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Sample records for activated b-cell abc

  1. CARMA1- and MyD88-dependent activation of Jun/ATF-type AP-1 complexes is a hallmark of ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Juilland, Mélanie; Gonzalez, Montserrat; Erdmann, Tabea; Banz, Yara; Jevnikar, Zala; Hailfinger, Stephan; Tzankov, Alexandar; Grau, Michael; Lenz, Georg; Novak, Urban

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) type, a molecular subtype characterized by adverse outcome, is constitutive activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor–κB (NF-κB), which controls expression of genes promoting cellular survival and proliferation. Much less, however, is known about the role of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) in ABC DLBCL. Here, we show that AP-1, like NF-κB, was controlled by constitutive activation of the B-cell receptor signaling component caspase recruitment domain-containing membrane-associated guanylate kinase 1 (CARMA1) and/or the Toll-like receptor signaling component myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in ABC DLBCL cell lines. In contrast to germinal center (GC) B-cell (GCB) DLBCL, ABC DLBCL cell lines expressed high levels of the AP-1 family members c-Jun, JunB, and JunD, which formed heterodimeric complexes with the AP-1 family members activating transcription factor (ATF) 2, ATF3, and ATF7. Inhibition of these complexes by a dominant-negative approach led to impaired growth of a majority of ABC DLBCL cell lines. Individual silencing of c-Jun, ATF2, or ATF3 decreased cellular survival and revealed c-Jun/ATF2-dependent control of ATF3 expression. As a consequence, ATF3 expression was much higher in ABC vs GCB DLBCL cell lines. Samples derived from DLBCL patients showed a clear trend toward high and nuclear ATF3 expression in nodal DLBCL of the non-GC or ABC subtype. These findings identify the activation of AP-1 complexes of the Jun/ATF-type as an important element controlling the growth of ABC DLBCL. PMID:26747248

  2. Cerdulatinib, a novel dual SYK/JAK kinase inhibitor, has broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB types of diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiao; Xing, Wei; Coffey, Greg; Dresser, Karen; Lu, Kellie; Guo, Ailin; Raca, Gordana; Pandey, Anjali; Conley, Pamela; Yu, Hongbo; Wang, Y. Lynn

    2015-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) and JAK/STAT pathways play critical roles in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Herein, we investigated the anti-lymphoma activity of cerdulatinib, a novel compound that dually targets SYK and JAK/STAT pathways. On a tissue microarray of 62 primary DLBCL tumors, 58% expressed either phosphorylated SYK or STAT3 or both. SYK and STAT3 are also phosphorylated in a panel of eleven DLBCL cell lines although ABC and GCB subtypes exhibited different JAK/STAT and BCR signaling profiles. In both ABC and GCB cell lines, cerdulatinib induced apoptosis that was associated with caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The compound also blocked G1/S transition and caused cell cycle arrest, accompanied by inhibition of RB phosphorylation and down-regulation of cyclin E. Phosphorylation of BCR components and STAT3 was sensitive to cerdulatinib in both ABC and GCB cell lines under stimulated conditions. Importantly, JAK/STAT and BCR signaling can be blocked by cerdulatinib in primary GCB and non-GCB DLBCL tumor cells that were accompanied by cell death. Our work provides mechanistic insights into the actions of cerdulatinib, suggesting that the drug has a broad anti-tumor activity in both ABC and GCB DLBCL, at least in part by inhibiting SYK and JAK pathways. PMID:26575169

  3. ROBUST: Lenalidomide-R-CHOP versus placebo-R-CHOP in previously untreated ABC-type diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Chiappella, Annalisa; Witzig, Thomas E; Spina, Michele; Gascoyne, Randy D; Zhang, Lei; Flament, Jocelyne; Repici, Jacqueline; Vitolo, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    Activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the major constituent of nongerminal center B-cell-like (non-GCB) DLBCL, is associated with poorer survival outcomes than GCB-type DLBCL. In Phase II studies, lenalidomide combined with R-CHOP (R(2)-CHOP) improved outcomes relative to historical R-CHOP in newly diagnosed DLBCL, particularly in non-GCB cases. ROBUST (CC-5013-DLC-002) is a randomized, double-blind, global, Phase III study of oral lenalidomide (15 mg, days 1-14) plus R-CHOP21 × 6 versus placebo-R-CHOP21 × 6 in patients with previously untreated ABC-type DLBCL. Subtyping is done within 3 calendar days by central laboratory gene-expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy tissue. The primary end point is progression-free survival. Secondary end points include response rates, overall survival and health-related quality of life. PMID:27089170

  4. Polyclonal B cell activation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, P; Olivieri, I; Benedettini, G; Marelli, P; Ciompi, M L; Pasero, G; Campa, M

    1990-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to several polyclonal B cell activators was investigated. No differences were found in the reactivity to pokeweed mitogen and protein A between patients and controls; in contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocyte response to Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I (SAC) was significantly higher in patients with AS than in controls. This responsiveness was not influenced either by the presence of the HLA-B27 antigen or by environmental factors or associated diseases, and it was higher in patients with active AS than in those with inactive disease. The percentage of circulating B cells was normal. The responses to T cell mitogens and the percentages of T cell subpopulations were similar in patients and in controls. The peripheral blood lymphocyte hyperactivity of patients with AS to SAC was associated with an increased in vitro production of immunoglobulins. PMID:2383063

  5. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation. PMID:26775846

  6. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Systemically Delivered NEMO Binding Domain Peptide in Dogs with Spontaneous Activated B-Cell like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Habineza Ndikuyeze, Georges; Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Patel, Reema; Baldwin, Albert S.; May, Michael J.; Flood, Patrick; Krick, Erika; Propert, Kathleen J.; Mason, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Activated B-Cell (ABC) Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common, aggressive and poorly chemoresponsive subtype of DLBCL, characterized by constitutive canonical NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling leads to apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cell lines, suggesting targeted disruption of this pathway may have therapeutic relevance. The selective IKK inhibitor, NEMO Binding Domain (NBD) peptide effectively blocks constitutive NF-κB activity and induces apoptosis in ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro. Here we used a comparative approach to determine the safety and efficacy of systemic NBD peptide to inhibit constitutive NF-κB signaling in privately owned dogs with spontaneous newly diagnosed or relapsed ABC-like DLBCL. Malignant lymph nodes biopsies were taken before and twenty-four hours after peptide administration to determine biological effects. Intravenous administration of <2 mg/kg NBD peptide was safe and inhibited constitutive canonical NF-κB activity in 6/10 dogs. Reductions in mitotic index and Cyclin D expression also occurred in a subset of dogs 24 hours post peptide and in 3 dogs marked, therapeutically beneficial histopathological changes were identified. Mild, grade 1 toxicities were noted in 3 dogs at the time of peptide administration and one dog developed transient subclinical hepatopathy. Long term toxicities were not identified. Pharmacokinetic data suggested rapid uptake of peptide into tissues. No significant hematological or biochemical toxicities were identified. Overall the results from this phase I study indicate that systemic administration of NBD peptide is safe and effectively blocks constitutive NF-κB signaling and reduces malignant B cell proliferation in a subset of dogs with ABC-like DLBCL. These results have potential translational relevance for human ABC-DLBCL. PMID:24798348

  7. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  8. High-throughput combinatorial screening identifies drugs that cooperate with ibrutinib to kill activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Young, Ryan M; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Goldlust, Ian S; Yasgar, Adam; McKnight, Crystal; Boxer, Matthew B; Duveau, Damien Y; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Michael, Sam; Mierzwa, Tim; Huang, Wenwei; Walsh, Martin J; Mott, Bryan T; Patel, Paresma; Leister, William; Maloney, David J; Leclair, Christopher A; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Peyser, Brian D; Austin, Christopher P; Martin, Scott E; Simeonov, Anton; Ferrer, Marc; Staudt, Louis M; Thomas, Craig J

    2014-02-11

    The clinical development of drug combinations is typically achieved through trial-and-error or via insight gained through a detailed molecular understanding of dysregulated signaling pathways in a specific cancer type. Unbiased small-molecule combination (matrix) screening represents a high-throughput means to explore hundreds and even thousands of drug-drug pairs for potential investigation and translation. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform capable of testing compounds in pairwise matrix blocks for the rapid and systematic identification of synergistic, additive, and antagonistic drug combinations. We use this platform to define potential therapeutic combinations for the activated B-cell-like subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We identify drugs with synergy, additivity, and antagonism with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which targets the chronic active B-cell receptor signaling that characterizes ABC DLBCL. Ibrutinib interacted favorably with a wide range of compounds, including inhibitors of the PI3K-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade, other B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors, Bcl-2 family inhibitors, and several components of chemotherapy that is the standard of care for DLBCL. PMID:24469833

  9. The ABCs (Antibody, B cells, and Carbohydrate epitopes) of cholera immunity: considerations for an improved vaccine.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Daniele; Kovác, Pavol; Wade, William F

    2006-01-01

    Cholera, a diarrheal disease, is known for explosive epidemics that can quickly kill thousands. Endemic cholera is a seasonal torment that also has a significant mortality. Not all nations with extensive rural communities can achieve the required infrastructure or behavioral changes to prevent epidemic or endemic cholera. For some communities, a single-dose cholera vaccine that protects those at risk is the most efficacious means to reduce morbidity and mortality. It is clear that our understanding of what a protective cholera immune response is has not progressed at the rate our understanding of the pathogenesis and molecular biology of cholera infection has. This review addresses V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-based immunogens because LPS is the only immunogen proven to induce protective antibody in humans. We discuss the role of anti-LPS antibodies in protection from cholera, the importance and the potential role of B cell subsets in protection that is based on their anatomical location and the intrinsic antigen-receptor specificity of various subsets is introduced. PMID:17179659

  10. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  11. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 induced by constitutively activated NF-κB as a potential therapeutic target for activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Guo, Pengxiang; Ma, Dan; Lin, Xiaojing; Fang, Qin; Wang, Jishi

    2016-07-01

    There is an urgent requirement for a new therapeutic target for activated B-cell-like lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL), which is known to have dismal outcome and constitutive activation of NF-κB. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can inhibit apoptosis and promote proliferation in many cancers. To our knowledge, no studies have been performed on the correlation between HO-1 and DLBCL. In this study, immunohistochemical analysis of 31 tumor tissues from DLBCL patients [20 of ABC subtype and 11 of germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) subtype] and 11 normal lymph nodes revealed that HO-1 overexpression was characteristic of ABC-DLBCL. In addition, HO-1 mRNA expression levels were consistent with the immunohistochemistry results. High levels of HO-1 expression were significantly correlated with the involvement of more than 1 extranodal site (p=0.025), with a high positivity rate of Ki-67 (p<0.01). Similar to its anti-apoptotic role in other malignancies, HO-1 upregulation suppressed apoptosis of the ABC-DLBCL cell line OCI-ly10, whereas its downregulation sensitized the tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Further study demonstrated that the HO-1 overexpression was mediated by constitutively activated NF-κB which together played an anti-apoptotic role in ABC-DLBCL. Combination of the NF-κB inhibitor Bay11‑7082 and the lentivirus vector Lenti-siHO-1 significantly decreased HO-1 protein expression and increased apoptosis in OCI-ly10 cells. However, in GCB-DLBCL cells with low levels of NF-κB expression, the TNF-α-mediated activation of NF-κB leading to HO-1 upregulation rescued the cells from apoptosis caused by HO-1 silencing. These results indicated that HO-1 can be a potential target for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27211510

  12. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates B Cell Number and Activation-Induced B Cell Proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Yang, Yinhua; Golech, Susanne; Katz, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor and functions in regulating cell differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle. Although Klf4 is expressed in lymphocytes, its function in lymphocytes is unknown. In this study, we report that the levels of Klf4 expression were low in pro-B cells and continuously increased in pre-B and in mature B cells. Upon activation, Klf4 was rapidly decreased in mature B cells after 2 h of activation. A modest decrease in numbers of pre-B cells in bone marrow and mature B cells in spleen was observed in Klf4-deficient mice. In the absence of Klf4, fewer B cells entered the S phase of the cell cycle and completed cell division in response to the engagement of BCR and/or CD40 in vitro. Furthermore, the delay in entering the cell cycle is associated with decreased expression of cyclin D2 in B cells that lack Klf4 expression. We then demonstrated that Klf4 directly bound to the promoter of cyclin D2 and regulated its expression. These findings demonstrate that Klf4 regulates B cell number and activation-induced B cell proliferation through directly acting on the promoter of cyclin D2. PMID:17878366

  13. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B.; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL. PMID:26668357

  14. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  15. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation.

    PubMed

    Brazão, Tiago F; Johnson, Jethro S; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-08-18

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  16. Activation of normal murine B cells by Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D A; Marshall-Clarke, S; Dixon, J B

    1989-01-01

    Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex (PSC) infection of BALB/c mice led, after 4 days, to raised numbers of cells forming plaques with trinitrophenyl-treated sheep red cells and bromelain-treated mouse red cells. The findings were similar in athymic and euthymic CBA mice. Activation of B cells was accompanied by secretion of immunoglobulin, as indicated by the reverse plaque technique. In addition, co-culture of PSC with the 7OZ/3 pre-B-cell led to the induction of differentiation, resulting in the expression of surface immunoglobulin (Ig). It is concluded that E. granulosus is a polyclonal activator of B cells inducing both transformation and differentiation, and that the effect is thymus-independent. PMID:2661414

  17. B-cell-activating factor inhibits CD20-mediated and B-cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yohei; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Onda, Keiko; Nakajima, Hideki; Sato, Ban; Horiuchi, Yasuomi; Okita, Hajime; Katagiri, Yohko U; Saito, Masahiro; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2008-01-01

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a survival and maturation factor for B cells belonging to the tumour necrosis factor superfamily. Among three identified functional receptors, the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is thought to be responsible for the effect of BAFF on B cells though details of how remain unclear. We determined that a hairy-cell leukaemia line, MLMA, expressed a relatively high level of BAFF-R and was susceptible to apoptosis mediated by either CD20 or B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). Using MLMA cells as an in vitro model of mature B cells, we found that treatment with BAFF could inhibit apoptosis mediated by both CD20 and BCR. We also observed, using immunoblot analysis and microarray analysis, that BAFF treatment induced activation of nuclear factor-κB2 following elevation of the expression level of Bcl-2, which may be involved in the molecular mechanism of BAFF-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, BAFF treatment was also found to induce the expression of a series of genes, such as that for CD40, related to cell survival, suggesting the involvement of a multiple mechanism in the BAFF-mediated anti-apoptotic effect. MLMA cells should provide a model for investigating the molecular basis of the effect of BAFF on B cells in vitro and will help to elucidate how B cells survive in the immune system in which BAFF-mediated signalling is involved. PMID:18540961

  18. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-03-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco-Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  19. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco–Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  20. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  1. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  2. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  3. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  4. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  5. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G; Luther, Sanjiv A; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  6. B cell mitogenic activity of sea squirt antigen.

    PubMed

    Segawa, K; Ono, K; Oka, S; Jyo, T; Kuroiwa, A; Yamashita, U

    1994-07-01

    The activity of sea squirt antigen, one of the allergy-inducing substances for humans, on murine and human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Sea squirt antigen stimulated normal mouse spleen cells to proliferate, as detected by [3H]-TdR incorporation, in a dose-dependent manner. The responder cells are B cells because the response was reduced by the treatment of spleen cells with anti-immunoglobulin antibody and complement and passing through a nylon wool column, but not with anti-Thy-1 antibody and complement. Spleen cells of C3H/HeJ mice, which are lipopolysaccharide low responders, were also stimulated as well as spleen cells of C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that this response is not due to lipopolysaccharide in the antigen fraction. Sea squirt antigen stimulated not only proliferative response of B cells, but also polyclonal immunoglobulin production. Furthermore, sea squirt antigen also stimulated human lymphocytes to proliferate and to produce immunoglobulin. All these results suggest that sea squirt antigen has mitogenic activity on B cells, and this ability is concerned with the induction of allergic reaction. PMID:8032238

  7. Kidins220/ARMS binds to the B cell antigen receptor and regulates B cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Gina J.; Janowska, Iga; Prutek, Fabiola; Hobeika, Elias; Satapathy, Annyesha; Sprenger, Adrian; Plum, Thomas; Seidl, Maximilian; Dengjel, Jörn; Reth, Michael; Cesca, Fabrizia; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is critical for B cell development and activation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a protein kinase D–interacting substrate of 220 kD (Kidins220)/ankyrin repeat–rich membrane-spanning protein (ARMS) as a novel interaction partner of resting and stimulated BCR. Upon BCR stimulation, the interaction increases in a Src kinase–independent manner. By knocking down Kidins220 in a B cell line and generating a conditional B cell–specific Kidins220 knockout (B-KO) mouse strain, we show that Kidins220 couples the BCR to PLCγ2, Ca2+, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling. Consequently, BCR-mediated B cell activation was reduced in vitro and in vivo upon Kidins220 deletion. Furthermore, B cell development was impaired at stages where pre-BCR or BCR signaling is required. Most strikingly, λ light chain–positive B cells were reduced sixfold in the B-KO mice, genetically placing Kidins220 in the PLCγ2 pathway. Thus, our data indicate that Kidins220 positively regulates pre-BCR and BCR functioning. PMID:26324445

  8. A mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 enable survival of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M; Turton, K B; Zhu, F; Li, Y; Grindle, K M; Annis, D S; Lu, L; Drennan, A C; Tweardy, D J; Bharadwaj, U; Mosher, D F; Rui, L

    2016-01-01

    Activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL) is characterized by increased expression and activator of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). ABC DLBCL cells require STAT3 for growth in culture. In ABC DLBCL cells, eosinophils and perhaps all cells, four variant STAT3 mRNAs (Sα, ΔSα, Sβ and ΔSβ) are present as a result of two alternative splicing events, one that results in the inclusion of a 55-residue C-terminal transactivation domain (α) or a truncated C-terminal domain with 7 unique residues (β) and a second that includes (S) or excludes (ΔS) the codon for Ser-701 in the linker between the SH2 and C-terminal domains. A substantial literature indicates that both α and β variants are required for optimal STAT3 function, but nothing is known about functions of ΔS variants. We used a knockdown/re-expression strategy to explore whether survival of ABC DLBCL cells requires that the four variants be in an appropriate ratio. No single variant rescued survival as well as STAT3Sα-C, Sα with activating mutations (A661C and N663C) in the SH2 domain. Better rescue was achieved when all four variants were re-expressed or Sα and ΔSα or Sβ and ΔSβ were re-expressed in pairs. Rescue correlated with expression of STAT3-sensitive genes NFKBIA and NFKBIZ. We consider a variety of explanations why a mix of S and ΔS variants of STAT3 should enable survival of ABC DLBCL cells. PMID:26727576

  9. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Autoreactive marginal zone B cells are spontaneously activated but lymph node B cells require T cell help

    PubMed Central

    Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Racz, Jennifer; Sleckman, Barry P.; Allen, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    In K/BxN mice, arthritis is induced by autoantibodies against glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (GPI). To investigate B cell tolerance to GPI in nonautoimmune mice, we increased the GPI-reactive B cell frequency using a low affinity anti-GPI H chain transgene. Surprisingly, anti-GPI B cells were not tolerant to this ubiquitously expressed and circulating autoantigen. Instead, they were found in two functionally distinct compartments: an activated population in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) and an antigenically ignorant one in the recirculating follicular/lymph node (LN) pool. This difference in activation was due to increased autoantigen availability in the MZ. Importantly, the LN anti-GPI B cells remained functionally competent and could be induced to secrete autoantibodies in response to cognate T cell help in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, our study of low affinity autoreactive B cells reveals two distinct but potentially concurrent mechanisms for their activation, of which one is T cell dependent and the other is T cell independent. PMID:16880262

  11. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that—in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells—macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry. PMID:22868664

  12. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a disease of activated monoclonal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Calissano, Carlo; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    B-cell type chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been considered a disease of resting lymphocytes. However cell surface and intracellular phenotypes suggest that most CLL cells are activated cells, although only a small subset progresses beyond the G1 stage of the cell cycle. In addition, traditional teaching says that CLL cells divide rarely, and therefore the buildup of leukemic cells is due to an inherent defect in cell death. However, in vivo labeling of CLL cells indicates a much more active rate of cell birth than originally estimated, suggesting that CLL is a dynamic disease. Here we review the observations that have led to these altered views of the activation state and proliferative capacities of CLL cells and also provide our interpretation of these observations in light of their potential impact on patients. PMID:20620969

  14. Regulation of B cell activating factor (BAFF) receptor expression by NF-κB signaling in rheumatoid arthritis B cells

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yun-Ju; Yoon, Bo-Young; Jhun, Joo-Yeon; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Min, Sewon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn

    2011-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) are detected in autoimmune diseases. BAFF and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) are expressed in B and T cells of RA synovium. The study was undertaken to identify the NF-κB signal pathway involved in the induction of BAFF-R in human B cells. Immunohistochemical staining of NF-κB p65, NF-κB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R was performed on sections of synovium from severe and mild RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from control and RA patients and B cells were isolated from controls. BAFF-R was analyzed by flow cytometry, realtime PCR and confocal staining after treatment with NF-κB inhibitors. NF-κB p65, NF-κB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R were highly expressed in severe RA synovium relative to mild RA synovium or OA synovium. BAFF-R expression was reduced by NF-κB inhibitors in PBMCs and B cells from normal controls. We also showed reduction in expression of BAFF-R via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in PBMCs of RA patients. BAFF/BAFF-R signaling is an important mechanism of pathogenesis in RA and that BAFF-R reduction by NF-κB blocking therapy is another choice for controlling B cells in autoimmune diseases such as RA. PMID:21515993

  15. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  16. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  17. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  18. Clonal B cells in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia exhibit functional features of chronic active B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, K V; Vogel, R; Ziegler, C; Altan-Bonnet, G; Velardi, E; Calafiore, M; Dogan, A; Arcila, M; Patel, M; Knapp, K; Mallek, C; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; van den Brink, M R M; Palomba, M L

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) characterized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and the medullary expansion of clonal lymphoplasmacytic cells. Neoplastic transformation has been partially attributed to hyperactive MYD88 signaling, secondary to the MYD88 L265P mutation, occurring in the majority of WM patients. Nevertheless, the presence of chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a feature of multiple IgM+ B-NHL, remains a subject of speculation in WM. Here, we interrogated the BCR signaling capacity of primary WM cells by utilizing multiparametric phosphoflow cytometry and found heightened basal phosphorylation of BCR-related signaling proteins, and augmented phosphoresponses on surface IgM (sIgM) crosslinking, compared with normal B cells. In support of those findings we observed high sIgM expression and loss of phosphatase activity in WM cells, which could both lead to signaling potentiation in clonal cells. Finally, led by the high-signaling heterogeneity among WM samples, we generated patient-specific phosphosignatures, which subclassified patients into a ‘high' and a ‘healthy-like' signaling group, with the second corresponding to patients with a more indolent clinical phenotype. These findings support the presence of chronic active BCR signaling in WM while providing a link between differential BCR signaling utilization and distinct clinical WM subgroups. PMID:26867669

  19. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, promotes cell differentiation, and reduces telomerase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LINA; CHEN, ZHENZHU; ZUO, WENLI; ZHU, XINGHU; LI, YUFU; LIU, XINJIAN; WEI, XUDONG

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerts beneficial effects on acute myelogenous leukemia. It has been suggested that omacetaxine mepesuccinate, used alone or with interferon-α or cytarabine, induces remission in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. These effects are possibly mediated by its ability to induce apoptosis of leukemia cells and inhibit the activity of telomerase. To determine whether omacetaxine mepesuccinate is beneficial in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), two DLBCL cell lines [a germinal center B cell-like subtype (GCB) and an activated B cell-like subtype (ABC)] were treated with omacetaxine mepesuccinate at various concentrations for different durations. The present study indicated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerts proapoptotic effects in the two cell types in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ABC subtype demonstrated increased sensitivity compared with the GCB subtype. At 40 ng/ml, omacetaxine mepesuccinate exhibited a marked proapoptotic effect on DLBCL cells compared with the other tumor cells investigated. Furthermore, omacetaxine mepesuccinate induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and promoted cell terminal differentiation of pro-B cells. The present study also demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate exerted its antitumor effect by reducing telomerase activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that omacetaxine mepesuccinate may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, promote cell differentiation, and reduce telomerase activity in DLBCL cells, thus aiding the development of omacetaxine mepesuccinate-based DLBCL therapeutic strategies. PMID:26935769

  20. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  1. Activation of the STAT3 Signaling Pathway Is Associated With Poor Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With R-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Meng, Bin; Iqbal, Javeed; Ding, B. Belinda; Perry, Anamarija M.; Cao, Wenfeng; Smith, Lynette M.; Bi, Chengfeng; Jiang, Chunsun; Greiner, Timothy C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Armitage, James O.; Vose, Julie M.; Staudt, Louis M.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.; Ye, B. Hilda; Fu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported that constitutive STAT3 activation is a prominent feature of the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL). In this study, we investigated whether STAT3 activation can risk stratify patients with DLBCL. Patients and Methods By an immunohistochemical method, we investigated phosphotyrosine STAT3 (PY-STAT3) expression from 185 patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone). Cell line-based siRNA experiments were also performed to generate an 11-gene, PY-STAT3 activation signature, which was used to study a previously published cohort of 222 patients with DLBCL. The STAT3 activation status determined by these two methods and by STAT3 mRNA levels were then correlated with survival. Results PY-STAT3 was detected in 37% of DLBCL and enriched in ABC-DLBCL cases (P = .03). PY-STAT3 positivity significantly correlated with poor overall survival (OS; P = .01) and event-free survival (EFS; P = .006). Similar observations were made for high levels of STAT3 mRNA. In multivariable analysis, PY-STAT3 status (P = .02), International Prognostic Index (P = .02), and BCL2 expression (P = .046) were independent prognosticators of OS in this cohort. Among the cell-of-origin subgroups, PY-STAT3 was associated with poor EFS among non–germinal center B-cell DLBCL cases only (P = .027). Similarly, the 11-gene STAT3 activation signature correlated with poor survival in the entire DLBCL cohort (OS, P < .001; EFS, P < .001) as well as the ABC-DLBCL subgroup (OS, P = .029; EFS, P = .025). Conclusion STAT3 activation correlated with poor survival in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP, especially those with tumors of the ABC-DLBCL subtype. PMID:24220563

  2. B cell activation involves nanoscale receptor reorganizations and inside-out signaling by Syk

    PubMed Central

    Kläsener, Kathrin; Maity, Palash C; Hobeika, Elias; Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Binding of antigen to the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) initiates a multitude of events resulting in B cell activation. How the BCR becomes signaling-competent upon antigen binding is still a matter of controversy. Using a high-resolution proximity ligation assay (PLA) to monitor the conformation of the BCR and its interactions with co-receptors at a 10–20 nm resolution, we provide direct evidence for the opening of BCR dimers during B cell activation. We also show that upon binding Syk opens the receptor by an inside-out signaling mechanism that amplifies BCR signaling. Furthermore, we found that on resting B cells, the coreceptor CD19 is in close proximity with the IgD-BCR and on activated B cells with the IgM-BCR, indicating nanoscale reorganization of receptor clusters during B cell activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02069.001 PMID:24963139

  3. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  4. Liver Fibrosis Occurs Through Dysregulation of MyD88-dependent Innate B cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Manoj; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Velazquez, Victoria M.; Tedesco, Dana; Elrod, Elizabeth; Han, Jin-Hwan; Sharma, Prachi; Ibegbu, Chris; Gewirtz, Andrew; Anania, Frank; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.; Grakoui, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver disease mediated by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) leads to liver fibrosis. Here, we postulated that the immune regulatory properties of HSCs might promote the profibrogenic activity of B cells. Fibrosis is completely attenuated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated B cell deficient μMT mice showing that B cells are required. The retinoic acid produced by HSCs augmented B cell survival, plasma cell marker CD138 expression, and IgG production. These activities were reversed following the addition of the retinoic acid inhibitor, LE540. Transcriptional profiling of fibrotic liver B cells revealed an increased expression of genes related to NF-κB activation, proinflammatory cytokine production and CD40 signaling suggesting that these B cells are activated and may be acting as inflammatory cells. Biological validation experiments also revealed increased activation (CD44 and CD86 expressions), constitutive IgG production and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP1-α. Likewise targeted deletion of B-cell-intrinsic MyD88 signaling, an innate adaptor with involvement in RA signaling, resulted in reduced infiltration of migratory CD11c+ dendritic cells and Ly6C++ monocytes, and hence reduced liver pathology. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that liver fibrosis occurs through a mechanism of HSC-mediated augmentation of innate B cell activity and highlight B cells as an important ‘first responders’ of the intrahepatic immune environment. PMID:25711908

  5. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase–Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers. PMID:25987726

  6. B Cell Infection and Activation by Rabies Virus-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Andrew G.; Norton, James E.; Dorfmeier, Corin L.; Shen, Shixue

    2013-01-01

    Replication-deficient rabies viruses (RABV) are promising rabies postexposure vaccines due to their prompt and potent stimulation of protective virus neutralizing antibody titers, which are produced in mice by both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms. To promote such early and robust B cell stimulation, we hypothesized that live RABV-based vaccines directly infect B cells, thereby activating a large pool of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) capable of providing early priming and costimulation to CD4+ T cells. In this report, we show that live RABV-based vaccine vectors efficiently infect naive primary murine and human B cells ex vivo. Infection of B cells resulted in the significant upregulation of early markers of B cell activation and antigen presentation, including CD69, major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), and CD40 in murine B cells or HLA-DR and CD40 in human B cells compared to mock-infected cells or cells treated with an inactivated RABV-based vaccine. Furthermore, primary B cells infected with a live RABV expressing ovalbumin were able to prime and stimulate naive CD4+ OT-II T cells to proliferate and to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2), demonstrating a functional consequence of B cell infection and activation by live RABV-based vaccine vectors. We propose that this direct B cell stimulation by live RABV-based vaccines is a potential mechanism underlying their induction of early protective T cell-dependent B cell responses, and that designing live RABV-based vaccines to infect and activate B cells represents a promising strategy to develop a single-dose postexposure rabies vaccine where the generation of early protective antibody titers is critical. PMID:23760241

  7. B cell infection and activation by rabies virus-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Andrew G; Norton, James E; Dorfmeier, Corin L; Shen, Shixue; McGettigan, James P

    2013-08-01

    Replication-deficient rabies viruses (RABV) are promising rabies postexposure vaccines due to their prompt and potent stimulation of protective virus neutralizing antibody titers, which are produced in mice by both T-dependent and T-independent mechanisms. To promote such early and robust B cell stimulation, we hypothesized that live RABV-based vaccines directly infect B cells, thereby activating a large pool of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) capable of providing early priming and costimulation to CD4(+) T cells. In this report, we show that live RABV-based vaccine vectors efficiently infect naive primary murine and human B cells ex vivo. Infection of B cells resulted in the significant upregulation of early markers of B cell activation and antigen presentation, including CD69, major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), and CD40 in murine B cells or HLA-DR and CD40 in human B cells compared to mock-infected cells or cells treated with an inactivated RABV-based vaccine. Furthermore, primary B cells infected with a live RABV expressing ovalbumin were able to prime and stimulate naive CD4(+) OT-II T cells to proliferate and to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2), demonstrating a functional consequence of B cell infection and activation by live RABV-based vaccine vectors. We propose that this direct B cell stimulation by live RABV-based vaccines is a potential mechanism underlying their induction of early protective T cell-dependent B cell responses, and that designing live RABV-based vaccines to infect and activate B cells represents a promising strategy to develop a single-dose postexposure rabies vaccine where the generation of early protective antibody titers is critical. PMID:23760241

  8. Chromosome instability in diffuse large B cell lymphomas is suppressed by activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandiran, Sampath; Adon, Arsene; Guo, Xiangxue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Huichen; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Sunay, Ustun R.; Young, Andrew N.; Brown, Theresa; Mar, Jessica C.; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Mann, Karen P.; Natkunam, Yasodha; Boise, Lawrence H.; Saavedra, Harold I.; Lossos, Izidore S.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma in the United States. DLBCL comprises biologically distinct subtypes including germinal center-like (GCB) and activated-B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC). The most aggressive type, ABC-DLBCL, displays dysregulation of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathway as well as genomic instability. Although, much is known about the tumorigenic roles of the canonical NF-kB pathway, the precise role of the noncanonical NF-kB pathway remains unknown. Here we show that activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway regulates chromosome stability, DNA damage response and centrosome duplication in DLBCL. Analysis of 92 DLBCL samples revealed that activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway is associated with low levels of DNA damage and centrosome amplification. Inhibiting the noncanonical pathway in lymphoma cells uncovered baseline DNA damage and prevented doxorubicin-induced DNA damage repair. In addition, it triggered centrosome amplification and chromosome instability, indicated by anaphase bridges, multipolar spindles and chromosome missegregation. We determined that the noncanonical NF-κB pathway execute these functions through the regulation of GADD45α and REDD1 in a p53-independent manner, while it collaborates with p53 to regulate cyclin G2 expression. Furthermore, this pathway regulates GADD45α, REDD1 and cyclin G2 through direct binding of NF-κB sites to their promoter region. Overall, these results indicate that the noncanonical NF-κB pathway plays a central role in maintaining genome integrity in DLBCL. Our data suggests that inhibition of the noncanonical NF-kB pathway should be considered as an important component in DLBCL therapeutic approach. PMID:25359525

  9. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 Is Essential for the Activation and Function of Mature B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerasimcik, Natalija; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Massaad, Michel J.; Geha, Raif S.; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Cdc42 coordinates regulation of the actin and the microtubule cytoskeleton by binding and activating the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein. We sought to define the role of intrinsic expression of Cdc42 by mature B cells in their activation and function. Mice with inducible deletion of Cdc42 in mature B cells formed smaller germinal centers and had a reduced Ab response, mostly of low affinity to T cell–dependent Ag, compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Spreading formation of long protrusions that contain F-actin, microtubules, and Cdc42-interacting protein 4, and assumption of a dendritic cell morphology in response to anti-CD40 plus IL-4 were impaired in Cdc42-deficient B cells compared with WT B cells. Cdc42-deficient B cells had an intact migratory response to chemokine in vitro, but their homing to the B cell follicles in the spleen in vivo was significantly impaired. Cdc42-deficient B cells induced a skewed cytokine response in CD4+ T cells, compared with WT B cells. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Cdc42 in the motility of mature B cells, their cognate interaction with T cells, and their differentiation into Ab-producing cells. PMID:25870239

  10. Independent Activity of the Homologous Small Regulatory RNAs AbcR1 and AbcR2 in the Legume Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Quesada, Omar; Millán, Vicenta; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martín; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I.

