNA binding, mRNA splicing and mRNP export proteins. Immunoblotting of two identified RNA regulatory proteins, RBM25 and MEF-2D, confirmed the proteomics data. Consistent with these findings, the AKT-inhibitor (MK-2206) dramatically reduced, while the mTORC-inhibitor PP242 totally blocked phosphorylation on the RXRXXpS/T motif. This demonstrates that this motif, previously suggested as an AKT target sequence, also is a substrate for mTORC1/2. Proteins with PDZ, PH and/or SH3 domains contained the consensus motif, whereas in those with an HMG-box, H15 domains and/or NF-X1-zinc-fingers, the motif was absent. Proteins carrying the consensus motif were found in all eukaryotic clades indicating that they regulate a phylogenetically conserved set of proteins. PMID:27487157

  1. B Cell Receptor Activation Predominantly Regulates AKT-mTORC1/2 Substrates Functionally Related to RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Dara K; Ali, Raja H; Turunen, Janne J; Nore, Beston F; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylates numerous substrates on the consensus motif RXRXXpS/T, a docking site for 14-3-3 interactions. To identify novel AKT-induced phosphorylation events following B cell receptor (BCR) activation, we performed proteomics, biochemical and bioinformatics analyses. Phosphorylated consensus motif-specific antibody enrichment, followed by tandem mass spectrometry, identified 446 proteins, containing 186 novel phosphorylation events. Moreover, we found 85 proteins with up regulated phosphorylation, while in 277 it was down regulated following stimulation. Up regulation was mainly in proteins involved in ribosomal and translational regulation, DNA binding and transcription regulation. Conversely, down regulation was preferentially in RNA binding, mRNA splicing and mRNP export proteins. Immunoblotting of two identified RNA regulatory proteins, RBM25 and MEF-2D, confirmed the proteomics data. Consistent with these findings, the AKT-inhibitor (MK-2206) dramatically reduced, while the mTORC-inhibitor PP242 totally blocked phosphorylation on the RXRXXpS/T motif. This demonstrates that this motif, previously suggested as an AKT target sequence, also is a substrate for mTORC1/2. Proteins with PDZ, PH and/or SH3 domains contained the consensus motif, whereas in those with an HMG-box, H15 domains and/or NF-X1-zinc-fingers, the motif was absent. Proteins carrying the consensus motif were found in all eukaryotic clades indicating that they regulate a phylogenetically conserved set of proteins. PMID:27487157

  2. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  3. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment.

  4. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment. PMID:17281912

  5. Importance of the CCR5-CCL5 axis for mucosal Trypanosoma cruzi protection and B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nicole L; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Giddings, Olivia K; Lane, Thomas E; Hoft, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite and the causative agent of Chagas disease. Previous work has shown that the chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a role in systemic T. cruzi protection. We evaluated the importance of CCR5 and CCL5 for mucosal protection against natural oral and conjunctival T. cruzi challenges. T. cruzi-immune CCR5(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were generated by repeated infectious challenges with T. cruzi. CCR5(-/-) and wild-type mice developed equivalent levels of cellular, humoral, and protective mucosal responses. However, CCR5(-/-)-immune mice produced increased levels of CCL5 in protected gastric tissues, suggesting compensatory signaling through additional receptors. Neutralization of CCL5 in CCR5(-/-)-immune mice resulted in decreased mucosal inflammatory responses, reduced T. cruzi-specific Ab-secreting cells, and significantly less mucosal T. cruzi protection, confirming an important role for CCL5 in optimal immune control of T. cruzi replication at the point of initial mucosal invasion. To investigate further the mechanism responsible for mucosal protection mediated by CCL5-CCR5 signaling, we evaluated the effects of CCL5 on B cells. CCL5 enhanced proliferation and IgM secretion in highly purified B cells triggered by suboptimal doses of LPS. In addition, neutralization of endogenous CCL5 inhibited B cell proliferation and IgM secretion during stimulation of highly purified B cells, indicating that B cell production of CCL5 has important autocrine effects. These findings demonstrate direct effects of CCL5 on B cells, with significant implications for the development of mucosal adjuvants, and further suggest that CCL5 may be important as a general B cell coactivator.

  6. Antigen-Independent Appearance of Recombination Activating Gene (Rag)-Positive Bone Marrow B Cells in the Spleens of Immunized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Frank; Alt, Frederick W.; Monroe, Robert J.; Seidl, Katherine J.

    2000-01-01

    Splenic B lineage cells expressing recombination activation genes (RAG+) in mice immunized with 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl-acetyl coupled to chicken γ-globulin (NP-CGG) and the adjuvant aluminum-hydroxide (alum) have been proposed to be mature B cells that reexpress RAG after an antigen encounter in the germinal center (GC), a notion supported by findings of RAG expression in peripheral B lymphocyte populations activated in vitro. However, recent studies indicate that these cells might be immature B cells that have not yet extinguished RAG expression. Here, we employ RAG2–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion gene knock-in mice to show that RAG+ B lineage cells do appear in the spleen after the administration of alum alone, and that their appearance is independent of T cell interactions via the CD40 pathway. Moreover, splenic RAG+ B lineage cells were detectable in immunized RAG2-deficient mice adoptively transferred with bone marrow (BM) cells, but not with spleen cells from RAG+ mice. Although splenic RAG+ B cells express surface markers associated with GC B cells, we also find the same basic markers on progenitor/precursor BM B cells. Finally, we did not detect RAG gene expression after the in vitro stimulation of splenic RAG− mature B cells with mitogens (lipopolysaccharide and anti-CD40) and cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4 and IL-7). Together, our studies indicate that RAG+ B lineage cells from BM accumulate in the spleen after immunization, and that this accumulation is not the result of an antigen-specific response. PMID:11120771

  7. In Vitro Evolution of Allergy Vaccine Candidates, with Maintained Structure, but Reduced B Cell and T Cell Activation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D.; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients. PMID:21931754

  8. In vitro evolution of allergy vaccine candidates, with maintained structure, but reduced B cell and T cell activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients.

  9. Poloxamines display a multiple inhibitory activity of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2011-08-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common fatal cancer worldwide with more than 500,000 annual deaths. Approximately 40% of the patients with HCC showed tumoral overexpression of transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette protein superfamily (ABC) which pump drugs out of cells. The overexpression of these efflux transporters confers on the cells a multiple drug resistance phenotype, which is considered a crucial cause of treatment refractoriness in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of pH- and temperature-responsive X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines, Tetronic, PEO-PPO) showing a wide range of molecular weights and EO/PO ratios on the functional activity of three different ABC proteins, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, in two human hepatocarcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. First, the cytotoxicity of the different copolymers (at different concentrations) on both liver carcinoma cell lines was thoroughly evaluated by means of apoptosis analysis using annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Thus, viable cells (AV-/PI-), early apoptotic cells (AV+/PI-) and late apoptotic cells (V-FITC+/PI+) were identified. Results pointed out copolymers of intermediate to high hydrophobicity and intermediate molecular weight (e.g., T904) as the most cytotoxic. Then, DiOC2, rhodamine 123 and vinblastine were used as differential substrates of these pumps. HeLa, an epithelial cell line of human cervical cancer that does not express P-gp, was used exclusively as a control and enabled the discerning between P-gp and MRP1 inhibition. Moderate to highly hydrophobic poloxamines T304, T904 and T1301 showed inhibitory activity against P-gp and BCRP but not against MRP1 in both hepatic cell lines. A remarkable dependence of this effect on the

  10. Poloxamines display a multiple inhibitory activity of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2011-08-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common fatal cancer worldwide with more than 500,000 annual deaths. Approximately 40% of the patients with HCC showed tumoral overexpression of transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette protein superfamily (ABC) which pump drugs out of cells. The overexpression of these efflux transporters confers on the cells a multiple drug resistance phenotype, which is considered a crucial cause of treatment refractoriness in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of pH- and temperature-responsive X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines, Tetronic, PEO-PPO) showing a wide range of molecular weights and EO/PO ratios on the functional activity of three different ABC proteins, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, in two human hepatocarcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. First, the cytotoxicity of the different copolymers (at different concentrations) on both liver carcinoma cell lines was thoroughly evaluated by means of apoptosis analysis using annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Thus, viable cells (AV-/PI-), early apoptotic cells (AV+/PI-) and late apoptotic cells (V-FITC+/PI+) were identified. Results pointed out copolymers of intermediate to high hydrophobicity and intermediate molecular weight (e.g., T904) as the most cytotoxic. Then, DiOC2, rhodamine 123 and vinblastine were used as differential substrates of these pumps. HeLa, an epithelial cell line of human cervical cancer that does not express P-gp, was used exclusively as a control and enabled the discerning between P-gp and MRP1 inhibition. Moderate to highly hydrophobic poloxamines T304, T904 and T1301 showed inhibitory activity against P-gp and BCRP but not against MRP1 in both hepatic cell lines. A remarkable dependence of this effect on the

  11. Differential Effects of B Cell Receptor and B Cell Receptor–FcγRIIB1 Engagement on Docking of Csk to GTPase-activating Protein (GAP)-associated p62

    PubMed Central

    Vuica, Milena; Desiderio, Stephen; Schneck, Jonathan P.

    1997-01-01

    The stimulatory and inhibitory pathways initiated by engagement of stimulatory receptors such as the B cell receptor for antigen (BCR) and inhibitory receptors such as Fcγ receptors of the IIB1 type (FcγRIIB1) intersect in ways that are poorly understood at the molecular level. Because the tyrosine kinase Csk is a potential negative regulator of lymphocyte activation, we examined the effects of BCR and FcγRIIB1 engagement on the binding of Csk to phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. Stimulation of a B lymphoma cell line, A20, with intact anti-IgG antibody induced a direct, SH2-mediated association between Csk and a 62-kD phosphotyrosine-containing protein that was identified as RasGTPase-activating protein–associated p62 (GAP-A.p62). In contrast, stimulation of A20 cells with anti-IgG F(ab′)2 resulted in little increase in the association of Csk with GAP-A.p62. The effect of FcγRIIB1 engagement on this association was abolished by blockade of FcγRIIB1 with the monoclonal antibody 2.4G2. Furthermore, the increased association between Csk and GAP-A.p62 seen upon stimulation with intact anti-Ig was abrogated in the FcγRIIB1-deficient cell line IIA1.6 and recovered when FcγRIIB1 expression was restored by transfection. The differential effects of BCR and BCR-FcγRIIB1–mediated signaling on the phosphorylation of GAP-A.p62 and its association with Csk suggest that docking of Csk to GAP-A.p62 may function in the negative regulation of antigen receptor–mediated signals in B cells. PMID:9221755

  12. LRRK1 is critical in the regulation of B-cell responses and CARMA1-dependent NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Keiko; Baba, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Hisaaki; Kang, Sujin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshida, Yuji; Maeda, Yohei; Sarashina-Kida, Hana; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiro; Hayama, Yoshitomo; Kinehara, Yuhei; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B-cell activation and humoral immunity. In this study, we discovered a critical function of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) in BCR-mediated immune responses. Lrrk1−/− mice exhibited altered B1a-cell development and basal immunoglobulin production. In addition, these mice failed to produce IgG3 antibody in response to T cell–independent type 2 antigen due to defects in IgG3 class-switch recombination. Concomitantly, B cells lacking LRRK1 exhibited a profound defect in proliferation and survival upon BCR stimulation, which correlated with impaired BCR-mediated NF-κB activation and reduced expression of NF-κB target genes including Bcl-xL, cyclin D2, and NFATc1/αA. Furthermore, LRRK1 physically interacted and potently synergized with CARMA1 to enhance NF-κB activation. Our results reveal a critical role of LRRK1 in NF-κB signaling in B cells and the humoral immune response. PMID:27166870

  13. The CD40 ligand expressed by human B cells costimulates B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Bergman, M C; Miura, Y; Fujita, K; Davis, L S; Lipsky, P E

    1995-05-15

    The possibility that activated B cells might express a ligand for CD40 that was of functional importance for B cell responses was examined by using highly purified human peripheral blood B cells, as well as a variety of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and hybridomas. Following stimulation with the combination of a calcium ionophore and a phorbol ester, human B cells bound a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular portion of CD40 and the Fc region of IgG1 (CD40.Ig). A variety of B cell lines and hybridomas also bound CD40.Ig, either constitutively or after activation. In addition, CD40.Ig specifically immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa glycoprotein from surface 125I-labeled activated B cells. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the CD40 ligand mRNA amplified by RT-PCR from activated T cells and B cell lines was identical. The CD40 ligand expressed on human B cells was important functionally because homotypic aggregation of CD40 ligand-expressing B cells was inhibited by the CD40.Ig construct. Additionally, RNA and DNA synthesis as well as Ig production by polyclonally activated, highly purified peripheral B cells and a variety of B cell lines were inhibited significantly by the CD40.Ig construct. Finally, B cell lines expressing the CD40 ligand induced Ig production from resting normal B cells in a CD40-dependent manner. These results indicate that human B cells express a ligand for CD40 that is identical with that expressed by activated T cells and that the B cell-expressed CD40 ligand plays an important role in facilitating responses of activated B cells.

  14. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  15. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  16. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  17. Molecular evidence of Zn chelation of the procaspase activating compound B-PAC-1 in B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aloke; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Jefferson; Patel, Viralkumar; Neelapu, Sattva S.; McMurray, John S.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of apoptosis in cancer cells is pivotal for their survival and is typically ruled by mutations or dysregulation of core apoptotic cascade. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin's B-cell malignancy expressing higher anti-apoptotic proteins providing survival advantage. B-PAC-1, a procaspase activating compound, induces apoptosis by sequestering Zn bound to procaspase-3, but the amino acids holding Zn in Caspase-3 is not known. Here we show that reintroduction of WT caspase-3 or 7 in Caspase3–7 double knock-out (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) promoted B-PAC-1 to induce apoptosis (27–43%), but not in DKO MEFs or MEFs expressing respective Casp3–7 catalytic mutants (12–13%). Using caspase-6 and -9 exosite analysis, we identified and mutated predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3 (H108A, C148S and E272A) and overexpressed into DKO MEFs. Mutants carrying E272A abrogated Zn-reversal of apoptosis induced by B-PAC-1 via higher XIAP and smac expressions but not in H108A or C148S mutants. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed stronger XIAP-caspase-3 interaction suggesting a novel mechanism of impulsive apoptosis resistance by disrupting predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3. B-PAC-1 sponsored apoptosis in MCL cell lines (30–73%) via caspase-3 and PARP cleavages accompanied by loss of Mcl-1 and IAPs including XIAP while Zn substantially abrogated B-PAC-1-driven apoptosis (18–36%). In contrary, Zn is dispensable to inhibit staurosporin, bendamustine, ABT199 or MK206-induced apoptosis. Consistent to cell lines, B-PAC-1 stimulated cell death in primary B-lymphoma cells via caspase-3 cleavage with decline in both Mcl-1 and XIAP. This study underscores the first genetic evidence that B-PAC-1 driven apoptosis is mediated via Zn chelation. PMID:26658105

  18. Comparing regions of the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein which function as transcriptional activating sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G; Himmelfarb, H; Heston, L; Countryman, J; Gradoville, L; Baumann, R; Chi, T; Carey, M

    1993-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein activates expression of Epstein-Barr virus early-lytic-cycle genes in human B lymphocytes. Here it is shown that ZEBRA also behaves as a sequence-specific transcriptional activator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletional mutagenesis defined three regions of ZEBRA that participate in activation in S. cerevisiae. These regions are designated YI (amino acids [aa] 1 to 25), YII (aa 51 to 102), and YIII (aa 228 to 245). Two of the three regions of the native ZEBRA protein act together to mediate activation when assayed on ZEBRA binding sites. However, when fused to the DNA binding domain of GAL4 and assayed on GAL4 binding sites, regions YII and YIII were each sufficient to confer activation in S. cerevisiae. Regions of ZEBRA which affected activation in S. cerevisiae were also required in human B lymphocytes. The amino-terminal region of ZEBRA (aa 1 to 98) was required for activation both in S. cerevisiae and in human B cells; deletion of the carboxy-terminal 18 aa also significantly reduced activation in both cell types. Thus, the behavior of ZEBRA in human B cells and S. cerevisiae suggests that the protein contains universal activation motifs that interact with conserved components of the transcription machinery. However, certain deletion mutants of ZEBRA containing mutations in the N-terminal region exhibited discordant behaviors in S. cerevisiae and in B cells. For example, deletion of ZEBRA aa 26 to 51 impaired activation to a great extent in B cells but had little or no effect in S. cerevisiae. The discordant mutants may reflect interactions with a variable domain of a conserved component or unique interactions with specialized components of the basal transcription apparatus in different cells. PMID:8230468

  19. Src kinase and Syk activation initiate PI3K signaling by a chimeric latent membrane protein 1 in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Olivia; Lambert, Stacie L; Krams, Sheri M; Martinez, Olivia M

    2012-01-01

    The B lymphotrophic γ-herpesvirus EBV is associated with a variety of lymphoid- and epithelial-derived malignancies, including B cell lymphomas in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals. The primary oncogene of EBV, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), activates the PI3K/Akt pathway to induce the autocrine growth factor, IL-10, in EBV-infected B cells, but the mechanisms underlying PI3K activation remain incompletely understood. Using small molecule inhibition and siRNA strategies in human B cell lines expressing a chimeric, signaling-inducible LMP1 protein, nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR)-LMP1, we show that NGFR-LMP1 utilizes Syk to activate PI3K/Akt signaling and induce IL-10 production. NGFR-LMP1 signaling induces phosphorylation of BLNK, a marker of Syk activation. Whereas Src kinases are often required for Syk activation, we show here that PI3K/Akt activation and autocrine IL-10 production by NGFR-LMP1 involves the Src family kinase Fyn. Finally, we demonstrate that NGFR-LMP1 induces phosphorylation of c-Cbl in a Syk- and Fyn-dependent fashion. Our results indicate that the EBV protein LMP1, which lacks the canonical ITAM required for Syk activation, can nevertheless activate Syk, and the Src kinase Fyn, resulting in downstream c-Cbl and PI3K/Akt activation. Fyn, Syk, and PI3K/Akt antagonists thus may present potential new therapeutic strategies that target the oncogene LMP1 for treatment of EBV+ B cell lymphomas.

  20. Conditional Deletion of NF-κB-Inducing Kinase (NIK) in Adult Mice Disrupts Mature B Cell Survival and Activation.

    PubMed

    Brightbill, Hans D; Jackman, Janet K; Suto, Eric; Kennedy, Heather; Jones, Charles; Chalasani, Sreedevi; Lin, Zhonghua; Tam, Lucinda; Roose-Girma, Meron; Balazs, Mercedesz; Austin, Cary D; Lee, Wyne P; Wu, Lawren C

    2015-08-01

    NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) is a primary regulator of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway, which plays a vital role downstream of BAFF, CD40L, lymphotoxin, and other inflammatory mediators. Germline deletion or inactivation of NIK in mice results in the defective development of B cells and secondary lymphoid organs, but the role of NIK in adult animals has not been studied. To address this, we generated mice containing a conditional allele of NIK. Deletion of NIK in adult mice results in decreases in B cell populations in lymph nodes and spleen, similar to what is observed upon blockade of BAFF. Consistent with this, B cells from mice in which NIK is acutely deleted fail to respond to BAFF stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, mice with induced NIK deletion exhibit a significant decrease in germinal center B cells and serum IgA, which is indicative of roles for NIK in additional pathways beyond BAFF signaling. Our conditional NIK-knockout mice may be broadly useful for assessing the postdevelopmental and cell-specific roles of NIK and the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in mice.