    2013-01-01

    The legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti expresses a plethora of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) whose function is mostly unknown. Here, we have functionally characterized two tandemly encoded S. meliloti Rm1021 sRNAs that are similar in sequence and structure. Homologous sRNAs (designated AbcR1 and AbcR2) have been shown to regulate several ABC transporters in the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In Rm1021, AbcR1 and AbcR2 exhibit divergent unlinked regulation and are stabilized by the RNA chaperone Hfq. AbcR1 is transcribed in actively dividing bacteria, either in culture, rhizosphere or within the invasion zone of mature alfalfa nodules. Conversely, AbcR2 expression is induced upon entry into stationary phase and under abiotic stress. Only deletion of AbcR1 resulted into a discrete growth delay in rich medium, but both are dispensable for symbiosis. Periplasmic proteome profiling revealed down-regulation of the branched-chain amino acid binding protein LivK by AbcR1, but not by AbcR2. A double-plasmid reporter assay confirmed the predicted specific targeting of the 5′-untranslated region of the livK mRNA by AbcR1 in vivo. Our findings provide evidences of independent regulatory functions of these sRNAs, probably to fine-tune nutrient uptake in free-living and undifferentiated symbiotic rhizobia. PMID:23869210

  11. Independent activity of the homologous small regulatory RNAs AbcR1 and AbcR2 in the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Torres-Quesada, Omar; Millán, Vicenta; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martín; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I

    2013-01-01

    The legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti expresses a plethora of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) whose function is mostly unknown. Here, we have functionally characterized two tandemly encoded S. meliloti Rm1021 sRNAs that are similar in sequence and structure. Homologous sRNAs (designated AbcR1 and AbcR2) have been shown to regulate several ABC transporters in the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In Rm1021, AbcR1 and AbcR2 exhibit divergent unlinked regulation and are stabilized by the RNA chaperone Hfq. AbcR1 is transcribed in actively dividing bacteria, either in culture, rhizosphere or within the invasion zone of mature alfalfa nodules. Conversely, AbcR2 expression is induced upon entry into stationary phase and under abiotic stress. Only deletion of AbcR1 resulted into a discrete growth delay in rich medium, but both are dispensable for symbiosis. Periplasmic proteome profiling revealed down-regulation of the branched-chain amino acid binding protein LivK by AbcR1, but not by AbcR2. A double-plasmid reporter assay confirmed the predicted specific targeting of the 5'-untranslated region of the livK mRNA by AbcR1 in vivo. Our findings provide evidences of independent regulatory functions of these sRNAs, probably to fine-tune nutrient uptake in free-living and undifferentiated symbiotic rhizobia. PMID:23869210

  12. Dysfunctional B-cell activation in cirrhosis due to hepatitis C infection associated with disappearance of CD27+ B-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Iyer, Tara K.; Carpenter, Erica; Li, Hong; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Kaplan, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both advanced solid tumors and hepatitis C have previously been associated with memory B-cell dysfunction. In this study we sought to dissect the impact of viral infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer on memory B-cell frequency and function in the spectrum of HCV disease. Methods Peripheral blood from healthy donors, HCV-infected patients with F1–F2 liver fibrosis, HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis, patients with HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma and non-HCV-infected cirrhotics were assessed for B-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Isolated B-cells were stimulated with anti-CD40 antibodies and TLR9 agonist for assessment of costimulation marker expression, cytokine production, immunoglobulin production and CD4+ T-cell allostimulatory capacity. Results CD27+ memory B-cells, and more specifically CD27+IgM+ B-cells, were markedly less frequent in cirrhotic patients independent of HCV infection. Circulating B-cells in cirrhotics were hyporesponsive to CD40/TLR9 activation as characterized by CD70 upregulation, TNFβ secretion, IgG production and T-cell allostimulation. Lastly, blockade of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling abrogated the activation of normal donor B-cells by cirrhotic plasma suggesting a role for bacterial translocation in driving B-cell changes in cirrhosis. Conclusion Profound abnormalities in B-cell phenotype and function occur in cirrhosis independent of hepatitis C viral infection. These B-cell defects may explain in part the vaccine hyporesponsiveness and susceptibility to bacterial infection in this population. PMID:21932384

  13. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  14. CD45RO enriches for activated, highly mutated human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen M.; Harp, Natessa; Patel, Darshna; Zhang, Jeffrey; Willson, Savannah; Kim, Yoon J.; Clanton, Christian

    2007-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus regarding the influence of different CD45 isoforms during peripheral B-cell development. Examining correlations between surface CD45RO expression and various physiologic processes ongoing during the germinal center (GC) reaction, we hypothesized that GC B cells, like T cells, that up-regulate surface RO should progressively acquire phenotypes commonly associated with activated, differentiating lymphocytes. GC B cells (IgD−CD38+) were subdivided into 3 surface CD45RO fractions: RO−, RO+/−, and RO+. We show here that the average number of mutations per IgVH transcript increased in direct correlation with surface RO levels. Conjunctional use of RO and CD69 further delineated low/moderately and highly mutated fractions. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA was slightly reduced among RO+ GC B cells, suggesting that higher mutation averages are unlikely due to elevated somatic mutation activity. Instead, RO+ GC B cells were negative for Annexin V, comprised mostly (93%) of CD77− centrocytes, and were enriched for CD69+ cells. Collectively, RO+ GC B cells occupy what seems to be a specialized niche comprised mostly of centrocytes that may be in transition between activation states. These findings are among the first to sort GC B cells into populations enriched for live mutated cells solely using a single extracellular marker. PMID:17644737

  15. The absence of the transcription activator TFE3 impairs activation of B cells in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, K; Wells, S; Henderson, A; Gorman, J; Alt, F; Stall, A; Calame, K

    1997-01-01

    TFE3 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the TFE3/mi family of basic helix loop helix zipper transcription factors. TFE3 binds to muE3 sites located in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) intronic enhancer, heavy-chain variable region promoters, the Ig kappa intronic enhancer, and regulatory sites in other genes. To understand the role of TFE3 in Ig expression and lymphoid development, we used embryonic stem (ES) cell-mediated gene targeting and RAG2-/- blastocyst complementation to generate mice which lack TFE3 in their B and T lymphocytes. TFE3- ES cells fully reconstitute the B- and T-cell compartments, giving rise to normal patterns of IgM+ B220+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, TFE3- B cells show several defects consistent with poor B-cell activation. Serum IgM levels are reduced twofold and IgG and IgA isotypes are reduced three- to sixfold in the TFE3- chimeras even though in vitro, the TFE3- splenocytes secrete normal levels of all isotypes in response to lipopolysaccharide activation. Peripheral TFE3- B cells also show reduced surface expression of CD23 and CD24 (heat-stable antigen). PMID:9154832

  16. MK5 activates Rag transcription via Foxo1 in developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kwan T.; Timblin, Greg A.; McWhirter, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Foxo1 is a critical, direct regulator of Rag (recombination activating gene) transcription during B cell development and is thus essential for the generation of a diverse repertoire of antigen receptors. Although Foxo1 regulation has been widely studied in many cell types, pathways regulating Foxo1 in B cells have not been fully elucidated. By screening a panel of Foxo1 mutants, we identified serine 215 on Foxo1 as a novel phosphorylation site that is essential for the activation of Rag transcription. Mutation of S215 strongly attenuated transactivation of Rag but did not affect most other Foxo1 target genes. We show that MK5, a MAPK-activated protein kinase, is a previously unidentified upstream regulator of Foxo1. MK5 was necessary and sufficient to activate Rag transcription in transformed and primary pro–B cells. Together, our experiments show that MK5 positively regulates Rag transcription via phosphorylation of Foxo1 in developing B cells. PMID:23878308

  17. Suppression of Human B Cell Activation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Involves Altered Regulation of B Cell Lymphoma-6

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S.; Crawford, Robert B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD. PMID:25543051

  18. The ABCs of Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Containment and Reallocation Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes activity-based costing (ABC) and how this tool may help management understand the costs of major activities and identify possible alternatives. Also discussed are the traditional costing systems used by higher education and ways of applying ABC to higher education. (GLR)

  19. Evolution of B-cell malignancy; Pre-B-cell leukemia resulting from MYC activation in a B-cell neoplasm with a rearranged BCL2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gauwerky, C.E.; Haluska, F.G.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The authors have analyzed the molecular genetics of the breakpoints involved in the t(8;14) and t(14;18) translocations of an acute pre-B-cell leukemia from a patient with a history of follicular lymphoma. In this patient's leukemic cells, the breakpoint of the t(14;18) translocation occurred in the major breakpoint-cluster region of the BCL2 gene and became linked to the J{sub H}4 joining-region gene segment of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus on the 14q+ chromosome as previously observed in follicular lymphoma. An N region and heptamer and nonamer signal sequences indicated that this translocation occurred as a mistake in V{sub H}-D{sub H}-J{sub H} joining (where V{sub H} and D{sub H} are the variable and diversity segments). In the t(8;14) translocation, the breakpoint was located immediately 5' of the first exon of the MYC protooncogene, which was juxtaposed with the C{gamma}2 constant gene segment of the second 14q+ chromosome. The finding of repeated sequences typical of switch regions suggested that this translocation occurred during heavy-chain isotype switching, resulting in progression to pre-B-cell leukemia with both the 5(8;14) and the t(14;18) translocations. The terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-positive phenotype of the patient's leukemic cells further suggests that the pre-B-cell leukemia was derived from a pre-B cell carrying a t(14;18) translocation in the original follicular lymphoma. The polymerase chain reaction method was then used to identify cancer cells in the bone marrow of the patient.

  20. Characterization of the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CD10) as an activation molecule on mature human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiyokawa, N; Kokai, Y; Ishimoto, K; Fujita, H; Fujimoto, J; Hata, J I

    1990-01-01

    Distinct expression pattern of CD10 molecules during B cell activation was analysed using in vivo and in vitro systems. By two-colour flowcytometrical analysis, CD10 was found to be expressed at a specific stage of in vivo activating B cells. The expression of CD10 during B cell activation appeared to be unique from that of other activation-related B cell antigens including L29, MA6, OKT9 and OKT10. Although the expression of CD10 was associated with that of the activation-related B cell antigens, CD10+ B cells could be separated in the distinct fractions to those expressing other activation-related B cell antigens when fractionated by cell gravity. In particular, certain CD10+ B cells were detected positive for the resting B cell antigen, L30. In vitro studies revealed that CD10+ B cells arose from CD10- B cells at an early step of B cell activation, and disappeared lately when activated by Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. Collectively, CD10 was an antigen transiently expressed at an early phase of B cell activation process. Expression of CD10 and other antigens on Burkitt's lymphomas (15 cases) was studied next. All cases were CD10+, and 87% (13 cases) were also L30+. In addition, six of CD10+ L30+ cases were L29+. This observation suggested that Burkitt's lymphomas were phenotypically similar to the B cells at an early phase of activation, those expressing CD10 and L30, simultaneously. The present study has dissected a precise expression pattern of CD10 on mature B cell activation in vitro and in vivo, and could be implicated for the histogenesis of one of the poorly characterized B cell lymphoma, namely Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:2138527

  1. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L.; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P.; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A.; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A.; Poe, Jonathan C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow–specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86+ dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  2. Targeting Syk-activated B cells in murine and human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan; Allen, Jessica L; Luznik, Leo; MacDonald, Kelli P; Paz, Katelyn; Alexander, Kylie A; Vulic, Ante; Du, Jing; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taylor, Patricia A; Poe, Jonathan C; Serody, Jonathan S; Murphy, William J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Ritz, Jerome; Chao, Nelson J; Clynes, Raphael A; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-06-25

    Novel therapies for chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are needed. Aberrant B-cell activation has been demonstrated in mice and humans with cGVHD. Having previously found that human cGVHD B cells are activated and primed for survival, we sought to further evaluate the role of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in cGVHD in multiple murine models and human peripheral blood cells. In a murine model of multiorgan system, nonsclerodermatous disease with bronchiolitis obliterans where cGVHD is dependent on antibody and germinal center (GC) B cells, we found that activation of Syk was necessary in donor B cells, but not T cells, for disease progression. Bone marrow-specific Syk deletion in vivo was effective in treating established cGVHD, as was a small-molecule inhibitor of Syk, fostamatinib, which normalized GC formation and decreased activated CD80/86(+) dendritic cells. In multiple distinct models of sclerodermatous cGVHD, clinical and pathological disease manifestations were not eliminated when mice were therapeutically treated with fostamatinib, though both clinical and immunologic effects could be observed in one of these scleroderma models. We further demonstrated that Syk inhibition was effective at inducing apoptosis of human cGVHD B cells. Together, these data demonstrate a therapeutic potential of targeting B-cell Syk signaling in cGVHD. PMID:25852057

  3. Interleukin-7 and Toll-Like Receptor 7 Induce Synergistic B Cell and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bikker, Angela; Kruize, Aike A.; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M. G.; Peters, Rogier P.; Kleinjan, Marije; Redegeld, Frank; de Jager, Wilco; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Roon, Joël A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the potential synergy of IL-7-driven T cell-dependent and TLR7-mediated B cell activation and to assess the additive effects of monocyte/macrophages in this respect. Methods Isolated CD19 B cells and CD4 T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with TLR7 agonist (TLR7A, Gardiquimod), IL-7, or their combination with or without CD14 monocytes/macrophages (T/B/mono; 1 : 1 : 0,1). Proliferation was measured using 3H-thymidine incorporation and Ki67 expression. Activation marker (CD19, HLA-DR, CD25) expression was measured by FACS analysis. Immunoglobulins were measured by ELISA and release of cytokines was measured by Luminex assay. Results TLR7-induced B cell activation was not associated with T cell activation. IL-7-induced T cell activation alone and together with TLR7A synergistically increased numbers of both proliferating (Ki67+) B cells and T cells, which was further increased in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. This was associated by up regulation of activation markers on B cells and T cells. Additive or synergistic induction of production of immunoglobulins by TLR7 and IL-7 was associated by synergistic induction of T cell cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17A, IL-22), which was only evident in the presence of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions IL-7-induced CD4 T cell activation and TLR7-induced B cell activation synergistically induce T helper cell cytokine and B cell immunoglobulin production, which is critically dependent on monocytes/macrophages. Our results indicate that previously described increased expression of IL-7 and TLR7 together with increased numbers of macrophages at sites of inflammation in autoimmune diseases like RA and pSS significantly contributes to enhanced lymphocyte activation. PMID:24740301

  4. The Role of Activity Based Costing (ABC) in Educational Support Services: A White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edds, Daniel B.

    Many front-line managers who are assuming more financial responsibility for their organizations find traditional cost accounting inadequate for their needs and are turning to Activity Based Costing (ABC). ABC is not a financial reporting system to serve the needs of regulatory agencies, but a tool that tracks costs from the general ledger…

  5. Autoantigen-Specific B Cell Activation in FAS-Deficient Rheumatoid Factor Immunoglobulin Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haowei; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    In systemic autoimmune disease, self-tolerance fails, leading to autoantibody production. A central issue in immunology is to understand the origins of activated self-reactive B cells. We have used immunoglobulin (Ig) transgenic mice to investigate the regulation of autoreactive B cells with specificity for self-IgG2a (the rheumatoid factor [RF] specificity) to understand how normal mice regulate RF autoantibodies and how this fails in autoimmune mice. We previously showed that normal mice do not tolerize the AM14 RF clone, nor do they appear to activate it. Here we show that in Fas-deficient autoimmune mice, the picture is quite different. RF B cells are activated to divide and secrete, but only when the autoantigen is present. Thus, B cells that are ignored rather than anergized in normal mice can be stimulated to produce autoantibody in Fas-deficient mice. This demonstrates a novel developmental step at which intact Fas–Fas ligand signaling is required to regulate B cells in order to prevent autoimmunity. These data also establish the relevance of ignorant self-specific B cells to autoantibody production in disease and prove that in the case of the RF specificity, the nominal autoantigen IgG2a is the driving autoantigen in vivo. PMID:10477549

  6. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  7. Markers of B-Cell Activation in Relation to Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mirick, Dana K; Edlefsen, Kerstin L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Madeleine, Margaret; Magpantay, Larry; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2012-01-01

    B-cell activation biomarkers have been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected populations. However, whether a similar association may exist in general populations has not been established. We conducted a case-control study within the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study cohort to measure the B-cell activation biomarkers sCD23, sCD27, sCD30, sCD44, and CXCL13 in serum samples collected an average of 6 years before NHL diagnosis, in 491 cases and 491 controls. Using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios, we observed strong associations between NHL and markers, for all B-cell NHL and for major subtypes. Women with marker levels in the highest-versus-lowest quartile categories of CD23, CD27, CD30, or CXCL13 were at 2.8 to 5.5-fold increased risk of B-NHL. Additionally, there were significant trends of risk with increasing levels of these markers present. Associations were strongest for cases with shortest lag times between blood draw and diagnosis (<3 years). However, there were also significant associations for cases with the longest prediagnostic lag (9–13 years). Taken together, our findings indicate a prominent role for B-cell activation among postmenopausal women in the etiology of B-cell NHL and/or in processes reflective of early disease development, as early as 9 years before diagnosis. PMID:22846913

  8. Acidic phospholipids govern the enhanced activation of IgG-B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangjun; Pan, Weiling; Sui, Yinqiang; Li, Hua; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Qi, Hai; Xu, Chenqi; Liu, Wanli

    2015-01-01

    B cells that express the isotype-switched IgG-B cell receptor (IgG-BCR) are one of the driving forces for antibody memory. To allow for a rapid memory IgG antibody response, IgG-BCR evolved into a highly effective signalling machine. Here, we report that the positively charged cytoplasmic domain of mIgG (mIgG-tail) specifically interacts with negatively charged acidic phospholipids. The key immunoglobulin tail tyrosine (ITT) in mIgG-tail is thus sequestered in the membrane hydrophobic core in quiescent B cells. Pre-disruption of such interaction leads to excessive recruitment of BCRs and inflated BCR signalling upon antigen stimulation, resulting in hyperproliferation of primary B cells. Physiologically, membrane-sequestered mIgG-tail can be released by antigen engagement or Ca2+ mobilization in the initiation of B cell activation. Our studies suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for how dynamic association of mIgG-tail with acidic phospholipids governs the enhanced activation of IgG-BCR. PMID:26440273

  9. Chronic bacterial infection activates autoreactive B cells and induces isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sophie; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Kern, Aurélie; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Eftekhari, Pierre; Da Silva, Sylvia; Jaulhac, Benoît; Brink, Robert; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Korganow, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The links between infections and the development of B-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases are still unclear. In particular, it has been suggested that infection-induced stimulation of innate immune sensors can engage low affinity autoreactive B lymphocytes to mature and produce mutated IgG pathogenic autoantibodies. To test this hypothesis, we established a new knock-in mouse model in which autoreactive B cells could be committed to an affinity maturation process. We show that a chronic bacterial infection allows the activation of such B cells and the production of nonmutated IgM autoantibodies. Moreover, in the constitutive presence of their soluble antigen, some autoreactive clones are able to acquire a germinal center phenotype, to induce Aicda gene expression and to introduce somatic mutations in the IgG heavy chain variable region on amino acids forming direct contacts with the autoantigen. Paradoxically, only lower affinity variants are detected, which strongly suggests that higher affinity autoantibodies secreting B cells are counterselected. For the first time, we demonstrate in vivo that a noncross-reactive infectious agent can activate and induce autoreactive B cells to isotype switching and autoantigen-driven mutations, but on a nonautoimmune background, tolerance mechanisms prevent the formation of consequently dangerous autoimmunity. PMID:26474536

  10. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shweta; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Agrewala, Javed N

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB) cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID), signifying class switch recombination (CSR). Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response. PMID:21674065

  11. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  12. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  13. Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase in B Cell Immunity and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an enzyme that is predominantly expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a pivotal role in immunoglobulin class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation for antibody (Ab) maturation. These two genetic processes endow Abs with protective functions against a multitude of antigens (pathogens) during humoral immune responses. In B cells, AID expression is regulated at the level of either transcriptional activation on AID gene loci or post-transcriptional suppression of AID mRNA. Furthermore, AID stabilization and targeting are determined by post-translational modifications and interactions with other cellular/nuclear factors. On the other hand, aberrant expression of AID causes B cell leukemias and lymphomas, including Burkitt's lymphoma caused by c-myc/IgH translocation. AID is also ectopically expressed in T cells and non-immune cells, and triggers point mutations in relevant DNA loci, resulting in tumorigenesis. Here, I review the recent literatures on the function of AID, regulation of AID expression, stability and targeting in B cells, and AID-related tumor formation. PMID:23396757

  14. A functional receptor for B-cell activating factor is expressed on human acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Muschen, Markus; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises by transformation of a progenitor (pre-B) cell. Cure rates in adults remain low and treatment is complicated by support provided by the microenvironment to the leukemic cells, indicating an urgent need to better understand the factors that promote their survival. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor BAFF-R are important for survival and growth of mature normal and malignant B-cells but are not expressed on pre-B cells. Unexpectedly, all cells in the primary Philadelphia-chromosome positive and negative ALL samples tested were positive for high BAFF-R cell surface expression. The BAFF-R was fully competent to bind BAFF and stimulation of the receptor activated both the classical and the non-canonical NFκB pathways. Recombinant BAFF supported survival of the ALL cells in the absence of stroma, and it significantly attenuated the rate of apoptosis caused by exposure to nilotinib, a drug used therapeutically to treat Philadelphia-chromosome positive ALLs. Surprisingly, BAFF mRNA and protein were also expressed in the same cells but BAFF was not shed into the medium. Our report is the first showing universal expression of the BAFF-R by pre-B ALL cells and opens the possibility of blocking its function as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy. PMID:20460528

  15. Analysis by Flow Cytometry of B-Cell Activation and Antibody Responses Induced by Toll-Like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in B lymphocytes and contribute to B-cell activation, antibody responses, and their maturation. TLR stimulation of mouse B cells induces class switch DNA recombination (CSR) to isotypes specified by cytokines, and also induces formation of IgM(+) as well as class-switched plasma cells. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, while on its own inducing limited B-cell proliferation and no CSR, can enhance CSR driven by TLRs. Particular synergistic or antagonistic interactions among TLR pathways, BCR, and cytokine signaling can have important consequences for B-cell activation, CSR, and plasma cell formation. This chapter outlines protocols for the induction and analysis of B-cell activation and antibody production by TLRs with or without other stimuli. PMID:26803633

  16. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  17. Molecular characteristics of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and -uninfected patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy and pre-rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Morton, Lindsay M; Kim, Clara J; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bhatia, Kishor; Cockburn, Myles; Hawes, Debra; Wang, Sophia S; Chang, Cindy; Altekruse, Sean F; Engels, Eric A; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection substantially elevates diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) risk, but its impact on the distinct DLBCL subtypes defined by cell of origin is unclear. We compared DLBCL molecular characteristics and prognosis in 51 HIV-infected and 116 HIV-uninfected cases diagnosed during 1977-2003. Using immunohistochemistry to classify cell of origin based on the Tally algorithm, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL was substantially more common in HIV-infected (83%) than in HIV-uninfected (54%) cases (p < 0.001). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 63% of DLBCLs in HIV-infected cases, occurring almost exclusively in ABC-DLBCL (74% vs. 13% of germinal center B-cell [GCB]-DLBCL, p = 0.002), but was rarely detected in DLBCLs among HIV-uninfected cases (3%). Among HIV-uninfected cases, MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] and IgH/BCL2 [t(14;18)(q32;q21)] translocations were significantly more common and BCL6/IgH [t(3;14)(q27;q32)] significantly less common in GCB-DLBCL than in ABC-DLBCL (p = 0.010, < 0.001 and = 0.039, respectively). Among HIV-infected cases, translocations other than MYC/IgH [t(8;14)(q24;q32)] (21%) were rare (≤ 6%) and unrelated to cell of origin. ABC-DLBCL was associated with adverse overall survival compared with GCB-DLBCL regardless of HIV status (pHIV-infected = 0.066; pHIV-uninfected = 0.038). Our data demonstrate key differences in the molecular characteristics, cell of origin and prognosis of DLBCL by HIV status in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and pre-rituximab era, supporting biologic differences in lymphomagenesis in the presence of HIV. PMID:23772639

  18. Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis: IgM and Polyclonal B-Cell Activation Lead to Disease Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Eszter; Jayakumar, Asha; Wing Cho, Ka; Goldsmith-Pestana, Karen; Dondji, Blaise; Lambris, John D.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the draining lymph node (DLN) is the initial site for colonization and establishment of infection after intradermal transmission by the sand fly vector; however, little is known about the developing immune response within this site. Using an intradermal infection model, which allows for parasite visceralization, we have examined the ongoing immune responses in the DLN of BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Although not unexpected, at early times post-infection there is a marked B cell expansion in the DLN, which persists throughout infection. However, the characteristics of this response were of interest; as early as day 7 post-infection, polyclonal antibodies (TNP, OVA, chromatin) were observed and the levels appeared comparable to the specific anti-leishmania response. Although B-cell-deficient JHD BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to infection, neither B-cell-derived IL-10 nor B-cell antigen presentation appear to be primarily responsible for the elevated parasitemia. However, passive transfer and reconstitution of JHD BALB/c with secretory immunoglobulins, (IgM or IgG; specific or non-specific immune complexes) results in increased susceptibility to L. infantum infection. Further, JHD BALB/c mice transgenetically reconstituted to secrete IgM demonstrated exacerbated disease in comparison to wild type BALB/c mice as early as 2 days post-infection. Evidence suggests that complement activation (generation of C5a) and signaling via the C5aR (CD88) is related to the disease exacerbation caused by IgM rather than cytokine levels (IL-10 or IFN-γ). Overall these studies indicate that polyclonal B cell activation, which is known to be associated with human visceral leishmaniasis, is an early and intrinsic characteristic of disease and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20213734

  19. Anti-tumor activity of the combination of bendamustine with vorinostat in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Salar, Antonio; Navarro, Alfons; Gimeno, Eva; Pairet, Silvia; Camacho, Laura; Ferraro, Mariana; Serrano, Sergi; Besses, Carles; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Blanca

    2016-03-01

    Current standard-of-care therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) results in up to 40% of patients who either relapse or develop refractory disease. In this setting, further therapeutic improvements are needed. This study analyzed the in vitro effects of the combination of bendamustine with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat in DLBCL cells. This combination enhanced histone acetylation and double strand DNA breaks resulting in an additive to synergistic cytotoxic effect in both ABC- and GCB-type DLBCL cells, independently of their TP53 mutational status. These results support the rationale for considering bendamustine and vorinostat combination as a novel approach in DLBCL treatment. PMID:26084206

  20. Substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T-cell-independent antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingyue; Yi, Junyang; Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Kai; Song, Ping; Chau, Alicia; Wang, Fei; Chang, Zai; Han, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Chunyang; Liu, Wanli

    2015-06-01

    B cells use B-cell receptors (BCRs) to sense antigens that are usually presented on substrates with different stiffness. However, it is not known how substrate stiffness affects B-cell proliferation, class switch, and in vivo antibody responses. We addressed these questions using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with different stiffness (20 or 1100 kPa). Live cell imaging experiments suggested that antigens on stiffer substrates more efficiently trigger the synaptic accumulation of BCR and phospho-Syk molecules compared with antigens on softer substrates. In vitro expansion of mouse primary B cells shows different preferences for substrate stiffness when stimulated by different expansion stimuli. LPS equally drives B-cell proliferation on stiffer or softer substrates. Anti-CD40 antibodies enhance B-cell proliferation on stiffer substrates, while antigens enhance B-cell proliferation on softer substrates through a mechanism involving the enhanced phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO1. In vitro class switch differentiation of B cells prefers softer substrates. Lastly, NP67-Ficoll on softer substrates accounted for an enhanced antibody response in vivo. Thus, substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T cell independent antibody responses in vivo, suggesting its broad application in manipulating the fate of B cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25756957

  1. Activation and trafficking of peritoneal B1a B-cells in response to amphibole asbestos.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Hurley, Kristina; Peterson, Cody; Coker, Lindsey; Fowers, Cody; Marcum, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    B1a B-cells are concentrated in peritoneal and pleural cavities, are producers of 'natural auto-antibodies', and have been implicated in autoimmune responses. Their numbers are increased in humans and mice with systemic autoimmune diseases, but their role in the immune pathology is not known. Asbestos causes pulmonary, pleural, and peritoneal pathologies by accessing these tissues after inhalation. Amphibole asbestos has been shown to elicit immune dysfunction, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and autoantibody production. This study tested the hypothesis that asbestos affects immune dysfunction by activating B1a B-cells to traffic to secondary lymphatic tissue. C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to amphibole asbestos (Libby 6-Mix) either endotracheally or intraperitoneally, and the B1a B-cells in pleural or peritoneal compartments were tested by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adoptive transfer of peritoneal lymphocytes from CD45.1 transgenic to wild-type mice was used to track the migration. The percentage and numbers of B1a B-cells in pleural and peritoneal cavities decreased 3-6 days following exposure. During that time, asbestos exposure led to a decrease in cells expressing alpha-4 (α4) integrin and MHC II antigen. Peritoneal cells treated in vitro showed decreased α4 integrin with no change in CD5, IgM, or MHC II antigen. Therefore, B1a cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), MHC II(+)) traffic from the peritoneal cavity following loss of α4 integrin expression. Following adoptive transfer into the peritoneum of asbestos-exposed mice, CD45.1(+) B1a cells were detected in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes after 3 days, peaking at 6 days. Interestingly, the percentage of splenic suppressor B-cells (IgM(+), CD5(+), CD11b(+), CD1d(+)) decreased following amphibole exposure, demonstrating that the B1a cells did not contribute to an increased pool of suppressive B-cells. These results show that B1a B-cells respond to asbestos exposure by trafficking to secondary lymphatic

  2. BCR repertoire sequencing: different patterns of B cell activation after two Meningococcal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Galson, Jacob D.; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Trück, Johannes; Ramasamy, Maheshi N.; Münz, Márton; Fowler, Anna; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Pollard, Andrew J.; Lunter, Gerton; Kelly, Dominic F.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used to investigate the B cell receptor heavy chain transcript repertoire of different B cell subsets (naïve, marginal zone, IgM memory and IgG memory) at baseline, and of plasma cells 7 days following administration of serogroup ACWY meningococcal polysaccharide and protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines. Baseline B cell subsets could be distinguished from each other using a small number of repertoire properties (clonality, mutation from germ-line and complementarity-determining region 3 length) that were conserved between individuals. However, analyzing the complementarity-determining region 3 amino acid sequence (which is particularly important for antigen binding) of the baseline subsets showed few sequences shared between individuals. In contrast, day 7 plasma cells demonstrated nearly tenfold greater sequence sharing between individuals than the baseline subsets, consistent with the plasma cells being induced by the vaccine antigen, and sharing specificity for a more limited range of epitopes. By annotating plasma cell sequences based on IgG subclass usage and mutation, and also comparing them to the sequences of the baseline cell subsets, we were able to identify different signatures after the polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. Plasma cells produced after conjugate vaccination were predominantly IgG1, and most related to IgG memory cells. In contrast, after polysaccharide vaccination, the plasma cells were predominantly IgG2, less mutated, and were equally likely to be related to marginal zone, IgM memory or IgG memory cells. High-throughput B cell repertoire sequencing thus provides a unique insight into patterns of B cell activation not possible from more conventional measures of immunogenicity. PMID:25976772

  3. LLT1 and CD161 Expression in Human Germinal Centers Promotes B Cell Activation and CXCR4 Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Llibre, Alba; López-Macías, Constantino; Marafioti, Teresa; Mehta, Hema; Partridge, Amy; Kanzig, Carina; Rivellese, Felice; Galson, Jacob D; Walker, Lucy J; Milne, Paul; Phillips, Rodney E; Kelly, Dominic F; Freeman, Gordon J; El Shikh, Mohey Eldin; Klenerman, Paul; Willberg, Christian B

    2016-03-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are microanatomical structures critical for the development of high-affinity Abs and B cell memory. They are organized into two zones, light and dark, with coordinated roles, controlled by local signaling. The innate lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) is known to be expressed on B cells, but its functional role in the GC reaction has not been explored. In this study, we report high expression of LLT1 on GC-associated B cells, early plasmablasts, and GC-derived lymphomas. LLT1 expression was readily induced via BCR, CD40, and CpG stimulation on B cells. Unexpectedly, we found high expression of the LLT1 ligand, CD161, on follicular dendritic cells. Triggering of LLT1 supported B cell activation, CD83 upregulation, and CXCR4 downregulation. Overall, these data suggest that LLT1-CD161 interactions play a novel and important role in B cell maturation within the GC in humans. PMID:26829983

  4. Cbl Suppresses B Cell Receptor–Mediated Phospholipase C (Plc)-γ2 Activation by Regulating B Cell Linker Protein–Plc-γ2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomoharu; Maeda, Akito; Kurosaki, Mari; Tezuka, Tohru; Hironaka, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the Cbl protein plays a negative role in immune receptor signaling; however, the mode of Cbl action in B cell receptor (BCR) signaling still remains unclear. DT40 B cells deficient in Cbl showed enhanced BCR-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)-γ2 activation, thereby leading to increased apoptosis. A possible explanation for the involvement of Cbl in PLC-γ2 activation was provided by findings that Cbl interacts via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain with B cell linker protein (BLNK) after BCR ligation. BLNK is a critical adaptor molecule for PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation through its binding to the PLC-γ2 SH2 domains. As a consequence of the interaction between Cbl and BLNK, the BCR-induced recruitment of PLC-γ2 to BLNK and the subsequent PLC-γ2 tyrosine phosphorylation were inhibited. Thus, our data suggest that Cbl negatively regulates the PLC-γ2 pathway by inhibiting the association of PLC-γ2 with BLNK. PMID:10684856

  5. Mutation of Fnip1 is associated with B-cell deficiency, cardiomyopathy, and elevated AMPK activity.

    PubMed

    Siggs, Owen M; Stockenhuber, Alexander; Deobagkar-Lele, Mukta; Bull, Katherine R; Crockford, Tanya L; Kingston, Bethany L; Crawford, Greg; Anzilotti, Consuelo; Steeples, Violetta; Ghaffari, Sahar; Czibik, Gabor; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Watkins, Hugh; Ashrafian, Houman; Davies, Benjamin; Woods, Angela; Carling, David; Yavari, Arash; Beutler, Bruce; Cornall, Richard J

    2016-06-28

    Folliculin (FLCN) is a tumor-suppressor protein mutated in the Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, which associates with two paralogous proteins, folliculin-interacting protein (FNIP)1 and FNIP2, forming a complex that interacts with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Although it is clear that this complex influences AMPK and other metabolic regulators, reports of its effects have been inconsistent. To address this issue, we created a recessive loss-of-function variant of Fnip1 Homozygous FNIP1 deficiency resulted in profound B-cell deficiency, partially restored by overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2, whereas heterozygous deficiency caused a loss of marginal zone B cells. FNIP1-deficient mice developed cardiomyopathy characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and glycogen accumulation, with close parallels to mice and humans bearing gain-of-function mutations in the γ2 subunit of AMPK. Concordantly, γ2-specific AMPK activity was elevated in neonatal FNIP1-deficient myocardium, whereas AMPK-dependent unc-51-like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) phosphorylation and autophagy were increased in FNIP1-deficient B-cell progenitors. These data support a role for FNIP1 as a negative regulator of AMPK. PMID:27303042

  6. T cell–independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K.; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D.; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M.M.; Schoen, Carolin T.; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A.; Madaio, Michael P.; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell–dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell–independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity. PMID:23979161

  7. Anti-cancer activity of withaferin A in B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, MK; Gachuki, BW; Alhakeem, SS; Oben, KN; Rangnekar, VM; Gupta, RC; Bondada, S

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide from the plant, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) used in Ayurvedic medicine, has been found to be valuable in the treatment of several medical ailments. WA has been found to have anticancer activity against various solid tumors, but its effects on hematological malignancies have not been studied in detail. WA strongly inhibited the survival of several human and murine B cell lymphoma cell lines. Additionally, in vivo studies with syngeneic-graft lymphoma cells suggest that WA inhibits the growth of tumor but does not affect other proliferative tissues. We demonstrate that WA inhibits the efficiency of NF-κB nuclear translocation in diffuse large B cell lymphomas and found that WA treatment resulted in a significant decrease in protein levels involved in B cell receptor signaling and cell cycle regulation. WA inhibited the activity of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 as reflected by a sharp increase in Hsp70 expression levels. Hence, we propose that the anti-cancer effects of WA in lymphomas are likely due to its ability to inhibit Hsp90 function and subsequent reduction of critical kinases and cell cycle regulators that are clients of Hsp90. PMID:26020511

  8. Pro-Apoptotic Activity of New Honokiol/Triphenylmethane Analogues in B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mędra, Aleksandra; Witkowska, Magdalena; Majchrzak, Agata; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Bonner, Michael Y; Robak, Tadeusz; Arbiser, Jack L; Smolewski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Honokiol and triphenylmethanes are small molecules with anti-tumor properties. Recently, we synthesized new honokiol analogues (HAs) that possess common features of both groups. We assessed the anti-tumor effectiveness of HAs in B-cell leukemia/lymphoma cells, namely in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells ex vivo and in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Nalm-6), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; Raji), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; Toledo) and multiple myeloma (MM; RPMI 8226) cell lines. Four of these compounds appeared to be significantly active against the majority of cells examined, with no significant impact on healthy lymphocytes. These active HAs induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, causing significant deregulation of several apoptosis-regulating proteins. Overall, these compounds downregulated Bcl-2 and XIAP and upregulated Bax, Bak and survivin proteins. In conclusion, some of the HAs are potent tumor-selective inducers of apoptosis in ex vivo CLL and in BL, DLBCL and MM cells in vitro. Further preclinical studies of these agents are recommended. PMID:27483232

  9. Functional and clinical aspects of the B-cell-activating factor (BAFF): a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lied, G A; Berstad, A

    2011-01-01

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) influences peripheral B-cell survival, maturation and immunoglobulin class-switch recombination and has a range of potential clinical implications. Biological functions of BAFF and its relevance in various clinical disorders including currently investigated BAFF-targeting therapies are reviewed and discussed based on PubMed search of relevant articles. Serum levels of BAFF are increased in autoimmune diseases including autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis where BAFF concentrations are related to titres of autoantibodies and disease progression. Increased BAFF levels are found in synovial, bronchoalveolar and gut lavage fluids, suggesting local class switching and immunoglobulin production. Clinical relevance and diagnostic potential of BAFF are also noted in patients with allergic diseases, malignancies and infections including hepatitis C virus. BAFF antagonists are promising new therapeutic agents, currently being tried in B-cell-related autoimmune diseases. Serum level of BAFF may indicate disease mechanisms and the degree of activity. Determination of BAFF in different body compartments like synovium, airways and gut may also have clinical implications. Results of ongoing clinical trials with BAFF antagonists are eagerly awaited. PMID:21128997

  10. Immunoglobulin class-switched B cells provide an active immune axis between CNS and periphery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengzhi; Pitts, Steven J.; Sundar, Purnima D.; Telman, Dilduz; Zhao, Lora Z.; Derstine, Mia; Abounasr, Aya; Hauser, Stephen L.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian

    2014-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), an exchange of lymphocytes, in particular B cells, between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery is believed to be required for the maintenance of active disease. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that prevent lymphocytes from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or induce near-complete peripheral B cell depletion rapidly mitigate MS disease activity. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we recently found that clonally related B cells exist in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) of MS patients, establishing the existence of an immune axis across the BBB. However, it remains unclear which subpopulations of the highly diverse peripheral B cell compartment share antigen-specificity with intrathecal B cell repertoires, and whether their antigen stimulation occurs on both sides of the BBB. To address these questions, we combined flow cytometry sorting of PB B cell subsets with deep immune repertoire sequencing of CSF and PB B cells. Immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG) heavy chain variable (VH) region repertoires of five PB B cell subsets from MS patients (n=8) were compared with their CSF Ig-VH transcriptomes. In 6 of 8 patients, we identified peripheral CD27+IgD−memory B cells, CD27hiCD38hi plasma cells/plasmablasts, or CD27−IgD− B cells providing an immune connection to the CNS compartment. Pinpointing Ig class-switched B cells as key component of the immune axis thought to contribute to ongoing MS disease activity strengthens the rationale of current therapeutic strategies and may lead to more targeted approaches. PMID:25100740

  11. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  12. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Samantha D.; Lafarge, Sandrine T.; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  13. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kato, Yasutaka; Tanino, Mishie; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Obara, Masato; Endo, Tomoyuki; Koike, Takao; Tanaka, Shinya

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines, Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.

  14. A Computational Study of the Effects of Syk Activity on B Cell Receptor Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Reginald L.; Krisenko, Mariya O.; Geahlen, Robert L.; Rundell, Ann E.; Buzzard, Gregery T.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase Syk is intricately involved in early signaling events in B cells and is required for proper response when antigens bind to B cell receptors (BCRs). Experiments using an analog-sensitive version of Syk (Syk-AQL) have better elucidated its role, but have not completely characterized its behavior. We present a computational model for BCR signaling, using dynamical systems, which incorporates both wild-type Syk and Syk-AQL. Following the use of sensitivity analysis to identify significant reaction parameters, we screen for parameter vectors that produced graded responses to BCR stimulation as is observed experimentally. We demonstrate qualitative agreement between the model and dose response data for both mutant and wild-type kinases. Analysis of our model suggests that the level of NF-κB activation, which is reduced in Syk-AQL cells relative to wild-type, is more sensitive to small reductions in kinase activity than Erkp activation, which is essentially unchanged. Since this profile of high Erkp and reduced NF-κB is consistent with anergy, this implies that anergy is particularly sensitive to small changes in catalytic activity. Also, under a range of forward and reverse ligand binding rates, our model of Erkp and NF-κB activation displays a dependence on a power law affinity: the ratio of the forward rate to a non-unit power of the reverse rate. This dependence implies that B cells may respond to certain details of binding and unbinding rates for ligands rather than simple affinity alone. PMID:26525178

  15. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Ross, Susan R.

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was independent of viral gene expression, because it occurred after treatment of MMTV with ultraviolet light or 2,2′-dithiodipyridine and in azidothymidine-treated mice. Nuclear extracts prepared from the lymphocytes of MMTV-injected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice showed increased nuclear factor κB activity. Additionally, the MMTV- and Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins coimmunoprecipitated with TLR4 when expressed in 293T cells. The MMTV receptor failed to coimmunoprecipitate with TLR4, suggesting that MMTV/TLR4 interaction is independent of virus attachment and fusion. These results identify retroviral proteins that interact with a mammalian toll receptor and show that direct activation by such viruses may initiate in vivo infection pathways. PMID:11854525

  16. Canine olfactory ensheathing cells from the olfactory mucosa can be engineered to produce active chondroitinase ABC.

    PubMed

    Carwardine, Darren; Wong, Liang-Fong; Fawcett, James W; Muir, Elizabeth M; Granger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    A multitude of factors must be overcome following spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to achieve clinical improvement in patients. It is thought that by combining promising therapies these diverse factors could be combatted with the aim of producing an overall improvement in function. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present in the glial scar that forms following SCI present a significant block to axon regeneration. Digestion of CSPGs by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) leads to axon regeneration, neuronal plasticity and functional improvement in preclinical models of SCI. However, the enzyme activity decays at body temperature within 24-72h, limiting the translational potential of ChABC as a therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have shown huge promise as a cell transplant therapy in SCI. Their beneficial effects have been demonstrated in multiple small animal SCI models as well as in naturally occurring SCI in canine patients. In the present study, we have genetically modified canine OECs from the mucosa to constitutively produce enzymatically active ChABC. We have developed a lentiviral vector that can deliver a mammalian modified version of the ChABC gene to mammalian cells, including OECs. Enzyme production was quantified using the Morgan-Elson assay that detects the breakdown products of CSPG digestion in cell supernatants. We confirmed our findings by immunolabelling cell supernatant samples using Western blotting. OECs normal cell function was unaffected by genetic modification as demonstrated by normal microscopic morphology and the presence of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NGF)) following viral transduction. We have developed the means to allow production of active ChABC in combination with a promising cell transplant therapy for SCI repair. PMID:27423610

  17. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  18. Neuropilin-1 expression characterizes T follicular helper (Tfh) cells activated during B cell differentiation in human secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Renand, Amédée; Milpied, Pierre; Rossignol, Julien; Bruneau, Julie; Lemonnier, François; Dussiot, Michael; Coulon, Séverine; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play an essential role in the development of antigen-specific B cell immunity. Tfh cells regulate the differentiation and survival of activated B cells outside and inside germinal centers (GC) of secondary lymphoid organs. They act through cognate contacts with antigen-presenting B cells, but there is no current marker to specifically identify those Tfh cells which productively interact with B cells. Here we show that neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), a cell surface receptor, is selectively expressed by a subset of Tfh cells in human secondary lymphoid organs. Nrp1 expression on Tfh cells correlates with B cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro, is transient, and can be induced upon co-culture with autologous memory B cells in a cell contact-dependent manner. Comparative analysis of ex vivo Nrp1(+) and Nrp1(-) Tfh cells reveals gene expression modulation during activation. Finally, Nrp1 is expressed by malignant Tfh-like cells in a severe case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) associated with elevated terminal B cell differentiation. Thus, Nrp1 is a specific marker of Tfh cells cognate activation in humans, which may prove useful as a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in neoplastic diseases associated with Tfh cells activity. PMID:24386482

  19. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  20. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  1. RNA exosome regulates AID DNA mutator activity in the B cell genome

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin diversification processes of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination critically rely on transcription coupled targeting of AID to Ig loci in activated B lymphocytes. AID catalyzes deamination of cytidine deoxynucleotides on exposed single stranded DNA. In addition to driving immunoglobulin diversity, promiscuous targeting of AID mutagenic activity poses a deleterious threat to genomic stability. Recent genome-wide studies have uncovered pervasive AID activity throughout the B cell genome. It is increasingly apparent that AID activity is frequently targeted to genomic loci undergoing early transcription termination where RNA exosome promotes the resolution of stalled transcription complexes via co-transcriptional RNA degradation mechanisms. Here we review aspects and consequences of eukaryotic transcription that lead to early termination, RNA exosome recruitment, and ultimately targeting of AID mutagenic activity. PMID:26073986

  2. Determination of soluble CD21 as a parameter of B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huemer, H P; Larcher, C; Prodinger, W M; Petzer, A L; Mitterer, M; Falser, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study we established a novel solid-phase immunoassay for CD21 using the time-resolved fluorescence of lanthanide chelates. The capture assay was able to detect concentrations of as low as 100 pg of CD21 antigen per millilitre of sample and was used for quantitative determination of CD21 in lysates of different cell lines as well as in patient serum specimens. CD21 was measured in lysates of tonsils and cell lines of B, T cell and myelomonocyte lineage, and appeared to consist of monomeric antigen under the detergent conditions used. Elevated levels of soluble CD21 were observed in serum of patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, a disease known to be associated with polyclonal B cell activation, and in infection with the lymphotropic rubella virus. Significantly increased levels were also found in malignancies which are associated with EBV. In patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a correlation with the titre of EBV-specific IgA was observed, thus supporting a possible role of soluble CD21 as a marker for disease activity in certain malignancies. Our data suggest that measurement of soluble CD21 could serve as a marker for activation of the immune system and diseases involving the B cell lymphoid system. Possible mechanisms and functions of soluble CD21 are discussed. PMID:8348744

  3. B Cell Super-Enhancers and Regulatory Clusters Recruit AID Tumorigenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jason; Wang, Qiao; Dose, Marei; Pruett, Nathanael; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Resch, Wolfgang; Liang, Genqing; Tang, Zhonghui; Mathé, Ewy; Benner, Christopher; Dubois, Wendy; Nelson, Steevenson; Vian, Laura; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Jankovic, Mila; Hakim, Ofir; Gazumyan, Anna; Pavri, Rushad; Awasthi, Parirokh; Song, Bin; Liu, Geng; Chen, Longyun; Zhu, Shida; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Staudt, Louis; Murre, Cornelis; Ruan, Yijun; Robbiani, Davide F.; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Casellas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The antibody gene mutator activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) promiscuously damages oncogenes, leading to chromosomal translocations and tumorigenesis. Why nonimmunoglobulin loci are susceptible to AID activity is unknown. Here, we study AID-mediated lesions in the context of nuclear architecture and the B cell regulome. We show that AID targets are not randomly distributed across the genome but are predominantly grouped within super-enhancers and regulatory clusters. Unexpectedly, in these domains, AID deaminates active promoters and eRNA+ enhancers interconnected in some instances over megabases of linear chromatin. Using genome editing, we demonstrate that 3D-linked targets cooperate to recruit AID-mediated breaks. Furthermore, a comparison of hypermutation in mouse B cells, AID-induced kataegis in human lymphomas, and translocations in MEFs reveals that AID damages different genes in different cell types. Yet, in all cases, the targets are predominantly associated with topological complex, highly transcribed super-enhancers, demonstrating that these compartments are key mediators of AID recruitment. PMID:25483777

  4. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  5. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} impairs NF-{kappa}B activation in human naive B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geldmeyer-Hilt, Kerstin; Heine, Guido; Hartmann, Bjoern; Baumgrass, Ria; Radbruch, Andreas; Worm, Margitta

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} In naive B cells, VDR activation by calcitriol results in reduced NF-{kappa}B p105 and p50 protein expression. {yields} Ligating the VDR with calcitriol causes reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Reduced nuclear amount of p65 after calcitriol incubation results in reduced binding of p65 on the p105 promoter. {yields} Thus, vitamin D receptor signaling may reduce or prevent activation of B cells and unwanted immune responses, e.g. in IgE dependent diseases such as allergic asthma. -- Abstract: 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (calcitriol), the bioactive metabolite of vitamin D, modulates the activation and inhibits IgE production of anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulated human peripheral B cells. Engagement of CD40 results in NF-{kappa}B p50 activation, which is essential for the class switch to IgE. Herein, we investigated by which mechanism calcitriol modulates NF-{kappa}B mediated activation of human naive B cells. Naive B cells were predominantly targeted by calcitriol in comparison with memory B cells as shown by pronounced induction of the VDR target gene cyp24a1. Vitamin D receptor activation resulted in a strongly reduced p105/p50 protein and mRNA expression in human naive B cells. This effect is mediated by impaired nuclear translocation of p65 and consequently reduced binding of p65 to its binding site in the p105 promoter. Our data indicate that the vitamin D receptor reduces NF-{kappa}B activation by interference with NF-{kappa}B p65 and p105. Thus, the vitamin D receptor inhibits costimulatory signal transduction in naive B cells, namely by reducing CD40 signaling.

  6. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis.

    PubMed

    Kettman, J R; Soederberg, A; Lefkovits, I

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that "promoted" contact ("Rock and Roll" experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation. PMID:3488344

  7. Molecular cloning, expression and bioactivity of B cell activating factor (BAFF) in African ostrich.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keli; Xiao, Ke; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Shun; Zhong, Juming; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Liu, Huazhen; Peng, Kemei

    2015-09-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, is testified to play a critical role in B cell survival, proliferation, maturation and immunoglobulin secretion. In the present study, the cDNA of open reading frame (ORF) in African ostrich (Struthio camelus) BAFF (designated OsBAFF) was cloned by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The OsBAFF gene encodes a 288-amino acid protein containing a predicted transmembrane domain and a putative furin protease cleavage site like BAFFs from chicken (cBAFF), quail (qBAFF), duck (dBAFF), goose (gBAFF) and dove (doBAFF). RT-PCR analysis showed that the OsBAFF gene is strongly expressed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. The soluble OsBAFF had been cloned into pET28a. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis confirmed that the soluble fusion protein His-OsBAFF was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Rosset (DE3). In vitro, purified OsBAFF was not only able to promote the survival of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, but also able to co-stimulate proliferation of mouse splenic B cells. The expression of OsBAFF in lymphocyte cells was higher than the control after LPS stimulation. These findings indicated that OsBAFF plays an important role in survival and proliferation of African ostrich bursal lymphocytes, which may provide valuable information for research into the immune system of African ostrich and OsBAFF may serve as a potential immunologic factor for enhancing immunological efficacy in African ostrich and any other birds. PMID:26256697

  8. Polyclonal B cell activation, circulating immune complexes and autoimmunity in human american visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Galvão-Castro, B; Sá Ferreira, J A; Marzochi, K F; Marzochi, M C; Coutinho, S G; Lambert, P H

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study, serum and plasma samples from 17 patients with kala-azar were collected in Rio de Janeiro. High levels of immune complexes (IC) were detected in serum by means of 125I-Clq and conglutinin binding assays. The Clq binding material had a sedimentation coefficient of 19-25S, as determined by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient. Plasma levels of C3 and C3 breakdown products were measured and the C3d levels were increased in six out of 11 patients. The occurrence of polyclonal B cell activation was suggested by (a) a marked increase of serum IgG and IgM levels and (b) of the presence of antibodies against various proteins and haptens (SRBC, DNP-BSA, FITC-BSA,KLH). There was a close association between the presence of IC and anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Anti-smooth muscle antibodies were also observed. These data are consistent with a major role of polyclonal B cell activation in the induction of IC during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:6424987

  9. B-cell antigens within normal and activated human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, G P; Perry, M; Wootton, M; Hair, J; More, I A R

    1999-01-01

    In this study we compared cell surface staining for human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) CD antigens by flow cytometry, with staining obtained following permeabilization of PBL using the Cytoperm method (Serotec). Six CD antigens (CD20, CD21, CD22, CD32, CD35 and major histocompatibility complex class II antigen) normally found on the surface of B cells, were also found to be expressed within T cells. We also showed, by immunoelectron microscopy, that these inappropriately expressed (‘occult’) CD antigens are located within cytoplasmic vesicles or within the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Following in vitro activation of T cells a distinct increase in expression of all of these cytoplasmic antigens was observed but staining at the cell surface was, by comparison, weak. We therefore propose that up-regulation of various B-cell CD antigens occurs within the cytoplasm of T cells following activation and that these antigens may be synthesized and released into the fluid-phase as soluble immunoregulatory molecules. PMID:10233724

  10. B-cell antigens within normal and activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, G P; Perry, M; Wootton, M; Hair, J; More, I A

    1999-03-01

    In this study we compared cell surface staining for human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) CD antigens by flow cytometry, with staining obtained following permeabilization of PBL using the Cytoperm method (Serotec). Six CD antigens (CD20, CD21, CD22, CD32, CD35 and major histocompatibility complex class II antigen) normally found on the surface of B cells, were also found to be expressed within T cells. We also showed, by immunoelectron microscopy, that these inappropriately expressed ('occult') CD antigens are located within cytoplasmic vesicles or within the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Following in vitro activation of T cells a distinct increase in expression of all of these cytoplasmic antigens was observed but staining at the cell surface was, by comparison, weak. We therefore propose that up-regulation of various B-cell CD antigens occurs within the cytoplasm of T cells following activation and that these antigens may be synthesized and released into the fluid-phase as soluble immunoregulatory molecules. PMID:10233724

  11. The SH3-SAM adaptor HACS1 is up-regulated in B cell activation signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Benn, Sally; Li, Zhi Hua; Wei, Ellen; Masih-Khan, Esther; Trieu, Young; Bali, Meenakshi; McGlade, C Jane; Claudio, Jaime O; Stewart, A Keith

    2004-09-20

    HACS1 is a Src homology 3 and sterile alpha motif domain-containing adaptor that is preferentially expressed in normal hematopoietic tissues and malignancies including myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Microarray data showed HACS1 expression is up-regulated in activated human B cells treated with interleukin (IL)-4, CD40L, and anti-immunoglobulin (Ig)M and clustered with genes involved in signaling, including TNF receptor-associated protein 1, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, IL-6, and DEC205. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that HACS1 is up-regulated by IL-4, IL-13, anti-IgM, and anti-CD40 in human peripheral blood B cells. In murine spleen B cells, Hacs1 can also be up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide but not IL-13. Induction of Hacs1 by IL-4 is dependent on Stat6 signaling and can also be impaired by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and nuclear factor kappaB. HACS1 associates with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins after B cell activation and binds in vitro to the inhibitory molecule paired Ig-like receptor B. Overexpression of HACS1 in murine spleen B cells resulted in a down-regulation of the activation marker CD23 and enhancement of CD138 expression, IgM secretion, and Xbp-1 expression. Knock down of HACS1 in a human B lymphoma cell line by small interfering ribonucleic acid did not significantly change IL-4-stimulated B cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that HACS1 is up-regulated by B cell activation signals and is a participant in B cell activation and differentiation. PMID:15381729

  12. B lymphocytes and B-cell activating factor promote collagen and profibrotic markers expression by dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction B lymphocytes might play a pathogenic role in dermal fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc). B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a key cytokine for B-cell activation, is increased in the serum and the skin of patients with SSc. However, the ability of B cells directly to stimulate dermal fibroblasts and the role of BAFF are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of B cells and BAFF in the expression of collagen and profibrotic markers by dermal fibroblasts. Methods Cocultures of blood B cells from healthy blood donors and normal or SSc dermal fibroblasts stimulated with anti-IgM and BAFF were performed. Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, MMP9, COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1 mRNA expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Soluble collagen, BAFF, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL2 protein secretion were assessed. Results Coculture of blood B cells and dermal fibroblasts isolated from SSc patients induced IL-6, TGF-β1, CCL2, and collagen secretion, as well as Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, and MMP9 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Transwell assays demonstrated that this induction was dependent on cell-cell contact. Addition of anti-IgM and BAFF to the coculture increased IL-6, CCL2, TGF-β1, and collagen secretion. B cell- and BAFF-induced collagen secretion was highly reduced by anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. Conclusions Our results showed for the first time a direct role of B cells on the production of collagen by dermal fibroblasts, which is further enhanced by BAFF. Thus, these results demonstrate a new pathogenic role of B cells and BAFF in fibrosis and systemic sclerosis. PMID:24289101

  13. Retrotransposon derepression leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in pro-B cells.

    PubMed

    Pasquarella, Alessandra; Ebert, Anja; Pereira de Almeida, Gustavo; Hinterberger, Maria; Kazerani, Maryam; Nuber, Alexander; Ellwart, Joachim; Klein, Ludger; Busslinger, Meinrad; Schotta, Gunnar

    2016-05-15

    The H3K9me3-specific histone methyltransferase Setdb1 impacts on transcriptional regulation by repressing both developmental genes and retrotransposons. How impaired retrotransposon silencing may lead to developmental phenotypes is currently unclear. Here, we show that loss of Setdb1 in pro-B cells completely abrogates B cell development. In pro-B cells, Setdb1 is dispensable for silencing of lineage-inappropriate developmental genes. Instead, we detect strong derepression of endogenous murine leukemia virus (MLV) copies. This activation coincides with an unusual change in chromatin structure, with only partial loss of H3K9me3 and unchanged DNA methylation, but strongly increased H3K4me3. Production of MLV proteins leads to activation of the unfolded protein response pathway and apoptosis. Thus, our data demonstrate that B cell development depends on the proper repression of retrotransposon sequences through Setdb1. PMID:27013243

  14. A Crucial Role for the p110δ Subunit of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase in B Cell Development and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Elizabeth; Bardi, Giuseppe; Bell, Sarah E.; Chantry, David; Downes, C. Peter; Gray, Alexander; Humphries, Lisa A.; Rawlings, David; Reynolds, Helen; Vigorito, Elena; Turner, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mice lacking the p110δ catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase have reduced numbers of B1 and marginal zone B cells, reduced levels of serum immunoglobulins, respond poorly to immunization with type II thymus-independent antigen, and are defective in their primary and secondary responses to thymus-dependent antigen. p110δ−/− B cells proliferate poorly in response to B cell receptor (BCR) or CD40 signals in vitro, fail to activate protein kinase B, and are prone to apoptosis. p110δ function is required for BCR-mediated calcium flux, activation of phosphlipaseCγ2, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase. Thus, p110δ plays a critical role in B cell homeostasis and function. PMID:12235209

  15. B cells drive lymphocyte activation and expansion in mice with the CD45 wedge mutation and Fas deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vikas A.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Cassafer, Gail; Daikh, David I.; Weiss, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    CD45 and Fas regulate tyrosine phosphorylation and apoptotic signaling pathways, respectively. Mutation of an inhibitory wedge motif in CD45 (E613R) results in hyperresponsive thymocytes and B cells on the C57BL/6 background, but no overt autoimmunity, whereas Fas deletion results in a mild autoimmune disease on the same genetic background. In this study, we show that these two mutations cooperate in mice, causing early lethality, autoantibody production, and substantial lymphoproliferation. In double-mutant mice, this phenotype was dependent on both T and B cells. T cell activation required signaling in response to endogenous or commensal antigens, demonstrated by the introduction of a transgenic T cell receptor. Genetic deletion of B cells also prevented T cell activation. Similarly, T cells were necessary for B cell autoantibody production. However, B cells appeared to be intrinsically activated even in the absence of T cells, suggesting that they may drive the phenotype of these mice. These results reveal a requirement for careful control of B cell signaling and cell death in preventing inappropriate lymphocyte activation and autoimmunity. PMID:19001138

  16. Shared signaling networks active in B cells isolated from genetically distinct mouse models of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianfu; Qin, Xiangmei; Kurepa, Zoran; Kumar, Kirthi Raman; Liu, Kui; Kanta, Hasna; Zhou, Xin J.; Satterthwaite, Anne B.; Davis, Laurie S.; Mohan, Chandra

    2007-01-01

    Though B cells play key roles in lupus pathogenesis, the molecular circuitry and its dysregulation in these cells as disease evolves remain poorly understood. To address this, a comprehensive scan of multiple signaling axes using multiplexed Western blotting was undertaken in several different murine lupus strains. PI3K/AKT/mTOR (mTOR, mammalian target of rapamycin), MEK1/Erk1/2, p38, NF-κB, multiple Bcl-2 family members, and cell-cycle molecules were observed to be hyperexpressed in lupus B cells in an age-dependent and lupus susceptibility gene–dose–dependent manner. Therapeutic targeting of the AKT/mTOR axis using a rapamycin (sirolimus) derivative ameliorated the serological, cellular, and pathological phenotypes associated with lupus. Surprisingly, the targeting of this axis was associated with the crippling of several other signaling axes. These studies reveal that lupus pathogenesis is contingent upon the activation of an elaborate network of signaling cascades that is shared among genetically distinct mouse models and raise hope that targeting pivotal nodes in these networks may offer therapeutic benefit. PMID:17641780

  17. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies. PMID:26187411

  18. In vivo sensitized and in vitro activated B cells mediate tumor regression in cancer adoptive immunotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiao; Song, Hongbin; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Donald, Elizabeth J.; Li, Mu; Chang, Alfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy utilizing tumor-reactive T cells has proven to be a promising strategy for cancer treatment. However, we hypothesize that successful treatment strategies will have to appropriately stimulate not only cellular immunity, but also humoral immunity. We previously reported that B cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) may function as antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we identified TDLN B cells as effector cells in an adoptive immunotherapy model. In vivo primed and in vitro activated TDLN B cells alone mediated effective (p<0.05) tumor regression after adoptive transfer into two histologically distinct murine pulmonary metastatic tumor models. Prior lymphodepletion of the host with either chemotherapy or whole-body irradiation augmented the therapeutic efficacy of the adoptively transferred TDLN B cells in the treatment of subcutaneous tumors as well as metastatic pulmonary tumors. Furthermore, B cell plus T cell transfers resulted in substantially more efficient antitumor responses than B cells or T cells alone (p<0.05). Activated TDLN B cells conferred strong humoral responses to tumor. This was evident by the production of IgM, IgG and IgG2b, which bound specifically to tumor cells and led to specific tumor cell lysis in the presence of complement. Collectively, these data indicate that in vivo primed and in vitro activated B cells can be employed as effector cells for cancer therapy. The synergistic antitumor efficacy of co-transferred activated B effector cells and T effector cells represents a novel approach for cancer adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:19667089

  19. An intrinsic adenylate kinase activity regulates gating of the ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-12-26

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Like other ABC transporters, it can hydrolyze ATP. Yet while ATP hydrolysis influences channel gating, it has long seemed puzzling that CFTR would require this reaction because anions flow passively through CFTR. Moreover, no other ion channel is known to require the large energy of ATP hydrolysis to gate. We found that CFTR also has adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP <=> ADP + ADP) that regulates gating. When functioning as an adenylate kinase, CFTR showed positive cooperativity for ATP suggesting its two nucleotide binding domains may dimerize. Thus, channel activity could be regulated by two different enzymatic reactions, ATPase and adenylate kinase, that share a common ATP binding site in the second nucleotide binding domain. At physiologic nucleotide concentrations, adenylate kinase activity, rather than ATPase activity may control gating, and therefore involve little energy consumption. PMID:14697202

  20. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  1. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  2. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  3. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host. PMID:26649443

  4. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  5. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  6. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  7. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  8. LLT1 and CD161 Expression in Human Germinal Centers Promotes B Cell Activation and CXCR4 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Alba; López-Macías, Constantino; Marafioti, Teresa; Mehta, Hema; Partridge, Amy; Kanzig, Carina; Rivellese, Felice; Galson, Jacob D.; Walker, Lucy J.; Milne, Paul; Phillips, Rodney E.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are microanatomical structures critical for the development of high-affinity Abs and B cell memory. They are organized into two zones, light and dark, with coordinated roles, controlled by local signaling. The innate lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) is known to be expressed on B cells, but its functional role in the GC reaction has not been explored. In this study, we report high expression of LLT1 on GC-associated B cells, early plasmablasts, and GC-derived lymphomas. LLT1 expression was readily induced via BCR, CD40, and CpG stimulation on B cells. Unexpectedly, we found high expression of the LLT1 ligand, CD161, on follicular dendritic cells. Triggering of LLT1 supported B cell activation, CD83 upregulation, and CXCR4 downregulation. Overall, these data suggest that LLT1–CD161 interactions play a novel and important role in B cell maturation within the GC in humans. PMID:26829983

  9. CD38, CD81 and BAFFR combined expression by transitional B cells distinguishes active from inactive systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana; Silva, Isabel; Inês, Luís; Souto-Carneiro, M Margarida; Pais, M Luísa; Trindade, Hélder; da Silva, José António Pereira; Paiva, Artur

    2016-05-01

    In view of its heterogeneous presentation and unpredictable course, clinical management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is difficult. There is a need for biomarkers and diagnostic aids to monitor SLE disease activity and severity prior to, during and after treatment. We undertook this study to search for unique phenotypic patterns in each peripheral blood (PB) B cell subset, capable of distinguishing SLE patients with inactive disease versus SLE patients with active disease versus controls by using an automated population separator (APS) visualization strategy. PB was collected from 41 SLE patients and 28 age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed the cell surface markers (in a tube CD20/CD27/CD19/CD45/CD38/CD81/BAFFR combination) expression on PB B cell subsets using principal component analysis, implemented in the APS software tool. Overall, our analysis indicates that active SLE can be distinguished from inactive SLE on the basis of a single tube analysis, focused on the decreased expression of CD38, CD81 and BAFFR in transitional B cells. The cluster analysis of immunophenotypic profiles of B cell subsets highlighted disease-specific abnormalities on transitional B cells that emerge as promising surrogate markers for disease activity. Further validation is needed with larger samples and prospective follow-up of patients. PMID:25894569

  10. Temporal regulation of Lsp1 O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation during apoptosis of activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jung-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Chiang, Ming-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ju; Gao, Shijay; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Hung; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Kuo-I.

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinking of B-cell receptor (BCR) sets off an apoptosis programme, but the underlying pathways remain obscure. Here we decipher the molecular mechanisms bridging B-cell activation and apoptosis mediated by post-translational modification (PTM). We find that O-GlcNAcase inhibition enhances B-cell activation and apoptosis induced by BCR crosslinking. This proteome-scale analysis of the functional interplay between protein O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation in stimulated mouse primary B cells identifies 313 O-GlcNAcylation-dependent phosphosites on 224 phosphoproteins. Among these phosphoproteins, temporal regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of lymphocyte-specific protein-1 (Lsp1) is a key switch that triggers apoptosis in activated B cells. O-GlcNAcylation at S209 of Lsp1 is a prerequisite for the recruitment of its kinase, PKC-β1, to induce S243 phosphorylation, leading to ERK activation and downregulation of BCL-2 and BCL-xL. Thus, we demonstrate the critical PTM interplay of Lsp1 that transmits signals for initiating apoptosis after BCR ligation. PMID:27555448

  11. Expression of essential B cell genes and immunoglobulin isotypes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, Rebecca L; McLaughlin, Kristin; Secor, Erica; Ruano, Diana; Matychak, Mary Beth; Flaminio, M Julia B F

    2009-09-01

    Many features of the equine immune system develop during fetal life, yet the naïve or immature immune state of the neonate renders the foal uniquely susceptible to particular pathogens. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical experiments investigated the progressive expression of developmental B cell markers and immunoglobulins in lymphoid tissues from equine fetus, pre-suckle neonate, foal, and adult horses. Serum IgM, IgG isotype, and IgA concentrations were also quantified in pre-suckle foals and adult horses. The expression of essential B cell genes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation, including immunoglobulin isotype switching. The corresponding production of IgM and IgG proteins is detectable in a limited scale at birth. Although the equine neonate humoral response seems competent, B cell activation factors derived from antigen presenting cells and T cells may control critical developmental regulation and immunoglobulin production during the initial months of life. PMID:19442687

  12. Schistosoma mansoni: autoantibodies and polyclonal B cell activation in infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Camus, D; Santoro, F; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The appearance of autoantibodies was investigated during the course of Schistosoma mansoni infection in C57Bl/6 mice. Anti-liver autoantibodies or lymphocyte-reactive alloantibodies were detected respectively without cell-mediated immunity against liver antigen or lymphocytotoxic activity. Anti-liver, anti-DNA, anti-Ig and anti-lymphocyte antibodies were shown 6-7 weeks after the beginning of the infection concomitantly with the increase of immunoglobulin levels and circulating immune complexes. At this period, the antibody response to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was increased and the injection of spleen cells from day-45-infected mice to uninfected recipients increased the anti-PVP antibody response. Conversely, the injection of spleen cells from uninfected to infected mice did not modify the anti-PVP Ab response. After 6 weeks of infection, the basal thymidine incorporation of spleen cells was increased contrasting with the marked inhibition of spleen cell response to PHA. The present data are consistent with the induction of a polyclonal non-specific B cell activation by S. mansoni. PMID:6978217

  13. Changes in potassium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1994-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and microelectrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to investigate the changes in ionic currents and action potential shape that follow axotomy of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion B-cells. 2. Axotomy increased M-conductance (gM; muscarine-sensitive, voltage- and time-dependent K+ conductance) by 35% at -30 mV and slowed its deactivation kinetics. 3. The delayed rectifier K+ current (IK; at +50 mV) was reduced in axotomized neurones to 61% of control without any change in activation or deactivation kinetics. Steady-state intracellular Ca2+ levels and leak conductance were unchanged. 4. The fast, voltage-sensitive, Ca(2+)-activated K+ current (IC), evoked from -40 mV, was decreased to about 71% of control (at +30 mV) in axotomized neurones, whereas that evoked from -80 mV was largely unaffected. IC kinetics were also similar in control and axotomized neurones. This suggests that IC channels are not changed after axotomy. 5. In axotomized neurones, commands to +10 from -40 mV had to be extended by 16 ms to evoke voltage-insensitive Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IAHP) responses that were similar in magnitude to those observed in control cells. 6. The previously documented, axotomy-induced decrease in Ca2+ current (ICa) due to increased resting inactivation can account for the reduction in IC and IAHP and for the change in the shape of the action potential. PMID:7837094

  14. Pin1 is required for sustained B cell proliferation upon oncogenic activation of Myc

    PubMed Central

    D'Artista, Luana; Bisso, Andrea; Piontini, Andrea; Doni, Mirko; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Kress, Theresia R.; Morelli, Marco J.; Del Sal, Giannino; Amati, Bruno; Campaner, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is activated by translocation in Burkitt's lymphoma and substitutions in codon 58 stabilize the Myc protein or augment its oncogenic potential. In wild-type Myc, phosphorylation of Ser 62 and Thr 58 provides a landing pad for the peptidyl prolyl-isomerase Pin1, which in turn promotes Ser 62 dephosphorylation and Myc degradation. However, the role of Pin1 in Myc-induced lymphomagenesis remains unknown. We show here that genetic ablation of Pin1 reduces lymphomagenesis in Eμ-myc transgenic mice. In both Pin1-deficient B-cells and MEFs, the proliferative response to oncogenic Myc was selectively impaired, with no alterations in Myc-induced apoptosis or mitogen-induced cell cycle entry. This proliferative defect wasn't attributable to alterations in either Ser 62 phosphorylation or Myc-regulated transcription, but instead relied on the activity of the ARF-p53 pathway. Pin1 silencing in lymphomas retarded disease progression in mice, making Pin1 an attractive therapeutic target in Myc-driven tumors. PMID:26943576

  15. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  16. An evolutionarily conserved program of B-cell development and activation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Page, Dawne M; Wittamer, Valerie; Bertrand, Julien Y; Lewis, Kanako L; Pratt, David N; Delgado, Noemi; Schale, Sarah E; McGue, Caitlyn; Jacobsen, Bradley H; Doty, Alyssa; Pao, Yvonne; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C; Magor, Brad G; Traver, David

    2013-08-22

    Teleost fish are among the most ancient vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system with B and T lymphocytes that produce memory responses to pathogens. Most bony fish, however, have only 2 types of B lymphocytes, in contrast to the 4 types available to mammals. To better understand the evolution of adaptive immunity, we generated transgenic zebrafish in which the major immunoglobulin M (IgM(+)) B-cell subset expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) (IgM1:eGFP). We discovered that the earliest IgM(+) B cells appear between the dorsal aorta and posterior cardinal vein and also in the kidney around 20 days postfertilization. We also examined B-cell ontogeny in adult IgM1:eGFP;rag2:DsRed animals, where we defined pro-B, pre-B, and immature/mature B cells in the adult kidney. Sites of B-cell development that shift between the embryo and adult have previously been described in birds and mammals. Our results suggest that this developmental shift occurs in all jawed vertebrates. Finally, we used IgM1:eGFP and cd45DsRed;blimp1:eGFP zebrafish to characterize plasma B cells and investigate B-cell function. The IgM1:eGFP reporter fish are the first nonmammalian B-cell reporter animals to be described. They will be important for further investigation of immune cell evolution and development and host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish. PMID:23861249

  17. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  18. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated disruption of the CD40 ligand-induced activation of primary human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haitian Crawford, Robert B. Kaplan, Barbara L.F. Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2011-09-15

    Suppression of the primary antibody response is particularly sensitive to suppression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mice; however, surprisingly little is known concerning the effects of TCDD on humoral immunity or B cell function in humans. Results from a limited number of previous studies, primarily employing in vitro activation models, suggested that human B cell effector function is suppressed by TCDD. The present study sought to extend these findings by investigating, in primary human B cells, the effects of TCDD on several critical stages leading to antibody secretion including activation and plasmacytic differentiation using an in vitro CD40 ligand activation model. These studies revealed important differences in the response of human and mouse B cells to TCDD, the most striking being altered expression of plasmacytic differentiation regulators, B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 and paired box protein 5, in mouse but not human B cells. The activation of human B cells was profoundly impaired by TCDD, as evidenced by decreased expression of activation markers CD80, CD86, and CD69. The impaired activation correlated with decreased cell viability, which prevented the progression of human B cells toward plasmacytic differentiation. TCDD treatment also attenuated the early activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling in human B cells. Collectively, the present study provided experimental evidence for novel mechanisms by which TCDD impairs the effector function of primary human B cells. - Highlights: > In this study primary human and mouse B cell toxicity to TCDD was compared. > TCDD altered the expression of Blimp-1 and Pax5 in mouse but not human B cells. > TCDD markedly suppressed human B cell activation as characterized by CD80, CD86 and CD69 expression. > TCDD inhibited ERK, p38, and Akt phosphorylation in human B cells.