  1. Identification of a novel surface protein on activated CD4+ T cells that induces contact-dependent B cell differentiation (help)

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes provide contact-dependent stimuli to B cells that are critical for the generation of specific antibody responses in a process termed T helper function. The surface structures on activated CD4+ T cells that mediate this function are not fully known. We previously reported the isolation of a functionally unique subclone of the Jurkat leukemic T cell line (D1.1) that constitutively expressed contact-dependent helper effector function. To identify T cell surface molecules that mediate contact-dependent T helper function, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated 5c8, was generated that inhibits D1.1-mediated B cell activation and immunoprecipitates a novel 30-kD protein structure from surface-iodinated D1.1 cells. Normal CD4+ T cells express 5c8 antigen (Ag) transiently 5-6 h after activation by phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin with maximal expression 5-6 h after activation and absence of expression by 24 h. In contrast, neither resting nor activated CD8+ T cells express 5c8 Ag. In functional studies, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of fixed, activated CD4+ T cells to induce B cell surface CD23 expression. In addition, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to direct terminal B cell differentiation driven by pokeweed mitogen. Taken together, these data suggest that 5c8 Ag is a novel, activation-induced surface T cell protein that is involved in mediating a contact-dependent element of the helper effector function of CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:1348081

  2. Protein kinase c-β-dependent activation of NF-κB in stromal cells is indispensable for the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lutzny, Gloria; Kocher, Thomas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rudelius, Martina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Finch, Andrew J; Dürig, Jan; Wagner, Michaela; Haferlach, Claudia; Kohlmann, Alexander; Schnittger, Susanne; Seifert, Marc; Wanninger, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Oostendorp, Robert; Ruland, Jürgen; Leitges, Michael; Kuhnt, Toni; Schäfer, Yvonne; Lampl, Benedikt; Peschel, Christian; Egle, Alexander; Ringshausen, Ingo

    2013-01-14

    Tumor cell survival critically depends on heterotypic communication with benign cells in the microenvironment. Here, we describe a survival signaling pathway activated in stromal cells by contact to B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The expression of protein kinase C (PKC)-βII and the subsequent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells are prerequisites to support the survival of malignant B cells. PKC-β knockout mice are insusceptible to CLL transplantations, underscoring the in vivo significance of the PKC-βII-NF-κB signaling pathway in the tumor microenvironment. Upregulated stromal PKC-βII in biopsies from patients with CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and mantle cell lymphoma suggests that this pathway may commonly be activated in a variety of hematological malignancies.

  3. The adaptor protein 3BP2 associates with VAV guanine nucleotide exchange factors to regulate NFAT activation by the B-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Isabelle; Le Bras, Séverine; Charvet, Céline; Moon, Chéol; Altman, Amnon; Deckert, Marcel

    2005-02-01

    Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) activates kinases of the Src and Syk families and signaling complexes assembled by adaptor proteins, which dictate B-cell fate and function. The adaptor 3BP2/SH3BP2, an Abl Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-binding and Syk-kinases interacting protein, exhibits positive regulatory roles in T, natural killer (NK), and basophilic cells. However, its involvement in BCR signaling is completely unknown. Here we show that 3BP2 is tyrosine phosphorylated following BCR aggregation on B lymphoma cells, and that 3BP2 is a substrate for Syk and Fyn, but not Btk. To further explore the function of 3BP2 in B cells, we screened a yeast 2-hybrid B-lymphocyte library and found 3BP2 as a binding partner of Vav proteins. The interaction between 3BP2 and Vav proteins involved both constitutive and inducible mechanisms. 3BP2 also interacted with other components of the BCR signaling pathway, including Syk and phospholipase C gamma (PLC-gamma). Furthermore, overexpression and RNAi blocking experiments showed that 3BP2 regulated BCR-mediated activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs). Finally, evidence was provided that 3BP2 functionally cooperates with Vav proteins and Rho GTPases to activate NFATs. Our results show that 3BP2 may regulate BCR-mediated gene activation through Vav proteins.

  4. Activation of T and B cells by a crude extract of Artocarpus integrifolia is mediated by a lectin distinct from jacalin.

    PubMed

    de Miranda-Santos, I K; Mengel JO Júnior; Bunn-Moreno, M M; Campos-Neto, A

    1991-07-01

    The biological activities previously described for a crude extract derived from seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) are shown in the present work to be assigned to two distinct fractions present in this extract. One fraction is the D-galactose binding lectin, jacalin, obtained by affinity purification on a D-galactose Sepharose column. The other fraction is a D-mannose-binding protein which we propose to call 'Artocarpin'. As is well documented, jacalin binds to human IgA1 and is a useful tool for the purification of this immunoglobulin. We show here that the remaining biological activities consisting of the proliferative response of mouse spleen cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and polyclonal activation of human and mouse B cells for the secretion of immunoglobulin are mediated by artocarpin. Artocarpin is unique in its capacity to induce polyclonal activation of B cells in the absence of proliferation. BALB/c nu/nu spleen cells failed to proliferate which indicates that this lectin is a T cell-dependent B cell polyclonal activator.

  5. Nfkb1 activation by the E26 transformation-specific transcription factors PU.1 and Spi-B promotes Toll-like receptor-mediated splenic B cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Stephen K H; Abbas, Ali K; Solomon, Lauren A; Groux, Gaëlle M N; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2015-05-01

    Generation of antibodies against T-independent and T-dependent antigens requires Toll-like receptor (TLR) engagement on B cells for efficient responses. However, the regulation of TLR expression and responses in B cells is not well understood. PU.1 and Spi-B (encoded by Sfpi1 and Spib, respectively) are transcription factors of the E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family and are important for B cell development and function. It was found that B cells from mice knocked out for Spi-B and heterozygous for PU.1 (Sfpi1(+/-) Spib(-/-) [PUB] mice) proliferated poorly in response to TLR ligands compared to wild-type (WT) B cells. The NF-κB family member p50 (encoded by Nfkb1) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness in mice. PUB B cells expressed reduced Nfkb1 mRNA transcripts and p50 protein. The Nfkb1 promoter was regulated directly by PU.1 and Spi-B, as shown by reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Occupancy of the Nfkb1 promoter by PU.1 was reduced in PUB B cells compared to that in WT B cells. Finally, infection of PUB B cells with a retroviral vector encoding p50 substantially restored proliferation in response to LPS. We conclude that Nfkb1 transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B promotes TLR-mediated B cell proliferation.

  6. Discovery of novel, high potent, ABC type PTP1B inhibitors with TCPTP selectivity and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peihong; Du, Yongli; Song, Lianhua; Shen, Jingkang; Li, Qunyi

    2016-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a key negative regulator of both insulin and leptin receptor pathways has been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. With the goal of enhancing potency and selectivity of the PTP1B inhibitors, a series of methyl salicylate derivatives as ABC type PTP1B inhibitors (P1-P7) were discovered. More importantly, compound P6 exhibited high potent inhibitory activity (IC50 = 50 nM) for PTP1B with 15-fold selectivity over T-cell PTPase (TCPTP). Further studies on cellular activities revealed that compound P6 could enhance insulin-mediated insulin receptor β (IRβ) phosphorylation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:27123900

  7. Ionic, electrical, and secretory effects of protein kinase C activation in mouse pancreatic B-cells: studies with a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Bozem, M.; Nenquin, M.; Henquin, J.C.

    1987-09-01

    The phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was used to study the effects of protein kinase C activation on stimulus-secretion coupling in mouse pancreatic B-cells. At a nonstimulatory concentration of glucose (3 mM), 100 nM TPA, but not 10 nM TPA, slightly and slowly increased insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux and decreased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux, but did not affect the membrane potential of B-cells. At a threshold concentration of glucose (7 mM), 100 nM TPA markedly increased insulin release without triggering electrical activity in B-cells. At a stimulatory concentration of glucose (10 mM), TPA caused a dose-dependent irreversible increase in insulin release, /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux and slightly augmented islet cAMP levels. Omission of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ abolished the effects of 10 nM TPA and partially inhibited those of 100 nM TPA on insulin release and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. In contrast, their effect on /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux was paradoxically augmented. Glucose-induced electrical activity in B-cells was only marginally affected by TPA; the duration of the slow waves with spikes was not modified, but a small shortening of the polarized intervals raised their frequency and slightly increased the overall activity. This increase was significant only with 10 nM TPA, whereas only 100 nM TPA brought about a minute increase in /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. These results thus show that TPA induces insulin release or potentiates glucose-induced insulin release without mimicking or amplifying the initial ionic and electrical signals triggered by glucose. They suggest that protein kinase C activation affects stimulus-secretion coupling by modulating intracellular and/or nonelectrogenic membrane events.

  8. Investigation of the role of complement and complement receptors in the modulation of B cell activation by a Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cell wall fraction.

    PubMed

    de Agostino Biella, Carla; Uecker, Marilei; Fernandes da Silva, Marcelo; Barbosa, José Elpidio; Silva, Célio Lopes; Crott, Luciana Simon Pereira

    2006-01-01

    F1 fraction from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a potent activator of the complement system. Considering that complement receptors CR1 and CR2 are involved in the regulation of B cell response, we evaluated the in vitro effect of the F1 in the activation of B lymphocytes, as well as the participation of complement receptors in this process. Murine splenocytes were cultured in order to evaluate the expression of CD40, CD45RB and CD69 on B lymphocyte, and IgG and IgM were quantified in the culture supernatant. F1 participated in the activation of B cells, showing a positive modulation effect on all markers analyzed. An increase in the production of IgG was detected in the supernatants when the opsonized F1 fraction was present. Complement receptor blockade with monoclonal antibodies led to a partial reduction in immunoglobulin secretion, suggesting that these receptors, especially CR2, play a role in modulating the function of B lymphocyte stimulated with the opsonized F1 fraction. These results may contribute for a better understanding of the B cell activation and differentiation processes in response to the F1 fraction from P. brasiliensis.

  9. A novel Lyn-protein kinase Cδ/ε-protein kinase D axis is activated in B cells by signalosome-independent alternate pathway BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Benchang; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2013-06-01

    BCR signaling initiates multiple activities critical for B-cell function. Recently, we identified an alternate BCR signaling pathway, induced by IL-4, that is signalosome-independent, unlike the classical signalosome-dependent pathway, and that leads to activation of the MAP kinase, ERK. Here we questioned whether alternate pathway signaling extends to other key downstream events, especially protein kinase D (PKD) activation. We found that in murine spleen-derived B cells the IL-4-induced alternate pathway for BCR signaling results in PKD and PKD substrate phosphorylation, and that alternate pathway phosphorylation of HDAC5/7 and other key substrates requires PKD. Furthermore, we found that tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε occurs as a result of alternate but not classical pathway signaling and is required for phosphorylation of PKD and PKD substrates. This result identifies PKCδ/ε tyrosine phosphorylation as a unique outcome of the alternate pathway. The alternate pathway is mediated by Lyn that is not required for classical pathway signaling and we found that Lyn associates directly with PKCδ/ε and is required for phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε and of PKD. These findings indicate that IL-4 influences B-cell activation by inducing a novel signaling pathway from BCR to Lyn to PKCδ/ε to PKD.

  10. Occurrence of autoantibodies to intermediate filament proteins in human visceral leishmaniasis and their induction by experimental polyclonal B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Böhme, M W; Evans, D A; Miles, M A; Holborow, E J

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen sera of patients with visceral leishmaniasis were investigated for the occurrence of autoantibodies. They were found in high incidence and titre, and with specificity to the intermediate filament (INFIL) proteins vimentin (12 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) and keratin (9 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) as well as to speckled anti-nuclear antigens (ANA). Additionally, supernatants of Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani cultures containing soluble parasite-derived antigens were mitogenic to cultures of mononuclear cells (MNC) obtained from healthy donors without specific antibodies to leishmanial antigens. The activation of MNC resulted in significant immunoglobulin production, some of which demonstrated autoantibody specificity to INFIL. The co-operation of monocytes, T cells and B cells was required in order to obtain maximal stimulation. The importance of polyclonal B-cell activation for the genesis and occurrence of autoantibodies in visceral leishmaniasis is discussed. PMID:3492440

  11. Immunoglobulin switch transcript production in vivo related to the site and time of antigen-specific B cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination is associated with the production and splicing of germline IgCH messenger RNA transcripts. Levels of gamma 1 transcripts in mouse spleen sections were assessed by semiquantitative analysis of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products during primary and secondary antibody responses to chicken gamma globulin (CGG). This was correlated with the appearance of CGG-specific B cells and their growth and differentiation to plasma cells. After primary immunization with CGG, gamma 1 switch transcripts appeared after 4 d, peaked at a median of six times starting levels between 10 and 18 d after immunization, and returned to background levels before secondary immunization at 5 wk. By contrast, after secondary challenge with CGG, a sevenfold increase in transcripts occurs during the first d. The level again doubles by day 3, when it is six times that which is seen at the peak of the primary response. After day 4, there was a gradual decline over the next 2-3 wk. Within 12 h of secondary immunization, antigen-specific memory B cells appeared in the outer I zone and by 24 h entered S phase, presumably as a result of cognate interaction with primed T cells. Over the next few hours, they migrated to the edge of the red pulp, where they grew exponentially until the fourth day, when they synchronously differentiated to become plasma cells. The same pattern was seen for the migration, growth, and differentiation of virgin hapten-specific B cells when CGG-primed mice were challenged with hapten protein. The continued production of transcripts after day 3 indicates that switching also occurs in germinal centers, but in a relatively small proportion of their B cells. The impressive early production of switch transcripts during T cell-dependent antibody responses occurs in cells that are about to undergo massive clonal expansion. It is argued that Ig class switching at this time, which is associated with cognate T cell-B

  12. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  13. Neutralization of (NK-cell-derived) B-cell activating factor by Belimumab restores sensitivity of chronic lymphoid leukemia cells to direct and Rituximab-induced NK lysis.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Schmiedel, B J; Maurer, A; Raab, S; Prokop, L; Stevanović, S; Dörfel, D; Schneider, P; Salih, H R

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that substantially contribute to the therapeutic benefit of antitumor antibodies like Rituximab, a crucial component in the treatment of B-cell malignancies. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the ability of NK cells to lyse the malignant cells and to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity upon Fc receptor stimulation is compromised, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. We report here that NK-cells activation-dependently produce the tumor necrosis factor family member 'B-cell activating factor' (BAFF) in soluble form with no detectable surface expression, also in response to Fc receptor triggering by therapeutic CD20-antibodies. BAFF in turn enhanced the metabolic activity of primary CLL cells and impaired direct and Rituximab-induced lysis of CLL cells without affecting NK reactivity per se. The neutralizing BAFF antibody Belimumab, which is approved for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, prevented the effects of BAFF on the metabolism of CLL cells and restored their susceptibility to direct and Rituximab-induced NK-cell killing in allogeneic and autologous experimental systems. Our findings unravel the involvement of BAFF in the resistance of CLL cells to NK-cell antitumor immunity and Rituximab treatment and point to a benefit of combinatory approaches employing BAFF-neutralizing drugs in B-cell malignancies.

  14. Small molecule inhibitors of IkappaB kinase are selectively toxic for subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma defined by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lloyd T; Davis, R Eric; Pierce, Jackie; Hepperle, Michael; Xu, Yajun; Hottelet, Maria; Nong, Yuhua; Wen, Danyi; Adams, Julian; Dang, Lenny; Staudt, Louis M

    2005-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the NF-kappaB pathway is required for survival of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here we show that a small molecule IkappaB kinase (IKK) inhibitor, PS-1145, and related compounds are toxic for ABC DLBCL cell lines but not for cell lines derived from the other prevalent form of DLBCL, germinal center B cell-like DLBCL. Treatment of ABC lines with these inhibitors rapidly induced a series of gene expression changes that were attributable to cessation of constitutive IKK activity, similar to changes induced by acute expression of genetic inhibitors of NF-kappaB, confirming the effectiveness and specificity of this compound. Before cell death, inhibition of IKK also induced features of apoptosis and an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. To test further the specificity of this toxicity, an inducible form of NF-kappaB was created by fusing the p65 NF-kappaB subunit with the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (p65-ERD). In the presence of tamoxifen, p65-ERD reversed the toxicity of IKK inhibition and restored expression of many NF-kappaB target genes. Another subgroup of DLBCL, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL), also expresses NF-kappaB target genes, and treatment of a PMBL cell line with an IKK inhibitor was toxic and induced gene expression changes of a distinct group of NF-kappaB target genes. These studies validate the NF-kappaB pathway as a promising therapeutic target in ABC DLBCL, PMBL, and other lymphomas that depend on the activity of NF-kappaB for survival and proliferation. PMID:15671525

  15. Downregulation of internal enhancer activity contributes to abnormally low immunoglobulin expression in the MedB-1 mediastinal B-cell lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Olga; Leithäuser, Frank; Hasel, Cornelia; Brüderlein, Silke; Ushmorov, Alexey; Möller, Peter; Wirth, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a highly aggressive tumour with a unique pattern of clinical, morphological, immunological and genetic features distinct from other diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. PMBLs are characterized by a mature B-cell phenotype, but they typically lack immunoglobulin (Ig) gene expression. The PMBL cell line MedB-1 shares many characteristic properties of the primary tumour, including low-level Ig production despite a functionally rearranged IgVH gene and absence of 'crippling' mutations. In this study, a search was undertaken for reasons for downregulated Ig expression. Similar levels of the B-cell-specific transcription factors BOB.1/OBF.1 and PU.1 were found in MedB-1 cells to those in the Ig-producing UM-1 lymphoblastoid cell line. However, MedB-1 lacked the Oct2 transcription factor. Reporter assays showed that Ig-type promoters were active in MedB-1 cells. In contrast, activity of the intronic heavy chain enhancer was dramatically reduced. Ectopic expression of Oct2 was able partially to restore enhancer activity but transcription from the endogenous IgVH gene could not be rescued. Therefore, the role of epigenetic factors in the downregulation of Ig was investigated. Methylated histone 3 lysine 9, a reliable marker of chromatin silencing, was not detected in MedB-1 promoter and enhancer regions. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase and of histone deacetylases also did not reactivate Ig production. These data suggest the existence of alternative mechanisms of Ig inhibition in MedB-1 cells, different from chromatin silencing and the lack of Oct2. PMID:15682441

  16. CD11c+ dendritic cells and B cells contribute to the tumoricidal activity of anti-DR5 antibody therapy in established tumors.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Nicole M; Hawkins, Edwin D; Li, Ming; McLaughlin, Nicole M; Hämmerling, Günter J; Schwendener, Reto; Winoto, Astar; Wensky, Allen; Yagita, Hideo; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Smyth, Mark J

    2010-07-01

    The selective targeting of the tumor-associated death-inducing receptors DR4 and DR5 with agonistic mAbs has demonstrated preclinical and clinical antitumor activity. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to this efficacy remain poorly understood. In this study, using the first described C57BL/6 (B6) TRAIL-sensitive experimental tumor models, we have characterized the innate and adaptive immune components involved in the primary rejection phase of an anti-mouse DR5 (mDR5) mAb, MD5-1 in established MC38 colon adenocarcinomas. FcR mediated cross-linking of MD5-1 significantly inhibited the growth of MC38 colon adenocarcinomas through the induction of TRAIL-R-dependent tumor cell apoptosis. The loss of host DR5, TRAIL, perforin, FasL, or TNF did not compromise anti-DR5 therapy in vivo. By contrast, anti-DR5 therapy was completely abrogated in mice deficient of B cells or CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), providing the first direct evidence that these cells play a critical role. Importantly, the requirement for an intact B cell compartment for optimal anti-DR5 antitumor efficacy was also observed in established AT-3 mammary tumors. Interestingly, MD5-1-mediated apoptosis as measured by early TUNEL activity was completely lost in B cell-deficient microMT mice, but intact in mice deficient in CD11c(+) DCs. Overall, these data show that Ab-mediated targeting of DR5 triggers tumor cell apoptosis in established tumors in a B cell-dependent manner and that CD11c(+) DCs make a critical downstream contribution to anti-DR5 antitumor activity.

  17. Changes in sodium and calcium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1993-01-01

    1. Currents mediated by Ca2+ channels using Ba2+ as a charge carrier (IBa), Na+ currents (INa) and voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents (IC) were recorded from bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion B-cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques. Currents recorded from control cells were compared with those from axotomized cells 13-15 days after transection of the postganglionic nerve. 2. Axotomy reduced peak IBa at -10 mV (holding potential = -80 mV) from 3.3 +/- 0.3 nA (n = 42) to 1.7 +/- 0.1 nA (n = 39, P < 0.001). Tail IBa at -40 mV following a step to +70 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV was also reduced in axotomized neurones (9.7 +/- 0.6 nA for forty-two control neurones and 5.2 +/- 0.3 nA for thirty-nine axotomized neurones; P < 0.001). Minimal changes were observed in the kinetics of activation and deactivation. 3. Pharmacological experiments using 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(2- trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyridine-5-carboxylic acid methyl ester (BayK 8644), nifedipine and omega-conotoxin showed that axotomy predominantly affected the N-type Ca2+ channels which carry the majority of ICa in these neurones. L-type Ca2+ current was little affected and T-type Ca2+ currents were not observed in control or axotomized cells. 4. Development of inactivation of 0 mV and recovery from inactivation of IBa at -80 mV exhibited three distinct components in both control and axotomized neurones: 'fast', 'intermediate' and 'slow'. The relative proportions of both the 'fast' and 'intermediate' components of inactivation at 0 mV were almost doubled after axotomy (fast component was 15% in control and 29% in axotomized neurones; intermediate component was 17% in control and 26% in axotomized neurones). 'Fast' and 'intermediate' inactivation tended to develop more rapidly and recover more slowly after axotomy. The rate of onset of 'slow' inactivation was unaffected by axotomy but the steady-state level at -40 mV was increased. Most of the change in

  18. Oridonin ameliorates lupus-like symptoms of MRL(lpr/lpr) mice by inhibition of B-cell activating factor (BAFF).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Sun, Lijuan; Wu, Hongkun; Zhang, Lingzhen; Chen, Mingcang; Liu, Jianwen; Zhong, Renqian

    2013-09-01

    Oridonin, a pharmacologically safe agent extracted from Isodon Serra, has been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not clear whether Oridonin affects B-cell activating factor (BAFF) expression, thereby exerting beneficial effects in the treatment of BAFF-associated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, the current study aimed to find the function of Oridonin in regulation of BAFF and amelioration of SLE. In vitro, we explored the effect of Oridonin on BAFF expression and production in mouse macrophages. Moreover, using a spontaneous murine SLE model, we investigated the role of Oridonin delivery in the treatment of lupus-like disease in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, by measuring the changes in lupus symptoms, renal damage, BAFF expression, and B cell subsets. Our results showed that Oridonin significantly inhibited BAFF expression in mouse macrophages by suppressing the transcriptional activation of its promoter. And in vivo administration of Oridonin efficiently ameliorated the serological and clinical manifestations of SLE in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, as shown by increased survival benefit, reduced proteinuria levels, diminished production of specific auto-antibodies, and attenuated renal damage, in association with down-regulation of BAFF and a lower rate of B-cell maturation and differentiation. Thus, it suggests that Oridonin will serve as a novel natural therapeutic strategy for SLE by inhibition of BAFF. PMID:23712004

  19. Enhanced insulin-receptor tyrosine kinase activity associated with chromosomal translocation (1;19) in a pre-B-cell leukemia line.

    PubMed

    Newman, J D; Harrison, L C; Eckardt, G S; Jack, I

    1992-02-01

    The gene for the insulin receptor has been assigned to chromosome 19 near the breakpoint of the translocation t(1;19) which occurs in 25% of pre-B-cell leukemias. Insulin receptors in a pre-B-cell leukemia cell line (ACV) with t(1;19) were found to have 2-fold higher affinity for insulin, 5-fold higher basal and insulin-stimulated beta sub-unit autophosphorylation, and 2-fold higher basal and 4-fold higher insulin-stimulated beta sub-unit kinase activity on the synthetic peptide poly(Glu,Tyr), compared to receptors in a B-cell line (ADD) with normal karyotype from the same patient. ACV cells had a novel 13-kb receptor mRNA species and expressed a DNA polymorphism localized to the tyrosine kinase domain of the receptor gene. These findings suggest that t(1;19) in the ACV cell may result in rearrangement of the insulin receptor gene and translation of a receptor with enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:1310491

  20. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation.

  1. Characterization of genomic imbalances in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by detailed SNP-chip analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Hummel, Michael; Rosolowski, Maciej; Szczepanowski, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Loeffler, Markus; Trümper, Lorenz; Siebert, Reiner; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) is only partly understood. We analyzed 148 DLBCL by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-chips to characterize genomic imbalances. Seventy-nine cases were of the germinal center B-cell like (GCB) type of DLBCL, 49 of the activated B-cell like (ABC) subtype and 20 were unclassified DLBCL. Twenty-four regions of recurrent genomic gains and 38 regions of recurrent genomic losses were identified over the whole cohort, with a median of 25 imbalances per case for ABC-DLBCL and 19 per case for GCB-DLBCL. Several recurrent copy number changes showed differential frequencies in the GCB- and ABC-DLBCL subgroups, including gains of HDAC7A predominantly in GCB-DLBCL (38% of cases) and losses of BACH2 and CASP8AP2 predominantly in ABC-DLBCL (35%), hinting at disparate pathogenetic mechanisms in these entities. Correlating gene expression and copy number revealed a strong gene dosage effect in all tumors, with 34% of probesets showing a concordant expression change in affected regions. Two new potential tumor suppressor genes emerging from the analysis, CASP3 and IL5RA, were sequenced in ten and 16 candidate cases, respectively. However, no mutations were found, pointing to a potential haploinsufficiency effect of these genes, considering their reduced expression in cases with deletions. Our study thus describes differences and similarities in the landscape of genomic aberrations in the DLBCL subgroups in a large collection of cases, confirming already known targets, but also discovering novel copy number changes with possible pathogenetic relevance.

  2. Genetic drivers of NF-κB deregulation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Zhang, Baochun

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide and comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies that originate from the malignant transformation of germinal center (GC) B cells. Over the past decade, significant improvement has been achieved in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis underlying this disease, thanks in part to the implementation of powerful genomic technologies allowing genome-wide structural and functional analyses. These studies revealed the presence of multiple oncogenic alterations dysregulating signal transduction pathways that are normally required for the normal biology of the cells from which these tumors are derived. Among the pathways identified as recurrent targets of genetic lesions in DLBCL, NF-κB has emerged as a central player in the development and maintenance of this disease, particularly in the less curable, activated B cell (ABC)- like subtype. These lesions reveal vulnerabilities of the lymphoma cells that can be exploited for the design of more rationale therapeutic approaches. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent progresses in understanding the role of NF-κB deregulation in the pathogenesis of DLBCL, with emphasis on the genetic basis underlying its aberrant activation, in relationship to the normal biology of B lymphocytes, and the modelling of these lesions in the mouse. PMID:27546290

  3. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes.

  4. Effect of activated antigen-specific B cells on ES-62-mediated modulation of effector function of heterologous antigen-specific T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Fraser A; Watson, Katherine A; Garside, Paul; Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2008-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the idea of using helminth-derived molecules for therapeutic purposes and indeed we have shown that ES-62, a filarial nematode-derived phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein, significantly reduces the severity of arthritis in a murine model. Clearly, knowledge of mechanism of action is important when considering molecules for use in treating disease and although much is known regarding how ES-62 interacts with the immune system, gaps in our understanding remain. A feature of filarial nematode infection is a defective, T helper 2 (Th2)-polarized antigen-specific T-cell response and in relation to this we have recently shown that ES-62 inhibits clonal expansion and modulates effector function towards a Th2 phenotype, of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. ES-62 is also known to directly modulate B-cell behaviour and hence to determine whether it was mediating these effects on T cells by disrupting B–T-cell co-operation, we have investigated antigen-specific responses using an adoptive transfer system in which traceable numbers of tg ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells and hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-specific B cells respond to a chemically coupled form of OVA–HEL that contains linked epitopes that promote cognate T- and B-cell interactions. Surprisingly, these studies indicate that activated B cells restore T-cell expansion and prevent Th2-like polarization. However, ES-62-treated double cell transfer mice demonstrate a more generalized immunosuppression with reduced levels of Th1 and -2 type cytokines and antibody subclasses. Collectively, these results suggest that whilst ES-62 can target B–T-cell co-operation, this does not promote polarizing of T-cell responses towards a Th2-type phenotype. PMID:17961164

  5. STAT-5 is activated constitutively in T cells, B cells and monocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pertovaara, M; Silvennoinen, O; Isomäki, P

    2015-01-01

    The expression and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) have been shown to be markedly increased in the salivary gland epithelial cells of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The present aim was to investigate the activation status of different STAT proteins in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes and monocytes, and their correlations with clinical parameters in patients with pSS. To this end, PB samples were drawn from 16 patients with active pSS and 16 healthy blood donors, and the phosphorylation of STAT-1, -3, -4, -5 and -6 proteins was studied in T cells, B cells and monocytes using multi-colour flow cytometry. In addition, mRNA expression of STAT molecules in PB mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied with quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR). Basal phosphorylation of STAT-5 was found to be significantly higher in PB T cells, B cells and monocytes in patients with pSS than in healthy controls. The expression of STAT-5 mRNA was not increased in PBMC. pSTAT-5 levels in B cells and monocytes showed a significant correlation with serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels and anti-SSB antibody titres. Constitutive STAT-5 activation in monocytes and CD4+ T cells was associated with purpura. There were no major differences in the activation of other STATs between pSS patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, STAT-5 is activated constitutively in PB leucocytes in patients with pSS, and basal STAT-5 phosphorylation seems to associate with hypergammaglobulinaemia, anti-SSB antibody production and purpura. PMID:25736842

  6. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL.

  7. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  8. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  9. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Mind Bomb-2 (MIB2) Protein Controls B-cell CLL/Lymphoma 10 (BCL10)-dependent NF-κB Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Stempin, Cinthia C.; Chi, Liying; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; High, Anthony A.; Häcker, Hans; Redecke, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) is crucial for the activation of NF-κB in numerous immune receptor signaling pathways, including the T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead to signal transduction from BCL10 to downstream NF-κB effector kinases, such as TAK1 and components of the IKK complex, are not entirely understood. Here we used a proteomic approach and identified the E3 ligase MIB2 as a novel component of the activated BCL10 complex. In vitro translation and pulldown assays suggest direct interaction between BCL10 and MIB2. Overexpression experiments show that MIB2 controls BCL10-mediated activation of NF-κB by promoting autoubiquitination and ubiquitination of IKKγ/NEMO, as well as recruitment and activation of TAK1. Knockdown of MIB2 inhibited BCL10-dependent NF-κB activation. Together, our results identify MIB2 as a novel component of the activated BCL10 signaling complex and a missing link in the BCL10-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:21896478

  10. Distinctive patterns of BCL6 molecular alterations and their functional consequences in different subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, J; Greiner, TC; Patel, K; Dave, BJ; Smith, L; Ji, J; Wright, G; Sanger, WG; Pickering, DL; Jain, S; Horsman, DE; Shen, Y; Fu, K; Weisenburger, DD; Hans, CP; Campo, E; Gascoyne, RD; Rosenwald, A; Jaffe, ES; Delabie, J; Rimsza, L; Ott, G; Müller-Hermelink, HK; Connors, JM; Vose, JM; McKeithan, T; Staudt, LM; Chan, WC

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has revealed biologically and prognostically distinct subgroups: germinal center B-cell-like (GCB), activated B-cell-like (ABC) and primary mediastinal (PM) DLBCL. The BCL6 gene is often translocated and/or mutated in DLBCL. Therefore, we examined the BCL6 molecular alterations in these DLBCL subgroups, and their impact on BCL6 expression and BCL6 target gene repression. BCL6 translocations at the major breakpoint region (MBR) were detected in 25 (18.8%) of 133 DLBCL cases, with a higher frequency in the PM (33%) and ABC (24%) subgroups than in the GCB (10%) subgroup. Translocations at the alternative breakpoint region (ABR) were detected in five (6.4%) of 78 DLBCL cases, with three cases in ABC and one case each in the GCB and the unclassifiable subgroups. The translocated cases involved IgH and non-IgH partners in about equal frequency and were not associated with different levels of BCL6 mRNA and protein expression. BCL6 mutations were detected in 61% of DLBCL cases, with a significantly higher frequency in the GCB and PM subgroups (> 70%) than in the ABC subgroup (44%). Exon-1 mutations were mostly observed in the GCB subgroup. The repression of known BCL6 target genes correlated with the level of BCL6 mRNA and protein expression in GCB and ABC subgroups but not with BCL6 translocation and intronic mutations. No clear inverse correlation between BCL6 expression and p53 expression was observed. Patients with higher BCL6 mRNA or protein expression had a significantly better overall survival. The biological role of BCL6 in translocated cases where repression of known target genes is not demonstrated is intriguing and warrants further investigation. PMID:17625604

  11. STAT3 activation is associated with cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-10 (IL-10) in primary central nervous system diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Sasayama, Takashi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Mizukawa, Katsu; Takata, Kumi; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirotomo; Nagashima, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Masamitsu; Hirose, Takanori; Itoh, Tomoo; Kohmura, Eiji

    2015-09-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) are activated by various cytokines and oncogenes; however, the activity and pathogenesis of STAT3 in diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the central nervous system have not been thoroughly elucidated. We investigated the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 in 40 specimens of primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PCNS DLBCL) and analyzed the association between phsopho-STAT3 (pSTAT3) expression and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-6. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that most of the specimens in PCNS DLBCL expressed pSTST3 protein, and a strong phosphorylation levels of STAT3 was statistically associated with high CSF IL-10 levels, but not with CSF IL-6 levels. Next, we demonstrated that recombinant IL-10 and CSF containing IL-10 induced the phosphorylation of STAT3 in PCNS DLBCL cells. Furthermore, molecular subtype classified by Hans' algorithm was correlated with pSTAT3 expression levels and CSF IL-10 levels. These results suggest that the STAT3 activity is correlated with CSF IL-10 level, which is a useful marker for STAT3 activity in PCNS DLBCLs.

  12. PLD1 activation mediates Amb a 1-induced Th2-associated cytokine expression via the JNK/ATF-2 pathway in BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Hwa; Choi, Hye-Jin; Oh, Cheong-Hae; Oh, Jae-Won; Han, Joong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) in Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression. When BEAS-2B cells were stimulated with Amb a 1, PLD activity increased, and knockdown of PLD1 decreased Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression. Amb a 1 also activated the PLCγ/p70S6K/JNK pathway. Furthermore, Amb a 1-induced PLD activation was also attenuated by PLCγ inhibition, and knockdown of PLD1 decreased Amb a 1-induced activation of P70S6K and JNK. When ATF-2 activity was blocked with ATF-2 siRNA, Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression was completely abolished, indicating that ATF-2 is a transcriptional factor required for the expression of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to Amb a 1. Taken together, we suggest that PLD1 acts as an important regulator in Amb a 1-induced expression of IL-5 and IL-13 via a PLCγ/p70S6K/JNK/ATF-2 pathway in BEAS-2B cells. PMID:26302934

  13. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  14. Identification and validation of a two-gene expression index for subtype classification and prognosis in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghua; Tan, Cong; Ni, Shujuan; Wang, Qifeng; Wu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xun; Meng, Xia; Sheng, Weiqi; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The division of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtypes based on gene expression profiling has proved to be a landmark in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. This study aims to identify a novel biomarker to facilitate the translation of research into clinical practice. Using a training set of 350 patients, we identified a two-gene expression signature, "LIMD1-MYBL1 Index", which is significantly associated with cell-of-origin subtypes and clinical outcome. This two-gene index was further validated in two additional dataset. Tested against the gold standard method, the LIMD1-MYBL1 Index achieved 81% sensitivity, 89% specificity for ABC group and 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity for GCB group. The ABC group had significantly worse overall survival than the GCB group (hazard ratio = 3.5, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the performance of LIMD1-MYBL1 Index was satisfactory compared with common immunohistochemical algorithms. Thus, the LIMD1-MYBL1 Index had considerable clinical value for DLBCL subtype classification and prognosis. Our results might prompt the further development of this two-gene index to a simple assay amenable to routine clinical practice. PMID:25940947

  15. JMJD3 promotes survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes via distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Stupack, Dwayne G.; Bai, Nan; Xun, Jing; Ren, Guosheng; Han, Jihong; Li, Luyuan; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    JMJD3 (Jumonji domain containing-3), a histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been reported to be involved in the antigen-driven differentiation of germinal center B-cells. However, insight into the mechanism of JMJD3 in DLBCL (Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) progression remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the subtype-specific JMJD3-dependent survival effects in DLBCL. Our data showed that in the ABC subtype, silencing-down of JMJD3 inhibited interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression in a demethylase activity-dependent fashion. IRF4 reciprocally stimulated expression of JMJD3, forming a positive feedback loop that promoted survival in these cells. Accordingly, IRF4 expression was sufficient to rescue the pro-apoptotic effect of JMJD3 suppression in the ABC, but not in the GCB subtype. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of BCL-2 completely offset JMJD3-mediated survival in the GCB DLBCL cells. In vivo, treatment with siRNA to JMJD3 reduced tumor volume concordant with increased apoptosis in either subtype. This suggests it is a common target, though the distinctive signaling axes regulating DCBCL survival offer different strategic options for treating DLBCL subtypes. PMID:27102442