  19. Pleural innate response activator B cells protect against pneumonia via a GM-CSF-IgM axis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Georg F; Chousterman, Benjamin G; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S; Theurl, Igor; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Quach, Tam D; Ali, Muhammad; Chen, John W; Rothstein, Thomas L; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2014-06-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality worldwide and a serious problem in critical care medicine, but the immunophysiological processes that confer either protection or morbidity are not completely understood. We show that in response to lung infection, B1a B cells migrate from the pleural space to the lung parenchyma to secrete polyreactive emergency immunoglobulin M (IgM). The process requires innate response activator (IRA) B cells, a transitional B1a-derived inflammatory subset which controls IgM production via autocrine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling. The strategic location of these cells, coupled with the capacity to produce GM-CSF-dependent IgM, ensures effective early frontline defense against bacteria invading the lungs. The study describes a previously unrecognized GM-CSF-IgM axis and positions IRA B cells as orchestrators of protective IgM immunity. PMID:24821911

  20. STS-1 promotes IFN-α induced autophagy by activating the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Fan, Hongye; Ding, Liang; Sun, Lingyun; Hou, Yayi

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the overexpression of IFN-α. IFN-α induces autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway, contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. Recent studies reported that B cells from patients with SLE and NZB/W F1 mice had enhanced autophagy activity; however, the mechanism still remains unknown. Here, we show that the protein tyrosine phosphatase STS-1 (suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling 1) was significantly overexpressed in B cells from patients with SLE and MRL/lpr mice. Notably, STS-1 promoted IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells by enhancing the JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. STS-1 inhibited the phosphorylation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase c-cbl, and subsequently promoted IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine kinase 2, leading to JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. Furthermore, STAT1 and JAK1 inhibitors blocked the IFN-α-induced autophagy promoted by STS-1, indicating that STS-1 promotes IFN-α-induced autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling. Our results demonstrate the importance of STS-1 in regulating IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells, and this could be used as a therapeutic approach to treat SLE. PMID:25959715

  1. Genomic instability in B-cells and diversity of recombinations that activate c-myc.

    PubMed

    Janz, S; Jones, G M; Müller, J R; Potter, M

    1995-01-01

    Genetic rearrangements activating the proto-oncogene c-myc comprise a mandatory oncogenic step in plasma cell tumor development in BALB/cAnPt mice. In the majority of plasmacytomas, c-myc activating rearrangements take the form of reciprocal chromosomal translocations t(12;15) that juxtapose c-myc to the immunoglobulin heavy chain alpha locus (IgH alpha) in particular the switch alpha region (S alpha). The genetic basis for the prevalence of S alpha/c-myc recombinations in BALB/cAnPt plasmacytomas is not known but may be related to a hypothetical regional genomic instability of the c-myc and IgH alpha loci in BALB/cAnPt mice. We wished to test whether the genomic instability of both loci might be revealed by the diversity of genetic recombinations that can be observed in IgH alpha and c-myc. We employed PCR methods to detect new recombinations of c-myc and IgH alpha in the preneoplastic stage of plasma cell tumor development and found that c-myc can be joined to more genes or genomic regions than known before. This is indicative but does not formally prove a particular genomic instability of c-myc and IgH alpha in BALB/cAnPt B cells. Since defective DNA repair provides a mechanistic explanation for genomic instability, we measured the efficiency of repair in IgH alpha and c-myc using an assay that quantitates the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers within specific genomic regions. We used plasmacytoma XRPC 24 as a model system and found that both IgH alpha and c-myc were poorly repaired, whereas c-abl, a proto-oncogene not related to conventional pristane-induced plasmacytoma-genesis, was efficiently repaired. PMID:7895512

  2. Cutting edge: An in vivo reporter reveals active B cell receptor signaling in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Mueller, James; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Zikherman, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Long-lasting Ab responses rely on the germinal center (GC), where B cells bearing high-affinity Ag receptors are selected from a randomly mutated pool to populate the memory and plasma cell compartments. Signaling downstream of the BCR is dampened in GC B cells, raising the possibility that Ag presentation and competition for T cell help, rather than Ag-dependent signaling per se, drive these critical selection events. In this study we use an in vivo reporter of BCR signaling, Nur77-eGFP, to demonstrate that although BCR signaling is reduced among GC B cells, a small population of cells exhibiting GC light zone phenotype (site of Ag and follicular helper T cell encounter) express much higher levels of GFP. We show that these cells exhibit somatic hypermutation, gene expression characteristic of signaling and selection, and undergo BCR signaling in vivo. PMID:25725108

  3. Essential Function for the Nuclear Protein Akirin2 in B Cell Activation and Humoral Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Tartey, Sarang; Matsushita, Kazufumi; Imamura, Tomoko; Wakabayashi, Atsuko; Ori, Daisuke; Mino, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2015-07-15

    Akirin2, an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein, is an important factor regulating inflammatory gene transcription in mammalian innate immune cells by bridging the NF-κB and SWI/SNF complexes. Although Akirin is critical for Drosophila immune responses, which totally rely on innate immunity, the mammalian NF-κB system is critical not only for the innate but also for the acquired immune system. Therefore, we investigated the role of mouse Akirin2 in acquired immune cells by ablating Akirin2 function in B lymphocytes. B cell-specific Akirin2-deficient (Cd19(Cre/+)Akirin2(fl/fl)) mice showed profound decrease in the splenic follicular (FO) and peritoneal B-1, but not splenic marginal zone (MZ), B cell numbers. However, both Akirin2-deficient FO and MZ B cells showed severe proliferation defect and are prone to undergo apoptosis in response to TLR ligands, CD40, and BCR stimulation. Furthermore, B cell cycling was defective in the absence of Akirin2 owing to impaired expression of genes encoding cyclin D and c-Myc. Additionally, Brg1 recruitment to the Myc and Ccnd2 promoter was severely impaired in Akirin2-deficient B cells. Cd19(Cre/+)Akirin2(fl/fl) mice showed impaired in vivo immune responses to T-dependent and -independent Ags. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Akirin2 is critical for the mitogen-induced B cell cycle progression and humoral immune responses by controlling the SWI/SNF complex, further emphasizing the significant function of Akirin2 not only in the innate, but also in adaptive immune cells. PMID:26041538

  4. miR290-5p/292-5p Activate the Immunoglobulin kappa Locus in B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patty B.; Cai, Amie; Bates, Jamie G.; Nolla, Hector; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated expression of miRNAs influences development in a wide variety of contexts. We report here that miR290-5p (100049710) and miR292-5p (100049711) are induced at the pre-B stage of murine B cell development and that they influence assembly of the Igκ light chain gene (243469) by contributing to the activation of germline Igκ transcription (κGT). We found that upon forced over-expression of miR290-5p/292-5p in Abelson Murine Leukemia Virus (AMuLV) transformed pro-B cells, two known activators of κGT, E2A (21423) and NF-κB (19697), show increased chromosomal binding to the kappa intronic enhancer. Conversely, knockdown of miR290-5p/292-5p in AMuLV pro-B cells blunts drug-induced activation of κGT. Furthermore, miR290-5p/292-5p knockdown also diminishes κGT activation, but not Rag1/2 (19373, 19374) expression, in an IL-7 dependent primary pro-B cell culture system. In addition, we identified a deficiency in κGT induction in miR290 cluster knockout mice. We hypothesize that increased expression of miR290-5p and miR292-5p contributes to the induction of κGT at the pre-B stage of B cell development through increased binding of NF-κB and E2A to kappa locus regulatory sequences. PMID:22928038

  5. miR290-5p/292-5p activate the immunoglobulin kappa locus in B cell development.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patty B; Cai, Amie; Bates, Jamie G; Nolla, Hector; Schlissel, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Regulated expression of miRNAs influences development in a wide variety of contexts. We report here that miR290-5p (100049710) and miR292-5p (100049711) are induced at the pre-B stage of murine B cell development and that they influence assembly of the Igκ light chain gene (243469) by contributing to the activation of germline Igκ transcription (κGT). We found that upon forced over-expression of miR290-5p/292-5p in Abelson Murine Leukemia Virus (AMuLV) transformed pro-B cells, two known activators of κGT, E2A (21423) and NF-κB (19697), show increased chromosomal binding to the kappa intronic enhancer. Conversely, knockdown of miR290-5p/292-5p in AMuLV pro-B cells blunts drug-induced activation of κGT. Furthermore, miR290-5p/292-5p knockdown also diminishes κGT activation, but not Rag1/2 (19373, 19374) expression, in an IL-7 dependent primary pro-B cell culture system. In addition, we identified a deficiency in κGT induction in miR290 cluster knockout mice. We hypothesize that increased expression of miR290-5p and miR292-5p contributes to the induction of κGT at the pre-B stage of B cell development through increased binding of NF-κB and E2A to kappa locus regulatory sequences. PMID:22928038

  6. Efficient secretion of biologically active Chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells in the absence of an N-terminal signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Klüppel, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Proteoglycans carrying chondroitin sulfate side chains have been shown to fulfill important biological functions in development, disease, and signaling. One area of considerable interest is the functional importance of chondroitin sulfates as inhibitors of the regeneration of axonal projections in the mammalian central nervous system. In animal models of spinal cord injury, injections of the enzyme Chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris into the lesion site leads to degradation of chondroitin sulfates, and promotes axonal regeneration and significant functional recovery. Here, a mammalian expression system of an epitope-tagged Chondroitinase ABC protein is described. It is demonstrated that the addition of a eukaryotic secretion signal sequence to the N-terminus of the bacterial Chondroitinase ABC sequence allowed secretion, but interfered with function of the secreted enzyme. In contrast, expression of the Chondroitinase ABC gene without N-terminal eukaryotic secretion sequence or bacterial hydrophobic leader sequence led to efficient secretion of a biologically active Chondroitinase ABC protein from both immortalized and primary cells. Moreover, the C-terminal epitope tag could be utilized to follow expression of this protein. This novel Chondroitinase ABC gene is a valuable tool for a better understanding of the in vivo roles of chondroitin sulfates in mammalian development and disease, as well as in gene therapy approaches, including the treatment of spinal chord injuries. PMID:21213020

  7. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Löhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko; Speletas, Matthaios; Eibel, Hermann; Ware, Carl F.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the generation and maintenance of the CD169+ macrophage compartment. Consequently, Baffr−/− mice exhibited limited induction of innate type I interferon production after viral infection. Lack of BAFFR signaling reduced virus amplification and presentation following viral infection, resulting in highly reduced antiviral adaptive immune responses. As a consequence, BAFFR-deficient mice showed exacerbated and fatal disease after viral infection. Mechanistically, transient lack of B cells in Baffr−/− animals resulted in limited lymphotoxin expression, which is critical for maintenance of CD169+ cells. In conclusion, BAFFR signaling affects both innate and adaptive immune activation during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Viruses cause acute and chronic infections in humans resulting in millions of deaths every year. Innate immunity is critical for the outcome of a viral infection. Innate type I interferon production can limit viral replication, while adaptive immune priming by innate immune cells induces pathogen-specific immunity with long-term protection. Here, we show that BAFFR deficiency not only perturbed B cells, but also resulted in limited CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages are critical in amplifying viral particles to trigger type I interferon production and initiate adaptive immune priming. Consequently, BAFFR deficiency resulted in reduced enforced viral replication, limited type I interferon production, and reduced adaptive immunity compared to BAFFR

  8. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Latron, F; Jotterand-Bellomo, M; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Bernard, M; Strominger, J L; Accolla, R S

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class II-negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids. Images PMID:3127829

  9. CD79B limits response of diffuse large B cell lymphoma to ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Won Seog; Ryu, Kyungju; Kim, Seok Jin; Park, Chaehwa

    2016-06-01

    Blockage of B cell receptor signaling with ibrutinib presents a promising clinical approach for treatment of B-cell malignancies. However, many patients show primary resistance to the drug or develop secondary resistance. In the current study, cDNA microarray and Western blot analyses revealed CD79B upregulation in the activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) that display differential resistance to ibrutinib. CD79B overexpression was sufficient to induce resistance to ibrutinib and enhanced AKT and MAPK activation, indicative of an alternative mechanism underlying resistance. Conversely, depletion of CD79B sensitized primary refractory cells to ibrutinib and led to reduced phosphorylation of AKT or MAPK. Combination of the AKT inhibitor or the MAPK inhibitor with ibrutinib resulted in circumvention of both primary and acquired resistance in ABC-DLBCL. Our data collectively indicate that CD79B overexpression leading to activation of AKT/MAPK is a potential mechanism underlying primary ibrutinib resistance in ABC-DLBCL, and support its utility as an effective biomarker to predict therapeutic response to ibrutinib. PMID:26699656

  10. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  11. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  12. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  13. B-cell receptor signaling as a driver of lymphoma development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Carsten U.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) is essential for normal B-cell development and maturation. In an increasing number of B-cell malignancies, BCR signaling is implicated as a pivotal pathway in tumorigenesis. Mechanisms of BCR activation are quite diverse and range from chronic antigenic drive by microbial or viral antigens to autostimulation of B-cells by self-antigens to activating mutations in intracellular components of the BCR pathway. Hepatitis C virus infection can lead to the development of splenic marginal zone lymphoma, while Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. In some of these cases, successful treatment of the infection removes the inciting antigen and results in resolution of the lymphoma. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been recognized for decades as a malignancy of auto-reactive B-cells and its clinical course is in part determined by the differential response of the malignant cells to BCR activation. In a number of B-cell malignancies, activating mutations in signal transduction components of the BCR pathway have been identified; prominent examples are activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) that carry mutations in CD79B and CARD11 and displays chronic active BCR signaling resulting in constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway. Despite considerable heterogeneity in biology and clinical course, many mature B-cell malignancies are highly sensitive to kinase inhibitors that disrupt BCR signaling. Thus, targeted therapy through inhibition of BCR signaling is emerging as a new treatment paradigm for many B-cell malignancies. Here, we review the role of the BCR in the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies and summarize clinical results of the emerging class of kinase inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24060900

  14. Activation-induced B cell fates are selected by intracellular stochastic competition.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Ken R; Wellard, Cameron J; Markham, John F; Zhou, Jie H S; Holmberg, Ross; Hawkins, Edwin D; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Dowling, Mark R; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2012-01-20

    In response to stimulation, B lymphocytes pursue a large number of distinct fates important for immune regulation. Whether each cell's fate is determined by external direction, internal stochastic processes, or directed asymmetric division is unknown. Measurement of times to isotype switch, to develop into a plasmablast, and to divide or to die for thousands of cells indicated that each fate is pursued autonomously and stochastically. As a consequence of competition between these processes, censorship of alternative outcomes predicts intricate correlations that are observed in the data. Stochastic competition can explain how the allocation of a proportion of B cells to each cell fate is achieved. The B cell may exemplify how other complex cell differentiation systems are controlled. PMID:22223740

  15. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  16. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  17. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease in a case of persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mitterer, M; Pescosta, N; Fend, F; Larcher, C; Prang, N; Schwarzmann, F; Coser, P; Huemer, H P

    1995-07-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare haematological disorder. It is characterized by activated and morphologically atypical B lymphocytes and polyclonal IgM production and has been associated with female sex, cigarette smoking, and HLA-DR7 expression. We report a case of PPBL with intermitting symptoms compatible with a chronic fatigue syndrome, recurrent erythema nodosum and multiforme. Serological findings suggested a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Messenger RNA of EBV immediate early gene transactivation BZLF1 was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes by reverse transcriptase PCR indicating a persistent replication of the virus. Over 2 years of observation we detected varying numbers of atypical lymphocytes. These cells hybridized with a probe specific for the EBV internal repeat region (BamHI W) which indicates a productive infection. Of interest, no reaction was observed with a probe specific for the latency-associated small RNAs (EBERs). The immunological phenotype of the polyclonal B cells was similar to B-cell lines immortalized by EBV in vitro, expressing a number of activation molecules (CD23, CD25, CD54) and the bcl-2 protein. In summary, our findings suggest that persistent EBV replication might be crucial in the development of lymphoproliferative disorders such as PPBL. PMID:7646989

  18. Active Akt and functional p53 modulate apoptosis in Abelson virus-transformed pre-B cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Li; Unnikrishnan, Indira; Raghavan, Anuradha; Parmar, Kalindi; Rosenberg, Naomi

    2004-02-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is an important feature of the Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV) transformation process. During multistep transformation, Ab-MLV-infected pre-B cells undergo p53-dependent apoptosis during the crisis phase of transformation. Even once cells are fully transformed, an active v-Abl protein tyrosine kinase is required to suppress apoptosis because cells transformed by temperature-sensitive (ts) kinase mutants undergo rapid apoptosis after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, inactivation of the v-Abl protein by a temperature shift interrupts signals transmitted via multiple pathways, making it difficult to identify those that are critically important for the suppression of apoptosis. To begin to dissect these pathways, we tested the ability of an SH2 domain Ab-MLV mutant, P120/R273K, to rescue aspects of the ts phenotype of pre-B cells transformed by the conditional kinase domain mutant. The P120/R273K mutant suppressed apoptosis at the nonpermissive temperature, a phenotype correlated with its ability to activate Akt. Apoptosis also was suppressed at the nonpermissive temperature by constitutively active Akt and in p53-null pre-B cells transformed with the ts kinase domain mutant. These data indicate that an intact Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is not critical for apoptosis suppression and suggest that signals transmitted through Akt and p53 play an important role in the response. PMID:14747529

  19. Interdomain regulation of the ATPase activity of the ABC transporter haemolysin B from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Sven; Poschmann, Gereon; Kanonenberg, Kerstin; Stühler, Kai; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-08-15

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) transport a wide range of substrates across both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are composed of an outer membrane protein, a membrane fusion protein and an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter. The ABC transporter HlyB (haemolysin B) is part of a T1SS catalysing the export of the toxin HlyA in E. coli HlyB consists of the canonical transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. Additionally, HlyB contains an N-terminal CLD (C39-peptidase-like domain) that interacts with the transport substrate, but its functional relevance is still not precisely defined. In the present paper, we describe the purification and biochemical characterization of detergent-solubilized HlyB in the presence of its transport substrate. Our results exhibit a positive co-operativity in ATP hydrolysis. We characterized further the influence of the CLD on kinetic parameters by using an HlyB variant lacking the CLD (HlyB∆CLD). The biochemical parameters of HlyB∆CLD revealed an increased basal maximum velocity but no change in substrate-binding affinity in comparison with full-length HlyB. We also assigned a distinct interaction of the CLD and a transport substrate (HlyA1), leading to an inhibition of HlyB hydrolytic activity at low HlyA1 concentrations. At higher HlyA1 concentrations, we observed a stimulation of the hydrolytic activities of both HlyB and HlyB∆CLD, which was completely independent of the interaction of HlyA1 with the CLD. Notably, all observed effects on ATPase activity, which were also analysed in detail by mass spectrometry, were independent of the HlyA1 secretion signal. These results assign an interdomain regulatory role for the CLD modulating the hydrolytic activity of HlyB. PMID:27279651

  20. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  1. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion. PMID:27609568

  2. B cells activated in lymph nodes in response to ultraviolet irradiation or by interleukin-10 inhibit dendritic cell induction of immunity.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Halliday, Gary M

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses systemic immunity. We explored these cellular mechanisms by exposing mice to systemically immunosuppressive doses of UV radiation and then analyzing cell phenotype and function in the lymphoid organs. Although UV radiation increased total cell number in the draining lymph nodes (DLN), it did not alter the activation state of dendritic cells (DC). Rather, UV radiation selectively activated lymph node B cells, with these cells being larger and expressing higher levels of both anti-major histocompatibility complex II and B220 but not co-stimulatory molecules. This phenotype resembled that of a B cell geared toward immune tolerance. To test whether UV radiation-activated B cells were responsible for immunosuppression, DC and B cells were conjugated to antigen ex vivo and transferred into naive hosts. Although DC by themselves activated T cells, when the B cells from UV radiation-irradiated mice were co-injected with DC, they suppressed DC activation of immunity. Interleukin (IL)-10-activated B cells also suppressed DC induction of immunity, suggesting that IL-10 may be involved in this suppressive effect of UV radiation. These results demonstrate a new mechanism of UV radiation immunosuppression whereby UV radiation activates B cells in the skin-DLN that can suppress DC activation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15737198

  3. Hypothesis: the pathogenesis of AIDS. Activation of the T- and B-cell cascades.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis is presented that a human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or a related agent produces a lytic response of T cells manifested by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and a proliferative response represented by the adult leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) syndromes. The sequence or cascade of T-cell events following loss of T4 helper cells in AIDS includes reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and a B-cell cascade of cytomegalovirus, resulting in Kaposi sarcoma in genetically susceptible persons, and of other intracellular agents (CNS viruses, M. avium intracellulari, T. gondii); opportunistic infections also occur. A comparison of AIDS and ATL syndromes is presented and the details of the B-cell cascade are outlined. The usefulness of prospective serological/immunological studies is discussed in an effort to determine the temporal sequence of infection by the candidate agents and their relation to the appearance of T4/T8 reversal and of the clinical features of AIDS. PMID:6093395

  4. Oxysterol gradient generation by lymphoid stromal cells guides activated B cell movement during humoral responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tangsheng; Wang, Xiaoming; Kelly, Lisa M.; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Sailer, Andreas W.; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Russel, David W.; Cyster, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) is a ligand for the G-protein coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183); however, the cellular sources of this oxysterol are undefined. 7α,25-OHC is synthesized from cholesterol by the stepwise actions of two enzymes, CH25H and CYP7B1, and is metabolized to a 3-oxo derivative by HSD3B7. We show that all three enzymes control EBI2-ligand concentration in lymphoid tissues. Lymphoid stromal cells are the main CH25H and CYP7B1-expressing cells required for positioning of B cells and they also mediate 7α,25-OHC inactivation. CH25H and CYP7B1 are abundant at the follicle perimeter whereas CH25H expression by follicular dendritic cells is repressed. CYP7B1-, CH25H- and HSD3B7-deficiencies each result in defective T-cell dependent plasma cell responses. These findings establish that CYP7B1 and HSD3B7, as well as CH25H, have essential roles in controlling oxysterol production in lymphoid tissues and they suggest that differential enzyme expression in stromal cell subsets establishes 7α,25-OHC gradients required for B cell responses. PMID:22999953

  5. The BCL6 RD2 domain governs commitment of activated B cells to form germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanxin; Gonzalez, David G; Cote, Christine M; Jiang, Yanwen; Hatzi, Katerina; Teater, Matt; Dai, Kezhi; Hla, Timothy; Haberman, Ann M; Melnick, Ari

    2014-09-11

    To understand how the Bcl6 transcriptional repressor functions in the immune system, we disrupted its RD2 repression domain in mice. Bcl6RD2(MUT) mice exhibit a complete loss of germinal center (GC) formation but retain normal extrafollicular responses. Bcl6RD2(MUT) antigen-engaged B cells migrate to the interfollicular zone and interact with cognate T helper cells. However, these cells fail to complete early GC-commitment differentiation and coalesce as nascent GC aggregates. Bcl6 directly binds and represses trafficking receptors S1pr1 and Gpr183 by recruiting Hdac2 through the RD2 domain. Deregulation of these genes impairs B cell migration and may contribute to GC failure in Bcl6RD2(MUT) mice. The development of functional GC-TFH cells was partially impaired in Bcl6RD2(MUT) mice. In contrast to Bcl6(-/-) mice, Bcl6RD2(MUT) animals experience no inflammatory disease or macrophage deregulation. These results reveal an essential role for RD2 repression in early GC commitment and striking biochemical specificity in Bcl6 control of humoral and innate immune-cell phenotypes. PMID:25176650

  6. The adaptor protein CIN85 assembles intracellular signaling clusters for B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Julius; Wong, Leo E; Pirkuliyeva, Sona; Schulz, Kathrin; Schwiegk, Claudia; Fünfgeld, Kevser Gencalp; Keppler, Selina; Batista, Facundo D; Urlaub, Henning; Habeck, Michael; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Wienands, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor molecule Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kD (CIN85) regulates signaling from a number of cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and antigen receptors on lymphocytes. Because of its multidomain structure, CIN85 is thought to act as a classical adaptor protein that connects functionally distinct components of a given signaling pathway through diverse protein domains. However, we found that in B lymphocytes, CIN85 functions to oligomerize SLP-65, which is the central effector protein of the B cell receptor (BCR). Therefore, CIN85 trimerizes through a carboxyl-terminal, coiled-coil domain. The multiple Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of trimeric CIN85 molecules associated with multiple SLP-65 molecules, which recruited further CIN85 trimers, thereby perpetuating the oligomerization process. Formation of this oligomeric signaling complex in resting B cells rendered the cells poised for the efficient initiation of intracellular signaling upon BCR stimulation. Our data suggest that the functionality of signaling cascades does not rely solely on the qualitative linkage of their various components but requires a critical number of effectors to become concentrated in signaling complexes. PMID:27353366

  7. Learning our ABCs: Rad50 directs MRN repair functions via adenylate kinase activity from the conserved ATP binding cassette.

    PubMed

    Williams, R Scott; Tainer, John A

    2007-03-23

    In groundbreaking work, Bhaskara et al. (2007) demonstrate in a recent issue of Molecular Cell that the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex harbors distinct, yet chemically related, ATPase and adenylate kinase catalytic activities that together orchestrate multiple requisite MRN functional and conformational states in dsDNA break repair sensing and signaling with general implications for ABC ATPases. PMID:17386254

  8. Social Experiences of Beginning Braille Readers in Literacy Activities: Qualitative and Quantitative Findings of the ABC Braille Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Sharon Z.; Kamei-Hannan, Cheryl; Erin, Jane N.; Barclay, Lizbeth; Sitar, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    This mixed-design investigation examined the social experiences of beginning braille readers who were initially taught contracted or alphabetic braille in literacy activities as part of the ABC Braille Study. No differences in the quality or quantity of social experiences were found between the two groups over time. (Contains 4 tables.)

  9. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  10. Elucidation of tonic and activated B-cell receptor signaling in Burkitt's lymphoma provides insights into regulation of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Corso, Jasmin; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Walter, Roland; Doebele, Carmen; Mohr, Sebastian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Ströbel, Philipp; Lenz, Christof; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Hüllein, Jennifer; Comoglio, Federico; Rieger, Michael A; Zenz, Thorsten; Wienands, Jürgen; Engelke, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Urlaub, Henning; Oellerich, Thomas

    2016-05-17

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a highly proliferative B-cell neoplasm and is treated with intensive chemotherapy that, because of its toxicity, is often not suitable for the elderly or for patients with endemic BL in developing countries. BL cell survival relies on signals transduced by B-cell antigen receptors (BCRs). However, tonic as well as activated BCR signaling networks and their relevance for targeted therapies in BL remain elusive. We have systematically characterized and compared tonic and activated BCR signaling in BL by quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify novel BCR effectors and potential drug targets. We identified and quantified ∼16,000 phospho-sites in BL cells. Among these sites, 909 were related to tonic BCR signaling, whereas 984 phospho-sites were regulated upon BCR engagement. The majority of the identified BCR signaling effectors have not been described in the context of B cells or lymphomas yet. Most of these newly identified BCR effectors are predicted to be involved in the regulation of kinases, transcription, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although tonic and activated BCR signaling shared a considerable number of effector proteins, we identified distinct phosphorylation events in tonic BCR signaling. We investigated the functional relevance of some newly identified BCR effectors and show that ACTN4 and ARFGEF2, which have been described as regulators of membrane-trafficking and cytoskeleton-related processes, respectively, are crucial for BL cell survival. Thus, this study provides a comprehensive dataset for tonic and activated BCR signaling and identifies effector proteins that may be relevant for BL cell survival and thus may help to develop new BL treatments. PMID:27155012

  11. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  12. TLR9 promotes tolerance by restricting survival of anergic anti-DNA B cells, yet is also required for their activation.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Kevin M; Christensen, Sean R; Cullen, Jaime L; Meng, Wenzhao; Luning Prak, Eline T; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2013-02-15

    Nucleic acid-reactive B cells frequently arise in the bone marrow but are tolerized by mechanisms including receptor editing, functional anergy, and/or deletion. TLR9, a sensor of endosomal dsDNA, both promotes and regulates systemic autoimmunity in vivo, but the precise nature of its apparently contradictory roles in autoimmunity remained unclear. In this study, using the 3H9 anti-DNA BCR transgene in the autoimmune-prone MRL.Fas(lpr) mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus, we identify the stages at which TLR9 contributes to establishing and breaking B cell tolerance. Although TLR9 is dispensable for L chain editing during B cell development in the bone marrow, TLR9 limits anti-DNA B cell life span in the periphery and is thus tolerogenic. In the absence of TLR9, anti-DNA B cells have much longer life spans and accumulate in the follicle, neither activated nor deleted. These cells retain some characteristics of anergic cells, in that they have elevated basal BCR signaling but impaired induced responses and downregulate their cell-surface BCR expression. In contrast, whereas TLR9-intact anergic B cells accumulate near the T/B border, TLR9-deficient anti-DNA B cells are somewhat more dispersed throughout the follicle. Nonetheless, in older autoimmune-prone animals, TLR9 expression specifically within the B cell compartment is required for spontaneous peripheral activation of anti-DNA B cells and their differentiation into Ab-forming cells via an extrafollicular pathway. Thus, TLR9 has paradoxical roles in regulating anti-DNA B cells: it helps purge the peripheral repertoire of autoreactive cells, yet is also required for their activation. PMID:23296704

  13. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  14. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  15. Spt5 accumulation at variable genes distinguishes somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells from ex vivo–activated cells

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Cao, Zheng; Venkataraman, Lakshmi; Giorgetti, Carol A.; Press, Joan L.; Denizot, Yves; Du, Hansen; Sen, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Variable (V) genes of immunoglobulins undergo somatic hypermutation by activation-induced deaminase (AID) to generate amino acid substitutions that encode antibodies with increased affinity for antigen. Hypermutation is restricted to germinal center B cells and cannot be recapitulated in ex vivo–activated splenic cells, even though the latter express high levels of AID. This suggests that there is a specific feature of antigen activation in germinal centers that recruits AID to V genes which is absent in mitogen-activated cultured cells. Using two Igh knock-in mouse models, we found that RNA polymerase II accumulates in V regions in B cells after both types of stimulation for an extended distance of 1.2 kb from the TATA box. The paused polymerases generate abundant single-strand DNA targets for AID. However, there is a distinct accumulation of the initiating form of polymerase, along with the transcription cofactor Spt5 and AID, in the V region from germinal center cells, which is totally absent in cultured cells. These data support a model where mutations are prevalent in germinal center cells, but not in ex vivo cells, because the initiating form of polymerase is retained, which affects Spt5 and AID recruitment. PMID:25288395

  16. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) Target Proteins by Proteome Analysis: Activation of EBNA2 in Conditionally Immortalized B Cells Reflects Early Events after Infection of Primary B Cells by EBV

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Martin; Krug, Tanja; Gires, Olivier; Zeidler, Reinhard; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Laux, Gerhard; Sauer, Guido; Lovric, Josip; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic herpesvirus associated with several malignant tumors, e.g., Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and is able to efficiently immortalize primary B lymphocytes in vitro. The growth program of infected B cells is initiated and maintained by the viral transcription factor EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), which regulates viral and cellular genes, including the proto-oncogene c-myc. In our study, patterns of protein expression in B cells with and without EBNA2 were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we used a conditional immortalization system for EBV, a B cell line (EREB2-5) that expresses an estrogen receptor-EBNA2 fusion protein. In order to discriminate downstream targets of c-Myc from c-Myc-independent EBNA2 targets, we used an EREB2-5-derived cell line, P493-6, in which c-Myc is expressed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Of 20 identified EBNA2 target proteins, 11 were c-Myc dependent and therefore most probably associated with proliferation, and one of these proteins was a posttranslationally modified protein, i.e., hypusinylated eIF5a. Finally, to estimate the relevance of EBNA2 targets during early EBV infection, we analyzed the proteomes of primary B cells before and after infection with EBV. The protein expression pattern induced upon EBV infection was similar to that following EBNA2 activation. These findings underscore the value of EREB2-5 cells as an appropriate model system for the analysis of early events in the process of EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. PMID:15047810

  17. Soluble B-cell activation marker of sCD27 and sCD30 and future risk of B-cell lymphomas: A nested case-control study and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Hosnijeh, Fatemeh Saberi; Portengen, Lutzen; Späth, Florentin; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Melin, Beatrice; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Naccarati, Alessio; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel

    2016-05-15

    Prediagnostic serum/plasma concentrations of B-cell activation markers have been associated with future risk of B-cell lymphomas (BCL) in HIV-infected patients and in the general population. Current evidence for the general population is however limited and relies on relatively small numbers of observations, especially for specific histologies. We carried out a nested case-control study, including 218 BCL and 218 matched controls, within two prospective cohorts, to investigate the association between plasma levels of soluble (s)CD27 and sCD30 and future risk of BCL, and main histologic subtypes separately. To expand the evidence further, we performed meta-analyses of the published data on these associations from prospective studies among the general population. Our study revealed a significant relationship between sCD30 concentration and BCL risk (OR = 0.86, 1.53, 1.76, for the 2nd-4th quartiles respectively, p trend = 0.01). Similar increased risks were observed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Analyses of sCD27 blood concentrations did not show significant associations with BCL, (OR = 0.90, 1.26, 1.65 for the 2nd-4th quartiles, respectively, p trend = 0.17), but significant associations were observed for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and for the group of "other BCL" subtypes. Our findings involving sCD30 were confirmed within our meta-analyses of five prospective cohorts, while results were more heterogeneous for sCD27 with the exception of CLL which was found consistently in all studies. Data to date suggest that chronic B-cell stimulation might be an important mechanism involved in B-cell lymphomagenesis both in HIV-infected and in the general population. PMID:26684261

  18. Induction of the c-myc protooncogene following antigen binding to hapten-specific B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, E.C.; Fetherston, J.; Zimmer, S.

    1986-03-01

    Considerable controversy has centered on the role that the surface immunoglobulin (sIg) receptor for antigen plays during the induction of B cell activation. Stimulation by anti-Ig reagents has been shown to activate G/sub 0/ B cells to enter the cell cycle. The binding of thymus-dependent antigens to hapten-specific B cell populations apparently does not result in the movement of the antigen-binding cells (ABC) into the G/sub 1/ stage of the cell cycle. However, the authors have recently demonstrated that antigen binding to such hapten-specific B cells does result in the initiation of the membrane phosphatidylinositol cycle. In the present experiments, hapten-specific B cells (80-90% ABC, 99% in G/sub 0/) were incubated with either the correct hapten-carrier conjugate, with the carrier protein, or only media for 2 hours at 37/sup 0/C. At that time, total cellular RNA was isolated and subsequently analyzed by either dot blots or Northern gel techniques. The blots were probed with a (/sup 32/P)-c-myc SstI-Xhol fragment. The results indicate that hapten carrier stimulation of the hapten-specific B cells induces enhanced transcription of the c-myc gene. These observations lend further support to the premise that antigen binding to the sIg receptor results in the transduction to the cell of important signals and implicates the active participation of sIg during the process of antigen-mediated B cell activation.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  20. Small molecule inhibitors of the Pyk2 and FAK kinases modulate chemoattractant-induced migration, adhesion and Akt activation in follicular and marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kathy W K; Lin, Kevin B L; Dang-Lawson, May; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Aspnes, Gary E; Buckbinder, Leonard; Gold, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    B-lymphocytes produce protective antibodies but also contribute to autoimmunity. In particular, marginal zone (MZ) B cells recognize both microbial components and self-antigens. B cell trafficking is critical for B cell activation and is controlled by chemoattactants such as CXCL13 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). The related tyrosine kinases focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase (Pyk2) regulate cell migration and adhesion but their roles in B cells are not fully understood. Using a novel Pyk2-selective inhibitor described herein (PF-719), as well as a FAK-selective inhibitor, we show that both Pyk2 and FAK are important for CXCL13- and S1P-induced migration of B-2 cells and MZ B cells. In contrast, LFA-1-mediated adhesion required only Pyk2 whereas activation of the Akt pro-survival kinase required FAK but not Pyk2. Thus Pyk2 and FAK mediate critical processes in B cells and these inhibitors can be used to further elucidate their functions in B cells. PMID:22507871

  1. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  2. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity. PMID:26022530

  3. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ limits B cell antigen receptor-dependent activation of ERK signaling to inhibit early antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew L; Dong, Matthew B; Brink, Robert; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2013-10-15

    Signaling downstream of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is tightly regulated to enable cells to gauge the strength and duration of antigen-receptor interactions and to respond appropriately. We investigated whether metabolism of the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) by members of the family of DAG kinases (DGKs) played a role in modulating the magnitude of signaling by DAG downstream of the BCR. In the absence of DGKζ, the threshold for BCR signaling, measured as activation of the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, was markedly reduced in mature follicular B cells, which resulted in enhanced responses to antigen in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of DAG signaling by DGKζ limited the number of antibody-secreting cells that were generated early in response to T cell-independent type 2 antigens, as well as to T cell-dependent antigens. Furthermore, the effect of loss of DGKζ closely resembled the effect of increasing the affinity of the BCR for antigen during the T cell-dependent antibody response. These results suggest that the magnitude of DAG signaling is important for translating the affinity of the BCR for antigen into the amount of antibody produced during the early stages of an immune response. PMID:24129701

  4. Constitutive NF-κB Activation Underlines Major Mechanism of Drug Resistance in Relapsed Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), encompassing 30–40% of the estimated 70,000 cases of NHL in 2014 in the USA. Despite major improvements with immune-chemotherapy, the fraction of patients who still succumb to a refractory or relapsed disease remains high. This review addresses whether the better understanding of the biology of DLBCL defines new therapeutic avenues that may overcome the emerging resistance of this disease to traditional immune-chemotherapy, such as rituximab in combination with traditional chemotherapy agents. Emerging targeted therapy for relapsed refractory DLBCL encompasses more complex molecular abnormalities involving signaling pathways other than NF-κB as mechanism of resistance to immune-chemotherapy. Our review suggests that NF-κB pathway is an important crossroad where other pathways converge as phenotype of resistance that emerges in patients who fail frontline and salvage immune-chemotherapy. Future efforts should aim at targeting the role of NF-κB resistance in clinical trials, where novel agents like lenalidomide and proteasome inhibitors with established activity in this perspective will be an important component in combination therapy, along with new monoclonal antibody, BTK-inhibitors, and other novel therapy agents. PMID:25984532

  5. Early activation of natural killer and B cells in response to primary dengue virus infection in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Shresta, Sujan; Kyle, Jennifer L; Robert Beatty, P; Harris, Eva

    2004-02-20

    Dengue virus (DEN) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans worldwide. Immune mechanisms that are involved in protection and pathogenesis of DEN infection have not been fully elucidated due largely to the lack of an adequate animal model. Therefore, as a first step, we characterized the primary immune response in immunocompetent inbred A/J mice that were infected intravenously with a non-mouse-adapted DEN type 2 (DEN2) strain. A subset (55%) of infected mice developed paralysis by 14 days post-infection (p.i.), harbored infectious DEN in the central nervous system (CNS), and had an elevated hematocrit and a decreased white blood cell (WBC) count. Immunologic studies detected (i). increased numbers of CD69(+) splenic natural killer (NK) and B cells at day 3 p.i., (ii). DEN-specific IgM and IgG responses by days 3 and 7 p.i., respectively, and (iii). splenocyte production of IFNgamma at day 14 p.i. We conclude that the early activities of NK cells, B cells and IgM, and later actions of IFNgamma and IgG likely play a role in the defense against DEN infection. PMID:14980486

  6. Pharmacoproteomics identifies combinatorial therapy targets for diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Yang, Shao Ning; Taldone, Tony; Chang, Betty; Gerecitano, John; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo; Shaknovich, Rita; Tam, Wayne; Leonard, John P.; Chiosis, Gabriela; Cerchietti, Leandro; Melnick, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Rationally designed combinations of targeted therapies for refractory cancers, such as activated B cell–like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL), are likely required to achieve potent, durable responses. Here, we used a pharmacoproteomics approach to map the interactome of a tumor-enriched isoform of HSP90 (teHSP90). Specifically, we chemically precipitated teHSP90-client complexes from DLBCL cell lines with the small molecule PU-H71 and found that components of the proximal B cell receptor (BCR) signalosome were enriched within teHSP90 complexes. Functional assays revealed that teHSP90 facilitates BCR signaling dynamics by enabling phosphorylation of key BCR signalosome components, including the kinases SYK and BTK. Consequently, treatment of BCR-dependent ABC DLBCL cells with PU-H71 attenuated BCR signaling, calcium flux, and NF-κB signaling, ultimately leading to growth arrest. Combined exposure of ABC DLBCL cell lines to PU-H71 and ibrutinib, a BCR pathway inhibitor, more potently suppressed BCR signaling than either drug alone. Correspondingly, PU-H71 combined with ibrutinib induced synergistic killing of lymphoma cell lines, primary human lymphoma specimens ex vivo, and lymphoma xenografts in vivo, without notable toxicity. Together, our results demonstrate that a pharmacoproteome-driven rational combination therapy has potential to provide more potent BCR-directed therapy for ABC DLCBL patients. PMID:26529251

  7. Distinct isoform of FABP7 revealed by screening for retroelement-activated genes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lock, Frances E; Rebollo, Rita; Miceli-Royer, Katharine; Gagnier, Liane; Kuah, Sabrina; Babaian, Artem; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Lai, C Benjamin; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Serrano, Isabel; Steidl, Christian; Karimi, Mohammad M; Mager, Dixie L

    2014-08-26

    Remnants of ancient transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes. These sequences harbor multiple regulatory motifs and hence are capable of influencing expression of host genes. In response to environmental changes, TEs are known to be released from epigenetic repression and to become transcriptionally active. Such activation could also lead to lineage-inappropriate activation of oncogenes, as one study described in Hodgkin lymphoma. However, little further evidence for this mechanism in other cancers has been reported. Here, we reanalyzed whole transcriptome data from a large cohort of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared with normal B-cell centroblasts to detect genes ectopically expressed through activation of TE promoters. We have identified 98 such TE-gene chimeric transcripts that were exclusively expressed in primary DLBCL cases and confirmed several in DLBCL-derived cell lines. We further characterized a TE-gene chimeric transcript involving a fatty acid-binding protein gene (LTR2-FABP7), normally expressed in brain, that was ectopically expressed in a subset of DLBCL patients through the use of an endogenous retroviral LTR promoter of the LTR2 family. The LTR2-FABP7 chimeric transcript encodes a novel chimeric isoform of the protein with characteristics distinct from native FABP7. In vitro studies reveal a dependency for DLBCL cell line proliferation and growth on LTR2-FABP7 chimeric protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the significance of TEs as regulators of aberrant gene expression in cancer and suggest that LTR2-FABP7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of DLBCL in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25114248

  8. Distinct isoform of FABP7 revealed by screening for retroelement-activated genes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Frances E.; Rebollo, Rita; Miceli-Royer, Katharine; Gagnier, Liane; Kuah, Sabrina; Babaian, Artem; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Lai, C. Benjamin; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Serrano, Isabel; Steidl, Christian; Karimi, Mohammad M.; Mager, Dixie L.