  16. New insights in the regulation of human B cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Heike; Diehl, Sean A.; Blom, Bianca

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide the cellular basis of the humoral immune response. All stages of this process, from B cell activation to formation of germinal centers and differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells, are influenced by extrinsic signals and controlled by transcriptional regulation. Compared to naïve B cells, memory B cells display a distinct expression profile, which allows for their rapid secondary responses. Indisputably, many B cell malignancies result from aberrations in the circuitry controlling B cell function, particularly during the GC reaction. Here we review new insights into memory B cell subtypes, recent literature on transcription factors regulating human B cell differentiation, and further evidence for B cell lymphomagenesis emanating from errors during the GC cell reactions. PMID:19447676

  17. Next generation sequencing and the management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: from whole exome analysis to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma, accounting for 30-40% of newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Historically, DLBCL has been thought to involve recurrent translocations of the IGH gene and the deregulation of rearranged oncogenes. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) have provided a vast and comprehensive catalogue of cancer genes involved in DLBCL pathogenesis. Whole exome sequencing (WES) of more than two hundred DLBCLs has completely redefined the genetic landscape of the disease by identifying recurrent single nucleotide variants and providing new therapeutic opportunities for the germinal center B-cell like (GCB), activated B-cell like (ABC), or primary mediastinal B-cell (PMBL) molecular subtypes. Some of these somatic mutations target genes that play a crucial role in B-cell function (BCR signaling, NF-κB pathway, NOTCH signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, and the PI3K pathway), immunity, cell cycle/apoptosis, or chromatin modification. In this review, we present an overview of the mutations recently discovered by NGS in DLBCL and discuss their biological relevance and possible impacts on clinical management. PMID:25091488

  18. Inhibitory activity of Socheongryong‑tang and its constituent components against the production of RANTES, eotaxin, eotaxin‑3 and MMP‑9 from BEAS‑2B cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junh-Hoon; Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2014-12-01

    Socheongryeong‑tang (SCRT) is a herbal formula previously used to treat pulmonary diseases primarily caused by the common cold virus, including airway inflammation, asthma and allergy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of SCRT water extract and its 13 constituent components on chemokine and enzyme production in the human bronchial epithelium cell line BEAS‑2B when induced by tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑4. The chemokines examined included regulated on activation of normal T‑cell‑expressed‑and‑secreted (RANTES), eotaxin and eotaxin‑3. The SCRT water extract demonstrated a dose‑dependent inhibition of RANTES, eotaxin, eotaxin‑3 and matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9) in BEAS‑2B cells. The 13 constituent compounds of SCRT water extract were quantitatively determined, and it was found that gallic acid, 6‑gingerol and methyl eugenol produced the most potent inhibition of RANTES, eotaxin and eotaxin‑3 as well as MMP‑9 activity regardless of their concentration in SCRT water extract. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the inhibitory effect of these three compounds contributed to that of SCRT water extract. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the inhibitory effects of SCRT on chemokine and enzyme production in BEAS‑2B cells was associated with three of its constituent compounds, gallic acid, 6‑gingerol and methyl eugenol. This therefore suggested the potential use of these compounds as anti‑inflammatory agents.

  19. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patient-derived xenograft models capture the molecular and biological heterogeneity of the disease.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, Bjoern; Cheng, Hongwei; Watahiki, Akira; Ducar, Matthew D; Tan, Yuxiang; Chen, Linfeng; Roemer, Margaretha G M; Ouyang, Jing; Christie, Amanda L; Zhang, Liye; Gusenleitner, Daniel; Abo, Ryan P; Farinha, Pedro; von Bonin, Frederike; Thorner, Aaron R; Sun, Heather H; Gascoyne, Randy D; Pinkus, Geraldine S; van Hummelen, Paul; Wulf, Gerald G; Aster, Jon C; Weinstock, David M; Monti, Stefano; Rodig, Scott J; Wang, Yuzhuo; Shipp, Margaret A

    2016-05-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous disease defined by transcriptional classifications, specific signaling and survival pathways, and multiple low-frequency genetic alterations. Preclinical model systems that capture the genetic and functional heterogeneity of DLBCL are urgently needed. Here, we generated and characterized a panel of large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, including 8 that reflect the immunophenotypic, transcriptional, genetic, and functional heterogeneity of primary DLBCL and 1 that is a plasmablastic lymphoma. All LBCL PDX models were subjected to whole-transcriptome sequencing to classify cell of origin and consensus clustering classification (CCC) subtypes. Mutations and chromosomal rearrangements were evaluated by whole-exome sequencing with an extended bait set. Six of the 8 DLBCL models were activated B-cell (ABC)-type tumors that exhibited ABC-associated mutations such as MYD88, CD79B, CARD11, and PIM1. The remaining 2 DLBCL models were germinal B-cell type, with characteristic alterations of GNA13, CREBBP, and EZH2, and chromosomal translocations involving IgH and either BCL2 or MYC Only 25% of the DLBCL PDX models harbored inactivating TP53 mutations, whereas 75% exhibited copy number alterations of TP53 or its upstream modifier, CDKN2A, consistent with the reported incidence and type of p53 pathway alterations in primary DLBCL. By CCC criteria, 6 of 8 DLBCL PDX models were B-cell receptor (BCR)-type tumors that exhibited selective surface immunoglobulin expression and sensitivity to entospletinib, a recently developed spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In summary, we have established and characterized faithful PDX models of DLBCL and demonstrated their usefulness in functional analyses of proximal BCR pathway inhibition.

  20. Proinflammatory GM-CSF-producing B cells in multiple sclerosis and B cell depletion therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Miyazaki, Yusei; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Touil, Hanane; Shen, Ping; Moore, Craig S; Michel, Laure; Althekair, Faisal; Rajasekharan, Sathy; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Fillatreau, Simon; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-10-21

    B cells are not limited to producing protective antibodies; they also perform additional functions relevant to both health and disease. However, the relative contribution of functionally distinct B cell subsets in human disease, the signals that regulate the balance between such subsets, and which of these subsets underlie the benefits of B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) are only partially elucidated. We describe a proinflammatory, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing human memory B cell subset that is increased in frequency and more readily induced in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared to healthy controls. In vitro, GM-CSF-expressing B cells efficiently activated myeloid cells in a GM-CSF-dependent manner, and in vivo, BCDT resulted in a GM-CSF-dependent decrease in proinflammatory myeloid responses of MS patients. A signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5)- and STAT6-dependent mechanism was required for B cell GM-CSF production and reciprocally regulated the generation of regulatory IL-10-expressing B cells. STAT5/6 signaling was enhanced in B cells of untreated MS patients compared with healthy controls, and B cells reemerging in patients after BCDT normalized their STAT5/6 signaling as well as their GM-CSF/IL-10 cytokine secretion ratios. The diminished proinflammatory myeloid cell responses observed after BCDT persisted even as new B cells reconstituted. These data implicate a proinflammatory B cell/myeloid cell axis in disease and underscore the rationale for selective targeting of distinct B cell populations in MS and other human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26491076

  1. Semi-synthesis of biologically active nisin hybrids composed of the native lanthionine ABC-fragment and a cross-stapled synthetic DE-fragment.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Peters, Nienke; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin is a promising template for designing novel peptide-based antibiotics to improve its drug-like properties. First steps in that direction represent the synthesis of hybrid nisin derivatives that contain a native nisin ABC-part and synthesized cross-stapled DE-ring fragments and are described here. The biological activity of the newly synthesized nisin derivatives was evaluated in order to compare the bioactivity of the synthetic DE-ring containing mimic and native lanthionine-bridged DE-ring containing nisin. The native nisin ABC-ring system was obtained via chymotrypsin digestion of full-length nisin, and was subsequently functionalized at the C-terminal carboxylate with two different amino alkyne moieties. Next, nisin hybrids were successfully prepared using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition 'click' chemistry by chemo-selective ligation of the ABC-alkyne with the N-terminal azido functionalized dicarba-DE ring mimic. The newly synthesized compounds were active as potent lipid II binders and retained antimicrobial activity in a growth inhibition assay. However, pore formation was not observed, possibly either due to the different character of the 'staples' as compared to the parent sulfides, or due to the triazole moiety as a sub-optimal amide bond isostere.

  2. Semi-synthesis of biologically active nisin hybrids composed of the native lanthionine ABC-fragment and a cross-stapled synthetic DE-fragment.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Peters, Nienke; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin is a promising template for designing novel peptide-based antibiotics to improve its drug-like properties. First steps in that direction represent the synthesis of hybrid nisin derivatives that contain a native nisin ABC-part and synthesized cross-stapled DE-ring fragments and are described here. The biological activity of the newly synthesized nisin derivatives was evaluated in order to compare the bioactivity of the synthetic DE-ring containing mimic and native lanthionine-bridged DE-ring containing nisin. The native nisin ABC-ring system was obtained via chymotrypsin digestion of full-length nisin, and was subsequently functionalized at the C-terminal carboxylate with two different amino alkyne moieties. Next, nisin hybrids were successfully prepared using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition 'click' chemistry by chemo-selective ligation of the ABC-alkyne with the N-terminal azido functionalized dicarba-DE ring mimic. The newly synthesized compounds were active as potent lipid II binders and retained antimicrobial activity in a growth inhibition assay. However, pore formation was not observed, possibly either due to the different character of the 'staples' as compared to the parent sulfides, or due to the triazole moiety as a sub-optimal amide bond isostere. PMID:25199583

  3. Surrogate or conventional light chains are required for membrane immunoglobulin mu to activate the precursor B cell transition [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1997 Jan 6;185(1):183

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of light chains in early B cell development we combined RAG-1 and lambda 5 mutations to produce mice that expressed neither conventional nor surrogate light chains (RAG-1-/-, lambda 5-/- ). Unique heavy and light chain genes were then introduced into the double and single mutant backgrounds. Membrane immunoglobulin (Ig)mu (mIg mu) associated with Ig alpha-Ig beta but was unable to activate the pre-B cell transition in RAG-1-/-lambda 5-/- mice. Either lambda 5 or kappa light chains were sufficient to complement this deficiency. Therefore light chains are absolutely required for a functional Ig signaling module in early B cell development. Our data provide direct evidence for the existence of two pathways for induction of early B cell development: one which is activated through surrogate light chains and mIg mu, and an alternative pathway which uses conventional light chains and mIg mu. PMID:8920890

  4. The strength of the antibody response to the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides inversely correlates with levels of B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) is a cytokine regulating antibody production. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding BAFF were associated with the antibody response to Ascaris but not to mite allergens. In the present study we evaluated the relationship between BAFF and specific antibodies against Ascaris and mites in 448 controls and 448 asthmatics. Soluble BAFF was measured by ELISA and BAFF mRNA by qPCR. Surface expression of BAFF and its receptor (BAFF-R) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Individuals with specific IgE levels to Ascaris >75th percentile had lower levels of soluble BAFF; those with specific IgG levels to Ascaris >75th percentile had reduced BAFF mRNA. Total IgE and specific IgE to mites were not related to BAFF levels. There were no differences in soluble BAFF or mRNA levels between asthmatics and controls. There was an inverse relationship between the cell-surface expression of BAFF-R on CD19+ B cells and BAFF levels at the transcriptional and protein level. Conclusions These findings suggest that differences in BAFF levels are related to the strength of the antibody response to Ascaris. PMID:24906685

  5. The ABC of Physical Activity for Health: a consensus statement from the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Gary; Blazevich, Anthony J; Boreham, Colin; Cooper, Ashley R; Crank, Helen; Ekelund, Ulf; Fox, Kenneth R; Gately, Paul; Giles-Corti, Billie; Gill, Jason M R; Hamer, Mark; McDermott, Ian; Murphy, Marie; Mutrie, Nanette; Reilly, John J; Saxton, John M; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health is constantly evolving. Therefore, the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences convened a panel of experts to review the literature and produce guidelines that health professionals might use. In the ABC of Physical Activity for Health, A is for All healthy adults, B is for Beginners, and C is for Conditioned individuals. All healthy adults aged 18-65 years should aim to take part in at least 150 min of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, or at least 75 min of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or equivalent combinations of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Moderate-intensity activities are those in which heart rate and breathing are raised, but it is possible to speak comfortably. Vigorous-intensity activities are those in which heart rate is higher, breathing is heavier, and conversation is harder. Aerobic activities should be undertaken in bouts of at least 10 min and, ideally, should be performed on five or more days a week. All healthy adults should also perform muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week. Weight training, circuit classes, yoga, and other muscle-strengthening activities offer additional health benefits and may help older adults to maintain physical independence. Beginners should work steadily towards meeting the physical activity levels recommended for all healthy adults. Even small increases in activity will bring some health benefits in the early stages and it is important to set achievable goals that provide success, build confidence, and increase motivation. For example, a beginner might be asked to walk an extra 10 min every other day for several weeks to slowly reach the recommended levels of activity for all healthy adults. It is also critical that beginners find activities they enjoy and gain support in becoming more active from family and friends. Conditioned individuals who have met the physical

  6. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  7. Toxicological effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) on rats: Bioaccumulation, antioxidant alterations, lipid damage, and ABC transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Joaquim de Paula; Kalb, Ana Cristina; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Cruz, Alex Rubén Huaman De La; Martinez, Pablo Elias; Gioda, Adriana; Souza, Marta Marques de; Gioda, Carolina Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the harmful effects of atmospheric pollutants on cardiac systems because of the presence of particulate matter (PM), a complex mixture of numerous substances including trace metals. In this study, the toxicity of PM2.5 from two regions, rural (PM2.5 level of 8.5 ± 4.0 μg m(-3)) and industrial (PM2.5 level of 14.4 ± 4.1 μg m(-3)) in Brazil, was investigated through in vivo experiments in rats. Metal accumulation and biochemical responses were evaluated after rats were exposed to three different concentrations of PM2.5 in saline extract (10× dilution, 5× dilution, and concentrated). The experimental data showed the bioaccumulation of diverse trace metals in the hearts of groups exposed to PM2.5 from both regions. Furthermore, mobilization of the antioxidant defenses and an increase in lipid peroxidation of the cardiac tissue was observed in response to the industrial and rural area PM2.5. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was increased in groups exposed to the 5× and concentrated rural PM2.5. Additionally, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity in the cardiac tissue exposed to PM2.5 was reduced in response to the 5× dilution of the rural and industrial region PM2.5. Histological analysis showed a decrease in the percentage of cardiac cells in the heart at all tested concentrations. The results indicate that exposure to different concentrations of PM2.5 from both sources causes biochemical and histological changes in the heart with consequent damage to biological structures; these factors can favor the development of cardiac diseases.

  8. Toxicological effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) on rats: Bioaccumulation, antioxidant alterations, lipid damage, and ABC transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Joaquim de Paula; Kalb, Ana Cristina; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Cruz, Alex Rubén Huaman De La; Martinez, Pablo Elias; Gioda, Adriana; Souza, Marta Marques de; Gioda, Carolina Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the harmful effects of atmospheric pollutants on cardiac systems because of the presence of particulate matter (PM), a complex mixture of numerous substances including trace metals. In this study, the toxicity of PM2.5 from two regions, rural (PM2.5 level of 8.5 ± 4.0 μg m(-3)) and industrial (PM2.5 level of 14.4 ± 4.1 μg m(-3)) in Brazil, was investigated through in vivo experiments in rats. Metal accumulation and biochemical responses were evaluated after rats were exposed to three different concentrations of PM2.5 in saline extract (10× dilution, 5× dilution, and concentrated). The experimental data showed the bioaccumulation of diverse trace metals in the hearts of groups exposed to PM2.5 from both regions. Furthermore, mobilization of the antioxidant defenses and an increase in lipid peroxidation of the cardiac tissue was observed in response to the industrial and rural area PM2.5. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was increased in groups exposed to the 5× and concentrated rural PM2.5. Additionally, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity in the cardiac tissue exposed to PM2.5 was reduced in response to the 5× dilution of the rural and industrial region PM2.5. Histological analysis showed a decrease in the percentage of cardiac cells in the heart at all tested concentrations. The results indicate that exposure to different concentrations of PM2.5 from both sources causes biochemical and histological changes in the heart with consequent damage to biological structures; these factors can favor the development of cardiac diseases. PMID:27567156

  9. ABC Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-14

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: `Provide a weapon`s grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon`s grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.` This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments.

  10. ABC Books and Activities: From Preschool to High School. School Library Media Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathie Hilterbran

    Intended primarily for librarians and media specialists, this book offers an in-depth analysis of alphabet books from their serious, religious beginnings to their "funny," instructive, and artistic present. The book lists 542 titles with short annotations, suggested activities, and essays on each type of book. Following an introduction, which…

  11. BCL2 Translocation Defines a Unique Tumor Subset within the Germinal Center B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Javeed; Sanger, Warren G.; Horsman, Douglas E.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Pickering, Diane L.; Dave, Bhavana; Dave, Sandeep; Xiao, Li; Cao, Kajia; Zhu, Quiming; Sherman, Simon; Hans, Christine P.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Greiner, Timothy C.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Ott, German; Müller-Hermelink, H. Konrad; Delabie, Jan; Braziel, Rita M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Campo, Elias; Lynch, James C.; Connors, Joseph M.; Vose, Julie M.; Armitage, James O.; Grogan, Thomas M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Chan, Wing C.

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has revealed prognostically important subgroups: germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. The t(14;18)(q32;q21) has been reported previously to define a unique subset within the GCB-DLBCL. We evaluated for the translocation in 141 cases of DLBCL that were successfully gene expression profiled. Using a dual-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization assay, we detected the t(14;18) in 17% of DLBCLs and in 34% of the GCB subgroup which contained the vast majority of positive cases. In addition, 12 t(14;18)-positive cases detected by polymerase chain reaction assays on additional samples were added to the fluorescence in situ hybridization-positive cases for subsequent analysis. Immunohistochemical data indicated that BCL2, BCL6, and CD10 protein were preferentially expressed in the t(14;18)-positive cases as compared to t(14;18)-negative cases. Within the GCB subgroup, the expression of BCL2 and CD10, but not BCL6, differed significantly between cases with or without the t(14;18): 88% versus 24% for BCL2 and 72% versus 32% for CD10, respectively. In the GCB-DLBCL subgroup, a heterogeneous group of genes is overexpressed in the t(14;18)-positive subset, among which BCL2 is a significant discriminator. Interestingly, the t(14;18)-negative subset is dominated by overexpression of cell cycle-associated genes, indicating that these tumors are significantly more proliferative, suggesting distinctive pathogenetic mechanisms. However, despite this higher proliferative activity, there was no significant difference in overall or failure-free survival between the t(14;18)-positive and -negative subsets within the GCB subgroup. PMID:15215171

  12. Tumor-released autophagosomes induce IL-10-producing B cells with suppressive activity on T lymphocytes via TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng; Wen, Zhifa; Cheng, Feng; Ma, Jie; Li, Weixia; Ren, Hongyan; Sheng, Yemeng; Dong, Huixia; Lu, Liwei; Hu, Hong-Ming; Wang, Li-Xin

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that tumor cells can release autophagosomes, which transport a broad array of biologically active molecules with potential modulatory effects on immune cell functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of tumor cells-released autophagosomes (i.e. TRAP) in regulating B cell differentiation and function. TRAPs from murine tumor cell lines were found to induce splenic B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) with a distinct phenotype of CD1d(+) CD5(+), which could potently inhibit CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses in IL-10-depedent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, adoptive transfer of TRAP-induced Bregs abrogated the immune response and antitumor effect induced by OVA-loaded DC vaccinations in E.G7-OVA-bearing mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that membrane-bound high-mobility group B1 (HMGB1) on the intact TRAPs was crucial for inducing Breg differentiation via the activation of TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway in B cells. Moreover, TRAPs enriched from malignant effusions of cancer patients could induce human B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing B cells with immunoregulatory functions, the frequency of which were positively correlated with the HMGB1 levels on TRAPs. Together, our findings have demonstrated that TRAPs promote the generation of IL-10(+) Bregs, which may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immunity. PMID:27622036

  13. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-27

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  14. Rhizobium meliloti nodD genes mediate host-specific activation of nodABC.