    2014-01-01

    Remnants of ancient transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes. These sequences harbor multiple regulatory motifs and hence are capable of influencing expression of host genes. In response to environmental changes, TEs are known to be released from epigenetic repression and to become transcriptionally active. Such activation could also lead to lineage-inappropriate activation of oncogenes, as one study described in Hodgkin lymphoma. However, little further evidence for this mechanism in other cancers has been reported. Here, we reanalyzed whole transcriptome data from a large cohort of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared with normal B-cell centroblasts to detect genes ectopically expressed through activation of TE promoters. We have identified 98 such TE-gene chimeric transcripts that were exclusively expressed in primary DLBCL cases and confirmed several in DLBCL-derived cell lines. We further characterized a TE-gene chimeric transcript involving a fatty acid-binding protein gene (LTR2-FABP7), normally expressed in brain, that was ectopically expressed in a subset of DLBCL patients through the use of an endogenous retroviral LTR promoter of the LTR2 family. The LTR2-FABP7 chimeric transcript encodes a novel chimeric isoform of the protein with characteristics distinct from native FABP7. In vitro studies reveal a dependency for DLBCL cell line proliferation and growth on LTR2-FABP7 chimeric protein expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the significance of TEs as regulators of aberrant gene expression in cancer and suggest that LTR2-FABP7 may contribute to the pathogenesis of DLBCL in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25114248

  9. Anti-PEG IgM and complement system are required for the association of second doses of PEGylated liposomes with splenic marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Mima, Yu; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Ukawa, Masami; Ando, Hidenori; Kiwada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2015-10-01

    The accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon makes it crucial to use PEGylated liposomes and micelles to deliver drugs. The ABC phenomenon is an immune response against an initial dose of PEGylated liposome, which causes subsequent doses to be rapidly cleared by macrophages in the liver. We recently found that in the early phase of the ABC phenomenon, subsequent doses of PEGylated liposomes were associated with splenic marginal zone (MZ)-B cells and were transported from the MZ to the follicle (FO). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms behind the association of subsequent doses of PEGylated liposomes with MZ-B cells in the spleen. Serum factors, anti-PEG IgM and complement system, were crucial to the association of PEGylated liposomes with MZ-B cells, while the sensitization of MZ-B cells by the first dose of PEGylated liposomes was not significant. It was the complement receptors (CRs) on the MZ-B cells, rather than either the PEG-specific B-cell receptors or the IgM Fc receptors, that were the main contributors to the association between PEGylated liposomes and MZ-B cells. It appeared that anti-PEG IgM would bind to PEGylated liposomes and causes subsequent complement activation, resulting in the formation of immune complexes of PEGylated liposome-anti-PEG IgM-complement. The MZ-B cells then recognized these immune complexes via their CRs. Such an association via CRs might have triggered the transport of the immune complex by MZ-B cells to the FO in the spleen. The information obtained in this study might be useful in the development of an efficient antigen delivery system to usher PEGylated nanoparticles into FO dendritic cells. PMID:26095176

  10. MicroRNA Profiling of Primary Cutaneous Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Koens, Lianne; Qin, Yongjun; Leung, Wai Y.; Corver, Willem E.; Jansen, Patty M.; Willemze, Rein; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Tensen, Cornelis P.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs is widely accepted to be pathogenetically involved in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). However, the microRNAs profiles of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas (PCLBCLs) are not yet described. Its two main subtypes, i.e., primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT) and primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) are characterized by an activated B-cell (ABC)-genotype and a germinal center B-cell (GCB)-genotype, respectively. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis on frozen tumor biopsies from 19 cases of PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT to establish microRNA profiles. Cluster analysis of the complete microRNome could not distinguish between the two subtypes, but 16 single microRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Single microRNA RT-qPCR was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies of 20 additional cases, confirming higher expression of miR-9-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-129-2-3p and miR-214-3p in PCFCL as compared to PCLBCL-LT. MicroRNAs previously described to be higher expressed in ABC-type as compared to GCB-type nodal DLBCL were not differentially expressed between PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT. In conclusion, PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT differ in their microRNA profiles. In contrast to their gene expression profile, they only show slight resemblance with the microRNA profiles found in GCB- and ABC-type nodal DLBCL. PMID:24358187

  11. MicroRNA profiling of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Koens, Lianne; Qin, Yongjun; Leung, Wai Y; Corver, Willem E; Jansen, Patty M; Willemze, Rein; Vermeer, Maarten H; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs is widely accepted to be pathogenetically involved in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). However, the microRNAs profiles of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas (PCLBCLs) are not yet described. Its two main subtypes, i.e., primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT) and primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) are characterized by an activated B-cell (ABC)-genotype and a germinal center B-cell (GCB)-genotype, respectively. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis on frozen tumor biopsies from 19 cases of PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT to establish microRNA profiles. Cluster analysis of the complete microRNome could not distinguish between the two subtypes, but 16 single microRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Single microRNA RT-qPCR was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies of 20 additional cases, confirming higher expression of miR-9-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-129-2-3p and miR-214-3p in PCFCL as compared to PCLBCL-LT. MicroRNAs previously described to be higher expressed in ABC-type as compared to GCB-type nodal DLBCL were not differentially expressed between PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT. In conclusion, PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT differ in their microRNA profiles. In contrast to their gene expression profile, they only show slight resemblance with the microRNA profiles found in GCB- and ABC-type nodal DLBCL. PMID:24358187

  12. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  13. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hongwei; Lin, Fuhuang; Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces expression of B-cell activation markers on in vitro infection of EBV-negative B-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calender, A; Billaud, M; Aubry, J P; Banchereau, J; Vuillaume, M; Lenoir, G M

    1987-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation markers, including the EBV/C3d receptor [complement receptor type 2 (CR2) (CD21)], the 45-kDa lymphoblastoid cell-associated (Blast-2) antigen (CD23), and the B-cell restricted activation (Bac-1) antigen (which was recently identified as a potential B-cell growth factor receptor) can be turned on by infecting lymphoma cells that are genome negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the B95-8 immortalizing strain of the virus. The nonimmortalizing EBV variant, strain P3HR-1, which possesses a deletion within the BamHI WYH region of the genome containing the coding sequence for the EBV-determined nuclear antigen 2, does not induce expression of these markers. Other lymphoblastoid cell-associated antigen markers can be activated by infection with either immortalizing or nonimmortalizing viruses. These results suggest that the immortalizing potential of EBV is correlated with its ability to induce expression of B-cell activation markers, which are suspected to play a major role in the physiological pathway leading to lymphoid cell proliferation. The viral genomic region deleted in the nonimmortalizing strain of EBV seems to be required for activation of some of these markers. Human lymphoma cell lines, such as those used in this study, can thus help identify the specific EBV genes involved in lymphoid B-cell proliferation and the mechanism of action of these genes. PMID:2825176

  15. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eloy F; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  16. Differential effects of CD45 CD45R and CD45R0 monoclonal antibodies in modulating human B cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Deane, D L; Harvey, E; Steel, C M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to different epitopes of the leucocyte common antigen (LCA), CD45, on anti-human immunoglobulin-primed B cell activation. Binding of MoAbs to restricted epitopes present on CD45 glycoproteins of 180 kD and 220 kD (designated CD45R0 and CD45R, respectively) was found to promote B cell proliferation in the presence of T cells. CD45 MoAbs reactive with 'public' determinants on all four constituent members of the LCA family (180, 190, 205, and 220 kD) had either little effect or inhibited the basal B cell response to anti-immunoglobulin priming. Simultaneous immunofluorescent analysis of 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and the expression of CD19 (B cell specific) or CD2 (T cell specific) identified the majority of responder cells as B lymphocytes. CD45R MoAbs significantly enhanced the B cell response to sub-optimal concentrations of interleukin-2. CD45 and CD45R0 MoAbs failed to elicit a similar response. Antibody to the interleukin-2 receptor (anti-Tac) partially blocked the CD45R-driven, T cell-dependent B cell proliferation. PMID:1703055

  17. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Eloy F.; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V.; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M.; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  18. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity.

    PubMed

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  19. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  20. High frequencies of activated B cells and T follicular helper cells are correlated with disease activity in patients with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Shan, Y; Jiang, Z; Feng, J; Li, C; Ma, L; Jiang, Y

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the frequency of different subsets of circulating B and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in patients with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and following standard therapies. Twenty-five RA patients and 15 healthy controls (HC) were recruited for characterizing the frequency of CD27+, immunoglobulin (Ig)D+, CD86+, CD95+, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9+ B cells and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) and programmed death 1 (PD-1)-positive Tfh cells and the level of serum interleukin (IL)-21. The potential correlation between the frequency of different subsets of B and Tfh cells and the values of clinical measures in RA patients was analysed. In comparison with HC, significantly higher percentages of circulating IgD+CD27−CD19+ naive B, CD86+CD19+ and CD95+CD19+ activated B, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+, CD3+CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+ and CD3+CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+PD-1+ Tfh cells but lower IgD+CD27+CD19+ preswitch memory B cells were detected, accompanied by significantly higher levels of serum IL-21 in the RA patients. Furthermore, the percentages of CD95+ B cells were correlated positively with the frequency of PD-1+ Tfh cells, but negatively with ICOS+ Tfh cells. The percentages of CD86+ B cells and ICOS+ Tfh cells were correlated positively with the values of disease activity score 28 (DAS28). Following the drug therapies for 1 month, the percentages of CD86+ B and PD-1+ Tfh cells were reduced significantly in the drug-responding patients. Our data suggest that activated B and Tfh cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA and the frequency of activated B and Tfh cells may be used as biomarkers for evaluating the therapeutic responses of individual patients with RA. PMID:23786438

  1. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway. PMID:26561366

  2. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: sub-classification by massive parallel quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xuemin; Zeng, Naiyan; Gao, Zifen; Du, Ming-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous entity with remarkably variable clinical outcome. Gene expression profiling (GEP) classifies DLBCL into activated B-cell like (ABC), germinal center B-cell like (GCB), and Type-III subtypes, with ABC-DLBCL characterized by a poor prognosis and constitutive NF-κB activation. A major challenge for the application of this cell of origin (COO) classification in routine clinical practice is to establish a robust clinical assay amenable to routine formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) diagnostic biopsies. In this study, we investigated the possibility of COO-classification using FFPE tissue RNA samples by massive parallel quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). We established a protocol for parallel qRT-PCR using FFPE RNA samples with the Fluidigm BioMark HD system, and quantified the expression of the COO classifier genes and the NF-κB targeted-genes that characterize ABC-DLBCL in 143 cases of DLBCL. We also trained and validated a series of basic machine-learning classifiers and their derived meta classifiers, and identified SimpleLogistic as the top classifier that gave excellent performance across various GEP data sets derived from fresh-frozen or FFPE tissues by different microarray platforms. Finally, we applied SimpleLogistic to our data set generated by qRT-PCR, and the ABC and GCB-DLBCL assigned showed the respective characteristics in their clinical outcome and NF-κB target gene expression. The methodology established in this study provides a robust approach for DLBCL sub-classification using routine FFPE diagnostic biopsies in a routine clinical setting. PMID:25418578

  3. Oct2 enhances antibody-secreting cell differentiation through regulation of IL-5 receptor α chain expression on activated B cells

    PubMed Central

    Emslie, Dianne; D'Costa, Kathy; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Metcalf, Donald; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Hodgkin, Philip O.; Corcoran, Lynn M.

    2008-01-01

    Mice lacking a functional gene for the Oct2 transcriptional activator display several developmental and functional deficiencies in the B lymphocyte lineage. These include defective B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, an absence of B-1 and marginal zone populations, and globally reduced levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) in naive and immunized animals. Oct2 was originally identified through its ability to bind to regulatory regions in the Ig loci, but genetic evidence has not supported an essential role for Oct2 in the expression of Ig genes. We describe a new Oct2-mediated role in B cells. Oct2 augments the ability of activated B cells to differentiate to antibody-secreting plasma cells (ASCs) under T cell–dependent conditions through direct regulation of the gene encoding the α chain of the interleukin (IL) 5 receptor. Ectopic expression of IL-5Rα in oct2-deficient B cells largely restores their ability to differentiate to functional ASCs in vitro but does not correct other phenotypic defects in the mutants, such as the maturation and specialization of peripheral B cells, which must therefore rely on distinct Oct2 target genes. IL-5 augments ASC differentiation in vitro, and we show that IL-5 directly activates the plasma cell differentiation program by enhancing blimp1 expression. PMID:18250192

  4. Constitutive activation of the DNA damage response pathway as a novel therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Derenzini, Enrico; Agostinelli, Claudio; Imbrogno, Enrica; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Casadei, Beatrice; Brighenti, Elisa; Righi, Simona; Fuligni, Fabio; Di Rorà, Andrea Ghelli Luserna; Ferrari, Anna; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pileri, Stefano; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The recent finding that MYC-driven cancers are sensitive to inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, prompted us to investigate the role of DDR pathway as therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which frequently overexpresses the MYC oncogene. In a preliminary immunohistochemical study conducted on 99 consecutive DLBCL patients, we found that about half of DLBCLs showed constitutive expression of the phosphorylated forms of checkpoint kinases (CHK) and CDC25c, markers of DDR activation, and of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), marker of DNA damage and genomic instability. Constitutive γH2AX expression correlated with c-MYC levels and DDR activation, and defined a subset of tumors characterised by poor outcome. Next, we used the CHK inhibitor PF-0477736 as a tool to investigate whether the inhibition of the DDR pathway might represent a novel therapeutic approach in DLBCL. Submicromolar concentrations of PF-0477736 hindered proliferation in DLBCL cell lines with activated DDR pathway. These results were fully recapitulated with a different CHK inhibitor (AZD-7762). Inhibition of checkpoint kinases induced rapid DNA damage accumulation and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary cells. These data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of DDR through targeting of CHK kinases may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in DLBCL. PMID:25544753

  5. Analysis of the apoptotic and therapeutic activities of histone deacetylase inhibitors by using a mouse model of B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, R. K.; Newbold, A.; Whitecross, K. F.; Cluse, L. A.; Frew, A. J.; Ellis, L.; Williams, S.; Wiegmans, A. P.; Dear, A. E.; Scott, C. L.; Pellegrini, M.; Wei, A.; Richon, V. M.; Marks, Paul A.; Lowe, S. W.; Smyth, M. J.; Johnstone, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can elicit a range of biological responses that affect tumor growth and survival, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of tumor cell-selective apoptosis, suppression of angiogenesis, and modulation of immune responses, and show promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials. Using the Eμ-myc model of B cell lymphoma, we screened tumors with defined genetic alterations in apoptotic pathways for therapeutic responsiveness to the HDACi vorinostat. We demonstrated a direct correlation between induction of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo and therapeutic efficacy. Vorinostat did not require p53 activity or a functional death receptor pathway to kill Eμ-myc lymphomas and mediate a therapeutic response but depended on activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway with the proapoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim playing an important role. Our studies provide important information regarding the mechanisms of action of HDACi that have broad implications regarding stratification of patients receiving HDACi therapy alone or in combination with other anticancer agents. PMID:17470784

  6. Constitutive activation of the DNA damage response pathway as a novel therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, Enrico; Agostinelli, Claudio; Imbrogno, Enrica; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Casadei, Beatrice; Brighenti, Elisa; Righi, Simona; Fuligni, Fabio; Ghelli Luserna Di Rorà, Andrea; Ferrari, Anna; Martinelli, Giovanni; Pileri, Stefano; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2015-03-30

    The recent finding that MYC-driven cancers are sensitive to inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, prompted us to investigate the role of DDR pathway as therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which frequently overexpresses the MYC oncogene. In a preliminary immunohistochemical study conducted on 99 consecutive DLBCL patients, we found that about half of DLBCLs showed constitutive expression of the phosphorylated forms of checkpoint kinases (CHK) and CDC25c, markers of DDR activation, and of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), marker of DNA damage and genomic instability. Constitutive γH2AX expression correlated with c-MYC levels and DDR activation, and defined a subset of tumors characterised by poor outcome. Next, we used the CHK inhibitor PF-0477736 as a tool to investigate whether the inhibition of the DDR pathway might represent a novel therapeutic approach in DLBCL. Submicromolar concentrations of PF-0477736 hindered proliferation in DLBCL cell lines with activated DDR pathway. These results were fully recapitulated with a different CHK inhibitor (AZD-7762). Inhibition of checkpoint kinases induced rapid DNA damage accumulation and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary cells. These data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of DDR through targeting of CHK kinases may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in DLBCL. PMID:25544753

  7. Sodium periodate-induced human suppressor cells for polyclonal B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M

    1982-09-01

    Sodium periodate (SP) induces proliferation of mature T cells. In this study, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) pretreated for 10 minutes at room temperature with increasing concentrations (0.1 to 5 mM) of SP before culture for 7 days in the presence of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IgG production, contrasting with an increase in 3H-thymidine uptake. When MNC from 70 normal individuals were pretreated with 1 and 2 mM SP, IgG production in culture was suppressed by 46.8 +/- 4.5% and 60.4 +/- 4.4% (mean +/- S.E.M.), respectively, as compared to IgG synthesis in the presence of PWM alone. Longitudinal studies of MNC obtained from the same normal individuals over 6-10 months showed similar degrees of suppression, indicating that the level of SP-inducible suppressor cell activity remains relatively constant, although the degree of suppression varies among normal persons. Both T cells and monocytes were required for PWM-driven IgG production and for SP-induced suppression. A soluble factor elaborated by SP-treated monocytes was also able to suppress IgG production. This model should provide useful information about abnormal regulation of IgG synthesis in various pathological conditions. PMID:6290661

  8. Pathogenic role of B-cell receptor signaling and canonical NF-κB activation in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nakhle S; Liu, Delong; Herman, Sarah E M; Underbayev, Chingiz; Tian, Xin; Behrend, David; Weniger, Marc A; Skarzynski, Martin; Gyamfi, Jennifer; Fontan, Lorena; Melnick, Ari; Grant, Cliona; Roschewski, Mark; Navarro, Alba; Beà, Sílvia; Pittaluga, Stefania; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wilson, Wyndham H; Wiestner, Adrian

    2016-07-01

    To interrogate signaling pathways activated in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in vivo, we contrasted gene expression profiles of 55 tumor samples isolated from blood and lymph nodes from 43 previously untreated patients with active disease. In addition to lymph nodes, MCL often involves blood, bone marrow, and spleen and is incurable for most patients. Recently, the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib demonstrated important clinical activity in MCL. However, the role of specific signaling pathways in the lymphomagenesis of MCL and the biologic basis for ibrutinib sensitivity of these tumors are unknown. Here, we demonstrate activation of B-cell receptor (BCR) and canonical NF-κB signaling specifically in MCL cells in the lymph node. Quantification of BCR signaling strength, reflected in the expression of BCR regulated genes, identified a subset of patients with inferior survival after cytotoxic therapy. Tumor proliferation was highest in the lymph node and correlated with the degree of BCR activation. A subset of leukemic tumors showed active BCR and NF-κB signaling apparently independent of microenvironmental support. In one of these samples, we identified a novel somatic mutation in RELA (E39Q). This sample was resistant to ibrutinib-mediated inhibition of NF-κB and apoptosis. In addition, we identified germ line variants in genes encoding regulators of the BCR and NF-κB pathway previously implicated in lymphomagenesis. In conclusion, BCR signaling, activated in the lymph node microenvironment in vivo, appears to promote tumor proliferation and survival and may explain the sensitivity of this lymphoma to BTK inhibitors. PMID:27127301

  9. Interleukin-24 mediates apoptosis in human B-cells through early activation of cell cycle arrest followed by late induction of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Hadife, Nader; Nemos, Christophe; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Hamadé, Tala; Perrot, Aurore; Dalloul, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-24 has death-promoting effects on various proliferating cells including B-cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and germinal center B-cells, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a B-cell differentiation model and mRNA profiling, we found that recombinant (r)IL-24 stimulated genes of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway (Bax, Bid, Casp8, COX6C, COX7B) after 36 h, whereas the transcription of genes involved in DNA replication and metabolism was inhibited within 6 h. Unexpectedly, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a hormone known to promote cell growth, was stimulated by IL-24. Activated B-cells express receptor for IGF1, to which they become sensitized and undergo apoptosis, a mechanism similar in this respect to IL-24-induced cell death. Furthermore, inhibition of the IGF1 pathway reversed the effects of IL-24. IL-24-mediated apoptosis was also antagonized by pifithrin-alpha, an inhibitor of p53 transactivation. Altogether, these results disclose sequential molecular signals generated by IL-24 in activated B-cells. PMID:22860893

  10. Cutting Edge: IL-4, IL-21, and IFN-γ Interact To Govern T-bet and CD11c Expression in TLR-Activated B Cells.

    PubMed

    Naradikian, Martin S; Myles, Arpita; Beiting, Daniel P; Roberts, Kenneth J; Dawson, Lucas; Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Bengsch, Bertram; Linderman, Susanne L; Stelekati, Erietta; Spolski, Rosanne; Wherry, E John; Hunter, Christopher; Hensley, Scott E; Leonard, Warren J; Cancro, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    T-bet and CD11c expression in B cells is linked with IgG2c isotype switching, virus-specific immune responses, and humoral autoimmunity. However, the activation requisites and regulatory cues governing T-bet and CD11c expression in B cells remain poorly defined. In this article, we reveal a relationship among TLR engagement, IL-4, IL-21, and IFN-γ that regulates T-bet expression in B cells. We find that IL-21 or IFN-γ directly promote T-bet expression in the context of TLR engagement. Further, IL-4 antagonizes T-bet induction. Finally, IL-21, but not IFN-γ, promotes CD11c expression independent of T-bet. Using influenza virus and Heligmosomoides polygyrus infections, we show that these interactions function in vivo to determine whether T-bet(+) and CD11c(+) B cells are formed. These findings suggest that T-bet(+) B cells seen in health and disease share the common initiating features of TLR-driven activation within this circumscribed cytokine milieu. PMID:27430719

  11. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; and others

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys{sup 38} to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. - Highlights: • Current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. • Piperlongumine inhibits NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import via directly binding to p65. • Piperlongumine selectively inhibits proliferation of ABC-DLBCL cells. • This study provides a novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy.

  12. Genes within the Idd5 and Idd9/11 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci affect the Pathogenic Activity of B-cells in NOD mice1

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Pablo A.; Chapman, Harold D.; Stolp, Jessica; Johnson, Ellis; Cox, S. Lewis; Hunter, Kara; Wicker, Linda S.; Serreze, David V.

    2010-01-01

    Autoreactive T-cells clearly mediate the pancreatic β cell destruction causing Type 1 diabetes (T1D)2. However, studies in NOD mice indicate that B-cells also contribute to pathogenesis since their ablation by introduction of an Igμnull mutation elicits T1D resistance. T1D susceptibility is restored in NOD.Igμnull mice that are irradiated and reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow (SBM) plus NOD B-cells, but not SBM alone. Thus, we hypothesized some non-MHC T1D susceptibility (Idd) genes contribute to disease by allowing development of pathogenic B-cells. Supporting this hypothesis was the finding, that unlike those from NOD donors, engraftment with B-cells from H2g7 MHC matched, but T1D-resistant, NOR mice failed to restore full disease susceptibility in NOD.Igμnull recipients. T1D resistance in NOR mice is mainly encoded within the Idd13, Idd5.2 and Idd9/11 loci. B-cells from NOD congenic stocks containing Idd9/11 or Idd5.1/5.2 resistance loci respectively derived from the NOR or C57BL/10 strains were characterized by suppressed diabetogenic activity. Immature autoreactive B-cells in NOD mice have an impaired ability to be rendered anergic upon antigen engagement. Interestingly, both Idd5.1/5.2 and Idd9/11 resistance loci were found to normalize this B-cell tolerogenic process, which may represent a mechanism contributing to the inhibition of T1D. PMID:17082619

  13. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  14. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  15. B cells pulsed with Helicobacter pylori antigen efficiently activate memory CD8+ T cells from H. pylori-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Azem, Josef; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis that may progress to peptic ulcers or gastric adenocarcinoma and thereby cause major world-wide health problems. Previous studies have shown that CD4+ T cells are important in the immune response to H. pylori in humans, but the role of CD8+ T cells is less clear. In order to study the CD8+ T cell response to H. pylori in greater detail, we have evaluated efficient conditions for activation of CD8+ T cells in vitro. We show that H. pylori-reactive CD8+ T cells can be activated most efficiently by B cells or dendritic cells pulsed with H. pylori antigens. We further show that the majority of CD8+ T cells in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa are memory cells, and that memory CD8+ T cells sorted from peripheral blood of H. pylori-infected individuals respond 15-fold more to H. pylori urease compared to memory cells from uninfected subjects. We conclude that CD8+ T cells do participate in the immune response to H. pylori, and this may have implications for the development of more severe disease outcomes in H. pylori-infected subjects. PMID:16324887

  16. Pioneering Activity of the C-Terminal Domain of EBF1 Shapes the Chromatin Landscape for B Cell Programming.

    PubMed

    Boller, Sören; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Akbas, Duygu; Nechanitzky, Robert; Burger, Lukas; Murr, Rabih; Schübeler, Dirk; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-03-15

    Lymphopoiesis requires the activation of lineage-specific genes embedded in naive, inaccessible chromatin or in primed, accessible chromatin. The mechanisms responsible for de novo gain of chromatin accessibility, known as "pioneer" function, remain poorly defined. Here, we showed that the EBF1 C-terminal domain (CTD) is required for the regulation of a specific gene set involved in B cell fate decision and differentiation, independently of activation and repression functions. Using genome-wide analysis of DNaseI hypersensitivity and DNA methylation in multipotent Ebf1(-/-) progenitors and derivative EBF1wt- or EBF1ΔC-expressing cells, we found that the CTD promoted chromatin accessibility and DNA demethylation in previously naive chromatin. The CTD allowed EBF1 to bind at inaccessible genomic regions that offer limited co-occupancy by other transcription factors, whereas the CTD was dispensable for EBF1 binding at regions that are occupied by multiple transcription factors. Thus, the CTD enables EBF1 to confer permissive lineage-specific changes in progenitor chromatin landscape. PMID:26982363

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 and Toll-like receptor 4-dependent activation of B cells by a polysaccharide from marine fungus Phoma herbarum YS4108.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Ding, Ran; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Rui; Liu, Wei; Jin, Lei; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    Various natural polysaccharides are capable of activating the immune system and therefore can be employed as biological response modifiers in anti-tumor therapy. We previously found a homogenous polysaccharide from the mycelium of marine fungus Phoma herbarum YS4108, named YCP, exhibiting strong in vivo antitumor ability via enhancement of the host immune responses. To further elucidate the role of YCP as a biological response modifier, the immunomodulating activities of YCP in B cells was investigated in the current study. We demonstrated that stimulation of YCP with murine splenic B cells resulted in cell proliferation and generation of IgM antibody response. Binding of YCP to B cells was a direct, saturable and reversible event and required TLR2 and TLR4 involvement. TLR2 and TLR4 defunctionalization by either antibody blocking or allele-specific mutation significantly impaired the B-cell proliferative and IgM responses to YCP. YCP interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 led to the activation of intracellular p38, ERK and JNK, as well as the translocation of transcriptional factor NF-κB into nucleus. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB could attenuate the ability of YCP to induce B cell proliferation and IgM production. Taken together, this study has indicated for the first time the immunostimulating properties of YCP on B cells through a receptor-mediated mechanism, which involves TLR2 and TLR4 and resultant activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, thereby highlighting the role of YCP as an efficacious biological response modifier in oncologic immunotherapy. PMID:23556003

  18. Transient expression of Bcl6 is sufficient for oncogenic function and induction of mature B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael R; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Liu, Chih Long; Dai, Bo; González-Herrero, Inés; García-Ramírez, Idoia; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Orfao, Alberto; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Blanco, Oscar; Jiménez, Rafael; Martínez-Climent, Jose Angel; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Lossos, Izidore S; Majeti, Ravindra; Melnick, Ari; Cobaleda, César; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma and can be separated into two subtypes based upon molecular features with similarities to germinal center B-cells (GCB-like) or activated B-cells (ABC-like). Here we identify gain of 3q27.2 as being significantly associated with adverse outcome in DLBCL and linked with the ABC-like subtype. This lesion includes the BCL6 oncogene, but does not alter BCL6 transcript levels or target-gene repression. Separately, we identify expression of BCL6 in a subset of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We therefore hypothesize that BCL6 may act by hit-and-run oncogenesis. We model this by transiently expressing Bcl6 within murine HSPCs, and find it causes mature B-cell lymphomas that lack Bcl6 expression and target-gene repression, are transcriptionally similar to post-GCB cells, and show epigenetic changes that are conserved from HSPCs to mature B-cells. Together these results suggest that Bcl6 may function in a hit-and-run role in lymphomagenesis. PMID:24887457

  19. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  20. RAG-mediated DNA double-strand breaks activate a cell type-specific checkpoint to inhibit pre-B cell receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Jeffrey J; Pandey, Ruchi; Schulte, Emily; White, Lynn S; Chen, Bo-Ruei; Sandoval, Gabriel J; Kohyama, Masako; Haldar, Malay; Nickless, Andrew; Trott, Amanda; Cheng, Genhong; Murphy, Kenneth M; Bassing, Craig H; Payton, Jacqueline E; Sleckman, Barry P

    2016-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) activate a canonical DNA damage response, including highly conserved cell cycle checkpoint pathways that prevent cells with DSBs from progressing through the cell cycle. In developing B cells, pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) signals initiate immunoglobulin light (Igl) chain gene assembly, leading to RAG-mediated DNA DSBs. The pre-BCR also promotes cell cycle entry, which could cause aberrant DSB repair and genome instability in pre-B cells. Here, we show that RAG DSBs inhibit pre-BCR signals through the ATM- and NF-κB2-dependent induction of SPIC, a hematopoietic-specific transcriptional repressor. SPIC inhibits expression of the SYK tyrosine kinase and BLNK adaptor, resulting in suppression of pre-BCR signaling. This regulatory circuit prevents the pre-BCR from inducing additional Igl chain gene rearrangements and driving pre-B cells with RAG DSBs into cycle. We propose that pre-B cells toggle between pre-BCR signals and a RAG DSB-dependent checkpoint to maintain genome stability while iteratively assembling Igl chain genes. PMID:26834154

  1. Nickel compounds induce apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells by activation of c-Myc through ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Suen, T.-C.; Sun Hong; Arita, Adriana; Costa, Max

    2009-03-01

    Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and have been shown to alter epigenetic homeostasis. The c-Myc protein controls 15% of human genes and it has been shown that fluctuations of c-Myc protein alter global epigenetic marks. Therefore, the regulation of c-Myc by nickel ions in immortalized but not tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells was examined in this study. It was found that c-Myc protein expression was increased by nickel ions in non-tumorigenic Beas-2B and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The results also indicated that nickel ions induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells. Knockout of c-Myc and its restoration in a rat cell system confirmed the essential role of c-Myc in nickel ion-induced apoptosis. Further studies in Beas-2B cells showed that nickel ion increased the c-Myc mRNA level and c-Myc promoter activity, but did not increase c-Myc mRNA and protein stability. Moreover, nickel ion upregulated c-Myc in Beas-2B cells through the MEK/ERK pathway. Collectively, the results demonstrate that c-Myc induction by nickel ions occurs via an ERK-dependent pathway and plays a crucial role in nickel-induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells.