    PubMed Central

    Honma, M A; Asomaning, M; Ausubel, F M

    1990-01-01

    To differentiate among the roles of the three nodD genes of Rhizobium meliloti 1021, we studied the activation of a nodC-lacZ fusion by each of the three nodD genes in response to root exudates from several R. meliloti host plants and in response to the flavone luteolin. We found (i) that the nodD1 and nodD2 products (NodD1 and NodD2) responded differently to root exudates from a variety of hosts, (ii) that NodD1 but not NodD2 responded to luteolin, (iii) that NodD2 functioned synergistically with NodD1 or NodD3, (iv) that NodD2 interfered with NodD1-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ in response to luteolin, and (v) that a region adjacent to and upstream of nodD2 was required for NodD2-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ. We also studied the ability of each of the three R. meliloti nodD genes to complement nodD mutations in R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. We found (i) that nodD1 complemented an R. trifolii nodD mutation but not a Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 nodD1 mutation and (ii) that R. meliloti nodD2 or nodD3 plus R. meliloti syrM complemented the nodD mutations in both R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. Finally, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the R. meliloti nodD2 gene and found that R. meliloti NodD1 and NodD2 are highly homologous except in the C-terminal region. Our results support the hypothesis that R. meliloti utilizes the three copies of nodD to optimize the interaction with each of its legume hosts. PMID:2298703

  15. A Mutation within the Extended X Loop Abolished Substrate-induced ATPase Activity of the Human Liver ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter MDR3*

    PubMed Central

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. PMID:25533467

  16. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Baker, Richard E; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-08-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID.

  17. CD40-Activated B Cell Cancer Vaccine Improves Second Clinical Remission and Survival in Privately Owned Dogs with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Erika; Coughlin, Christina M.; Overley, Beth; Gregor, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based active immunotherapy for cancer is a promising novel strategy, with the first dendritic cell (DC) vaccine achieving regulatory approval for clinical use last year. Manufacturing remains arduous, especially for DC vaccines, and the prospect of using cell-based immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting or in combination with chemotherapy remains largely untested. Here, we used a comparative oncology approach to test the safety and potential efficacy of tumor RNA-loaded, CD40-activated B cells in privately owned dogs presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a clinical scenario that represents not only a major problem in veterinary medicine but also a bona fide spontaneous animal model for the human condition. When administered to NHL dogs in remission after induction chemotherapy, CD40-B cells electroporated ex vivo with autologous tumor RNA safely stimulated immunity in vivo. Although chemotherapy plus CD40-B vaccination did not improve time-to-progression or lymphoma-specific survival compared to dogs treated with chemotherapy alone, vaccination potentiated the effects of salvage therapy and improved the rate of durable second remissions as well as subsequent lymphoma-specific survival following salvage therapy. Several of these relapsed dogs are now long-term survivors and free of disease for more than a year. Overall, these clinical and immunological results suggest that cell-based CD40 cancer vaccination is safe and synergizes with chemotherapy to improve clinical outcome in canine NHL. More broadly, our findings underscore the unique value of clinical investigations in tumor-bearing companion animals. PMID:21904611

  18. Generation of Recombination Activating Gene-1-Deficient Neonatal Piglets: A Model of T and B Cell Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuya; Sendai, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Seki-Soma, Marie; Hirose, Kensuke; Watanabe, Motoo; Fukawa, Kazuo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Although severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a very important research model for mice and SCID mice are widely used, there are only few reports describing the SCID pig models. Therefore, additional research in this area is needed. In this study, we describe the generation of Recombination activating gene-1 (Rag-1)-deficient neonatal piglets in Duroc breed using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with gene targeting and analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histology. We constructed porcine Rag-1 gene targeting vectors for the Exon 2 region and obtained heterozygous/homozygous Rag-1 knockout cell colonies using SCNT. We generated two Rag-1-deficient neonatal piglets and compared them with wild-type neonatal piglets. FACS analysis showed that Rag-1 disruption causes a lack of Immunoglobulin M-positive B cells and CD3-positive T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistent with FACS analysis, histological analysis revealed structural defects and an absence of mature lymphocytes in the spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLNs), and thymus in Rag-1-deficient piglets. These results confirm that Rag-1 is necessary for the generation of lymphocytes in pigs, and Rag-1-deficient piglets exhibit a T and B cell deficient SCID (T-B-SCID) phenotype similar to that of rodents and humans. The T-B-SCID pigs with Rag-1 deficiency generated in this study could be a suitably versatile model for laboratory, translational, and biomedical research, including the development of a humanized model and assessment of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25437445

  19. Gene expression-based risk score in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bret, Caroline; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jérôme

    2012-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and displays heterogeneous clinical and molecular characteristics. In this study, high throughput gene expression profiling of DLBCL tumor samples was used to design a 12-gene expression-based risk score (GERS) predictive for patient's overall survival. GERS allowed identifying a high-risk group comprising 46,4% of the DLBCL patients in two independent cohorts (n=414 and n=69). GERS was shown to be an independent predictor of survival when compared to the previously published prognostic factors, including the International Prognostic Index (IPI). GERS displayed a prognostic value in germinal-center B-cell-like subgroup (GCB) and activated B cell-like (ABC) molecular subgroups of patients as well as in DLBCL patients treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) or rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP) regimens. Combination of GERS and IPI lead to a potent prognostic classification of DLBCL patients. Finally, a genomic instability gene signature was highlighted in gene expression profiles of patients belonging to the high-risk GERS-defined group. PMID:23482333

  20. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  1. Cigarette smoke extract-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis and anti-oxidative Nrf-2 up-regulation are mediated by ROS-stimulated p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xi-Xi; Yang, Xin-Fu; Jiang, Jun-Xia; Zhang, Shui-Juan; Guan, Yan; Liu, Ya-Nan; Sun, Yan-Hong; Xie, Qiang-Min

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke contains reactive oxygen (ROS) that can cause oxidative stress. It increases the number of apoptotic and necrotic lung cells and further induces the development of chronic airway disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). CSE exposure induced ROS generation and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation that are associated with the activation of apoptosis-regulating signal kinase 1 (ASK-1). N-acetylcysteine (a general antioxidant) attenuated the CSE-induced ASK-1 and p38 MAPK activation and cell apoptosis, suggesting a triggering role of ROS in ASK-1/p38 MAPK activation during apoptotic progression. In contrast, the inhibition and knockdown of p38 attenuated the expression of anti-oxidant master NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and CSE-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38 MAPK modulates Nrf-2 expression and presumably prevents cell apoptosis. Taken together, the data presented in this manuscript demonstrate that the ROS-dependent ASK-1/p38 signaling cascade regulates CSE-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis. In addition, anti-oxidative Nrf-2 is also up-regulated by the ROS/p38 signaling cascade in this progression. PMID:25134437

  2. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  3. Applying the ABCs in provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Seema

    2012-11-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is an accounting technique designed to guard against potentially serious financial problems that can arise when an organization's accounting costs deviate significantly from its actual costs. In general, an ABC analysis considers two factors: a cost element (a directly measurable unit of cost, such as the cost of an item) and a cost driver (a directly measurable feature of the service, such as how often the item is used). ABC is best applied to specific service areas, orservice packages, for which consumption of resources is largely predictable and atomic units of services can be accurately identified. PMID:23173369

  4. Applying the ABCs in provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Seema

    2012-11-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is an accounting technique designed to guard against potentially serious financial problems that can arise when an organization's accounting costs deviate significantly from its actual costs. In general, an ABC analysis considers two factors: a cost element (a directly measurable unit of cost, such as the cost of an item) and a cost driver (a directly measurable feature of the service, such as how often the item is used). ABC is best applied to specific service areas, orservice packages, for which consumption of resources is largely predictable and atomic units of services can be accurately identified.

  5. Threshold Levels of Gfi1 Maintain E2A Activity for B Cell Commitment via Repression of Id1

    PubMed Central

    Fraszczak, Jennifer; Helness, Anne; Chen, Riyan; Vadnais, Charles; Robert, François; Khandanpour, Cyrus; Möröy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    A regulatory circuit that controls myeloid versus B lymphoid cell fate in hematopoietic progenitors has been proposed, in which a network of the transcription factors Egr1/2, Nab, Gfi1 and PU.1 forms the core element. Here we show that a direct link between Gfi1, the transcription factor E2A and its inhibitor Id1 is a critical element of this regulatory circuit. Our data suggest that a certain threshold of Gfi1 is required to gauge E2A activity by adjusting levels of Id1 in multipotent progenitors, which are the first bipotential myeloid/lymphoid-restricted progeny of hematopoietic stem cells. If Gfi1 levels are high, Id1 is repressed enabling E2A to activate a specific set of B lineage genes by binding to regulatory elements for example the IL7 receptor gene. If Gfi1 levels fall below a threshold, Id1 expression increases and renders E2A unable to function, which prevents hematopoietic progenitors from engaging along the B lymphoid lineage. PMID:27467586

  6. Oncogenic CARMA1 couples NF-κB and β-catenin signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bognar, M K; Vincendeau, M; Erdmann, T; Seeholzer, T; Grau, M; Linnemann, J R; Ruland, J; Scheel, C H; Lenz, P; Ott, G; Lenz, G; Hauck, S M; Krappmann, D

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the antiapoptotic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a hallmark of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Recurrent oncogenic mutations are found in the scaffold protein CARMA1 (CARD11) that connects B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling to the canonical NF-κB pathway. We asked how far additional downstream processes are activated and contribute to the oncogenic potential of DLBCL-derived CARMA1 mutants. To this end, we expressed oncogenic CARMA1 in the NF-κB negative DLBCL lymphoma cell line BJAB. By a proteomic approach we identified recruitment of β-catenin and its destruction complex consisting of APC, AXIN1, CK1α and GSK3β to oncogenic CARMA1. Recruitment of the β-catenin destruction complex was independent of CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 complex formation or constitutive NF-κB activation and promoted the stabilization of β-catenin. The β-catenin destruction complex was also recruited to CARMA1 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which coincided with elevated β-catenin expression. In line, β-catenin was frequently detected in non-GCB DLBCL biopsies that rely on chronic BCR signaling. Increased β-catenin amounts alone were not sufficient to induce classical WNT target gene signatures, but could augment TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activation in response to WNT signaling. In conjunction with NF-κB, β-catenin enhanced expression of immunosuppressive interleukin-10 and suppressed antitumoral CCL3, indicating that β-catenin can induce a favorable tumor microenvironment. Thus, parallel activation of NF-κB and β-catenin signaling by gain-of-function mutations in CARMA1 augments WNT stimulation and is required for regulating the expression of distinct NF-κB target genes to trigger cell-intrinsic and extrinsic processes that promote DLBCL lymphomagenesis. PMID:26776161

  7. Roles of MAPK pathway activation during cytokine induction in BEAS-2B cells exposed to fine World Trade Center (WTC) dust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Prophete, Colette; Soukup, Joleen M; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max; Ghio, Andrew; Qu, Qingshan; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chen, Haobin

    2010-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse on September 11, 2001 released copious amounts of particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere of New York City. Follow-up studies on persons exposed to the dusts have revealed a severely increased rate for asthma and other respiratory illnesses. There have only been a few studies that have sought to discern the possible mechanisms underlying these untoward pathologies. In one study, an increased cytokine release was detected in cells exposed to WTC fine dusts (PM₂.₅ fraction or WTC₂.₅). However, the mechanism(s) for these increases has yet to be fully defined. Because activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is known to cause cytokine induction, the current study was undertaken to analyze the possible involvement of these pathways in any increased cytokine formation by lung epithelial cells (as BEAS-2B cells) exposed to WTC₂.₅. Our results showed that exposure to WTC₂.₅ for 5 hr increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA expression in BEAS-2B cells, as well as its protein levels in the culture media, in a dose-dependent manner. Besides IL-6, cytokine multiplex analyses revealed that formation of IL-8 and -10 was also elevated by the exposure. Both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, signaling pathways were found to be activated in cells exposed to WTC₂.₅. Inactivation of ERK signaling pathways by PD98059 effectively blocked IL-6, -8, and -10 induction by WTC₂.₅; the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly decreased induction of IL-8 and -10. Together, our data demonstrated activation of MAPK signaling pathway(s) likely played an important role in the WTC₂.₅-induced formation of several inflammatory (and, subsequently, anti-inflammatory) cytokines. The results are important in that they help to define one mechanism via which the WTC dusts may have acted to cause the documented increases in asthma and other

  8. B cell biology: implications for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Anolik, J H

    2013-04-01

    B cells are critical players in the orchestration of properly regulated immune responses, normally providing protective immunity without autoimmunity. Balance in the B cell compartment is achieved through the finely regulated participation of multiple B cell populations with different antibody-dependent and independent functions. Both types of functions allow B cells to modulate other components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Autoantibody-independent B cell functions include antigen presentation, T cell activation and polarization, and dendritic cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines and chemokines and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organization including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Additionally, the functional versatility of B cells enables them to play either protective or pathogenic roles in autoimmunity. In turn, B cell dysfunction has been critically implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies and heterogeneous clinical involvement. Thus, the breakdown of B cell tolerance is a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B cell activation thresholds, B cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Once tolerance is broken, autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms including immune-complex mediated Type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines including IFNα, TNF and IL-1. The complexity of B cell functions has been highlighted by the variable success of B cell-targeted therapies in multiple autoimmune diseases, including those conventionally viewed as T cell-mediated conditions. Given the widespread

  9. CLL Cells Respond to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation with a MicroRNA/mRNA Signature Associated with MYC Activation and Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pede, Valerie; Rombout, Ans; Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Mestdagh, Pieter; Robberecht, Nore; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; Philippé, Jan; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease with variable clinical outcome. Several prognostic factors such as the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes (IGHV) mutation status are linked to the B-cell receptor (BCR) complex, supporting a role for triggering the BCR in vivo in the pathogenesis. The miRNA profile upon stimulation and correlation with IGHV mutation status is however unknown. To evaluate the transcriptional response of peripheral blood CLL cells upon BCR stimulation in vitro, miRNA and mRNA expression was measured using hybridization arrays and qPCR. We found both IGHV mutated and unmutated CLL cells to respond with increased expression of MYC and other genes associated with BCR activation, and a phenotype of cell cycle progression. Genome-wide expression studies showed hsa-miR-132-3p/hsa-miR-212 miRNA cluster induction associated with a set of downregulated genes, enriched for genes modulated by BCR activation and amplified by Myc. We conclude that BCR triggering of CLL cells induces a transcriptional response of genes associated with BCR activation, enhanced cell cycle entry and progression and suggest that part of the transcriptional profiles linked to IGHV mutation status observed in isolated peripheral blood are not cell intrinsic but rather secondary to in vivo BCR stimulation. PMID:23560086

  10. Circulating CD21low B cells in common variable immunodeficiency resemble tissue homing, innate-like B cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Baerbel; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Foerster, Christian; Hoenig, Manfred; Driessen, Gertjan; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J.; Wiech, Elisabeth; Visentini, Marcella; Quinti, Isabella; Prasse, Antje; Voelxen, Nadine; Salzer, Ulrich; Goldacker, Sigune; Fisch, Paul; Eibel, Hermann; Schwarz, Klaus; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Warnatz, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The homeostasis of circulating B cell subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy adults is well regulated, but in disease it can be severely disturbed. Thus, a subgroup of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) presents with an extraordinary expansion of an unusual B cell population characterized by the low expression of CD21. CD21low B cells are polyclonal, unmutated IgM+IgD+ B cells but carry a highly distinct gene expression profile which differs from conventional naïve B cells. Interestingly, while clearly not representing a memory population, they do share several features with the recently defined memory-like tissue, Fc receptor-like 4 positive B cell population in the tonsils of healthy donors. CD21low B cells show signs of previous activation and proliferation in vivo, while exhibiting defective calcium signaling and poor proliferation in response to B cell receptor stimulation. CD21low B cells express decreased amounts of homeostatic but increased levels of inflammatory chemokine receptors. This might explain their preferential homing to peripheral tissues like the bronchoalveolar space of CVID or the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, as a result of the close resemblance to the gene expression profile, phenotype, function and preferential tissue homing of murine B1 B cells, we suggest that CD21low B cells represent a human innate-like B cell population. PMID:19666505

  11. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  12. Roles of MAPK Pathway Activation During Cytokine Induction in BEAS-2B Cells Exposed to Fine World Trade Center (WTC) Dust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Prophete, Colette; Soukup, Joleen M.; Chen, Lung-chi; Costa, Max; Ghio, Andrew; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Haobin

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse on September 11, 2001 released copious amounts of particulate matter into the atmosphere of New York City. Follow-up studies on persons exposed to the dusts have revealed a severely increased rate for asthma and other respiratory illnesses. There have only been a few studies that have sought to discern the possible mechanisms underlying these untoward pathologies. In one study, an increased cytokine release was detected in cells exposed to WTC fine dusts (PM2.5 fraction or WTC2.5). However, the mechanism(s) for these increases has yet to be fully defined. Because activation of the MAPK signaling pathways is known to cause cytokine induction, the current study was undertaken to analyze the possible involvement of these pathways in any increased cytokine formation by lung epithelial cells (as BEAS-2B cells) exposed to WTC2.5. Our results showed that exposure to WTC2.5 for 5 hr increased IL-6 mRNA expression in BEAS-2B cells, as well as its protein levels in the culture media, in a dose-dependent manner. Besides IL-6, Cytokine Multiplex analyses revealed that formation of IL-8 and -10 was also elevated by the exposure. Both ERK and p38, but not JNK, signaling pathways were found to be activated in cells exposed to WTC2.5. Inactivation of ERK signaling pathways by PD98059 effectively blocked IL-6, -8, and -10 induction by WTC2.5; the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly decreased induction of IL-8 and -10. Together, our data demonstrated activation of MAPK signaling pathway(s) likely played an important role in the WTC2.5-induced formation of several inflammatory (and, subsequently, anti-inflammatory) cytokines. The results are important in that they help to define one mechanism via which the WTC dusts may have acted to cause the documented increases in asthma and other inflammation-associated respiratory dysfunctions in the individuals exposed to the dusts released from the WTC collapse. PMID:20731619

  13. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  14. The life and death of a B cell.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Thierry; Casamayor-Pallejà, Montserrat; Krammer, Peter H

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of apoptosis in the B cell lineage has implications for homeostasis, quality control of the antibody response, and tolerance. In this chapter we examine the different checkpoints that control life and death decisions of B cells during the antigen-independent and antigen-dependent phases of their development. We discuss the cell death mechanism involved in elimination of unwanted B cells at different stages of their development as well as the signals that trigger or repress the apoptotic process. At the steady state, before or after development of an immune response, B cell apoptosis ensures that the antigen receptor (BCR) on newly produced B cells is functional and does not recognize self-antigens with high avidity. It also ensures that the size of the peripheral B cell compartment remains constant in spite of the continuous input of B cells from the bone marrow. All these processes are controlled by the mitochondrial death pathway and are thus perturbed by overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the bcl-2 gene family. By contrast, the death receptor pathway plays a prominent role during the antigen-dependent phase of B cell development. Three sets of membrane molecules stand as crucial regulators of B cell survival. First, the BCR which plays a central but ambiguous role. On the one hand, it triggers death of B cells that recognize self-antigens or have been exposed to repeated antigenic stimulations. On the other hand, it promotes survival of the peripheral mature B cell pool and protects activated B cells from CD95-induced killing. Second, the death receptor Fas/CD95 which is instrumental in censoring B cells activated in a bystander fashion at the initiation of the response to T-dependent antigens. It also drives elimination of low-affinity and self-reactive B cell clones that arise through the process of somatic mutations during the germinal center reaction. As such, it contributes to the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Finally

  15. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  16. Septin4_i1 Regulates Apoptosis in Hepatic Stellate Cells through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ/Akt/B-Cell Lymphoma 2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Jinling; Pan, Jing; Xu, Tianhua; Qin, Yongwei; He, Xingxin; Huang, Caiqun

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has been verified as a potential mechanism to aid in hepatic fibrosis remission. Earlier research suggests that Septin4_i1 may sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of Septin4_i1 on HSC apoptosis and explore the associated signaling pathways. We found that Septin4_i1 can induce apoptosis in LX-2 cells and that this is accompanied by an up-regulation in cleaved-caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and a down-regulation in α-SMA expression. Over-expression of Septin4_i1 reduced phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression but had no effect on the expression of p53 and death receptor (DR)-5. The decreased expression of Bcl-2 and the increased expression of cleaved-caspase-3 induced by Sept4_i1 could be reversed by GW501516, a PPAR-β/δ agonist that has been reported by others to enhance Akt signaling. In addition, GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, could also inhibit apoptosis in LX-2 cells induced by Sept4_i1. In conclusion, our data suggest that Sept4_i1 induces HSC apoptosis by inhibiting Akt and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating PPAR-γ expression. PMID:25527525

  17. Septin4_i1 regulates apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/Akt/B-cell lymphoma 2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Jinling; Duan, Yinong; Pan, Jing; Xu, Tianhua; Qin, Yongwei; He, Xingxin; Huang, Caiqun

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has been verified as a potential mechanism to aid in hepatic fibrosis remission. Earlier research suggests that Septin4_i1 may sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of Septin4_i1 on HSC apoptosis and explore the associated signaling pathways. We found that Septin4_i1 can induce apoptosis in LX-2 cells and that this is accompanied by an up-regulation in cleaved-caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and a down-regulation in α-SMA expression. Over-expression of Septin4_i1 reduced phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression but had no effect on the expression of p53 and death receptor (DR)-5. The decreased expression of Bcl-2 and the increased expression of cleaved-caspase-3 induced by Sept4_i1 could be reversed by GW501516, a PPAR-β/δ agonist that has been reported by others to enhance Akt signaling. In addition, GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, could also inhibit apoptosis in LX-2 cells induced by Sept4_i1. In conclusion, our data suggest that Sept4_i1 induces HSC apoptosis by inhibiting Akt and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating PPAR-γ expression. PMID:25527525

  18. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  19. Circulating Th1-Cell-type Tfh Cells that Exhibit Impaired B Cell Help Are Preferentially Activated during Acute Malaria in Children.

    PubMed

    Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M; Yazew, Takele B; Skinner, Jeff; Li, Shanping; Jain, Aarti; Felgner, Philip L; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-10-13

    Malaria-specific antibody responses are short lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated bouts of febrile malaria. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this apparent immune deficiency are poorly understood. Recently, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells have been shown to play a critical role in generating long-lived antibody responses. We show that Malian children have resting PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CD4(+) Tfh cells in circulation that resemble germinal center Tfh cells phenotypically and functionally. Within this population, PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(-) Tfh cells are superior to Th1-polarized PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(+) Tfh cells in helping B cells. Longitudinally, we observed that malaria drives Th1 cytokine responses, and accordingly, the less-functional Th1-polarized Tfh subset was preferentially activated and its activation did not correlate with antibody responses. These data provide insights into the Tfh cell biology underlying suboptimal antibody responses to malaria in children and suggest that vaccine strategies that promote CXCR3(-) Tfh cell responses may improve malaria vaccine efficacy. PMID:26440897

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase initiates an ROR-γt–AHR-independent program leading to IL-17 production by activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Daniela A; Jackson, Shaun W; Gorosito-Serran, Melisa; Acosta-Rodriguez, Eva V; Amezcua-Vesely, Maria C; Sather, Blythe D; Singh, Akhilesh K.; Khim, Socheath; Mucci, Juan; Liggitt, Denny; Campetella, Oscar; Oukka, Mohamed; Gruppi, Adriana; Rawlings, David J

    2013-01-01

    We identified B cells as a major source for rapid, innate-like interleukin 17 (IL-17) production in vivo in response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. IL-17+ B cells exhibited a plasmablast phenotype, outnumbered TH17 cells and were required for optimal response to this pathogen. Using both murine and human primary B cells, we demonstrate that exposure to parasite-derived trans-sialidase in vitro was sufficient to trigger modification of the cell surface mucin, CD45, leading to Btk-dependent signaling and IL-17A or IL-17F production via an ROR-γt and AHR-independent transcriptional program. Our combined data suggest that generation of IL-17+ B cells may be an unappreciated feature of innate immune responses required for pathogen control or IL-17-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:23563688

  1. Thermodynamics of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Han, Lei; Zhao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters form the largest of all transporter families, and their structural study has made tremendous progress over recent years. However, despite such advances, the precise mechanisms that determine the energy-coupling between ATP hydrolysis and the conformational changes following substrate binding remain to be elucidated. Here, we present our thermodynamic analysis for both ABC importers and exporters, and introduce the two new concepts of differential-binding energy and elastic conformational energy into the discussion. We hope that the structural analysis of ABC transporters will henceforth take thermodynamic aspects of transport mechanisms into account as well.

  2. Toll-like receptor 7 cooperates with IL-4 in activated B cells through antigen receptor or CD38 and induces class switch recombination and IgG1 production.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Nagai, Yoshinori; Kariyone, Ai; Shibata, Takuma; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akira, Shizuo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-01

    IL-4 and 8-mercaptoguanosine (8-SGuo) stimulation of CD38-activated B cells induces mu to gamma1 class switch recombination (CSR) at the DNA level leading to a high level of IgG1 production. Although some of signaling events initiated by IL-4 in activated B cells have been characterized, the involvement of TLR/MyD88 and Btk pathway in IL-4-dependent mu to gamma1 CSR has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, we characterized receptors for 8-SGuo and differential roles of 8-SGuo and IL-4 in the induction and mu to gamma1 CSR and IgG1 production. The role of TLR7 and MyD88 in 8-SGuo-induced AID expression and mu to gamma1 CSR was documented, as 8-SGuo did not act on CD38-stimulated splenic B cells from Tlr7(-/-) and Myd88(-/-) mice. CD38-activated B cells from Btk-deficient mice failed to respond to TLR7 ligands for the AID expression and CSR, indicating that Btk is also indispensable for the system. Stimulation of CD38-activated B cells with 8-SGuo induced significant AID expression and DNA double strand breaks, but IL-4 stimulation by itself did not trigger mu to gamma1 CSR. Intriguingly, the mu to gamma1 CSR in the B cells stimulated with CD38 and 8-SGuo totally depends on IL-4 stimulation. Similar results were obtained in the activated B cells through BCR and loxoribine, a well-known TLR7 ligand, in place of 8-SGuo. In vivo administration of TLR7 ligand and anti-CD38 antibody induced the generation of CD138(+) IgG1(+) cells. These results indicate that TLR7 is a receptor for 8-SGuo and plays an essential role in the AID and Blimp-1 expression; however it is not enough to complete mu to gamma1 CSR in CD38-activated B cells. IL-4 may be required for the induction of DNA repair system together with AID for the completion of CSR.

  3. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  4. Functional analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell response to Epstein-Barr virus: T-cell-mediated activation of resting B cells and induction of viral BZLF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z; Cannon, M J

    2000-07-01

    In contrast to the major role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell responses in immunosurveillance, recent studies have offered the apparently paradoxical suggestion that development of EBV-driven human B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and tumors in SCID/hu mice is dependent on the presence of T cells, in particular CD4(+) T cells. This study presents a functional analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell response to EBV and shows that while CD4(+) T cells may be cytotoxic, they also express Th2 cytokines and CD40 ligand (gp39) and possess B-cell helper function. We show that EBV-specific CD4(+) T cells can provide non-HLA-restricted help for activation of resting B cells via a gp39-CD40-dependent pathway and are able to induce expression of BZLF1, a viral lytic cycle transactivator in latently infected resting B cells, ultimately resulting in rapid outgrowth of transformed B-cell colonies. These results support the proposal that CD4(+) T cells may play a key role in reactivation of latent EBV infection and may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders.

  5. RNA-transfected CD40-activated B cells induce functional T-cell responses against viral and tumor antigen targets: implications for pediatric immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Christina M; Vance, Barbara A; Grupp, Stephan A; Vonderheide, Robert H

    2004-03-15

    Vaccination with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) engineered to mimic mechanisms of immune stimulation represents a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. Dendritic cell vaccines have entered phase 3 testing in adult malignancies, but such vaccines in children have been limited. We demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B) transfected with RNA may serve as an alternative vaccine that can be generated from small blood volumes regardless of patient age. CD40-B from pediatric patients are efficient APCs and can be loaded with RNA as an antigenic payload, permitting simultaneous targeting of multiple antigenic epitopes without the necessity of HLA matching. For viral and tumor antigens, CD40-B/RNA technology induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from adults and children, which could be identified with peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers. These CTLs secreted interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and killed targets in an MHC-restricted fashion. For pooled neuroblastoma RNA and autologous neuroblastoma RNA, CTLs that lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, including CTLs specific against the widely expressed tumor-antigen survivin, were generated. These findings support a novel platform for tumor-specific vaccine or adoptive immunotherapies in pediatric malignancies.

  6. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  7. Evidence for preferential repair of 3-carbethoxypsoralen plus UVA induced DNA lesions in the active MAT alpha locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the UvrABC assay.

    PubMed

    Méniel, V; Brouwer, J; Averbeck, D

    1993-09-01

    The occurrence of preferential repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus was confirmed after 254 nm UV irradiation. Experiments carried out using the UvrABC excinuclease assay with the monofunctional furocoumarin 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs) plus UVA radiation which induce mainly monoadducts in DNA demonstrated preferential repair of the active MAT alpha locus compared with the inactive HML alpha locus in a SIR+ strain. However, as after 254 nm UV irradiation, no difference in the rate of removal of 3-CPs plus UVA induced lesions was observed between the two loci in the sir-3 mutant in which both loci are active. Thus, it appears that 3-CPs plus UVA induced monoadducts as well as pyrimidine dimers are subject to preferential repair.

  8. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  9. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  10. An in vitro study of liposomal curcumin: stability, toxicity and biological activity in human lymphocytes and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changguo; Johnston, Thomas D; Jeon, Hoonbae; Gedaly, Roberto; McHugh, Patrick P; Burke, Thomas G; Ranjan, Dinesh

    2009-01-21

    Curcumin is a multi-functional and pharmacologically safe natural agent. Used as a food additive for centuries, it also has anti-inflammatory, anti-virus and anti-tumor properties. We previously found that it is a potent inhibitor of cyclosporin A (CsA)-resistant T-cell co-stimulation pathway. It inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, NFkappaB activation and IL-2 signaling. In spite of its safety and efficacy, the in vivo bioavailability of curcumin is poor, and this may be a major obstacle to its utility as a therapeutic agent. Liposomes are known to be excellent carriers for drug delivery. In this in vitro study, we report the effects of different liposome formulations on curcumin stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), human blood, plasma and culture medium RPMI-1640+10% FBS (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Liposomal curcumin had higher stability than free curcumin in PBS. Liposomal and free curcumin had similar stability in human blood, plasma and RPMI-1640+10% FBS. We looked at the toxicity of non-drug-containing liposomes on (3)H-thymidine incorporation by concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated human lymphocytes, splenocytes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). We found that dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) were toxic to the tested cells. However, addition of cholesterol to the lipids at DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol=7:1:8 (molar ratio) almost completely eliminated the lipid toxicity to these cells. Liposomal curcumin had similar or even stronger inhibitory effects on Con A-stimulated human lymphocyte, splenocyte and LCL proliferation. We conclude that liposomal curcumin may be useful for intravenous administration to improve the bioavailability and efficacy, facilitating in vivo studies that could ultimately lead to clinical application of curcumin.

  11. ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinqiong; Liu, Yiping; Tang, Youhong; Li, Li; Zeng, Ruolan; Zeng, Shan; Zhong, Meizuo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a detoxifying enzyme, is responsible for chemoresistance in a variety of tumors. Although the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), chemoresistance is a common cause of treatment failure. This study aims to investigate the significance of ALDH1A1 expression and the mechanism by which ALDH1A1 is involved in the chemoresistance of DLBCL cells. ALDH1A1 expression was assessed in 88 DLBCL tissues by immunohistochemistry. The association between ALDH1A1 expression and outcome was evaluated. We also investigated the effect of ALDH1A1 on CHOP resistance in DLBCL cells using functional analysis. ALDH1A1 expression levels were upregulated in patients with stable or progressive disease after CHOP and its expression positively correlated with expression of STAT3 and p-STAT3. In keeping with these observations, ALDH1A1 expression was significantly associated with short survival of DLBCL patients who received CHOP chemotherapy. In functional assays in Pfeiffer cells, overexpression of ALDH1A1 conferred resistance to CHOP, while silencing of ALDH1A1 using short hairpin RNA had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also observed that ALDH1A1 could regulate the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by WP1066 negated the effect of ALDH1A1 overexpression. These observations reveal that ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in DLBCL, and its targeting provides a potential strategic approach for reversing CHOP resistance.

  12. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  13. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  14. ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinqiong; Liu, Yiping; Tang, Youhong; Li, Li; Zeng, Ruolan; Zeng, Shan; Zhong, Meizuo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a detoxifying enzyme, is responsible for chemoresistance in a variety of tumors. Although the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), chemoresistance is a common cause of treatment failure. This study aims to investigate the significance of ALDH1A1 expression and the mechanism by which ALDH1A1 is involved in the chemoresistance of DLBCL cells. ALDH1A1 expression was assessed in 88 DLBCL tissues by immunohistochemistry. The association between ALDH1A1 expression and outcome was evaluated. We also investigated the effect of ALDH1A1 on CHOP resistance in DLBCL cells using functional analysis. ALDH1A1 expression levels were upregulated in patients with stable or progressive disease after CHOP and its expression positively correlated with expression of STAT3 and p-STAT3. In keeping with these observations, ALDH1A1 expression was significantly associated with short survival of DLBCL patients who received CHOP chemotherapy. In functional assays in Pfeiffer cells, overexpression of ALDH1A1 conferred resistance to CHOP, while silencing of ALDH1A1 using short hairpin RNA had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also observed that ALDH1A1 could regulate the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by WP1066 negated the effect of ALDH1A1 overexpression. These observations reveal that ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in DLBCL, and its targeting provides a potential strategic approach for reversing CHOP resistance. PMID:27621650

  15. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  16. Dual immunoglobulin light chain B cells: Trojan horses of autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pelanda, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Receptor editing, a major mechanism of B cell tolerance, can also lead to allelic inclusion at the immunoglobulin light chain loci and the development of B cells that coexpress two different immunoglobulin light chains and, therefore, two antibody specificities. Most allelically included B cells express two κ chains, although rare dual-λ cells are also observed. Moreover, these cells typically coexpress an autoreactive and a nonautoreactive antibody. Thus, allelically included B cells could operate like 'Trojan horses': expression and function of the nonautoreactive antigen receptors might promote their maturation, activation, and terminal differentiation into effector cells that also express and secrete autoantibodies. Indeed, dual-κ B cells are greatly expanded into effector B cell subsets in some autoimmune mice, thus indicating they might play an important role in disease.