  2. Human B cell activation. Evidence for diverse signals provided by various monoclonal anti-IgM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with different binding characteristics for human IgM varied markedly in their ability to induce proliferation of T cell-depleted human splenocytes. Two mAb (HB57 and 5D7) that bound to distinct epitopes on IgM were highly effective initiators of B cell proliferation at very low concentrations, in the presence of a T cell factor source. In the absence of T cell supernatant, both HB57 and 5D7 mAbs produced a markedly reduced degree of stimulation at all concentrations. Two additional anti-IgM mAb (VIIIE11 and Mu53) were distinctive in that, even at high concentrations, only limited proliferation was observed compared with the first group of mAb. This proliferation depended on the presence of T cell supernatant. Competitive-binding studies revealed that the epitope recognized by mAb Mu53 may be identical or very proximate to that recognized by HB57. Three other mAb (1G6, XG9, and P24) induced little or no proliferation. 1G6 bound to a unique epitope on the IgM molecule, whereas XG9 shared a determinant with VIIIE11 mAb. Regulatory influences of Fc receptor binding cannot account for all the diversity in proliferation observed with the individual anti-IgM mAb. Markedly augmented proliferation was obtained when B cells were cultured with certain combinations of anti-IgM mAb in the presence of exogenous T cell supernatant. The proliferation induced in the absence of T cell supernatant by high concentrations of mAb mixtures that included 1G6 approached that observed for the same mixtures in the presence of T cell supernatant. The data suggest that certain signals delivered through membrane IgM can bypass the need for T cell supernatant in the activation of human B lymphocytes. PMID:2413155

  3. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment. PMID:17281912

  4. B Cell Receptor Activation Predominantly Regulates AKT-mTORC1/2 Substrates Functionally Related to RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Dara K.; Ali, Raja H.; Turunen, Janne J.; Nore, Beston F.; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylates numerous substrates on the consensus motif RXRXXpS/T, a docking site for 14-3-3 interactions. To identify novel AKT-induced phosphorylation events following B cell receptor (BCR) activation, we performed proteomics, biochemical and bioinformatics analyses. Phosphorylated consensus motif-specific antibody enrichment, followed by tandem mass spectrometry, identified 446 proteins, containing 186 novel phosphorylation events. Moreover, we found 85 proteins with up regulated phosphorylation, while in 277 it was down regulated following stimulation. Up regulation was mainly in proteins involved in ribosomal and translational regulation, DNA binding and transcription regulation. Conversely, down regulation was preferentially in RNA binding, mRNA splicing and mRNP export proteins. Immunoblotting of two identified RNA regulatory proteins, RBM25 and MEF-2D, confirmed the proteomics data. Consistent with these findings, the AKT-inhibitor (MK-2206) dramatically reduced, while the mTORC-inhibitor PP242 totally blocked phosphorylation on the RXRXXpS/T motif. This demonstrates that this motif, previously suggested as an AKT target sequence, also is a substrate for mTORC1/2. Proteins with PDZ, PH and/or SH3 domains contained the consensus motif, whereas in those with an HMG-box, H15 domains and/or NF-X1-zinc-fingers, the motif was absent. Proteins carrying the consensus motif were found in all eukaryotic clades indicating that they regulate a phylogenetically conserved set of proteins. PMID:27487157

  5. B Cell Receptor Activation Predominantly Regulates AKT-mTORC1/2 Substrates Functionally Related to RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Dara K; Ali, Raja H; Turunen, Janne J; Nore, Beston F; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylates numerous substrates on the consensus motif RXRXXpS/T, a docking site for 14-3-3 interactions. To identify novel AKT-induced phosphorylation events following B cell receptor (BCR) activation, we performed proteomics, biochemical and bioinformatics analyses. Phosphorylated consensus motif-specific antibody enrichment, followed by tandem mass spectrometry, identified 446 proteins, containing 186 novel phosphorylation events. Moreover, we found 85 proteins with up regulated phosphorylation, while in 277 it was down regulated following stimulation. Up regulation was mainly in proteins involved in ribosomal and translational regulation, DNA binding and transcription regulation. Conversely, down regulation was preferentially in RNA binding, mRNA splicing and mRNP export proteins. Immunoblotting of two identified RNA regulatory proteins, RBM25 and MEF-2D, confirmed the proteomics data. Consistent with these findings, the AKT-inhibitor (MK-2206) dramatically reduced, while the mTORC-inhibitor PP242 totally blocked phosphorylation on the RXRXXpS/T motif. This demonstrates that this motif, previously suggested as an AKT target sequence, also is a substrate for mTORC1/2. Proteins with PDZ, PH and/or SH3 domains contained the consensus motif, whereas in those with an HMG-box, H15 domains and/or NF-X1-zinc-fingers, the motif was absent. Proteins carrying the consensus motif were found in all eukaryotic clades indicating that they regulate a phylogenetically conserved set of proteins. PMID:27487157

  6. Polyclonal B-cell activation reveals antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in HIV-1-seronegative individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Jehuda-Cohen, T; Slade, B A; Powell, J D; Villinger, F; De, B; Folks, T M; McClure, H M; Sell, K W; Ahmed-Ansari, A

    1990-01-01

    Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals is of paramount importance for the control of the spread of AIDS worldwide. Currently, the vast majority of screening centers throughout the world rely on serological techniques. As such, clinically asymptomatic but HIV-infected, seronegative individuals are rarely identified. In this report we show that 18% (30/165) of seronegative individuals who were considered to be a unique cohort of patients at high risk for HIV infection had circulating B cells that, upon in vitro polyclonal activation with pokeweed mitogen, produced antibodies reactive with HIV. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA obtained from aliquots of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these seronegative but pokeweed mitogen assay-positive individuals tested revealed the presence of HIV-specific sequences in a significant number of samples. In addition, depletion of CD8+ T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-seronegative individuals prior to in vitro culture with pokeweed mitogen resulted in increased sensitivity for detecting HIV-reactive antibodies. This assay has obvious epidemiological implications, especially in the case of high-risk groups, and also provides a simple technique to enhance detection of HIV-infected individuals. Of further interest is the determination of the mechanisms related to the lack of HIV-specific antibodies in the serum of these infected individuals. Images PMID:2111024

  7. Inhibition of COP9-signalosome (CSN) deneddylating activity and tumor growth of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas by doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Li, Jing; Compitello, George; Rossi, Randy; Spence, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Vijaya; Jordan, Craig; Poligone, Brian; Casulo, Carla; Burack, Richard; Shapiro, Joel L.; Bernstein, Steven; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Deshaies, Raymond J.; Land, Hartmut; Zhao, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    In searching for small-molecule compounds that inhibit proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells and may, therefore, be exploited as potential therapeutic agents for this disease, we identified the commonly used and well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline as a strong candidate. Here, we demonstrate that doxycycline inhibits the growth of DLBCL cells both in vitro and in mouse xenograft models. In addition, we show that doxycycline accumulates in DLBCL cells to high concentrations and affects multiple signaling pathways that are crucial for lymphomagenesis. Our data reveal the deneddylating activity of COP-9 signalosome (CSN) as a novel target of doxycycline and suggest that doxycycline may exert its effects in DLBCL cells in part through a CSN5-HSP90 pathway. Consistently, knockdown of CSN5 exhibited similar effects as doxycycline treatment on DLBCL cell survival and HSP90 chaperone function. In addition to DLBCL cells, doxycycline inhibited growth of several other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells in vitro. Together, our results suggest that doxycycline may represent a promising therapeutic agent for DLBCL and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas subtypes. PMID:26142707

  8. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  9. Individual germinal centres of myasthenia gravis human thymuses contain polyclonal activated B cells that express all the Vh and Vk families.

    PubMed Central

    Guigou, V; Emilie, D; Berrih-Aknin, S; Fumoux, F; Fougereau, M; Schiff, C

    1991-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we analysed the immunoglobulin repertoire expressed by the B cells present in myasthenia gravis thymuses from four patients. B cells, mostly in activated state, were clustered in germinal centres, in which multiple isotypes were identified. A majority of cells expressed IgG as compared with IgM, with a roughly similar contribution of kappa and lambda chains. Hybridization with the six VH and the 4 VK human family probes was observed in serial sections, providing additional evidence that individual germinal centres were polyclonal. The thymic B cell repertoire closely reflected the VH and the VK family usage of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes with the preferential utilization of VH3, VK1 and VK3. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1899630

  10. Ly-1 B cells and disease activity in (New Zealand black x New Zealand white)F1 mice. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farinas, M.C.; Stall, A.M.; Solovera, J.J.; Tarlinton, D.M.; Herzenberg, L.A.; Strober, S. )

    1990-04-01

    The treatment of female (New Zealand black x New Zealand white)F1 mice with total lymphoid irradiation resulted in a prolonged remission of autoimmune disease activity. Total lymphoid irradiation-treated mice also showed a marked reduction of Ly-1 B cells, which lasted up to 3 months. The subsequent return of Ly-1 B cells to preirradiation levels was not associated with a simultaneous return of disease when measured by parameters such as IgG anti-DNA antibodies and spontaneous secretion of IgG by splenic cells. In cell sorting experiments, most of the cells spontaneously secreting IgG were found within the Ly-1- (CD5-) splenic B cell population.

  11. Tivantinib (ARQ 197) exhibits antitumor activity by directly interacting with tubulin and overcomes ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Aki; Katayama, Ryohei; Oh-Hara, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeo; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-12-01

    Tivantinib (ARQ197) was first reported as a highly selective inhibitor of c-MET and is currently being investigated in a phase III clinical trial. However, as recently reported by us and another group, tivantinib showed cytotoxic activity independent of cellular c-MET status and also disrupted microtubule dynamics. To investigate if tivantinib exerts its cytotoxic activity by disrupting microtubules, we quantified polymerized tubulin in cells and xenograft tumors after tivantinib treatment. Consistent with our previous report, tivantinib reduced tubulin polymerization in cells and in mouse xenograft tumors in vivo. To determine if tivantinib directly binds to tubulin, we performed an in vitro competition assay. Tivantinib competitively inhibited colchicine but not vincristine or vinblastine binding to purified tubulin. These results imply that tivantinib directly binds to the colchicine binding site of tubulin. To predict the binding mode of tivantinib with tubulin, we performed computer simulation of the docking pose of tivantinib with tubulin using GOLD docking program. Computer simulation predicts tivantinib fitted into the colchicine binding pocket of tubulin without steric hindrance. Furthermore, tivantinib showed similar IC50 values against parental and multidrug-resistant cells. In contrast, other microtubule-targeting drugs, such as vincristine, paclitaxel, and colchicine, could not suppress the growth of cells overexpressing ABC transporters. Moreover, the expression level of ABC transporters did not correlate with the apoptosis-inducing ability of tivantinib different from other microtubule inhibitor. These results suggest that tivantinib can overcome ABC transporter-mediated multidrug-resistant tumor cells and is potentially useful against various tumors. PMID:25313010

  12. LRRK1 is critical in the regulation of B-cell responses and CARMA1-dependent NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Keiko; Baba, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Hisaaki; Kang, Sujin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Yoshida, Yuji; Maeda, Yohei; Sarashina-Kida, Hana; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiro; Hayama, Yoshitomo; Kinehara, Yuhei; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B-cell activation and humoral immunity. In this study, we discovered a critical function of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) in BCR-mediated immune responses. Lrrk1−/− mice exhibited altered B1a-cell development and basal immunoglobulin production. In addition, these mice failed to produce IgG3 antibody in response to T cell–independent type 2 antigen due to defects in IgG3 class-switch recombination. Concomitantly, B cells lacking LRRK1 exhibited a profound defect in proliferation and survival upon BCR stimulation, which correlated with impaired BCR-mediated NF-κB activation and reduced expression of NF-κB target genes including Bcl-xL, cyclin D2, and NFATc1/αA. Furthermore, LRRK1 physically interacted and potently synergized with CARMA1 to enhance NF-κB activation. Our results reveal a critical role of LRRK1 in NF-κB signaling in B cells and the humoral immune response. PMID:27166870

  13. Irreversible dual inhibitory mode: the novel Btk inhibitor PLS-123 demonstrates promising anti-tumor activity in human B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Li, Xitao; Shi, Yunfei; Ping, Lingyan; Wu, Lina; Fu, Kai; Feng, Lixia; Zheng, Xiaohui; Song, Yuqin; Pan, Zhengying; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway has gained significant attention as a therapeutic target in B-cell malignancies. Recently, several drugs that target the BCR signaling pathway, especially the Btk inhibitor ibrutinib, have demonstrated notable therapeutic effects in relapsed/refractory patients, which indicates that pharmacological inhibition of BCR pathway holds promise in B-cell lymphoma treatment. Here we present a novel covalent irreversible Btk inhibitor PLS-123 with more potent anti-proliferative activity compared with ibrutinib in multiple cellular and in vivo models through effective apoptosis induction and dual-action inhibitory mode of Btk activation. The phosphorylation of BCR downstream activating AKT/mTOR and MAPK signal pathways was also more significantly reduced after treatment with PLS-123 than ibrutinib. Gene expression profile analysis further suggested that the different selectivity profile of PLS-123 led to significant downregulation of oncogenic gene PTPN11 expression, which might also offer new opportunities beyond what ibrutinib has achieved. In addition, PLS-123 dose-dependently attenuated BCR- and chemokine-mediated lymphoma cell adhesion and migration. Taken together, Btk inhibitor PLS-123 suggested a new direction to pharmacologically modulate Btk function and develop novel therapeutic drug for B-cell lymphoma treatment. PMID:25944695

  14. [Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by B cell activation and RT-PCR cloning].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Xu, Ke; Yu, Shuang-Qing; Ding, Lin-Lin; Luo, Hai-Yan; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K; Feng, Xia; Shao, Ji-Rong; Guan, Yong-Jun; Zeng, Yi

    2012-06-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. screened by ELISA after 1-2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vkappa or Vlambda genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and kappa or lambda expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vkappa or Vlambda were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and Vkappa/lambda pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded. PMID:22978159

  15. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  16. C/EBPα Activates Pre-existing and De Novo Macrophage Enhancers during Induced Pre-B Cell Transdifferentiation and Myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, Chris; Collombet, Samuel; Vicent, Guillermo; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Badeaux, Aimee; Bussmann, Lars; Sardina, Jose Luis; Thieffry, Denis; Beato, Miguel; Shi, Yang; Bonifer, Constanze; Graf, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    Transcription-factor-induced somatic cell conversions are highly relevant for both basic and clinical research yet their mechanism is not fully understood and it is unclear whether they reflect normal differentiation processes. Here we show that during pre-B-cell-to-macrophage transdifferentiation, C/EBPα binds to two types of myeloid enhancers in B cells: pre-existing enhancers that are bound by PU.1, providing a platform for incoming C/EBPα; and de novo enhancers that are targeted by C/EBPα, acting as a pioneer factor for subsequent binding by PU.1. The order of factor binding dictates the upregulation kinetics of nearby genes. Pre-existing enhancers are broadly active throughout the hematopoietic lineage tree, including B cells. In contrast, de novo enhancers are silent in most cell types except in myeloid cells where they become activated by C/EBP factors. Our data suggest that C/EBPα recapitulates physiological developmental processes by short-circuiting two macrophage enhancer pathways in pre-B cells. PMID:26235892

  17. Comparing regions of the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein which function as transcriptional activating sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G; Himmelfarb, H; Heston, L; Countryman, J; Gradoville, L; Baumann, R; Chi, T; Carey, M

    1993-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein activates expression of Epstein-Barr virus early-lytic-cycle genes in human B lymphocytes. Here it is shown that ZEBRA also behaves as a sequence-specific transcriptional activator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletional mutagenesis defined three regions of ZEBRA that participate in activation in S. cerevisiae. These regions are designated YI (amino acids [aa] 1 to 25), YII (aa 51 to 102), and YIII (aa 228 to 245). Two of the three regions of the native ZEBRA protein act together to mediate activation when assayed on ZEBRA binding sites. However, when fused to the DNA binding domain of GAL4 and assayed on GAL4 binding sites, regions YII and YIII were each sufficient to confer activation in S. cerevisiae. Regions of ZEBRA which affected activation in S. cerevisiae were also required in human B lymphocytes. The amino-terminal region of ZEBRA (aa 1 to 98) was required for activation both in S. cerevisiae and in human B cells; deletion of the carboxy-terminal 18 aa also significantly reduced activation in both cell types. Thus, the behavior of ZEBRA in human B cells and S. cerevisiae suggests that the protein contains universal activation motifs that interact with conserved components of the transcription machinery. However, certain deletion mutants of ZEBRA containing mutations in the N-terminal region exhibited discordant behaviors in S. cerevisiae and in B cells. For example, deletion of ZEBRA aa 26 to 51 impaired activation to a great extent in B cells but had little or no effect in S. cerevisiae. The discordant mutants may reflect interactions with a variable domain of a conserved component or unique interactions with specialized components of the basal transcription apparatus in different cells. PMID:8230468

  18. Molecular evidence of Zn chelation of the procaspase activating compound B-PAC-1 in B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aloke; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Jefferson; Patel, Viralkumar; Neelapu, Sattva S.; McMurray, John S.; Gandhi, Varsha

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of apoptosis in cancer cells is pivotal for their survival and is typically ruled by mutations or dysregulation of core apoptotic cascade. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin's B-cell malignancy expressing higher anti-apoptotic proteins providing survival advantage. B-PAC-1, a procaspase activating compound, induces apoptosis by sequestering Zn bound to procaspase-3, but the amino acids holding Zn in Caspase-3 is not known. Here we show that reintroduction of WT caspase-3 or 7 in Caspase3–7 double knock-out (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) promoted B-PAC-1 to induce apoptosis (27–43%), but not in DKO MEFs or MEFs expressing respective Casp3–7 catalytic mutants (12–13%). Using caspase-6 and -9 exosite analysis, we identified and mutated predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3 (H108A, C148S and E272A) and overexpressed into DKO MEFs. Mutants carrying E272A abrogated Zn-reversal of apoptosis induced by B-PAC-1 via higher XIAP and smac expressions but not in H108A or C148S mutants. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed stronger XIAP-caspase-3 interaction suggesting a novel mechanism of impulsive apoptosis resistance by disrupting predicted Zn-ligands in caspase-3. B-PAC-1 sponsored apoptosis in MCL cell lines (30–73%) via caspase-3 and PARP cleavages accompanied by loss of Mcl-1 and IAPs including XIAP while Zn substantially abrogated B-PAC-1-driven apoptosis (18–36%). In contrary, Zn is dispensable to inhibit staurosporin, bendamustine, ABT199 or MK206-induced apoptosis. Consistent to cell lines, B-PAC-1 stimulated cell death in primary B-lymphoma cells via caspase-3 cleavage with decline in both Mcl-1 and XIAP. This study underscores the first genetic evidence that B-PAC-1 driven apoptosis is mediated via Zn chelation. PMID:26658105

  19. SPIB and BATF provide alternate determinants of IRF4 occupancy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma linked to disease heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Care, Matthew A.; Cocco, Mario; Laye, Jon P.; Barnes, Nicholas; Huang, Yuanxue; Wang, Ming; Barrans, Sharon; Du, Ming; Jack, Andrew; Westhead, David R.; Doody, Gina M.; Tooze, Reuben M.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is central to the transcriptional network of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL), an aggressive lymphoma subgroup defined by gene expression profiling. Since cofactor association modifies transcriptional regulatory input by IRF4, we assessed genome occupancy by IRF4 and endogenous cofactors in ABC-DLBCL cell lines. IRF4 partners with SPIB, PU.1 and BATF genome-wide, but SPIB provides the dominant IRF4 partner in this context. Upon SPIB knockdown IRF4 occupancy is depleted and neither PU.1 nor BATF acutely compensates. Integration with ENCODE data from lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878, demonstrates that IRF4 adopts either SPIB- or BATF-centric genome-wide distributions in related states of post-germinal centre B-cell transformation. In primary DLBCL high-SPIB and low-BATF or the reciprocal low-SPIB and high-BATF mRNA expression links to differential gene expression profiles across nine data sets, identifying distinct associations with SPIB occupancy, signatures of B-cell differentiation stage and potential pathogenetic mechanisms. In a population-based patient cohort, SPIBhigh/BATFlow-ABC-DLBCL is enriched for mutation of MYD88, and SPIBhigh/BATFlow-ABC-DLBCL with MYD88-L265P mutation identifies a small subgroup of patients among this otherwise aggressive disease subgroup with distinct favourable outcome. We conclude that differential expression of IRF4 cofactors SPIB and BATF identifies biologically and clinically significant heterogeneity among ABC-DLBCL. PMID:24875472

  20. SPIB and BATF provide alternate determinants of IRF4 occupancy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma linked to disease heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Care, Matthew A; Cocco, Mario; Laye, Jon P; Barnes, Nicholas; Huang, Yuanxue; Wang, Ming; Barrans, Sharon; Du, Ming; Jack, Andrew; Westhead, David R; Doody, Gina M; Tooze, Reuben M

    2014-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) is central to the transcriptional network of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL), an aggressive lymphoma subgroup defined by gene expression profiling. Since cofactor association modifies transcriptional regulatory input by IRF4, we assessed genome occupancy by IRF4 and endogenous cofactors in ABC-DLBCL cell lines. IRF4 partners with SPIB, PU.1 and BATF genome-wide, but SPIB provides the dominant IRF4 partner in this context. Upon SPIB knockdown IRF4 occupancy is depleted and neither PU.1 nor BATF acutely compensates. Integration with ENCODE data from lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878, demonstrates that IRF4 adopts either SPIB- or BATF-centric genome-wide distributions in related states of post-germinal centre B-cell transformation. In primary DLBCL high-SPIB and low-BATF or the reciprocal low-SPIB and high-BATF mRNA expression links to differential gene expression profiles across nine data sets, identifying distinct associations with SPIB occupancy, signatures of B-cell differentiation stage and potential pathogenetic mechanisms. In a population-based patient cohort, SPIBhigh/BATFlow-ABC-DLBCL is enriched for mutation of MYD88, and SPIBhigh/BATFlow-ABC-DLBCL with MYD88-L265P mutation identifies a small subgroup of patients among this otherwise aggressive disease subgroup with distinct favourable outcome. We conclude that differential expression of IRF4 cofactors SPIB and BATF identifies biologically and clinically significant heterogeneity among ABC-DLBCL. PMID:24875472

  1. Neurotrophins and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Jennifer; O'Dwyer, Michael; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in a variety of cell types. Neurotrophins are produced by multiple cell types in both pro- and mature forms, and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The p75(NTR) and Trk receptors can elicit signalling in response to the presence or absence of their corresponding neurotrophin ligands. This signalling, along with neurotrophin and receptor expression, varies between different cell types. Neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be expressed by and elicit signalling in B lymphocytes. In general, most neurotrophins are expressed by activated B-cells and memory B-cells. Likewise, the TrkB95 receptor is seen on activated B-cells, while TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed by both resting and active B-cells as well as memory B-cells. Nerve growth factor stimulates B-cell proliferation, memory B-cell survival, antibody production and CD40 expression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is involved in B-cell maturation in the bone marrow through TrkB95. Overall neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be involved in B-cell proliferation, development, differentiation, antibody secretion and survival. As well as expression and activity in healthy B-cells, the neurotrophins and their receptors can contribute to B-cell malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. They are involved in B-cell malignancy survival and potentially in drug resistance. PMID:26399960

  2. Effect of Treatment With Tabalumab, a B Cell-Activating Factor Inhibitor, on Highly Sensitized Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Awaiting Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, M A; Komocsar, W J; Nantz, E; Samaniego, M D; Henson, S L; Hague, J A; Lobashevsky, A L; Higgins, N G; Czader, M; Book, B K; Anderson, M D; Pescovitz, M D; Taber, T E

    2016-04-01

    B cell-activation factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell maturation. Inhibition of BAFF represents an appealing target for desensitization of sensitized end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a Phase 2a, single-arm, open-label exploratory study investigating the effect of tabalumab (BAFF inhibitor) in patients with ESRD and calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRAs) >50%. The treatment period duration was 24 weeks. Eighteen patients received tabalumab, at doses of 240-mg subcutaneous (SC) at Week 0 followed by 120-mg SC monthly for 5 additional months. Patients were followed for an additional 52 weeks. Immunopharmacologic effects were characterized through analysis of blood for HLA antibodies, BAFF concentrations, immunoglobulins, T and B cell subsets, as well as pre- and posttreatment tonsil and bone marrow biopsies. Significant reductions in cPRAs were observed at Weeks 16 (p = 0.043) and 36 (p = 0.004); however, absolute reductions were small (<5%). Expected pharmacologic changes in B cell subsets and immunoglobulin reductions were observed. Two tabalumab-related serious adverse events occurred (pneumonia, worsening of peripheral neuropathy), while the most common other adverse events were injection-site pain and hypotension. Three patients received matched deceased donor transplants during follow-up. Treatment with a BAFF inhibitor resulted in statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful reduction in the cPRA from baseline (NCT01200290, Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26780484

  3. T-cell independent, B-cell receptor-mediated induction of telomerase activity differs among IGHV mutation-based subgroups of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Damle, Rajendra N; Temburni, Sonal; Banapour, Taraneh; Paul, Santanu; Mongini, Patricia K A; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-09-20

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) clones with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL) exhibit greater telomerase activity than those with mutated IGHV genes (M-CLL), the extent to which B-cell receptor (BCR) triggering contributes to telomerase up-regulation is not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of BCR stimulation on modulating telomerase activity. The multivalent BCR ligand, dextran conjugated anti-μ mAb HB57 (HB57-dex), increased telomerase activity and promoted cell survival and proliferation preferentially in U-CLL cases, whereas the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked HB57-dex induced telomerase activation. Although both U-CLL and M-CLL clones exhibited similar membrane proximal signaling responses to HB57-dex, telomerase activity and cell proliferation, when inducible in M-CLL, differed. B-CLL cells stimulated using bivalent F(ab')(2) -goat anti-μ antibody (goat anti-μ) exhibited higher membrane proximal response in U-CLL than M-CLL cells, whereas telomerase activity, cell survival, and proliferation were induced to lower levels than those induced by HB57-dex. In normal B lymphocytes, HB57-dex induced less protein phosphorylation but more cell proliferation and survival than goat anti-μ. Although both anti-BCR stimuli induced comparable telomerase activity, normal CD5(+) B cells preferentially exhibited higher hTERT positivity than their CD5(-) counterparts. These findings provide an understanding of how BCR-mediated signals impact telomerase modulation in IGHV mutation-based subgroups of B-CLL and normal B cells. PMID:22875913

  4. Discovery of novel, high potent, ABC type PTP1B inhibitors with TCPTP selectivity and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peihong; Du, Yongli; Song, Lianhua; Shen, Jingkang; Li, Qunyi

    2016-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a key negative regulator of both insulin and leptin receptor pathways has been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. With the goal of enhancing potency and selectivity of the PTP1B inhibitors, a series of methyl salicylate derivatives as ABC type PTP1B inhibitors (P1-P7) were discovered. More importantly, compound P6 exhibited high potent inhibitory activity (IC50 = 50 nM) for PTP1B with 15-fold selectivity over T-cell PTPase (TCPTP). Further studies on cellular activities revealed that compound P6 could enhance insulin-mediated insulin receptor β (IRβ) phosphorylation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:27123900

  5. Characterization and functional studies of forkhead box protein 3(-) lymphocyte activation gene 3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells induced by mucosal B cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, K-H; Chiang, B-L

    2015-05-01

    The induction of mucosal tolerance has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Our previous study demonstrated that Peyer's patch B cells could convert naive T cells into regulatory T cells (so-called Treg -of-B(P) cells); however, it is important to characterize this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells for future applications. This study aimed to investigate the role of lymphocyte activating gene 3 (LAG3) in mediating the regulatory function of Treg -of-B(P) cells induced by mucosal follicular B (FOB) cells. Microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess the gene expression pattern of Treg -of-B(P) cells. To evaluate the role of LAG3, the in-vitro suppressive function and the alleviation of airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma was assessed. Our data indicated that FOB cells isolated from Peyer's patches had the ability to generate more suppressive Treg -of-B cells with LAG3 expression, compared with CD23(lo) CD21(lo) B cells. LAG3 is not only a marker for Treg -of-B(P) cells, but also participate in the suppressive ability. Moreover, CCR4 and CCR6 could be detected on the LAG3(+) , not LAG3(-) , Treg -of-B(P) cells and would help cells homing to allergic lung. In the murine model of asthma, the adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg -of-B(P) cells was able to sufficiently suppress T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration and alleviate asthmatic symptoms. LAG3 was expressed in Treg -of-B(P) cells and was also involved in the function of Treg -of-B(P) cells. In the future, this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells might be used to alleviate allergic symptoms. PMID:25581421

  6. R-CVP regimen is active in frail elderly patients aged 80 or over with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Bolle, Delphine; Truong, Catherine; Besançon, Anne; Sandrini, Jeremy; Anghel, Andreaa; Farhi, Jonathan; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-10-01

    Patients aged 80 or over with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) often have comorbidities that increase drug toxicity and prevent the use of otherwise optimal treatment. We performed a retrospective analysis of 43 patients aged 80 or over (median age: 83; range: 80-93) unable to receive treatment with anthracyclines, at diagnosis of DLBCL, treated with an R-CVP treatment (standard R-CHOP without doxorubicin). The patients had one or more comorbidities: 18 patients (41.9 %) had a performance status (PS) of 3; 23 patients (53.5 %) had low creatinine clearance; 12 patients (27.9 %) had low left ventricular ejection fraction; seven patients (16.3 %) had poor hepatic function; and 26 patients (60.5 %) had a Charlson index score ≥4. Thirty patients (70 %) had two or three adverse factors according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Twenty-five patients (58.1 %) received eight cycles of R-CVP, but the full eight cycles could not be given to 18 patients (41.9 %). The OR rate was 58.1 % (CR 37.2 %). There were 34 deaths (79 %) during treatment and follow-up. Ten patients (23.3 %) died early from toxicity before interim evaluation; all had PS 3. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 52.6 months. The overall 2-year survival rate was 31.9 % and the median OS was 12.6 months. The median OS for patients who completed the entire treatment was 26.4 months. The median PFS was 11.2 months. In multivariate analyses, OS was only affected by performance status ≥2 and Charlson index score ≥4. The R-CVP regimen can be active in elderly frail patients aged 80 or more with DLBCL, but systematic geriatric assessment is required so that those unsuitable for chemotherapy are excluded. PMID:27485454

  7. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  8. Soluble suppressor supernatants elaborated by concanavalin A-activated human mononuclear cells. Characterization of a soluble suppressor of B cell immunoglobulin production

    SciTech Connect

    Fleisher, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Blaese, R.M.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1981-03-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) activated with the mitogenic lectin concanavalin A (Con A) elaborate a soluble immune suppressor supernatant (SISS) that contains at least 2 distinct suppressor factors. One of these, SISS-B, inhibits polyclonal B cell immunoglobulin production, whereas the other, SISS-T, suppresses T cell proliferation to both mitogens and antigens. The latter mediator is discussed in the companion paper. Characteristics of the human soluble suppressor of B cell immunoglobulin production (SISS-B) include: 1) inhibition by a noncytotoxic mechanism, 2) loss of activity in the presence of the monosaccharide L-rhamnose, 3) appearance within 8 to 16 hr after the addition of Con A, 4) elaboration by cells irradiated with 500 or 2000 rads, 5) production by highly purified T cells, 6) stability at pH 2.5 but instability at 56/sup o/C, and 7) m.w. of 60 to 80,000. These data indicate that after Con A activation, selected T cells not only become potent suppressor cells, but also generate a soluble saccharide-specific factor(s) that inhibits polyclonal immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

  9. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  10. B cell conducts the lymphocyte orchestra.

    PubMed

    Youinou, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The interest for B cells has recently been revived. They normally play a role in the development, the regulation, as well as the activation of lymphoid architecture: they regulate dendritic cells and T-cell subsets function through cytokine production. Receptor editing is also essential in B cells and aids in preventing autoimmunity. Both abnormalities in the distribution of B-cell subsets and clinical benefit response to B-cell depletion in autoimmune states illustrate their importance. A new area has thus been reached, whereby B lymphocytes return as a significant contributor to autoimmune disorders. PMID:17363215

  11. Oridonin ameliorates lupus-like symptoms of MRL(lpr/lpr) mice by inhibition of B-cell activating factor (BAFF).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Sun, Lijuan; Wu, Hongkun; Zhang, Lingzhen; Chen, Mingcang; Liu, Jianwen; Zhong, Renqian

    2013-09-01

    Oridonin, a pharmacologically safe agent extracted from Isodon Serra, has been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not clear whether Oridonin affects B-cell activating factor (BAFF) expression, thereby exerting beneficial effects in the treatment of BAFF-associated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thus, the current study aimed to find the function of Oridonin in regulation of BAFF and amelioration of SLE. In vitro, we explored the effect of Oridonin on BAFF expression and production in mouse macrophages. Moreover, using a spontaneous murine SLE model, we investigated the role of Oridonin delivery in the treatment of lupus-like disease in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, by measuring the changes in lupus symptoms, renal damage, BAFF expression, and B cell subsets. Our results showed that Oridonin significantly inhibited BAFF expression in mouse macrophages by suppressing the transcriptional activation of its promoter. And in vivo administration of Oridonin efficiently ameliorated the serological and clinical manifestations of SLE in MRL(lpr/lpr) mice, as shown by increased survival benefit, reduced proteinuria levels, diminished production of specific auto-antibodies, and attenuated renal damage, in association with down-regulation of BAFF and a lower rate of B-cell maturation and differentiation. Thus, it suggests that Oridonin will serve as a novel natural therapeutic strategy for SLE by inhibition of BAFF. PMID:23712004

  12. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation.

  13. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation. PMID:25698336

  14. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of lung tumor position using active breathing control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Koshani, Rojano . E-mail: rkashani@umich.edu; Balter, James M.; Hayman, James A.; Henning, George T.; Herk, Marcel van

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the short-term and long-term reproducibility of lung tumor position for scans acquired using an active breathing control (ABC) device. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with lung cancer were scanned over three sessions during the course of treatment. For each session, two scans were acquired at deep inhale, and one scan each at half of deep inhale and at exhale. Long-term reproducibility was evaluated by comparing the same breathing state scans from two sessions, with setup variation removed by skeletal alignment. Tumor alignment was based on intensity matching of a small volume around the tumor. For short-term reproducibility, the two inhale volumes from the same session were compared. Results: For the short-term reproducibility, the mean and the standard deviation (SD) of the displacement of the center of tumor were 0.0 (1.5) mm in anteroposterior (AP), 0.3 (1.4) mm in superior/inferior (SI), and 0.2 (0.7) mm in right/left (RL) directions. For long-term reproducibility, the mean (SD) were -1.3 (3.1) mm AP, -0.5 (3.8) mm SI, and 0.3 (1.6) mm RL for inhale and -0.2 (2.8) mm AP, 0.2 (2.1) mm SI, and -0.7 (1.1) mm RL for exhale. Conclusion: The ABC device demonstrates very good short-term and long-term reproducibility. Increased long-term variability in position, primarily in the SI and AP directions, indicates the role of tumor-directed localization in combination with breath-held immobilization.