  17. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  18. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  19. Machine learning-based classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients by eight gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangtao; Dong, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenzhi; Ye, Zhen; Xiang, Rong

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) had divided the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into molecular subgroups: germinal center B-cell like (GCB), activated B-cell like (ABC), and unclassified (UC) subtype. However, this classification with prognostic significance was not applied into clinical practice since there were more than 1000 genes to detect and interpreting was difficult. To classify cancer samples validly, eight significant genes (MYBL1, LMO2, BCL6, MME, IRF4, NFKBIZ, PDE4B, and SLA) were selected in 414 patients treated with CHOP/R-CHOP chemotherapy from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) data sets. Cutoffs for each gene were obtained using receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC) new model based on the support vector machine (SVM) estimated the probability of membership into one of two subgroups: GCB and Non-GCB (ABC and UC). Furtherly, multivariate analysis validated the model in another two cohorts including 855 cases in all. As a result, patients in the training and validated cohorts were stratified into two subgroups with 94.0%, 91.0%, and 94.4% concordance with GEP, respectively. Patients with Non-GCB subtype had significantly poorer outcomes than that with GCB subtype, which agreed with the prognostic power of GEP classification. Moreover, the similar prognosis received in the low (0-2) and high (3-5) IPI scores group demonstrated that the new model was independent of IPI as well as GEP method. In conclusion, our new model could stratify DLBCL patients with CHOP/R-CHOP regimen matching GEP subtypes effectively. PMID:26869285

  20. Class-switched B cells display response to therapeutic B-cell depletion in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Burkhard; Aeberli, Daniel; Eggli, Stefan; Fuhrer, Martin; Vajtai, Istvan; Vögelin, Esther; Ziswiler, Hans-Rudolf; Dahinden, Clemens A; Villiger, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reconstitution of peripheral blood (PB) B cells after therapeutic depletion with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (RTX) mimics lymphatic ontogeny. In this situation, the repletion kinetics and migratory properties of distinct developmental B-cell stages and their correlation to disease activity might facilitate our understanding of innate and adaptive B-cell functions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Thirty-five 'RTX-naïve' RA patients with active arthritis were treated after failure of tumour necrosis factor blockade in an open-label study with two infusions of 1,000 mg RTX. Prednisone dose was tapered according to clinical improvement from a median of 10 mg at baseline to 5 mg at 9 and 12 months. Conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were kept stable. Subsets of CD19+ B cells were assessed by flow cytometry according to their IgD and CD27 surface expression. Their absolute number and relative frequency in PB were followed every 3 months and were determined in parallel in synovial tissue (n = 3) or synovial fluid (n = 3) in the case of florid arthritis. Results Six of 35 patients fulfilled the European League Against Rheumatism criteria for moderate clinical response, and 19 others for good clinical response. All PB B-cell fractions decreased significantly in number (P < 0.001) after the first infusion. Disease activity developed independently of the total B-cell number. B-cell repopulation was dominated in quantity by CD27-IgD+ 'naïve' B cells. The low number of CD27+IgD- class-switched memory B cells (MemB) in the blood, together with sustained reduction of rheumatoid factor serum concentrations, correlated with good clinical response. Class-switched MemB were found accumulated in flaring joints. Conclusions The present data support the hypothesis that control of adaptive immune processes involving germinal centre-derived, antigen, and T-cell-dependently matured B cells is essential for successful RTX treatment. PMID

  1. BAFF enhances chemotaxis of primary human B cells: a particular synergy between BAFF and CXCL13 on memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Borhis, Gwenoline; Lefevre, Eric A; Chaoul, Nada; Deshayes, Frederique; Dessirier, Valérie; Lapree, Genevieve; Tsapis, Andreas; Richard, Yolande

    2008-03-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family, (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) regulate B-lymphocyte survival and activation. We report that BAFF, but not APRIL, increased the chemotactic response of primary human B cells to CCL21, CXCL12, and CXCL13. The BAFF-induced increase in B-cell chemotaxis was totally abolished by blockade of BAFF-R and was strongly dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, and p38MAPK pathways. BAFF had similar effects on the chemotaxis of naive and memory B cells in response to CCL21 but increased more strongly that of memory B cells to CXCL13 than that of naive B cells. Our findings indicate a previously unreported role for the BAFF/BAFF-R pair in mature B-cell chemotaxis. The synergy between CXCL13 and BAFF produced by stromal cells and follicular dendritic cells may have important implications for B-cell homeostasis, the development of normal B-cell areas, and for the formation of germinal center-like follicles that may be observed in various autoimmune diseases.

  2. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  3. DUSP4 deficiency caused by promoter hypermethylation drives JNK signaling and tumor cell survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Corina A.; Robinson, Mark D.; Scheifinger, Nicole A.; Müller, Sebastian; Cogliatti, Sergio; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes is an important driver of human carcinogenesis. We have combined genome-wide DNA methylation analyses and gene expression profiling after pharmacological DNA demethylation with functional screening to identify novel tumor suppressors in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We find that a CpG island in the promoter of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP4 is aberrantly methylated in nodal and extranodal DLBCL, irrespective of ABC or GCB subtype, resulting in loss of DUSP4 expression in 75% of >200 examined cases. The DUSP4 genomic locus is further deleted in up to 13% of aggressive B cell lymphomas, and the lack of DUSP4 is a negative prognostic factor in three independent cohorts of DLBCL patients. Ectopic expression of wild-type DUSP4, but not of a phosphatase-deficient mutant, dephosphorylates c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induces apoptosis in DLBCL cells. Pharmacological or dominant-negative JNK inhibition restricts DLBCL survival in vitro and in vivo and synergizes strongly with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. Our results indicate that DLBCL cells depend on JNK signaling for survival. This finding provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of JNK inhibitors in DLBCL, ideally in synthetic lethal combinations with inhibitors of chronic active B cell receptor signaling. PMID:25847947

  4. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  5. Regulation of IL-17A Production Is Distinct from IL-17F in a Primary Human Cell Co-culture Model of T Cell-Mediated B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Andrew C.; Melrose, Jennifer; Alajoki, Liisa; Privat, Sylvie; Cho, Hannah; Brown, Naomi; Plavec, Ana Marija; Nguyen, Dat; Johnston, Elijah D.; Yang, Jian; Polokoff, Mark A.; Plavec, Ivan; Berg, Ellen L.; O'Mahony, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Improper regulation of B cell responses leads to excessive production of antibodies and contributes to the development of autoimmune disease. T helper 17 (Th17) cells also drive the development of autoimmune disease, but the role of B cells in shaping Th17 cell-mediated immune responses, as well as the reciprocal regulation of B cell responses by IL-17 family cytokines, remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the regulation of IL-17A and IL-17F in a model of T cell-dependent B cell activation. Stimulation of primary human B cell and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (BT) co-cultures with α-IgM and a non-mitogenic concentration of superantigens for three days promoted a Th17 cell response as evidenced by increased expression of Th17-related gene transcripts, including Il17f, Il21, Il22, and Il23r, in CD4 T cells, as well as the secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F protein. We tested the ability of 144 pharmacologic modulators representing 91 different targets or pathways to regulate IL-17A and IL-17F production in these stimulated BT co-cultures. IL-17A production was found to be preferentially sensitive to inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, while prostaglandin EP receptor agonists, including PGE2, increased IL-17A concentrations. In contrast, the production of IL-17F was inhibited by PGE2, but selectively increased by TLR2 and TLR5 agonists. These results indicate that IL-17A regulation is distinct from IL-17F in stimulated BT co-cultures and that this co-culture approach can be used to identify pathway mechanisms and novel agents that selectively inhibit production of IL-17A or IL-17F. PMID:23505568

  6. Effect of Stress-Free Therapy on immune system: Induction of Interleukin 10 expression in lymphocytes through activation of CD19+ CD24hi CD38hi regulatory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takuma; Ishimaru, Keisou; Ozaki-Shimada, Atsuko; Kihara, Kazuhiko; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Otani, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Mild thermal treatment with “Pinpoint Plantar Long-wavelength Infrared Light Irradiation (PP-LILI)” named as Stress-Free Therapy® increases peripheral-deep body temperature and blood flow, and improves multiple disorders including hyperpiesia, type II diabetes and cardiovascular patients. Immunomodulatory effects of PP-LILI were investigated. Materials and methods: Seven healthy individuals and 4 people with underlying medical condition (UMC) participated in this study. Participants were given PP-LILI stimuli twice a week over 3 weeks and followed with placebo stimuli over 3 weeks. This set of sessions was repeated 3 times. For analyses, fresh peripheral mononuclear cells from participants were stained with fluorescencedye conjugated monoclonal antibodies and changes in populational compositions and IL-10 expression levels were observed by flow cytometry. Results: Distinct expression of IL-10 in lymphocytes was induced by PP-LILI from the second session in the healthy individuals. This induction was terminated during the following placebo sessions. PP-LILI induced activation of CD19+ CD24hi CD38hi regulatory B cells in every session prior to induce the IL-10 in major lymphocytes. Activated regulatory B cells in the individuals with UMC decreased as same levels of healthy individuals after second PP-LILI session and re-activated with the stimuli. Significant population changes in neither regulatory T cells nor proinflammatory IL-17A expressing CD4+ T cells were observed. Conclusions: PP-LILI is a potent immunomodulatory inducer that activates regulatory B cells and consequent IL-10 expression in lymphocytes. Moreover, its stimulatory intervals down-regulate the higher activation of regulatory B cells and lymphocyte's IL-10 expression occurred by UMC to the healthy people's level. PMID:26557732

  7. ABC's of Being Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Determining what giftedness is all about means focusing on many aspects of the individual. In this paper, the author focuses on letter D of the ABC's of being smart. She starts with specifics about giftedness (details), and then moves on to some ways of thinking (dispositions).

  8. The ABC's of Learning in Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Minta M.

    Learning in infancy is based on activity, beginnings, and curiosity, the so-called ABC's. Earliest behavior consists of mass activity, the period from birth to 24 months of sensory-motor development which provides the foundation for all future learning. Adults must provide space, toys, and affectionate care to help infants proceed through…

  9. Retinoic acid-induced IgG production in TLR-activated human primary B cells involves ULK1-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Abrahamsen, Greger; Spurkland, Anne; Moskaug, Jan Øivind; Simonsen, Anne; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have established a vital role of autophagy in retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated human B cells into Ig-secreting cells. Thus, RA enhanced autophagy in TLR9- and CD180-stimulated peripheral blood B cells, as revealed by increased levels of the autophagosomal marker LC3B-II, enhanced colocalization between LC3B and the lysosomal marker Lyso-ID, by a larger percentage of cells with more than 5 characteristic LC3B puncta, and by the concomitant reduction in the level of SQSTM1/p62. Furthermore, RA induced expression of the autophagy-inducing protein ULK1 at the transcriptional level, in a process that required the retinoic acid receptor RAR. By inhibiting autophagy with specific inhibitors or by knocking down ULK1 by siRNA, the RA-stimulated IgG production in TLR9- and CD180-mediated cells was markedly reduced. We propose that the identified prominent role of autophagy in RA-mediated IgG-production in normal human B cells provides a novel mechanism whereby vitamin A exerts its important functions in the immune system.

  10. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled.

  11. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  12. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  13. The Role of the Atypical Kinases ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 in Abscisic Acid Responses

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Anna; DalCorso, Giovanni; Furini, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The ABC1K family of atypical kinases (activity of bc1 complex kinase) is represented in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. In plants they regulate diverse physiological processes in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, but their precise functions are poorly defined. ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 are probably involved in oxidative stress responses, isoprenyl lipid synthesis and distribution of iron within chloroplasts. Because reactive oxygen species take part in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated processes, we investigated the functions of ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 during germination, stomatal movement, and leaf senescence. Both genes were upregulated by ABA treatment and some ABA-responsive physiological processes were affected in abc1k7 and abc1k8 mutants. Germination was more severely affected by ABA, osmotic stress and salt stress in the single and double mutants; the stomatal aperture was smaller in the mutants under standard growth conditions and was not further reduced by exogenous ABA application; ABA-induced senescence symptoms were more severe in the leaves of the single and double mutants compared to wild type leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 might be involved in the cross-talk between ABA and ROS signaling. PMID:27047531

  14. The Role of the Atypical Kinases ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Manara, Anna; DalCorso, Giovanni; Furini, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The ABC1K family of atypical kinases (activity of bc1 complex kinase) is represented in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. In plants they regulate diverse physiological processes in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, but their precise functions are poorly defined. ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 are probably involved in oxidative stress responses, isoprenyl lipid synthesis and distribution of iron within chloroplasts. Because reactive oxygen species take part in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated processes, we investigated the functions of ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 during germination, stomatal movement, and leaf senescence. Both genes were upregulated by ABA treatment and some ABA-responsive physiological processes were affected in abc1k7 and abc1k8 mutants. Germination was more severely affected by ABA, osmotic stress and salt stress in the single and double mutants; the stomatal aperture was smaller in the mutants under standard growth conditions and was not further reduced by exogenous ABA application; ABA-induced senescence symptoms were more severe in the leaves of the single and double mutants compared to wild type leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 might be involved in the cross-talk between ABA and ROS signaling. PMID:27047531

  15. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  16. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  17. B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Puri, Kamal D; Di Paolo, Julie A; Gold, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for normal B-cell development, selection, survival, proliferation, and differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Similarly, this pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple B-cell malignancies. Genetic and pharmacological approaches have established an important role for the Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoform p110delta (PI3Kδ) in coupling the BCR and other BCRs to B-cell survival, migration, and activation. In the past few years, several small-molecule inhibitory drugs that target PI3Kδ, Btk, and Syk have been developed and shown to have efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies. Emerging preclinical data have also shown a critical role of BCR signaling in the activation and function of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases. Because BCR signaling plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, inhibition of this pathway may represent a promising new strategy for treating these diseases. This review summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties, and clinical activity and toxicity of these BCR signaling inhibitors, with a focus on their emerging role in treating lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune disorders.

  18. PF-04691502, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent pre-clinical activity by inducing apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyu; Mao, Chaoming; Zhou, Yuepeng; Su, Yuting; Liu, Shenzha; Qi, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in a variety of human tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Targeting this pathway has been validated in solid and hematological tumors. In the present study, we demonstrated that PF-04691502, a novel PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent activity in a panel of aggressive B-NHL cell lines including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). MTS analysis showed that PF-04691502 effectively inhibited cell proliferation with IC50 values ranging from 0.12 to 0.55 µM. Cells treated with PF-04691502 exhibited decreased phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein confirming the mechanism of action of a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with PF-04691502 induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, PF-04691502 significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 which contributed to suppression of cell proliferation. Finally, rituximab enhanced apoptosis induced by PF-04691502. Taken together, our findings provide for the first time that PF-04691502 inhibits the constitutively activated PI3K/mTOR pathway in aggressive B-cell NHL cell lines associated with inhibition of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis. These findings suggest that PF-04691502 is a novel therapeutic strategy in aggressive B-cell NHL and warrants early phase clinical trial evaluation with and without rituximab. PMID:26549638

  19. Tissue-Specific B-Cell Dysfunction and Generalized Memory B-Cell Loss during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peruchon, Sandrine; Chaoul, Nada; Burelout, Chantal; Delache, Benoit; Brochard, Patricia; Laurent, Pascale; Cognasse, Fabrice; Prévot, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Richard, Yolande

    2009-01-01

    . Characterization of underlying mechanisms would be helpful in designing new therapeutic strategies to dampen B-cell activation and increases HIV/SIV specific antibody response. PMID:19543531

  20. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  1. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  2. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  3. ABSENCE OF SCLEROSTIN ADVERSELY AFFECTS B CELL SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Corey J.; Rueda, Randell; McLelland, Bryce; Collette, Nicole M.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Manilay, Jennifer O.

    2012-01-01

    Increased osteoblast activity in sclerostin-knockout (Sost−/−) mice results in generalized hyperostosis and bones with small bone marrow cavities due to hyperactive mineralizing osteoblast populations. Hematopoietic cell fate decisions are dependent on their local microenvironment, which contains osteoblast and stromal cell populations that support both hematopoietic stem cell quiescence and facilitate B cell development. In this study, we investigated whether high bone mass environments affect B cell development via the utilization of Sost−/− mice, a model of sclerosteosis. We found the bone marrow of Sost−/− mice to be specifically depleted of B cells, due to elevated apoptosis at all B cell developmental stages. In contrast, B cell function in the spleen was normal. Sost expression analysis confirmed that Sost is primarily expressed in osteocytes and is not expressed in any hematopoietic lineage, which indicated that the B cell defects in Sost−/− mice are non-cell autonomous and this was confirmed by transplantation of wildtype (WT) bone marrow into lethally irradiated Sost−/− recipients. WT→Sost−/− chimeras displayed a reduction in B cells, whereas reciprocal Sost−/−→WT chimeras did not, supporting the idea that the Sost−/− bone environment cannot fully support normal B cell development. Expression of the pre-B cell growth stimulating factor, Cxcl12, was significantly lower in bone marrow stromal cells of Sost−/− mice while the Wnt target genes Lef-1 and Ccnd1 remained unchanged in B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for Sost in the regulation of bone marrow environments that support B cells. PMID:22434688

  4. Identification of circulating maternal T and B lymphocytes in uncomplicated severe combined immunodeficiency by HLA typing of subpopulations of T cells separated by the fluorescence-activated cell sorter and of Epstein Barr virus-derived B cell lines.

    PubMed

    Geha, R S; Reinherz, E

    1983-06-01

    Circulating maternal T cells were sought in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and no evidence of acute graft-vs-host disease, but who had small numbers (9 to 11%) of circulating T3-positive cells. HLA typing of unfractionated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and of isolated E rosette-forming cells (37 to 44% of PBL) failed to reveal the presence of maternal lymphocytes. T3-positive cells isolated by the fluorescence-activated cell sorter, however, expressed exclusively maternal HLA antigens. A lymphoblastoid B cell line established by infecting the patient's PBL with Epstein Barr virus then expressed exclusively maternal HLA antigens. The presence of maternal T and B cells in uncomplicated SCID may be more common than thought previously and calls for a careful assessment of the origin of any mature T cells that are present in affected infants. In addition, the presence of maternal cells in SCID may complicate the infant's therapy.

  5. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  6. Stable transfection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 in lymphoma cells containing the EBV P3HR1 genome induces expression of B-cell activation molecules CD21 and CD23.

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, M; Calender, A; Billaud, M; Zimber, U; Rousselet, G; Pavlish, O; Banchereau, J; Tursz, T; Bornkamm, G; Lenoir, G M

    1990-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation molecules, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) receptor CR2 (CD21) and the B-cell activation antigen CD23 (Blast2/Fc epsilon RII), is turned on by infecting EBV-negative B-lymphoma cell lines with immortalizing strains of the viruslike B95-8 (BL/B95 cells). This up regulation may represent one of the mechanisms involved in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. The P3HR1 nonimmortalizing strain of the virus, which is deleted for the entire Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) protein open reading frame, is incapable of inducing the expression of CR2 and CD23, suggesting a crucial role for EBNA2 in the activation of these molecules. In addition, lymphoma cells containing the P3HR1 genome (BL/P3HR1 cells) do not express the viral latent membrane protein (LMP), which is regularly expressed in cells infected with immortalizing viral strains. Using electroporation, we have transfected the EBNA2 gene cloned in an episomal vector into BL/P3HR1 cells and have obtained cell clones that stably express the EBNA2 protein. In these clones, EBNA2 expression was associated with an increased amount of CR2 and CD23 steady-state RNAs. Of the three species of CD23 mRNAs described, the Fc epsilon RIIa species was preferentially expressed in these EBNA2-expressing clones. An increased cell surface expression of CR2 but not of CD23 was observed, and the soluble form of CD23 molecule (SCD23) was released. We were, however, not able to detect any expression of LMP in these cell clones. These data demonstrate that EBNA2 gene is able to complement P3HR1 virus latent functions to induce the activation of CR2 and CD23 expression, and they emphasize the role of EBNA2 protein in the modulation of cellular gene implicated in B-cell proliferation and hence in EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. Nevertheless, EBNA2 expression in BL/P3HR1 cells is not able to restore the level of CR2 and CD23 expression observed in BL/B95 cells, suggesting that other cellular or viral

  7. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  8. Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S; Grammer, Amrie C; Ning, Tony C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    B-cell-directed therapy-the use of agents that eliminate B cells or block cytokines important for B-cell function-is emerging as a promising approach to the treatment of rheumatic disease. Target diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), display diverse patterns of autoantibody production and aberrant activation of B cells. Despite the success of this general approach, the mechanisms by which B-cell-directed therapy ameliorates disease, and the role of autoantibodies as biomarkers of clinical response remain unclear. Importantly, although B-cell-directed therapy can reduce the production of some autoantibodies, the effects can be variable and heterogeneous, probably reflecting the critical (but ill-defined) roles of different B-cell and plasma cell populations in autoantibody production. Future studies during clinical trials of these agents are needed to define which B-cell and autoantibody populations are affected (or ought to be), and to discover informative biomarkers of clinical response that can be used to advance this therapeutic approach.

  9. B cells do not present antigen covalently linked to microspheres.

    PubMed Central

    Galelli, A; Charlot, B; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1993-01-01

    B cells have been shown to present antigen to T cells very efficiently through their capacity to capture antigens by their membrane immunoglobulin. This direct cognate interaction of T and B cells results in the proliferation and differentiation of B cells. This concept has been established using soluble proteins. However, most of the antigens to which the immune system is exposed are included in complex particulate structures such as bacteria or parasites. The capacity of B cells to present these large and complex antigens is still unclear. To address this question we have studied the presentation by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific B cells of the same antigen TNP-KLH (keyhole limpet haemocyanin), either in a soluble form or covalently linked to poly(acrolein) microspheres, from 0.25 to 1.5 microns in diameter. In the presence of irradiated splenocytes or purified macrophages as a source of antigen-presenting cells (APC), KLH-specific T cells proliferated in response to soluble TNP-KLH or to TNP-KLH coupled to beads. In contrast, TNP-specific memory B cells were totally ineffective in presenting the TNP-KLH beads to KLH-specific T cells whereas they presented very efficiently soluble TNP-KLH. Similar results were obtained with the A20 B lymphoma or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated TNP-specific B cells. These results therefore indicate that B cells are unable to present large size particulate antigens such as bacteria or parasites. PMID:8509143

  10. Accumulation of 4-1BBL+ B cells in the elderly induces the generation of granzyme-B+ CD8+ T cells with potential antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica; Moritoh, Kanako; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B.; Chan, Andrew C.; Croft, Michael; Mattison, Julie A.; Holst, Peter Johannes; Gress, Ronald E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hakim, Fran

    2014-01-01

    Although the accumulation of highly-differentiated and granzyme B (GrB)-expressing CD8+CD28– T cells has been associated with aging, the mechanism for their enrichment and contribution to immune function remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel B-cell subset expressing 4-1BBL, which increases with age in humans, rhesus macaques, and mice, and with immune reconstitution after chemotherapy and autologous progenitor cell transplantation. These cells (termed 4BL cells) induce GrB+CD8+ T cells by presenting endogenous antigens and using the 4-1BBL/4-1BB axis. We found that the 4BL cells increase antitumor responses in old mice, which may explain in part the paradox of retarded tumor growth in the elderly. 4BL cell accumulation and its capacity to evoke the generation of GrB+CD8+ T cells can be eliminated by inducing reconstitution of B cells in old mice, suggesting that the age-associated skewed cellular immune responses are reversible. We propose that 4BL cells and the 4-1BBL signaling pathway are useful targets for improved effectiveness of natural antitumor defenses and therapeutic immune manipulations in the elderly. PMID:25037628

  11. Methamphetamine activates nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription in human microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Wires, Emily S; Alvarez, David; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Wang, Yun; Morales, Marisela; Karn, Jonathan; Harvey, Brandon K

    2012-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) primarily infects glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent evidence suggests that HIV-infected individuals who abuse drugs such as methamphetamine (METH) have higher viral loads and experience more severe neurological complications than HIV-infected individuals who do not abuse drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of METH on HIV expression from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter and on an HIV integrated provirus in microglial cells, the primary host cells for HIV in the CNS. Primary human microglial cells immortalized with SV40 T antigen (CHME-5 cells) were cotransfected with an HIV LTR reporter and the HIV Tat gene, a key regulator of viral replication and gene expression, and exposed to METH. Our results demonstrate that METH treatment induced LTR activation, an effect potentiated in the presence of Tat. We also found that METH increased the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key cellular transcriptional regulator of the LTR promoter, and the activity of an NF-κB-specific reporter plasmid in CHME-5 cells. The presence of a dominant-negative regulator of NF-κB blocked METH-related activation of the HIV LTR. Furthermore, treatment of HIV-latently infected CHME-5 (CHME-5/HIV) cells with METH induced HIV expression and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. These results suggest that METH can stimulate HIV gene expression in microglia cells through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. This mechanism may outline the initial biochemical events leading to the observed increased neurodegeneration in HIV-positive individuals who use METH.

  12. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  13. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  14. Intracellular demonstration of active TGFbeta1 in B cells and plasma cells of autoimmune mice. IgG-bound TGFbeta1 suppresses neutrophil function and host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Caver, T E; O'Sullivan, F X; Gold, L I; Gresham, H D

    1996-01-01

    Infection remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with SLE. To investigate this, previously we assessed the host defense status of autoimmune MRL/lpr mice and found that elaboration of active TGFbeta suppressed neutrophil function and decreased survival in response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The purpose of the present work was to elucidate the molecular form and the cellular source of the active TGFbeta involved. Here, we report for the first time that TGFbeta1 is found in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells and that it circulates in the plasma complexed with IgG in two murine models of systemic autoimmunity and in some patients with SLE. IgG-bound active TGFbeta1 is many times more potent than uncomplexed active TGFbeta1 for suppression of neutrophil function in vitro and host defense against S. aureus infection in vivo. These data indicate that TGFbeta1 is in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells, that the formation of a complex of IgG and active TGFbeta1 is greatly accelerated in autoimmunity, and that this complex is extremely potent for suppression of PMN function and host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:8958212

  15. Structural diversity of ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    ter Beek, Josy; Guskov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a large superfamily of ATP-dependent protein complexes that mediate transport of a vast array of substrates across membranes. The 14 currently available structures of ABC transporters have greatly advanced insight into the transport mechanism and revealed a tremendous structural diversity. Whereas the domains that hydrolyze ATP are structurally related in all ABC transporters, the membrane-embedded domains, where the substrates are translocated, adopt four different unrelated folds. Here, we review the structural characteristics of ABC transporters and discuss the implications of this structural diversity for mechanistic diversity. PMID:24638992

  16. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  17. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  18. miR-155 targets histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and impairs transcriptional activity of B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) in the Eµ-miR-155 transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Sukhinder K.; Volinia, Stefano; Costinean, Stefan; Galasso, Marco; Neinast, Reid; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Parthun, Mark R.; Perrotti, Danilo; Marcucci, Guido; Garzon, Ramiro; Croce, Carlo M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have established that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. Notably, miR-155 is one of the most overexpressed miRNAs in several solid and hematological malignancies. Ectopic miR-155 expression in mice B cells (Eμ-miR-155 transgenic mice) has been shown to induce pre–B-cell proliferation followed by high-grade lymphoma/leukemia. Loss of miR-155 in mice resulted in impaired immunity due to defective T-cell–mediated immune response. Here we provide a mechanistic insight into miR-155–induced leukemogenesis in the Eμ-miR-155 mouse model through genome-wide transcriptome analysis of naïve B cells and target studies. We found that a key transcriptional repressor and proto-oncogene, Bcl6 is significantly down-regulated in Eμ-miR-155 mice. The reduction of Bcl6 subsequently leads to de-repression of some of the known Bcl6 targets like inhibitor of differentiation (Id2), interleukin-6 (IL6), cMyc, Cyclin D1, and Mip1α/ccl3, all of which promote cell survival and proliferation. We show that Bcl6 is indirectly regulated by miR-155 through Mxd1/Mad1 up-regulation. Interestingly, we found that miR-155 directly targets HDAC4, a corepressor partner of BCL6. Furthermore, ectopic expression of HDAC4 in human-activated B-cell–type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells results in reduced miR-155–induced proliferation, clonogenic potential, and increased apoptosis. Meta-analysis of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patient microarray data showed that miR-155 expression is inversely correlated with Bcl6 and Hdac4. Hence this study provides a better understanding of how miR-155 causes disruption of the BCL6 transcriptional machinery that leads to up-regulation of the survival and proliferation genes in miR-155–induced leukemias. PMID:23169640

  19. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P‐Glycoprotein (P‐gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The transmembrane ABC transporters P‐glycoprotein (P‐gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug–drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand‐transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P‐gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC‐transporters. PMID:26970257

  20. Expression of the Gene for Resistance to Phaseolotoxin (argK) Depends on the Activity of Genes phtABC in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Selene; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Murillo, Jesús; Bravo, Jaime; Alvarez-Morales, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola produces phaseolotoxin in a temperature dependent manner, being optimally produced between 18°C and 20°C, while no detectable amounts are present above 28°C. Phaseolotoxin is an effective inhibitor of ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCTase) activity from plant, mammalian and bacterial sources and causes a phenotypic requirement for arginine. To protect the cell from its own toxin, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola synthesizes a phaseolotoxin-resistant OCTase (ROCT). The ROCT is the product of the argK gene and is synthesized only under conditions leading to phaseolotoxin synthesis. The argK gene is included in a chromosomal fragment named Pht cluster, which contains genes involved in the synthesis of phaseolotoxin. The aim of the present work was to investigate the possible involvement of other genes included in the Pht cluster in the regulation of gene argK. We conducted transcriptional analyses of argK in several mutants unable to produce phaseolotoxin, transcriptional fusions and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, which allowed us to determine that genes phtABC, located within the Pht cluster, participate in the transcriptional repression of gene argK at temperatures not permissive for phaseolotoxin biosynthesis. This repression is mediated by a protein present in both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of P. syringae and in E. coli, and requires the coordinated participation of phtA, phtB and phtC products in order to carry out an efficient argK repression. PMID:23056465

  1. TdcA, a transcriptional activator of the tdcABC operon of Escherichia coli, is a member of the LysR family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganduri, Y L; Sadda, S R; Datta, M W; Jambukeswaran, R K; Datta, P

    1993-09-01

    The tdcB and tdcC genes of the tdcABC operon of Escherichia coli encode threonine dehydratase and a threonine-serine permease, respectively. These proteins are involved in transport and metabolism of threonine and serine during anaerobic growth. In this study, we functionally characterized tdcA, which encodes a 35 kDa polypeptide consisting of 312 amino acid residues. Non-polar and partially polar mutations introduced into tdcA drastically reduced the expression of the genes down-stream from tdcA. Complementation studies using single-copy chromosomal integrants of a tdcB-lacZ fusion harboring an in-frame deletion of tdcA with chromosomal or plasmid-borne tdcA+ in trans showed complete restoration of tdc operon expression in vivo. The amino acid sequence at the amino-terminal end of TdcA revealed a significant homology to the helix-turn-helix motifs of typical DNA binding proteins. Sequence alignment of TdcA with LysR also showed considerable sequence similarity throughout their entire lengths. Our results suggest that TdcA is related to the LysR family of proteins by common ancestry and, based on its functional role in tdc expression, belongs to the LysR family of transcriptional activators.

  2. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  3. BAFF: a fundamental survival factor for B cells.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Fabienne; Browning, Jeffrey L

    2002-07-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the tumour-necrosis-factor family (BAFF) enhances B-cell survival--a function that is indispensable for B-cell maturation--and has a role in enhancing immune responses. Moreover, the overexpression of BAFF results in severe autoimmune disorders in mice, and elevated serum levels of BAFF occur in some patients who have autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of the role of BAFF has set the stage for a new approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  4. PI3 Kinase signals BCR dependent mature B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Zhang, Baochun; Paik, Ji Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Kearney, John F.; Otipoby, Kevin L.; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that mature B cells depend upon survival signals delivered to the cells by their antigen receptor (BCR). To identify the molecular nature of this survival signal, we have developed a genetic approach in which ablation of the BCR is combined with the activation of specific, BCR dependent signaling cascades in mature B cells in vivo. Using this system, we provide evidence that the survival of BCR deficient mature B cells can be rescued by a single signaling pathway downstream of the BCR, namely PI3K signaling, with the FOXO1 transcription factor playing a central role. PMID:19879843

  5. Upregulation of bcl-2 by the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein LMP1: a B-cell-specific response that is delayed relative to NF-kappa B activation and to induction of cell surface markers.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, M; Peng-Pilon, M; Huen, D S; Hardy, R; Croom-Carter, D; Lundgren, E; Rickinson, A B

    1994-01-01

    An ability of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein LMP1 to enhance the survival of infected B cells through upregulation of the bcl-2 oncogene was first suggested by experiments involving gene transfection and the selection of stable LMP1+ clones (S. Henderson, M. Rowe, C. Gregory, F. Wang, E. Kieff, and A. Rickinson, Cell 65:1107-1115, 1991). However, it was not possible to ascertain whether Bcl-2 upregulation was a specific consequence of LMP1 expression or an artifact of the selection procedure whereby rare Bcl-2+ cells already present in the starting population might best be able to tolerate the potentially toxic effects of LMP1. We therefore reexamined this issue by using two different experimental approaches that allowed LMP1-induced effects to be monitored immediately following expression of the viral protein and in the absence of selective pressures; activation of the NF-kappa B transcription factor and upregulation of the cell adhesion molecule ICAM-1 were used as early indices of LMP1 function. In the first approach, stable clones of two B-cell lines carrying an LMP1 gene under the control of an inducible metallothionein promoter were induced to express LMP1 in all cells. Activation of NK-kappa B and upregulation of ICAM-1 occurred within 24 h and were followed at 48 to 72 h by upregulation of Bcl-2. In the second approach, we tested the generality of this phenomenon by transiently expressing LMP1 from a strong constitutively active promoter in a range of different cell types. All six B-cell lines tested showed NF-kappa B activation in response to LMP1 expression, and this was followed in five of six lines by expression of ICAM-1 and Bcl-2. In the same experiments, all three non-B-cell lines showed NF-kappa B activation and ICAM-1 upregulation but never any effect upon Bcl-2. We therefore conclude that Bcl-2 upregulation is part of the panoply of cellular changes induced by LMP1 but that the effect is cell type specific. Our data also suggest

  6. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  7. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  8. Do You Know Your ABC?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Within primary schools, the core subjects of literacy and numeracy are highly regarded, and rightly so, as children need to learn to read, write and be numerically literate. This means that all children learn their ABCs at an early age, But, what about the "other ABC"--"Airway, Breathing and Circulation?" Accidents and medical…

  9. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK)-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP. PMID:21816083

  10. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  11. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  12. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  13. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  14. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors. PMID:27653594

  15. ABC transporters in fish species: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marta; Costa, Joana; Reis-Henriques, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins were first recognized for their role in multidrug resistance (MDR) in chemotherapeutic treatments, which is a major impediment for the successful treatment of many forms of malignant tumors in humans. These proteins, highly conserved throughout vertebrate species, were later related to cellular detoxification and accounted as responsible for protecting aquatic organisms from xenobiotic insults in the so-called multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR). In recent years, research on these proteins in aquatic species has highlighted their importance in the detoxification mechanisms in fish thus it is necessary to continue these studies. Several transporters have been pointed out as relevant in the ecotoxicological context associated to the transport of xenobiotics, such as P-glycoproteins (Pgps), multidrug-resistance-associated proteins (MRPs 1-5) and breast cancer resistance associated protein (BCRP). In mammals, several nuclear receptors have been identified as mediators of phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and ABC transporters. In aquatic species, knowledge on co-regulation of the detoxification mechanism is scarce and needs to be addressed. The interaction of emergent contaminants that can act as chemosensitizers, with ABC transporters in aquatic organisms can compromise detoxification processes and have population effects and should be studied in more detail. This review intends to summarize the recent advances in research on MXR mechanisms in fish species, focusing in (1) regulation and functioning of ABC proteins; (2) cooperation with phase I and II biotransformation enzymes; and (3) ecotoxicological relevance and information on emergent pollutants with ability to modulate ABC transporters expression and activity. Several lines of evidence are clearly suggesting the important role of these transporters in detoxification mechanisms and must be further investigated in fish to underlay the mechanism to consider their use as

  16. Increased BCR responsiveness in B cells from patients with chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Tata, Prasanthi V.; Fore, Matthew S.; Wooten, Jenna; Rudra, Sharmistha; Deal, Allison M.; Sharf, Andrew; Hoffert, Todd; Roehrs, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Richards, Kristy L.; Jagasia, Madan; Lee, Stephanie J.; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells have emerged as important contributors to chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) pathogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for their sustained activation remain unknown. We previously showed that patients with cGVHD have significantly increased B cell–activating factor (BAFF) levels and that their B cells are activated and resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF confers a state of immediate responsiveness to antigen stimulation in normal murine B cells. To address this in cGVHD, we studied B-cell receptor (BCR) responsiveness in 48 patients who were >1 year out from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that B cells from cGVHD patients had significantly increased proliferative responses to BCR stimulation along with elevated basal levels of the proximal BCR signaling components B cell linker protein (BLNK) and Syk. After initiation of BCR signaling, cGVHD B cells exhibited increased BLNK and Syk phosphorylation compared with B cells from patients without cGVHD. Blocking Syk kinase activity prevented relative post-HSCT BCR hyper-responsiveness of cGVHD B cells. These data suggest that a lowered BCR signaling threshold in cGVHD associates with increased B-cell proliferation and activation in response to antigen. We reveal a mechanism underpinning aberrant B-cell activation in cGVHD and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of the involved kinases may benefit these patients. PMID:24532806

  17. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  18. Identification and Functional Relevance of de novo DNA Methylation in Cancerous B-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ming; Greiner, Timothy C.; Bibikova, Marina; Pike, Brian L.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Sinha, Uttam K.; Müschen, Markus; Jaeger, Erich B.; Weisenburger, Dennis J.; Chan, Wing C.; Shibata, Darryl; Fan, Jian-Bing; Hacia, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic remodeling is a hallmark of cancer, with the frequent acquisition of de novo DNA methylation in CpG islands. However, the functional relevance of de novo DNA methylation in cancer is less well-defined. To begin to address this issue in B-cells, we used BeadArray assays to survey the methylation status of 1,500 cancer-related CpG loci in two molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL and GCB-DLBCL) and cognate normal B-cell populations. We identified 81 loci that showed frequent de novo DNA methylation in GCB-DLBCL and 67 loci that showed frequent de novo DNA methylation in ABC-DLBCL. These de novo methylated CpG loci included reported targets of polycomb repressive complexes (PRC) in stem cells. All candidate loci in GCB-DLBCL are proximal to genes that are poorly expressed or silent in purified normal germinal center (GC) B-cells. This is consistent with the hypothesis that de novo DNA methylation in cancer is more frequently involved in the maintenance rather than the initiation of gene silencing (de novo repression). This suggests that epigenetic switching occurs during tumorigenesis with de novo DNA methylation locking in gene silencing normally mediated by transcriptional repressors. Furthermore, we propose that similar to de novo genetic mutations, the majority of de novo DNA methylation events observed in tumors are passengers not causally involved in tumorigenesis. PMID:20069569

  19. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eμ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Mike I.; Eve, Paul D.; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T.; Valenti, Melanie R.; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K.; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J.; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P.; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E.; Perkins, Neil D.; Aherne, G. Wynne; Reader, John C.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition. PMID:26295308

  20. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eµ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Walton, Mike I; Eve, Paul D; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E; Perkins, Neil D; Aherne, G Wynne; Reader, John C; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D

    2016-01-19

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4 nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220 nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor ac