  15. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    PubMed

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump. PMID:26782644

  16. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  17. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  18. The BCL6 RD2 domain governs commitment of activated B-cells to form germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuanxin; Gonzalez, David G.; Cote, Christine M.; Jiang, Yanwen; Hatzi, Katerina; Teater, Matt; Dai, Kezhi; Hla, Timothy; Haberman, Ann M.; Melnick, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Summary To understand how the Bcl6 transcriptional repressor functions in the immune system we disrupted its RD2 repression domain in mice. Bcl6RD2MUT mice exhibit a complete loss of GC formation but retain normal extrafollicular responses. Bcl6RD2MUT antigen-engaged B-cells migrate to the interfollicular zone and interact with cognate T helper cells. However, these cells fail to complete early GC-commitment differentiation and coalesce as nascent GC aggregates. Bcl6 directly binds and represses trafficking receptors S1pr1 and Gpr183 by recruiting Hdac2 through the RD2 domain. Deregulation of these genes impairs B-cell migration and may contribute to GC failure in Bcl6RD2MUT mice. The development of functional GC-TFH cells was partially impaired in Bcl6RD2MUT mice. In contrast to Bcl6−/− mice, Bcl6RD2MUT animals experience no inflammatory disease or macrophage deregulation. These results reveal an essential role for RD2 repression in early GC commitment and striking biochemical specificity in Bcl6 control of humoral and innate immune-cell phenotypes. PMID:25176650

  19. Novel oral histone deacetylase inhibitor, MPT0E028, displays potent growth-inhibitory activity against human B-cell lymphoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Li; Peng, Chieh-Yu; Lai, Mei-Jung; Chen, Chun-Han; Lee, Hsueh-Yun; Wang, Jing-Chi; Liou, Jing-Ping; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Teng, Che-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor has been a promising therapeutic option in cancer therapy due to its ability to induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we demonstrated that MPT0E028, a novel HDAC inhibitor, reduces the viability of B-cell lymphomas by inducing apoptosis and shows a more potent HDAC inhibitory effect compared to SAHA, the first HDAC inhibitor approved by the FDA. In addition to HDACs inhibition, MPT0E028 also possesses potent direct Akt targeting ability as measured by the kinome diversity screening assay. Also, MPT0E028 reduces Akt phosphorylation in B-cell lymphoma with an IC50 value lower than SAHA. Transient transfection assay revealed that both targeting HDACs and Akt contribute to the apoptosis induced by MPT0E028, with both mechanisms functioning independently. Microarray analysis also shows that MPT0E028 may regulate many oncogenes expression (e.g., TP53, MYC, STAT family). Furthermore, in vivo animal model experiments demonstrated that MPT0E028 (50–200 mg/kg, po, qd) prolongs the survival rate of mice bearing human B-cell lymphoma Ramos cells and inhibits tumor growth in BJAB xenograft model. In summary, MPT0E028 possesses strong in vitro and in vivo activity against malignant cells, representing a potential therapeutic approach for cancer therapy. PMID:25669976

  20. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  1. A Novel Recombinant Anti-CD22 Immunokinase Delivers Proapoptotic Activity of Death-Associated Protein Kinase (DAPK) and Mediates Cytotoxicity in Neoplastic B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lilienthal, Nils; Lohmann, Gregor; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Vasyutina, Elena; Zittrich, Stefan; Mayer, Petra; Herling, Carmen Diana; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Hallek, Michael; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Barth, Stefan; Herling, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The serine/threonine death-associated protein kinases (DAPK) provide pro-death signals in response to (oncogenic) cellular stresses. Lost DAPK expression due to (epi)genetic silencing is found in a broad spectrum of cancers. Within B-cell lymphomas, deficiency of the prototypic family member DAPK1 represents a predisposing or early tumorigenic lesion and high-frequency promoter methylation marks more aggressive diseases. On the basis of protein studies and meta-analyzed gene expression profiling data, we show here that within the low-level context of B-lymphocytic DAPK, particularly CLL cells have lost DAPK1 expression. To target this potential vulnerability, we conceptualized B-cell-specific cytotoxic reconstitution of the DAPK1 tumor suppressor in the format of an immunokinase. After rounds of selections for its most potent cytolytic moiety and optimal ligand part, a DK1KD-SGIII fusion protein containing a constitutive DAPK1 mutant, DK1KD, linked to the scFv SGIII against the B-cell-exclusive endocytic glyco-receptor CD22 was created. Its high purity and large-scale recombinant production provided a stable, selectively binding, and efficiently internalizing construct with preserved robust catalytic activity. DK1KD-SGIII specifically and efficiently killed CD22-positive cells of lymphoma lines and primary CLL samples, sparing healthy donor- or CLL patient-derived non-B cells. The mode of cell death was predominantly PARP-mediated and caspase-dependent conventional apoptosis as well as triggering of an autophagic program. The notoriously high apoptotic threshold of CLL could be overcome by DK1KD-SGIII in vitro also in cases with poor prognostic features, such as therapy resistance. The manufacturing feasibility of the novel CD22-targeting DAPK immunokinase and its selective antileukemic efficiency encourage intensified studies towards specific clinical application. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 971-84. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26826117

  2. STAT-5 is activated constitutively in T cells, B cells and monocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pertovaara, M; Silvennoinen, O; Isomäki, P

    2015-01-01

    The expression and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) have been shown to be markedly increased in the salivary gland epithelial cells of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The present aim was to investigate the activation status of different STAT proteins in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes and monocytes, and their correlations with clinical parameters in patients with pSS. To this end, PB samples were drawn from 16 patients with active pSS and 16 healthy blood donors, and the phosphorylation of STAT-1, -3, -4, -5 and -6 proteins was studied in T cells, B cells and monocytes using multi-colour flow cytometry. In addition, mRNA expression of STAT molecules in PB mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied with quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR). Basal phosphorylation of STAT-5 was found to be significantly higher in PB T cells, B cells and monocytes in patients with pSS than in healthy controls. The expression of STAT-5 mRNA was not increased in PBMC. pSTAT-5 levels in B cells and monocytes showed a significant correlation with serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels and anti-SSB antibody titres. Constitutive STAT-5 activation in monocytes and CD4+ T cells was associated with purpura. There were no major differences in the activation of other STATs between pSS patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, STAT-5 is activated constitutively in PB leucocytes in patients with pSS, and basal STAT-5 phosphorylation seems to associate with hypergammaglobulinaemia, anti-SSB antibody production and purpura. PMID:25736842

  3. STAT-5 is activated constitutively in T cells, B cells and monocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pertovaara, M; Silvennoinen, O; Isomäki, P

    2015-07-01

    The expression and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) have been shown to be markedly increased in the salivary gland epithelial cells of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The present aim was to investigate the activation status of different STAT proteins in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocytes and monocytes, and their correlations with clinical parameters in patients with pSS. To this end, PB samples were drawn from 16 patients with active pSS and 16 healthy blood donors, and the phosphorylation of STAT-1, -3, -4, -5 and -6 proteins was studied in T cells, B cells and monocytes using multi-colour flow cytometry. In addition, mRNA expression of STAT molecules in PB mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied with quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Basal phosphorylation of STAT-5 was found to be significantly higher in PB T cells, B cells and monocytes in patients with pSS than in healthy controls. The expression of STAT-5 mRNA was not increased in PBMC. pSTAT-5 levels in B cells and monocytes showed a significant correlation with serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels and anti-SSB antibody titres. Constitutive STAT-5 activation in monocytes and CD4(+) T cells was associated with purpura. There were no major differences in the activation of other STATs between pSS patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, STAT-5 is activated constitutively in PB leucocytes in patients with pSS, and basal STAT-5 phosphorylation seems to associate with hypergammaglobulinaemia, anti-SSB antibody production and purpura. PMID:25736842

  4. Progesterone and estradiol exert an inhibitory effect on the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by activated MZ B cells.

    PubMed

    Bommer, I; Muzzio, D O; Zygmunt, M; Jensen, F

    2016-08-01

    The main message of this work is the fact that female sex hormones, progesterone and estradiol, whose levels significantly rise during pregnancy, inhibit the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 with no apparent effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α by activated MZ B cells. This is an important piece of information and helps to better understand how the maternal immune system controls the balance between immune tolerance and immune activation during pregnancy leading to the simultaneously acceptance of the semi-allogeneic fetus and the proper defense of the mother against pathogens during this critical period of time. PMID:27317920

  5. Zinc-mediated regulation of caspases activity: dose-dependent inhibition or activation of caspase-3 in the human Burkitt lymphoma B cells (Ramos).

    PubMed

    Schrantz, N; Auffredou, M T; Bourgeade, M F; Besnault, L; Leca, G; Vazquez, A

    2001-02-01

    Divalent cations, including Zinc and Manganese ions, are important modulators of cell activation. We investigated the ability of these two divalent cations to modulate apoptosis in human Burkitt lymphoma B cells line (Ramos). We found that Zinc (from 10 to 50 microM) inhibited Manganese-induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis of Ramos cells. Higher concentration of Zinc (50 to 100 microM) did not prevent Manganese-mediated apoptosis but rather increased cell death among Ramos cells. This Zinc-mediated cell death was associated with apoptotic features such as cell shrinkage, the presence of phosphatidylserine residues on the outer leaflet of the cells, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Zinc-mediated apoptosis was associated with caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation as revealed by the appearance of active p35 fragment of caspase-9 and p19 and p17 of caspase-3 as well as in vivo cleavage of PARP and of a cell-permeable fluorogenic caspase-3 substrate (Phiphilux-G(1)D(2)). Both Zinc-mediated apoptosis and caspase-3 activation were prevented by the cell-permeable, broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases (zVAD-fmk) or overexpression of bcl-2. In addition, we show that Zinc-induced loss of transmembrane mitochondrial potential is a caspase-independent event, since it is not modified by the presence of zVAD-fmk, which is inhibited by overexpression of bcl-2. These results indicate that depending on its concentration, Zinc can exert opposite effects on caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in human B lymphoma cells: concentrations below 50 microM inhibit caspase-3 activation and apoptosis whereas higher concentrations of Zinc activate a death pathway associated with apoptotic-like features and caspase-3 activation. PMID:11313717

  6. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  7. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  8. Ectopic T Cell Receptor-α Locus Control Region Activity in B Cells Is Suppressed by Direct Linkage to Two Flanking Genes at Once

    PubMed Central

    Andino, Blanca E.; Harrow, Faith; Erhard, Karl F.; Kovalovsky, Damian; Sant'Angelo, Derek B.; Ortiz, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of the TCRα gene are required for the production of the circulating T cell repertoire. Elements of the mouse TCRα locus control region (LCR) play a role in these processes. We previously reported that TCRα LCR DNA supports a gene expression pattern that mimics proper thymus-stage, TCRα gene-like developmental regulation. It also produces transcription of linked reporter genes in peripheral T cells. However, TCRα LCR-driven transgenes display ectopic transcription in B cells in multiple reporter gene systems. The reasons for this important deviation from the normal TCRα gene regulation pattern are unclear. In its natural locus, two genes flank the TCRα LCR, TCRα (upstream) and Dad1 (downstream). We investigated the significance of this gene arrangement to TCRα LCR activity by examining transgenic mice bearing a construct where the LCR was flanked by two separate reporter genes. Surprisingly, the presence of a second, distinct, reporter gene downstream of the LCR virtually eliminated the ectopic B cell expression of the upstream reporter observed in earlier studies. Downstream reporter gene activity was unaffected by the presence of a second gene upstream of the LCR. Our findings indicate that a gene arrangement in which the TCRα LCR is flanked by two distinct transcription units helps to restrict its activity, selectively, on its 5′-flanking gene, the natural TCRα gene position with respect to the LCR. Consistent with these findings, a TCRα/Dad1 locus bacterial artificial chromosome dual-reporter construct did not display the ectopic upstream (TCRα) reporter expression in B cells previously reported for single TCRα transgenes. PMID:21124935

  9. PLD1 activation mediates Amb a 1-induced Th2-associated cytokine expression via the JNK/ATF-2 pathway in BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Hwa; Choi, Hye-Jin; Oh, Cheong-Hae; Oh, Jae-Won; Han, Joong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) in Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression. When BEAS-2B cells were stimulated with Amb a 1, PLD activity increased, and knockdown of PLD1 decreased Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression. Amb a 1 also activated the PLCγ/p70S6K/JNK pathway. Furthermore, Amb a 1-induced PLD activation was also attenuated by PLCγ inhibition, and knockdown of PLD1 decreased Amb a 1-induced activation of P70S6K and JNK. When ATF-2 activity was blocked with ATF-2 siRNA, Amb a 1-induced IL-5 and IL-13 expression was completely abolished, indicating that ATF-2 is a transcriptional factor required for the expression of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to Amb a 1. Taken together, we suggest that PLD1 acts as an important regulator in Amb a 1-induced expression of IL-5 and IL-13 via a PLCγ/p70S6K/JNK/ATF-2 pathway in BEAS-2B cells. PMID:26302934

  10. Identification and validation of a two-gene expression index for subtype classification and prognosis in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghua; Tan, Cong; Ni, Shujuan; Wang, Qifeng; Wu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xun; Meng, Xia; Sheng, Weiqi; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The division of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtypes based on gene expression profiling has proved to be a landmark in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. This study aims to identify a novel biomarker to facilitate the translation of research into clinical practice. Using a training set of 350 patients, we identified a two-gene expression signature, "LIMD1-MYBL1 Index", which is significantly associated with cell-of-origin subtypes and clinical outcome. This two-gene index was further validated in two additional dataset. Tested against the gold standard method, the LIMD1-MYBL1 Index achieved 81% sensitivity, 89% specificity for ABC group and 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity for GCB group. The ABC group had significantly worse overall survival than the GCB group (hazard ratio = 3.5, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the performance of LIMD1-MYBL1 Index was satisfactory compared with common immunohistochemical algorithms. Thus, the LIMD1-MYBL1 Index had considerable clinical value for DLBCL subtype classification and prognosis. Our results might prompt the further development of this two-gene index to a simple assay amenable to routine clinical practice. PMID:25940947

  11. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  12. Activation of B cells by 1 microm particulate lysozyme or peptides: a Th-dependent pathway requiring CD40-CD40 ligand interaction.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, C; Rojas, M; Leclerc, C

    1998-08-01

    Many antigens encountered by the immune system are included in complex structures such as bacteria or parasites. We previously developed an in vivo model to study the immunogenicity of particulate antigens, based on covalent linkage of proteins or peptides to 1 microm latex particles and showed that these antigens cannot be presented to MHC class II-restricted specific T cells by B cells. However, they induce strong CD4+ T cell responses when injected to mice without adjuvant. The present study demonstrates that four out of the five proteins tested did not stimulate antibody synthesis when linked to 1 microm microparticles, although a strong IgG production was induced by the same proteins administered in soluble form with adjuvant. In contrast, lysozyme and two synthetic peptides containing B and T cell viral epitopes induced strong and long-lasting specific antibody responses when linked to 1 micrometer synthetic beads. The isotypic pattern of antibodies induced by particulate lysozyme was similar to that induced by the soluble protein in alum. Studies using CD4+ T cell-depleted mice revealed that the induction of antibodies by particulate lysozyme strictly required Th cell activity. Moreover, the T-B cell cooperation involved in B cell activation by antigens linked to beads required CD40-CD40 ligand interaction. Thus, these particulate antigens provide a useful tool to study the mechanisms of induction of antibody response against complex bacterial or parasitic antigens. Moreover, they may represent attractive candidates to elaborate efficient new vaccines using short synthetic peptides. PMID:9723697

  13. Characterization of a new V gene replacement in the absence of activation-induced cytidine deaminase and its contribution to human B-cell receptor diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Ghamlouch, Hussein; Regnier, Aline; Trudel, Stephanie; Herent, Didier; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Marolleau, Jean Pierre; Gubler, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    In B cells, B-cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulin revision is a common route for modifying unwanted antibody specificities via a mechanism called VH replacement. This in vivo process, mostly affecting heavy-chain rearrangement, involves the replacement of all or part of a previously rearranged IGHV gene with another germline IGHV gene located upstream. Two different mechanisms of IGHV replacement have been reported: type 1, involving the recombination activating genes complex and requiring a framework region 3 internal recombination signal; and type 2, involving an unidentified mechanism different from that of type 1. In the case of light-chain loci, BCR immunoglobulin editing ensures that a second V-J rearrangement occurs. This helps to maintain tolerance, by generating a novel BCR with a new antigenic specificity. We report that human B cells can, surprisingly, undergo type 2 replacement associated with κ light-chain rearrangements. The de novo IGKV-IGKJ products result from the partial replacement of a previously rearranged IGKV gene by a new germline IGKV gene, in-frame and without deletion or addition of nucleotides. There are wrcy/rgyw motifs at the ‘IGKV donor–IGKV recipient chimera junction’ as described for type 2 IGHV replacement, but activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression was not detected. This unusual mechanism of homologous recombination seems to be a variant of gene conversion-like recombination, which does not require AID. The recombination phenomenon described here provides new insight into immunoglobulin locus recombination and BCR immunoglobulin repertoire diversity. PMID:24134819

  14. Therapeutic effects of the artemisinin analog SM934 on lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice via inhibition of TLR-triggered B-cell activation and plasma cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanwei; He, Shijun; Bai, Bingxin; Zhang, Luyao; Xue, Lu; Lin, Zemin; Yang, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Fenghua; He, Peilan; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that SM934, a water-soluble artemisinin derivative, was a viable treatment in murine lupus models. In the current study, we further investigated the therapeutic effects of a modified dosage regimen of SM934 on lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and explored its effects on B cell responses, a central pathogenic event in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When orally administered twice-daily, SM934 significantly prolonged the life-span of MRL/lpr mice, ameliorated the lymphadenopathy symptoms and decreased the levels of serum anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs) and of the pathogenic cytokines IL-6, IL-10 and IL-21. Furthermore, SM934 treatment restored the B-cell compartment in the spleen of MRL/lpr mice by increasing quiescent B cell numbers, maintaining germinal center B-cell numbers, decreasing activated B cell numbers and reducing plasma cell (PC) numbers. Ex vivo, SM934 suppressed the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered activation and proliferation of B cells, as well as antibody secretion. Moreover, the present study demonstrated that SM934 interfered with the B-cell intrinsic pathway by downregulating TLR7/9 mRNA expression, MyD88 protein expression and NF-κB phosphorylation. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), consistent with the results in MRL/lpr mice, SM934 inhibited TLR-associated B-cell activation and PC differentiation. In conclusion, a twice daily dosing regimen of SM934 had therapeutic effects on lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice by suppressing B cell activation and plasma cell formation. PMID:25942599

  15. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Common Molecular Signatures of NF-κB Activation in Canine and Human Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Manikhandan A. V.; Haggart, Ross D.; Miele, Gino; Sellar, Grant; Tan, Karen A. L.; Goodlad, John R.; Milne, Elspeth; Vail, David M.; Kurzman, Ilene

    2013-01-01

    We present the first comparison of global transcriptional changes in canine and human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with particular reference to the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Microarray data generated from canine DLBCL and normal lymph nodes were used for differential expression, co-expression and pathway analyses, and compared with analysis of microarray data from human healthy and DLBCL lymph nodes. The comparisons at gene level were performed by mapping the probesets in canine microarrays to orthologous genes in humans and vice versa. A considerable number of differentially expressed genes between canine lymphoma and healthy lymph node samples were also found differentially expressed between human DLBCL and healthy lymph node samples. Principal component analysis using a literature-derived NF-κB target gene set mapped to orthologous canine array probesets and human array probesets clearly separated the healthy and cancer samples in both datasets. The analysis demonstrated that for both human and canine DLBCL there is activation of the NF-κB/p65 canonical pathway, indicating that canine lymphoma could be used as a model to study NF-κB-targeted therapeutics for human lymphoma. To validate this, tissue arrays were generated for canine and human NHL and immunohistochemistry was employed to assess NF-κB activation status. In addition, human and canine B-cell lymphoma lines were assessed for NF-κB activity and the effects of NF-κB inhibition. PMID:24023754

  16. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  17. Targeting netrin-1/DCC interaction in diffuse large B-cell and mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Broutier, Laura; Creveaux, Marion; Vial, Jonathan; Tortereau, Antonin; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Chazot, Guillaume; McCarron, Mark J; Léon, Sophie; Pangault, Céline; Gadot, Nicolas; Colombe, Amélie; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Blachier, Jonathan; Marie, Julien C; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Donzé, Olivier; Chassagne-Clément, Catherine; Salles, Gilles; Tarte, Karin; Mehlen, Patrick; Castets, Marie

    2016-02-01

    DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma) has been demonstrated to constrain tumor progression by inducing apoptosis unless engaged by its ligand netrin-1. This has been shown in breast and colorectal cancers; however, this tumor suppressive function in other cancers is not established. Using a transgenic mouse model, we report here that inhibition of DCC-induced apoptosis is associated with lymphomagenesis. In human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), an imbalance of the netrin-1/DCC ratio suggests a loss of DCC-induced apoptosis, either via a decrease in DCC expression in germinal center subtype or by up-regulation of netrin-1 in activated B-cell (ABC) one. Such imbalance is also observed in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Using a netrin-1 interfering antibody, we demonstrate both in vitro and in vivo that netrin-1 acts as a survival factor for ABC-DLBCL and MCL tumor cells. Together, these data suggest that interference with the netrin-1/DCC interaction could represent a promising therapeutic strategy in netrin-1-positive DLBCL and MCL. PMID:26882243

  18. Analyses and comparisons of telomerase activity and telomere length in human T and B cells: Insights for epidemiology of telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jue; Epel, Elissa; Cheon, Joshua; Kroenke, Candyce; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Bigos, Marty; Wolkowitz, Owen; Mellon, Synthia; Blackburn, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are the DNA–protein complexes that protect the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. The cellular enzyme telomerase counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric DNA. A growing body of literature links shorter telomere length and lower telomerase activity with various age-related diseases and earlier mortality. Thus, leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and telomerase activity are emerging both as biomarkers and contributing factors for age-related diseases. However, no clinical study has directly examined telomerase activity and telomere length in different lymphocyte subtypes isolated from the same donors, which could offer insight into the summary measure of leukocyte telomere maintenance. We report the first quantitative data in humans examining both levels of telomerase activity and telomere length in four lymphocyte subpopulations from the same donors—CD4+, CD8+CD28+ and CD8+CD28− T cells and B cells, as well as total PBMCs—in a cohort of healthy women. We found that B cells had the highest telomerase activity and longest telomere length; CD4+ T cells had slightly higher telomerase activity than CD8+CD28+ T cells, and similar telomere length. Consistent with earlier reports that CD8+CD28−T cells are replicatively senescent cells, they had the lowest telomerase activity and shortest telomere length. In addition, a higher percentage of CD8+CD28− T cells correlated with shorter total PBMC TL (r = −0.26, p = 0.05). Interestingly, telomerase activities of CD4+ and CD8+CD28+ T cells from the same individual were strongly correlated (r = 0.55, r < 0.001), indicating possible common mechanisms for telomerase activity regulation in these two cell subtypes. These data will facilitate the understanding of leukocyte aging and its relationship to human health. PMID:19837074

  19. Central nervous system infiltrates are characterized by features of ongoing B cell-related immune activity in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Batoulis, Helena; Wunsch, Marie; Birkenheier, Johannes; Rottlaender, Andrea; Gorboulev, Valentin; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) lymphoid follicle-like aggregates have been reported in the meninges of patients. Here we investigated the functional relevance of B cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. In chronic EAE, B cell aggregates were characterized by the presence of CXCL13(+) and germinal center CD10(+) B cells. Germline transcripts were expressed in the CNS and particularly related to TH17-associated isotypes. We also observed B cells with restricted VH gene usage that differed from clones found in the spleen. Finally, we detected CNS-restricted spreading of the antigen-specific B cell response towards a myelin and a neuronal autoantigen. These data imply the development of autonomous B cell-mediated autoimmunity in the CNS in EAE - a concept that might also apply to MS itself. PMID:25796192

  20. Semi-synthesis of biologically active nisin hybrids composed of the native lanthionine ABC-fragment and a cross-stapled synthetic DE-fragment.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Peters, Nienke; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin is a promising template for designing novel peptide-based antibiotics to improve its drug-like properties. First steps in that direction represent the synthesis of hybrid nisin derivatives that contain a native nisin ABC-part and synthesized cross-stapled DE-ring fragments and are described here. The biological activity of the newly synthesized nisin derivatives was evaluated in order to compare the bioactivity of the synthetic DE-ring containing mimic and native lanthionine-bridged DE-ring containing nisin. The native nisin ABC-ring system was obtained via chymotrypsin digestion of full-length nisin, and was subsequently functionalized at the C-terminal carboxylate with two different amino alkyne moieties. Next, nisin hybrids were successfully prepared using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition 'click' chemistry by chemo-selective ligation of the ABC-alkyne with the N-terminal azido functionalized dicarba-DE ring mimic. The newly synthesized compounds were active as potent lipid II binders and retained antimicrobial activity in a growth inhibition assay. However, pore formation was not observed, possibly either due to the different character of the 'staples' as compared to the parent sulfides, or due to the triazole moiety as a sub-optimal amide bond isostere. PMID:25199583

  1. PI3 Kinase and FOXO1 Transcription Factor Activity Differentially Control B Cells in the Germinal Center Light and Dark Zones.

    PubMed

    Sander, Sandrine; Chu, Van Trung; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Franklin, Andrew; Graf, Robin; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Li, Shuang; Imami, Koshi; Selbach, Matthias; Di Virgilio, Michela; Bullinger, Lars; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 3' OH kinase (PI3K) signaling and FOXO transcription factors play opposing roles at several B cell developmental stages. We show here abundant nuclear FOXO1 expression in the proliferative compartment of the germinal center (GC), its dark zone (DZ), and PI3K activity, downregulating FOXO1, in the light zone (LZ), where cells are selected for further differentiation. In the LZ, however, FOXO1 was expressed in a fraction of cells destined for DZ reentry. Upon FOXO1 ablation or induction of PI3K activity, GCs lost their DZ, owing at least partly to downregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Although this prevented proper cyclic selection of cells in GCs, somatic hypermutation and proliferation were maintained. Class switch recombination was partly lost due to a failure of switch region targeting by activation-induced deaminase (AID). PMID:26620760

  2. CD47 Agonist Peptides Induce Programmed Cell Death in Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells via PLCγ1 Activation: Evidence from Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Attout, Tarik; Boullet, Heloïse; Herbi, Linda; Vela, Laura; Barbier, Sandrine; Chateau, Danielle; Chapiro, Elise; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Davi, Frédéric; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Moumné, Roba; Sarfati, Marika; Karoyan, Philippe; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Launay, Pierre; Susin, Santos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common adulthood leukemia, is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal CD5+ B lymphocytes, which results in a progressive failure of the immune system. Despite intense research efforts, drug resistance remains a major cause of treatment failure in CLL, particularly in patients with dysfunctional TP53. The objective of our work was to identify potential approaches that might overcome CLL drug refractoriness by examining the pro-apoptotic potential of targeting the cell surface receptor CD47 with serum-stable agonist peptides. Methods and Findings In peripheral blood samples collected from 80 patients with CLL with positive and adverse prognostic features, we performed in vitro genetic and molecular analyses that demonstrate that the targeting of CD47 with peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of thrombospondin-1 efficiently kills the malignant CLL B cells, including those from high-risk individuals with a dysfunctional TP53 gene, while sparing the normal T and B lymphocytes from the CLL patients. Further studies reveal that the differential response of normal B lymphocytes, collected from 20 healthy donors, and leukemic B cells to CD47 peptide targeting results from the sustained activation in CLL B cells of phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLCγ1), a protein that is significantly over-expressed in CLL. Once phosphorylated at tyrosine 783, PLCγ1 enables a Ca2+-mediated, caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathway that is not down-modulated by the lymphocyte microenvironment. Accordingly, down-regulation of PLCγ1 or pharmacological inhibition of PLCγ1 phosphorylation abolishes CD47-mediated killing. Additionally, in a CLL-xenograft model developed in NOD/scid gamma mice, we demonstrate that the injection of CD47 agonist peptides reduces tumor burden without inducing anemia or toxicity in blood, liver, or kidney. The limitations of our study are mainly linked to the affinity of the peptides

  3. The ABC of Physical Activity for Health: a consensus statement from the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Gary; Blazevich, Anthony J; Boreham, Colin; Cooper, Ashley R; Crank, Helen; Ekelund, Ulf; Fox, Kenneth R; Gately, Paul; Giles-Corti, Billie; Gill, Jason M R; Hamer, Mark; McDermott, Ian; Murphy, Marie; Mutrie, Nanette; Reilly, John J; Saxton, John M; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health is constantly evolving. Therefore, the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences convened a panel of experts to review the literature and produce guidelines that health professionals might use. In the ABC of Physical Activity for Health, A is for All healthy adults, B is for Beginners, and C is for Conditioned individuals. All healthy adults aged 18-65 years should aim to take part in at least 150 min of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, or at least 75 min of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or equivalent combinations of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Moderate-intensity activities are those in which heart rate and breathing are raised, but it is possible to speak comfortably. Vigorous-intensity activities are those in which heart rate is higher, breathing is heavier, and conversation is harder. Aerobic activities should be undertaken in bouts of at least 10 min and, ideally, should be performed on five or more days a week. All healthy adults should also perform muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week. Weight training, circuit classes, yoga, and other muscle-strengthening activities offer additional health benefits and may help older adults to maintain physical independence. Beginners should work steadily towards meeting the physical activity levels recommended for all healthy adults. Even small increases in activity will bring some health benefits in the early stages and it is important to set achievable goals that provide success, build confidence, and increase motivation. For example, a beginner might be asked to walk an extra 10 min every other day for several weeks to slowly reach the recommended levels of activity for all healthy adults. It is also critical that beginners find activities they enjoy and gain support in becoming more active from family and friends. Conditioned individuals who have met the physical

  4. ABC Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-14

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: `Provide a weapon`s grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon`s grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.` This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments.

  5. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  6. Mutational Analysis of Cvab, an ABC Transporter Involved in the Secretion of Active Colicin V

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Phang C.

    2012-01-01

    CvaB is the central membrane transporter of the colicin V secretion system that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Previous data showed that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CvaB are essential for the function of CvaB. N-terminal domain of CvaB possesses Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteolytic activity, and two critical residues, Cys32 and His105, have been identified. In this study, we also identify Asp121 as being the third residue of the putative catalytic triad within the active site of the enzyme. The Asp121 mutants lose both their colicin V secretion activity and N-terminal proteolytic activity. The adjacent residue Pro122 also appears to play a critical role in the colicin V secretion. However, the reversal of the two residues D121P - P122D results in loss of activity. Based on molecular modeling and protein sequence alignment, several residues adjacent to the critical residues, Cys32 and His105, were also examined and characterized. Site-directed mutagenesis of Trp101, Asp102, Val108, Leu76, Gly77, and Gln26 indicate that the neighboring residues around the catalytic triad affect colicin V secretion. Several mutated CvaB proteins with defective secretion were also tested, including Asp121 and Pro122, and were found to be structurally stable. These results indicate that the residues surrounding the identified catalytic triad are functionally involved in the secretion of biologically active colicin V. PMID:22539970

  7. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; Xu, Kailin

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys(38) to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. PMID:25979358

  8. Super-SILAC Allows Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Subtypes by Their Protein Expression Profiles*

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Sally J.; D'Souza, Rochelle C. J.; Cox, Jürgen; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Correct classification of cancer patients into subtypes is a prerequisite for acute diagnosis and effective treatment. Currently this classification relies mainly on histological assessment, but gene expression analysis by microarrays has shown great promise. Here we show that high accuracy, quantitative proteomics can robustly segregate cancer subtypes directly at the level of expressed proteins. We investigated two histologically indistinguishable subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): activated B-cell-like (ABC) and germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) subtypes, by first developing a general lymphoma stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) mix from heavy stable isotope-labeled cell lines. This super-SILAC mix was combined with cell lysates from five ABC-DLBCL and five GCB-DLBCL cell lines. Shotgun proteomic analysis on a linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy at the MS and MS/MS levels yielded a proteome of more than 7,500 identified proteins. High accuracy of quantification allowed robust separation of subtypes by principal component analysis. The main contributors to the classification included proteins known to be differentially expressed between the subtypes such as the transcription factors IRF4 and SPI1/PU.1, cell surface markers CD44 and CD27, as well as novel candidates. We extracted a signature of 55 proteins that segregated subtypes and contained proteins connected to functional differences between the ABC and GCB-DLBCL subtypes, including many NF-κB-regulated genes. Shortening the analysis time to single-shot analysis combined with use of the new linear quadrupole Orbitrap analyzer (Q Exactive) also clearly differentiated between the subtypes. These results show that high resolution shotgun proteomics combined with super-SILAC-based quantification is a promising new technology for tumor characterization and classification. PMID:22442255

  9. B cells and immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Quách, Tâm D; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-02-01

    Work from multiple groups continues to provide additional evidence for the powerful and highly diverse roles, both protective and pathogenic, that B cells play in autoimmune diseases. Similarly, it has become abundantly clear that antibody-independent functions may account for the opposing influences that B cells exercise over other arms of the immune response and ultimately over autoimmunity itself. Finally, it is becoming apparent that the clinical impact of B-cell depletion therapy may be, to a large extent, determined by the functional balance between different B-cell subsets that may be generated by this therapeutic intervention. In this review, we postulate that our perspective of B-cell tolerance and our experimental approach to its understanding are fundamentally changed by this view of B cells. Accordingly, we first discuss current knowledge of B-cell tolerance conventionally defined as the censoring of autoantibody-producing B cells (with an emphasis on human B cells). Therefore, we discuss a different model that contemplates B cells not only as targets of tolerance but also as mediators of tolerance. This model is based on the notion that the onset of clinical autoimmune disease may require a B-cell gain-of-pathogenic function (or a B-cell loss-of-regulatory-function) and that accordingly, disease remission may depend on the restoration of the physiological balance between B-cell pathogenic and protective functions. PMID:19148217

  10. Identification of IFN-γ-producing innate B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yan; Liu, Xingguang; Han, Chaofeng; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Bin; Zhang, Qian; Gu, Yan; Hou, Jin; Qian, Li; Qian, Cheng; Han, Huanxing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells play important roles in the humoral immune response and the regulation of adaptive immunity, B cell subpopulations with unique phenotypes, particularly those with non-classical immune functions, should be further investigated. By challenging mice with Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, vesicular stomatitis virus and Toll-like receptor ligands, we identified an inducible CD11ahiFcγRIIIhi B cell subpopulation that is significantly expanded and produces high levels of IFN-γ during the early stage of the immune response. This subpopulation of B cells can promote macrophage activation via generating IFN-γ, thereby facilitating the innate immune response against intracellular bacterial infection. As this new subpopulation is of B cell origin and exhibits the phenotypic characteristics of B cells, we designated these cells as IFN-γ-producing innate B cells. Dendritic cells were essential for the inducible generation of these innate B cells from the follicular B cells via CD40L-CD40 ligation. Increased Bruton's tyrosine kinase activation was found to be responsible for the increased activation of non-canonical NF-κB pathway in these innate B cells after CD40 ligation, with the consequent induction of additional IFN-γ production. The identification of this new population of innate B cells may contribute to a better understanding of B cell functions in anti-infection immune responses and immune regulation. PMID:24296781

  11. Tumor-released autophagosomes induce IL-10-producing B cells with suppressive activity on T lymphocytes via TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meng; Wen, Zhifa; Cheng, Feng; Ma, Jie; Li, Weixia; Ren, Hongyan; Sheng, Yemeng; Dong, Huixia; Lu, Liwei; Hu, Hong-Ming; Wang, Li-Xin

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that tumor cells can release autophagosomes, which transport a broad array of biologically active molecules with potential modulatory effects on immune cell functions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of tumor cells-released autophagosomes (i.e. TRAP) in regulating B cell differentiation and function. TRAPs from murine tumor cell lines were found to induce splenic B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) with a distinct phenotype of CD1d(+) CD5(+), which could potently inhibit CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses in IL-10-depedent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, adoptive transfer of TRAP-induced Bregs abrogated the immune response and antitumor effect induced by OVA-loaded DC vaccinations in E.G7-OVA-bearing mouse model. Mechanistic studies revealed that membrane-bound high-mobility group B1 (HMGB1) on the intact TRAPs was crucial for inducing Breg differentiation via the activation of TLR2-MyD88-NF-κB signal pathway in B cells. Moreover, TRAPs enriched from malignant effusions of cancer patients could induce human B cells to differentiate into IL-10-producing B cells with immunoregulatory functions, the frequency of which were positively correlated with the HMGB1 levels on TRAPs. Together, our findings have demonstrated that TRAPs promote the generation of IL-10(+) Bregs, which may contribute to the suppression of antitumor immunity. PMID:27622036

  12. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  13. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  14. De novo CD5+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Adverse outcomes with and without stem cell transplantation in a large, multicenter, rituximab treated cohort.

    PubMed

    Alinari, Lapo; Gru, Alejandro; Quinion, Carl; Huang, Ying; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Poston, Jacqueline; Venkataraman, Girish; Oak, Eunhye; Kreisel, Friederike; Park, Steven I; Matthews, Stephanie; Abramson, Jeremy S; Iris Lim, Hana; Martin, Peter; Cohen, Jonathon B; Evens, Andrew; Al-Mansour, Zeina; Singavi, Arun; Fenske, Timothy S; Blum, Kristie A

    2016-06-01

    De novo CD5+ diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are a distinct subgroup of DLBCL with poor prognosis. However the role of rituximab-containing therapy and salvage stem cell transplantation in this patients' population remain to be defined. We retrospectively reviewed clinical features and outcomes of 102 patients with de novo CD5+ DLBCL treated with rituximab-containing therapy at nine different institutions. By Hans' criteria, 64 patients had activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, 24 germinal center B-cell (GCB) subtype, and 14 were not evaluated. No patients had a myc translocation. Eighty-three patients were treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-CHOP), 7 with rituximab, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-EPOCH), and 6 with R-CHOP with methotrexate, 3 g/m(2) . The overall response rate to front-line therapy was 85%. The 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 40 and 65%, respectively. The 3-year PFS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 34 and 45%, respectively. The 3-year OS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 62 and 67%, respectively. The median time to second treatment failure was 3 months and 1 month for ABC- and GCB-subtypes, respectively. Twenty of 28 (71%) transplanted patients with autologous, allogeneic, or both, relapsed. This study confirms the poor prognosis of de novo CD5+ DLBCL in a large multi-center cohort despite initial rituximab-containing chemotherapy and suggests that stem cell transplantation fails to salvage the majority of these patients. Approaches to prevent recurrence and/or novel therapies for relapsed disease are needed for this subgroup of DLBCL patients. PMID:26800311

  15. CD40-Activated B Cell Cancer Vaccine Improves Second Clinical Remission and Survival in Privately Owned Dogs with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Erika; Coughlin, Christina M.; Overley, Beth; Gregor, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based active immunotherapy for cancer is a promising novel strategy, with the first dendritic cell (DC) vaccine achieving regulatory approval for clinical use last year. Manufacturing remains arduous, especially for DC vaccines, and the prospect of using cell-based immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting or in combination with chemotherapy remains largely untested. Here, we used a comparative oncology approach to test the safety and potential efficacy of tumor RNA-loaded, CD40-activated B cells in privately owned dogs presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a clinical scenario that represents not only a major problem in veterinary medicine but also a bona fide spontaneous animal model for the human condition. When administered to NHL dogs in remission after induction chemotherapy, CD40-B cells electroporated ex vivo with autologous tumor RNA safely stimulated immunity in vivo. Although chemotherapy plus CD40-B vaccination did not improve time-to-progression or lymphoma-specific survival compared to dogs treated with chemotherapy alone, vaccination potentiated the effects of salvage therapy and improved the rate of durable second remissions as well as subsequent lymphoma-specific survival following salvage therapy. Several of these relapsed dogs are now long-term survivors and free of disease for more than a year. Overall, these clinical and immunological results suggest that cell-based CD40 cancer vaccination is safe and synergizes with chemotherapy to improve clinical outcome in canine NHL. More broadly, our findings underscore the unique value of clinical investigations in tumor-bearing companion animals. PMID:21904611

  16. Generation of Recombination Activating Gene-1-Deficient Neonatal Piglets: A Model of T and B Cell Deficient Severe Combined Immune Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuya; Sendai, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Seki-Soma, Marie; Hirose, Kensuke; Watanabe, Motoo; Fukawa, Kazuo; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Although severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a very important research model for mice and SCID mice are widely used, there are only few reports describing the SCID pig models. Therefore, additional research in this area is needed. In this study, we describe the generation of Recombination activating gene-1 (Rag-1)-deficient neonatal piglets in Duroc breed using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with gene targeting and analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histology. We constructed porcine Rag-1 gene targeting vectors for the Exon 2 region and obtained heterozygous/homozygous Rag-1 knockout cell colonies using SCNT. We generated two Rag-1-deficient neonatal piglets and compared them with wild-type neonatal piglets. FACS analysis showed that Rag-1 disruption causes a lack of Immunoglobulin M-positive B cells and CD3-positive T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Consistent with FACS analysis, histological analysis revealed structural defects and an absence of mature lymphocytes in the spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLNs), and thymus in Rag-1-deficient piglets. These results confirm that Rag-1 is necessary for the generation of lymphocytes in pigs, and Rag-1-deficient piglets exhibit a T and B cell deficient SCID (T-B-SCID) phenotype similar to that of rodents and humans. The T-B-SCID pigs with Rag-1 deficiency generated in this study could be a suitably versatile model for laboratory, translational, and biomedical research, including the development of a humanized model and assessment of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25437445

  17. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, Erin K.; Schrader, Carol E.; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID. PMID:26263206

  18. Gene expression-based risk score in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bret, Caroline; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jérôme

    2012-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and displays heterogeneous clinical and molecular characteristics. In this study, high throughput gene expression profiling of DLBCL tumor samples was used to design a 12-gene expression-based risk score (GERS) predictive for patient's overall survival. GERS allowed identifying a high-risk group comprising 46,4% of the DLBCL patients in two independent cohorts (n=414 and n=69). GERS was shown to be an independent predictor of survival when compared to the previously published prognostic factors, including the International Prognostic Index (IPI). GERS displayed a prognostic value in germinal-center B-cell-like subgroup (GCB) and activated B cell-like (ABC) molecular subgroups of patients as well as in DLBCL patients treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) or rituximab-CHOP (R-CHOP) regimens. Combination of GERS and IPI lead to a potent prognostic classification of DLBCL patients. Finally, a genomic instability gene signature was highlighted in gene expression profiles of patients belonging to the high-risk GERS-defined group. PMID:23482333

  19. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  20. CD38 expression labels an activated subset within chronic lymphocytic leukemia clones enriched in proliferating B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Temburni, Sonal; Calissano, Carlo; Yancopoulos, Sophia; Banapour, Taraneh; Sison, Cristina; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are thought to have diminished cell-cycling capacity, a view challenged by their phenotypic resemblance to activated human B lymphocytes. The present study addresses the cell-cycling status of CLL cells, focusing on those leukemic cells expressing CD38, a molecule involved in signaling and activation that also serves as a prognostic marker in this disease. CD38+ and CD38− members of individual CLL clones were analyzed for coexpression of molecules associated with cellular activation (CD27, CD62L, and CD69), cell-cycle entry (Ki-67), signaling (ZAP-70), and protection from apoptosis (telomerase and Bcl-2). Regardless of the size of the CD38+ fraction within a CLL clone, CD38+ subclones are markedly enriched for expression of Ki-67, ZAP-70, human telomerase reverse transcriptase, and telomerase activity. Although the percentage of cells (approximately 2%) entering the cell cycle as defined by Ki-67 expression is small, the absolute number within a clone can be sizeable and is contained primarily within the CD38+ fraction. Despite these activation/proliferation differences, both CD38+ and CD38− fractions have similar telomere lengths, suggesting that CD38 expression is dynamic and transient. These findings may help explain why high percentages of CD38+ cells within clones are associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:17684154

  1. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  2. Applying the ABCs in provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Seema

    2012-11-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) is an accounting technique designed to guard against potentially serious financial problems that can arise when an organization's accounting costs deviate significantly from its actual costs. In general, an ABC analysis considers two factors: a cost element (a directly measurable unit of cost, such as the cost of an item) and a cost driver (a directly measurable feature of the service, such as how often the item is used). ABC is best applied to specific service areas, orservice packages, for which consumption of resources is largely predictable and atomic units of services can be accurately identified. PMID:23173369

  3. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects. PMID:24297686

  4. Oncogenic CARMA1 couples NF-κB and β-catenin signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bognar, M K; Vincendeau, M; Erdmann, T; Seeholzer, T; Grau, M; Linnemann, J R; Ruland, J; Scheel, C H; Lenz, P; Ott, G; Lenz, G; Hauck, S M; Krappmann, D

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the antiapoptotic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a hallmark of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Recurrent oncogenic mutations are found in the scaffold protein CARMA1 (CARD11) that connects B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling to the canonical NF-κB pathway. We asked how far additional downstream processes are activated and contribute to the oncogenic potential of DLBCL-derived CARMA1 mutants. To this end, we expressed oncogenic CARMA1 in the NF-κB negative DLBCL lymphoma cell line BJAB. By a proteomic approach we identified recruitment of β-catenin and its destruction complex consisting of APC, AXIN1, CK1α and GSK3β to oncogenic CARMA1. Recruitment of the β-catenin destruction complex was independent of CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 complex formation or constitutive NF-κB activation and promoted the stabilization of β-catenin. The β-catenin destruction complex was also recruited to CARMA1 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which coincided with elevated β-catenin expression. In line, β-catenin was frequently detected in non-GCB DLBCL biopsies that rely on chronic BCR signaling. Increased β-catenin amounts alone were not sufficient to induce classical WNT target gene signatures, but could augment TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activation in response to WNT signaling. In conjunction with NF-κB, β-catenin enhanced expression of immunosuppressive interleukin-10 and suppressed antitumoral CCL3, indicating that β-catenin can induce a favorable tumor microenvironment. Thus, parallel activation of NF-κB and β-catenin signaling by gain-of-function mutations in CARMA1 augments WNT stimulation and is required for regulating the expression of distinct NF-κB target genes to trigger cell-intrinsic and extrinsic processes that promote DLBCL lymphomagenesis. PMID:26776161

  5. Threshold Levels of Gfi1 Maintain E2A Activity for B Cell Commitment via Repression of Id1

    PubMed Central

    Fraszczak, Jennifer; Helness, Anne; Chen, Riyan; Vadnais, Charles; Robert, François; Khandanpour, Cyrus; Möröy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    A regulatory circuit that controls myeloid versus B lymphoid cell fate in hematopoietic progenitors has been proposed, in which a network of the transcription factors Egr1/2, Nab, Gfi1 and PU.1 forms the core element. Here we show that a direct link between Gfi1, the transcription factor E2A and its inhibitor Id1 is a critical element of this regulatory circuit. Our data suggest that a certain threshold of Gfi1 is required to gauge E2A activity by adjusting levels of Id1 in multipotent progenitors, which are the first bipotential myeloid/lymphoid-restricted progeny of hematopoietic stem cells. If Gfi1 levels are high, Id1 is repressed enabling E2A to activate a specific set of B lineage genes by binding to regulatory elements for example the IL7 receptor gene. If Gfi1 levels fall below a threshold, Id1 expression increases and renders E2A unable to function, which prevents hematopoietic progenitors from engaging along the B lymphoid lineage. PMID:27467586

  6. The novel receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is constitutively active in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acts as a docking site of nonreceptor kinases: implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Secreto, Charla; Boysen, Justin; Sassoon, Traci; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Kay, Neil E.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we detected that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cell–derived microvesicles in CLL plasma carry a constitutively phosphorylated novel receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), Axl, indicating that Axl was acquired from the leukemic B cells. To examine Axl status in CLL, we determined the expression of phosphorylated-Axl (P-Axl) in freshly isolated CLL B cells by Western blot analysis. We detected differential levels of P-Axl in CLL B cells, and further analysis showed that expression of P-Axl was correlated with the other constitutively phosphorylated kinases, including Lyn, phosphoinositide-3 kinase, SyK/ζ-associated protein of 70 kDa, phospholipase C γ2 in CLL B cells. We found that these intracellular signaling molecules were complexed with P-Axl in primary CLL B cells. When Axl and Src kinases were targeted by a Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, bosutinib (SKI-606), or a specific-inhibitor of Axl (R428), robust induction of CLL B-cell apoptosis was observed in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Therefore, we have identified a novel RTK in CLL B cells which appears to work as a docking site for multiple non-RTKs and drives leukemic cell survival signals. These findings highlight a unique target for CLL treatment. PMID:21135257

  7. Enhanced activation of an amino-terminally truncated isoform of the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 enriched in malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hondares, Elayne; Brown, Mark Adrian; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Taubert, Christina; Bhamrah, Mandeep K.; Coe, David; Marelli-Berg, Federica; Gribben, John G.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Capasso, Melania

    2014-01-01

    HVCN1 (Hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1) is the only mammalian voltage-gated proton channel. In human B lymphocytes, HVCN1 associates with the B-cell receptor (BCR) and is required for optimal BCR signaling and redox control. HVCN1 is expressed in malignant B cells that rely on BCR signaling, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. However, little is known about its regulation in these cells. We found that HVCN1 was expressed in B cells as two protein isoforms. The shorter isoform (HVCN1S) was enriched in B cells from a cohort of 76 CLL patients. When overexpressed in a B-cell lymphoma line, HVCN1S responded more profoundly to protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation. This more potent enhanced gating response was mediated by increased phosphorylation of the same residue responsible for enhanced gating in HVCN1L, Thr29. Furthermore, the association of HVCN1S with the BCR was weaker, which resulted in its diminished internalization upon BCR stimulation. Finally, HVCN1S conferred a proliferative and migratory advantage as well as enhanced BCR-dependent signaling. Overall, our data show for the first time, to our knowledge, the existence of a shorter isoform of HVCN1 with enhanced gating that is specifically enriched in malignant B cells. The properties of HVCN1S suggest that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of BCR-dependent B-cell malignancies. PMID:25425665

  8. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  9. Roles of MAPK Pathway Activation During Cytokine Induction in BEAS-2B Cells Exposed to Fine World Trade Center (WTC) Dust

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Prophete, Colette; Soukup, Joleen M.; Chen, Lung-chi; Costa, Max; Ghio, Andrew; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Haobin

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse on September 11, 2001 released copious amounts of particulate matter into the atmosphere of New York City. Follow-up studies on persons exposed to the dusts have revealed a severely increased rate for asthma and other respiratory illnesses. There have only been a few studies that have sought to discern the possible mechanisms underlying these untoward pathologies. In one study, an increased cytokine release was detected in cells exposed to WTC fine dusts (PM2.5 fraction or WTC2.5). However, the mechanism(s) for these increases has yet to be fully defined. Because activation of the MAPK signaling pathways is known to cause cytokine induction, the current study was undertaken to analyze the possible involvement of these pathways in any increased cytokine formation by lung epithelial cells (as BEAS-2B cells) exposed to WTC2.5. Our results showed that exposure to WTC2.5 for 5 hr increased IL-6 mRNA expression in BEAS-2B cells, as well as its protein levels in the culture media, in a dose-dependent manner. Besides IL-6, Cytokine Multiplex analyses revealed that formation of IL-8 and -10 was also elevated by the exposure. Both ERK and p38, but not JNK, signaling pathways were found to be activated in cells exposed to WTC2.5. Inactivation of ERK signaling pathways by PD98059 effectively blocked IL-6, -8, and -10 induction by WTC2.5; the p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 significantly decreased induction of IL-8 and -10. Together, our data demonstrated activation of MAPK signaling pathway(s) likely played an important role in the WTC2.5-induced formation of several inflammatory (and, subsequently, anti-inflammatory) cytokines. The results are important in that they help to define one mechanism via which the WTC dusts may have acted to cause the documented increases in asthma and other inflammation-associated respiratory dysfunctions in the individuals exposed to the dusts released from the WTC collapse. PMID:20731619

  10. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  11. CX3CR1(+) B Cells Show Immune Suppressor Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The immune regulatory functions of B cells are not fully understood yet. The present study aims to characterize a subtype of B cells that expresses CX3CR1. In this study, peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with food allergies and healthy subjects. Peripheral B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. T cell proliferation was assessed by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assay. The results showed that the CX3CR1+ B cells were detected in the peripheral blood samples of healthy subjects and were significantly less in patients with food allergies. CX3CR1+ B cells expressed high levels of TGF-β and integrin αvβ6. CX3CR1+ B cells could efficiently suppress other effector CD4+ T cell activation. We conclude that human peripheral CX3CR1+ B cells have immune suppressor properties. PMID:24970890

  12. Septin4_i1 regulates apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/Akt/B-cell lymphoma 2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Jianxin; Sun, Xiaolei; Chen, Jinling; Duan, Yinong; Pan, Jing; Xu, Tianhua; Qin, Yongwei; He, Xingxin; Huang, Caiqun

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has been verified as a potential mechanism to aid in hepatic fibrosis remission. Earlier research suggests that Septin4_i1 may sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of Septin4_i1 on HSC apoptosis and explore the associated signaling pathways. We found that Septin4_i1 can induce apoptosis in LX-2 cells and that this is accompanied by an up-regulation in cleaved-caspase-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression and a down-regulation in α-SMA expression. Over-expression of Septin4_i1 reduced phosphorylated Akt and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression but had no effect on the expression of p53 and death receptor (DR)-5. The decreased expression of Bcl-2 and the increased expression of cleaved-caspase-3 induced by Sept4_i1 could be reversed by GW501516, a PPAR-β/δ agonist that has been reported by others to enhance Akt signaling. In addition, GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, could also inhibit apoptosis in LX-2 cells induced by Sept4_i1. In conclusion, our data suggest that Sept4_i1 induces HSC apoptosis by inhibiting Akt and Bcl-2 expression and up-regulating PPAR-γ expression. PMID:25527525

  13. Circulating Th1 cell-type Tfh cells that exhibit impaired B cell help are preferentially activated during acute malaria in children

    PubMed Central

    Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M.; Yazew, Takele B.; Skinner, Jeff; Li, Shanping; Jain, Aarti; Felgner, Philip L.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria-specific antibody responses are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated bouts of febrile malaria. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this apparent immune deficiency are poorly understood. Recently, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells have been shown to play a critical role in generating long-lived antibody responses. We show that Malian children have resting PD-1+CXCR5+CD4+ Tfh cells in circulation that resemble germinal center Tfh cells phenotypically and functionally. Within this population PD-1+CXCR5+CXCR3− Tfh cells are superior to Th1-polarized PD-1+CXCR5+CXCR3+ Tfh cells in helping B cells. Longitudinally, we observed that malaria drives Th1 cytokine responses, and accordingly, the less functional Th1-polarized Tfh subset was preferentially activated and its activation did not correlate with antibody responses. These data provide insights into the Tfh cell biology underlying suboptimal antibody responses to malaria in children, and suggest that vaccine strategies that promote CXCR3− Tfh cell responses may improve malaria vaccine efficacy. PMID:26440897

  14. Hypermorphic mutation of phospholipase C, γ2 acquired in ibrutinib-resistant CLL confers BTK independency upon B-cell receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Ming; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Zhong, Yiming; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Dong, Shuai; Strattan, Ethan; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Flynn, Joseph; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Maddocks, Kami; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Byrd, John C.; Dubovsky, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib has significantly improved the outcome of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Recent reports attribute ibrutinib resistance to acquired mutations in Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK), the target of ibrutinib, as well as the immediate downstream effector phospholipase C, γ2 (PLCG2). Although the C481S mutation found in BTK has been shown to disable ibrutinib’s capacity to irreversibly bind this primary target, the detailed mechanisms of mutations in PLCG2 have yet to be established. Herein, we characterize the enhanced signaling competence, BTK independence, and surface immunoglobulin dependence of the PLCG2 mutation at R665W, which has been documented in ibrutinib-resistant CLL. Our data demonstrate that this missense alteration elicits BTK-independent activation after B-cell receptor engagement, implying the formation of a novel BTK-bypass pathway. Consistent with previous results, PLCG2R665W confers hypermorphic induction of downstream signaling events. Our studies reveal that proximal kinases SYK and LYN are critical for the activation of mutant PLCG2 and that therapeutics targeting SYK and LYN can combat molecular resistance in cell line models and primary CLL cells from ibrutinib-resistant patients. Altogether, our results engender a molecular understanding of the identified aberration at PLCG2 and explore its functional dependency on BTK, SYK, and LYN, suggesting alternative strategies to combat acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25972157

  15. Circulating Th1-Cell-type Tfh Cells that Exhibit Impaired B Cell Help Are Preferentially Activated during Acute Malaria in Children.

    PubMed

    Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Portugal, Silvia; Tran, Tuan M; Yazew, Takele B; Skinner, Jeff; Li, Shanping; Jain, Aarti; Felgner, Philip L; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-10-13

    Malaria-specific antibody responses are short lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated bouts of febrile malaria. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this apparent immune deficiency are poorly understood. Recently, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells have been shown to play a critical role in generating long-lived antibody responses. We show that Malian children have resting PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CD4(+) Tfh cells in circulation that resemble germinal center Tfh cells phenotypically and functionally. Within this population, PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(-) Tfh cells are superior to Th1-polarized PD-1(+)CXCR5(+)CXCR3(+) Tfh cells in helping B cells. Longitudinally, we observed that malaria drives Th1 cytokine responses, and accordingly, the less-functional Th1-polarized Tfh subset was preferentially activated and its activation did not correlate with antibody responses. These data provide insights into the Tfh cell biology underlying suboptimal antibody responses to malaria in children and suggest that vaccine strategies that promote CXCR3(-) Tfh cell responses may improve malaria vaccine efficacy. PMID:26440897

  16. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  17. Identification and transcriptional analysis of a Treponema pallidum operon encoding a putative ABC transport system, an iron-activated repressor protein homolog, and a glycolytic pathway enzyme homolog.

    PubMed

    Hardham, J M; Stamm, L V; Porcella, S F; Frye, J G; Barnes, N Y; Howell, J K; Mueller, S L; Radolf, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a 5.2-kilobase (kb) putative transport related operon (tro) locus of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) (Tp) encoding six proteins: TroA, TroB, TroC, TroD, TroR and Phosphoglycerate mutase (Pgm). Four of these gene products (TroA-TroD) are homologous to members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of bacterial transport proteins. TroA (previously identified as Tromp1) has significant sequence similarity to a family of Gram-negative periplasmic substrate-binding proteins and to a family of streptococcal proteins that may have dual roles as substrate binding proteins and adhesins. TroB is homologous to the ATP-binding protein component, whereas TroC and TroD are related to the hydrophobic membrane protein components of ABC transport systems. TroR is similar to Gram-positive iron-activated repressor proteins (DesR, DtxR, IdeR, and SirR). The last open reading frame (ORF) of the tro operon encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the glycolytic pathway enzyme, Pgm. Primer extension results demonstrated that the tro operon is transcribed from a sigma 70-type promoter element. Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions provided evidence for the presence of a primary 1-kb troA transcript and a secondary, less abundant, troA-pgm transcript. The tro operon is flanked by a Holliday structure DNA helicase homolog (upstream) and two ORFs representing a purine nucleoside phosphorylase homolog and tpp15, a previously characterized gene encoding a membrane lipoprotein (downstream). The presence of a complex operon containing a putative ABC transport system and a DtxR homolog indicates a possible linkage between transport and gene regulation in Tp. PMID:9332349

  18. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  19. ABCG1 is required for pulmonary B-1 B cell and natural antibody homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Angel; Gonen, Ayelet; Choung, Christina; Que, Xuchu; Marquart, Tyler J.; Hernandez, Irene; Bjorkhem, Ingemar; Ford, David A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), and obesity, have a chronic inflammatory component involving both innate and adaptive immunity. Mice lacking the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCG1 develop chronic inflammation in the lungs, associated with lipid accumulation (cholesterol, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid) and cholesterol crystal deposition, characteristic of atherosclerotic lesions and PAP. Here we demonstrate that specific lipids, likely oxidized (Ox) phospholipids and/or sterols, elicit a lung-specific immune response in Abcg1−/− mice. Loss of ABCG1 results in increased levels of specific oxysterols, phosphatidylcholines and oxidized phospholipids, including 1-palmitoyl-2-(5’-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), in the lungs. Further, we identify a niche-specific increase in natural antibody (NAb)-secreting B-1 B cells in response to this lipid accumulation that is paralleled by increased titers of IgM, IgA and IgG against oxidation specific epitopes such as those on OxLDL and malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL). Finally we identify a cytokine/chemokine signature reflective of increased B cell activation, antibody secretion and homing. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the accumulation of lipids in Abcg1−/− mice induces the specific expansion and localization of B-1 B cells, which secrete NAbs that may help protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Indeed, despite chronic lipid accumulation and inflammation, hyperlipidemic mice lacking ABCG1 develop smaller atherosclerotic lesions compared to controls. These data also suggest that Abcg1−/− mice may represent a new model in which to study the protective functions of B-1 B cells/NAbs, and suggest novel targets for pharmacologic intervention and treatment of disease. PMID:25339664

  20. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  1. A Stim1-dependent, noncapacitative Ca2+-entry pathway is activated by B-cell-receptor stimulation and depletion of Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takao; Tanimura, Akihiko; Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Tojyo, Yosuke

    2009-04-15

    The depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores activates capacitative Ca(2+) entry (CCE), which is a Ca(2+)-selective and La(3+)-sensitive entry pathway. Here, we report a novel mechanism of La(3+)-resistant Ca(2+) entry that is synergistically regulated by B-cell-receptor (BCR) stimulation and Ca(2+) store depletion. In DT40 cells, stimulation of BCRs with anti-IgM antibodies induced Ca(2+) release and subsequent Ca(2+) entry in the presence of 0.3 microM La(3+), a condition in which CCE is completely blocked. This phenomenon was not observed in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-deficient DT40 (IP3R-KO) cells. However, in response to thapsigargin pretreatment, BCR stimulation induced La(3+)-resistant Ca(2+) entry into both wild-type and IP3R-KO cells. These results indicate that BCR stimulation alone does not activate Ca(2+) entry, whereas BCR stimulation and depleted Ca(2+) stores (either due to IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release or Ca(2+) uptake inhibition) work in concert to activate La(3+)-resistant Ca(2+) entry. This Ca(2+) entry was inhibited by genistein. In addition, BCR-mediated Ca(2+) entry was completely abolished in Stim1-deficient DT40 cells and was restored by overexpression of YFP-Stim1, but was unaffected by double knockdown of Orai1 and Orai2. These results demonstrate a unique non-CCE pathway, in which Ca(2+) entry depends on Stim1- and BCR-mediated activation of tyrosine kinases. PMID:19339554

  2. Targeted activation of human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells controls epstein-barr virus-induced B cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Liu, Yinping; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Ming; Lv, Aizhen; Gao, Yulong; Hu, Huaidong; Lam, Kowk-Tai; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Yang, Yuanzhong; Chen, Honglin; Tsao, George Sai-Wah; Bonneville, Marc; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2014-10-13

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) after transplantation remains a serious and life-threatening complication. Herein we showed that the aminobisphosphonate pamidronate-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently killed EBV-transformed autologous lymphoblastoid B cell lines (EBV-LCL) through γ/δ-TCR and NKG2D receptor triggering and Fas and TRAIL engagement. By inoculation of EBV-LCL in Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice and humanized mice, we established lethal EBV-LPD with characteristics close to those of the human disease. Adoptive transfer of pamidronate-expanded Vγ9Vδ2-T cells alone effectively prevented EBV-LPD in Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice and induced EBV-LPD regression in EBV(+) tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice. Pamidronate treatment inhibited EBV-LPD development in humanized mice through selective activation and expansion of Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. This study provides proof-of-principle for a therapeutic approach using pamidronate to control EBV-LPD through Vγ9Vδ2-T cell targeting. PMID:25220446

  3. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3(+) (LAG3(+)) forkhead box protein 3(-) (FOXP3(-)) regulatory T cells induced by B cells alleviates joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Hsu, Wan-Tseng; Chen, Yi-Lien; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which dysregulated immune cells primarily target synovial joints. Despite recent advances in the treatment of RA, including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal. Previous studies have demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) was effective in treating a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The objective of this study was to develop optimal potential iTreg-based therapy for CIA by adoptively transferring LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells. B-cell-induced Treg-of-B cells expressed LAG3 but not Foxp3 (designated LAG3(+) Treg-of-B), and secreted IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β. Furthermore, LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) responder T cells through both LAG3 and IL-10 production. In the murine CIA model, adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells alleviated the joint severity as well as local and systemic inflammation. Treatment with LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cells also promoted IL-10 production in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and draining lymph nodes. Moreover, mice receiving LAG3(+) Treg-of-B cell treatment showed significantly less pronounced osteolysis in the hind footpads, which correlated with the downregulation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. In conclusion, we identified a novel subset of Tregs for CIA treatment. This insight may facilitate exploring novel regulatory T-cell-based therapies for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26908164

  4. B Cells in Multiple Sclerosis: Connecting the Dots

    PubMed Central

    von Büdingen, H.-Christian; Bar-Or, Amit; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades B cells have increasingly moved into the spotlight in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. This interest was fuelled by growing understanding and acceptance of pathological involvement of B cells and antibodies in MS. Data derived from animal models of MS, human histopathological studies, and analyses of B cells in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have permitted the integration of B cells in our overall picture of MS immunopathogenesis. The as yet strongest direct evidence for a central role of B cells in MS autoimmunity was the demonstration that peripheral B cell depletion leads to a rapid decline of disease-activity in MS. While lending formidable impact to peripheral blood B cells as mediators of disease activity, the effects of anti-CD20 treatment also seemingly challenged the paradigm of a role of antibodies in targeted central nervous system (CNS) myelin destruction. This review shall attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of B cell and antibody mediated mechanisms relevant to MS. We will include findings from, both, human studies, and animal models to highlight the complexity of B cell function as it pertains to MS. B cells appear to be effective drivers of inflammatory activity in MS by way of a diverse toolset of cellular functions. These functions appear to be closely linked to B cells that can be found in the periphery. However, by serving as the source of antibodies, B cells offer a direct humoral response that may target the CNS and lead to tissue specific destruction. Therefore, B cells participate in MS pathogenesis on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21983151

  5. B Cell-Activating Transcription Factor Plays a Critical Role in the Pathogenesis of Anti-Major Histocompatibility Complex-Induced Obliterative Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Ramachandran, S; Gunasekaran, M; Nayak, D; Benshoff, N; Hachem, R; Gelman, A; Mohanakumar, T

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies (Abs) against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) results in T helper-17 (Th17)-mediated immunity against lung self-antigens (SAgs), K-α1 tubulin and collagen V and obliterative airway disease (OAD). Because B cell-activating transcription factor (BATF) controls Th17 and autoimmunity, we proposed that BATF may play a critical role in OAD. Anti-H2K(b) was administered intrabronchially into Batf (-/-) and C57BL/6 mice. Histopathology of the lungs on days 30 and 45 after Ab administration to Batf (-/-) mice resulted in decreased cellular infiltration, epithelial metaplasia, fibrosis, and obstruction. There was lack of Abs to SAgs, reduction of Sag-specific interleukin (IL)-17 T cells, IL-6, IL-23, IL-17, IL-1β, fibroblast growth factor-6, and CXCL12 and decreased Janus kinase 2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and retinoid-related orphan receptor γT. Further, micro-RNA (miR)-301a, a regulator of Th17, was reduced in Batf (-/-) mice in contrast to upregulation of miR-301a and downregulation of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3) in anti-MHC-induced OAD animals. We also demonstrate an increase in miR-301a in the bronchoalveolar lavage cells from lung transplant recipients with Abs to human leukocyte antigen. This was accompanied by reduction in PIAS3 mRNA. Therefore, we conclude that BATF plays a critical role in the immune responses to SAgs and pathogenesis of anti-MHC-induced rejection. Targeting BATF should be considered for preventing chronic rejection after human lung transplantation. PMID:26844425

  6. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  7. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  8. ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinqiong; Liu, Yiping; Tang, Youhong; Li, Li; Zeng, Ruolan; Zeng, Shan; Zhong, Meizuo

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1), a detoxifying enzyme, is responsible for chemoresistance in a variety of tumors. Although the majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be cured with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), chemoresistance is a common cause of treatment failure. This study aims to investigate the significance of ALDH1A1 expression and the mechanism by which ALDH1A1 is involved in the chemoresistance of DLBCL cells. ALDH1A1 expression was assessed in 88 DLBCL tissues by immunohistochemistry. The association between ALDH1A1 expression and outcome was evaluated. We also investigated the effect of ALDH1A1 on CHOP resistance in DLBCL cells using functional analysis. ALDH1A1 expression levels were upregulated in patients with stable or progressive disease after CHOP and its expression positively correlated with expression of STAT3 and p-STAT3. In keeping with these observations, ALDH1A1 expression was significantly associated with short survival of DLBCL patients who received CHOP chemotherapy. In functional assays in Pfeiffer cells, overexpression of ALDH1A1 conferred resistance to CHOP, while silencing of ALDH1A1 using short hairpin RNA had the opposite effect. Furthermore, we also observed that ALDH1A1 could regulate the JAK2/STAT3 pathway, while inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by WP1066 negated the effect of ALDH1A1 overexpression. These observations reveal that ALDH1A1 induces resistance to CHOP through activation of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway in DLBCL, and its targeting provides a potential strategic approach for reversing CHOP resistance. PMID:27621650

  9. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  10. An in vitro study of liposomal curcumin: stability, toxicity and biological activity in human lymphocytes and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changguo; Johnston, Thomas D; Jeon, Hoonbae; Gedaly, Roberto; McHugh, Patrick P; Burke, Thomas G; Ranjan, Dinesh

    2009-01-21

    Curcumin is a multi-functional and pharmacologically safe natural agent. Used as a food additive for centuries, it also has anti-inflammatory, anti-virus and anti-tumor properties. We previously found that it is a potent inhibitor of cyclosporin A (CsA)-resistant T-cell co-stimulation pathway. It inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, NFkappaB activation and IL-2 signaling. In spite of its safety and efficacy, the in vivo bioavailability of curcumin is poor, and this may be a major obstacle to its utility as a therapeutic agent. Liposomes are known to be excellent carriers for drug delivery. In this in vitro study, we report the effects of different liposome formulations on curcumin stability in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), human blood, plasma and culture medium RPMI-1640+10% FBS (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Liposomal curcumin had higher stability than free curcumin in PBS. Liposomal and free curcumin had similar stability in human blood, plasma and RPMI-1640+10% FBS. We looked at the toxicity of non-drug-containing liposomes on (3)H-thymidine incorporation by concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated human lymphocytes, splenocytes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). We found that dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) were toxic to the tested cells. However, addition of cholesterol to the lipids at DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol=7:1:8 (molar ratio) almost completely eliminated the lipid toxicity to these cells. Liposomal curcumin had similar or even stronger inhibitory effects on Con A-stimulated human lymphocyte, splenocyte and LCL proliferation. We conclude that liposomal curcumin may be useful for intravenous administration to improve the bioavailability and efficacy, facilitating in vivo studies that could ultimately lead to clinical application of curcumin. PMID:18840516

  11. B-Cell Lymphopoiesis Is Regulated by Cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Badano, Maria Noel; Camicia, Gabriela Lorena; Lombardi, Gabriela; Maglioco, Andrea; Cabrera, Gabriel; Costa, Hector; Meiss, Roberto Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CTSL) is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine peptidase with diverse and highly specific functions. The involvement of CTSL in thymic CD4+ T-cell positive selection has been well documented. Using CTSLnkt/nkt mice that lack CTSL activity, we have previously demonstrated that the absence of CTSL activity affects the homeostasis of the T-cell pool by decreasing CD4+ cell thymic production and increasing CD8+ thymocyte production. Herein we investigated the influence of CTSL activity on the homeostasis of peripheral B-cell populations and bone marrow (BM) B-cell maturation. B-cell numbers were increased in lymph nodes (LN), spleen and blood from CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Increases in splenic B-cell numbers were restricted to transitional T1 and T2 cells and to the marginal zone (MZ) cell subpopulation. No alterations in the proliferative or apoptosis levels were detected in peripheral B-cell populations from CTSLnkt/nkt mice. In the BM, the percentage and the absolute number of pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B, immature and mature B cells were not altered. However, in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that BM B-cell production was markedly increased in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Besides, BM B-cell emigration to the spleen was increased in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Colony-forming unit pre-B (CFU pre-B) assays in the presence of BM stromal cells (SC) and reciprocal BM chimeras revealed that both BM B-cell precursors and SC would contribute to sustain the increased B-cell hematopoiesis in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Overall, our data clearly demonstrate that CTSL negatively regulates BM B-cell production and output therefore influencing the homeostasis of peripheral B cells. PMID:23585893

  12. Machine learning-based classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients by eight gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangtao; Dong, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenzhi; Ye, Zhen; Xiang, Rong

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) had divided the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into molecular subgroups: germinal center B-cell like (GCB), activated B-cell like (ABC), and unclassified (UC) subtype. However, this classification with prognostic significance was not applied into clinical practice since there were more than 1000 genes to detect and interpreting was difficult. To classify cancer samples validly, eight significant genes (MYBL1, LMO2, BCL6, MME, IRF4, NFKBIZ, PDE4B, and SLA) were selected in 414 patients treated with CHOP/R-CHOP chemotherapy from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) data sets. Cutoffs for each gene were obtained using receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC) new model based on the support vector machine (SVM) estimated the probability of membership into one of two subgroups: GCB and Non-GCB (ABC and UC). Furtherly, multivariate analysis validated the model in another two cohorts including 855 cases in all. As a result, patients in the training and validated cohorts were stratified into two subgroups with 94.0%, 91.0%, and 94.4% concordance with GEP, respectively. Patients with Non-GCB subtype had significantly poorer outcomes than that with GCB subtype, which agreed with the prognostic power of GEP classification. Moreover, the similar prognosis received in the low (0-2) and high (3-5) IPI scores group demonstrated that the new model was independent of IPI as well as GEP method. In conclusion, our new model could stratify DLBCL patients with CHOP/R-CHOP regimen matching GEP subtypes effectively. PMID:26869285

  13. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  14. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  15. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  16. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  17. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  18. B cells and monocytes from patients with active multiple sclerosis exhibit increased surface expression of both HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env, accompanied by increased seroreactivity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The etiology of the neurogenerative disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. The leading hypotheses suggest that MS is the result of exposure of genetically susceptible individuals to certain environmental factor(s). Herpesviruses and human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent potentially important factors in MS development. Herpesviruses can activate HERVs, and HERVs are activated in MS patients. Results Using flow cytometry, we have analyzed HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env epitope expression on the surface of PBMCs from MS patients with active and stable disease, and from control individuals. We have also analyzed serum antibody levels to the expressed HERV-H and HERV-W Env epitopes. We found a significantly higher expression of HERV-H and HERV-W Env epitopes on B cells and monocytes from patients with active MS compared with patients with stable MS or control individuals. Furthermore, patients with active disease had relatively higher numbers of B cells in the PBMC population, and higher antibody reactivities towards HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env epitopes. The higher antibody reactivities in sera from patients with active MS correlate with the higher levels of HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env expression on B cells and monocytes. We did not find such correlations for stable MS patients or for controls. Conclusion These findings indicate that both HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env are expressed in higher quantities on the surface of B cells and monocytes in patients with active MS, and that the expression of these proteins may be associated with exacerbation of the disease. PMID:19917105

  19. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  20. DUSP4 deficiency caused by promoter hypermethylation drives JNK signaling and tumor cell survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Corina A.; Robinson, Mark D.; Scheifinger, Nicole A.; Müller, Sebastian; Cogliatti, Sergio; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes is an important driver of human carcinogenesis. We have combined genome-wide DNA methylation analyses and gene expression profiling after pharmacological DNA demethylation with functional screening to identify novel tumor suppressors in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We find that a CpG island in the promoter of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP4 is aberrantly methylated in nodal and extranodal DLBCL, irrespective of ABC or GCB subtype, resulting in loss of DUSP4 expression in 75% of >200 examined cases. The DUSP4 genomic locus is further deleted in up to 13% of aggressive B cell lymphomas, and the lack of DUSP4 is a negative prognostic factor in three independent cohorts of DLBCL patients. Ectopic expression of wild-type DUSP4, but not of a phosphatase-deficient mutant, dephosphorylates c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induces apoptosis in DLBCL cells. Pharmacological or dominant-negative JNK inhibition restricts DLBCL survival in vitro and in vivo and synergizes strongly with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. Our results indicate that DLBCL cells depend on JNK signaling for survival. This finding provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of JNK inhibitors in DLBCL, ideally in synthetic lethal combinations with inhibitors of chronic active B cell receptor signaling. PMID:25847947

  1. Revisiting the ABCs of multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Amit K; Sodani, Kamlesh; Dai, Chun-Ling; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-04-01

    The adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest transmembrane gene families in humans. The ABC transporters are present in a number of tissues, providing protection against xenobiotics and certain endogenous molecules. Unfortunately, their presence produces suboptimal chemotherapeutic outcomes in cancer patient tumor cells. It is well established that they actively efflux antineoplastic agents from cancer cells, producing the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The inadequate response to chemotherapy and subsequent poor prognosis in cancer patients can be in part the result of the clinical overexpression of ABC transporters. In fact, one of the targeted approaches for overcoming MDR in cancer cells is that directed towards blocking or inhibiting ABC transporters. Indeed, for almost three decades, research has been conducted to overcome MDR through pharmacological inhibition of ABC transporters with limited clinical success. Therefore, contemporary strategies to identify or to synthesize selective "resensitizers" of ABC transporters with limited nonspecific toxicity have been undertaken. Innovative approaches en route to understanding specific biochemical role of ABC transporters in MDR and tumorigenesis will prove essential to direct our knowledge towards more effective targeted therapies. This review briefly discusses the current knowledge regarding the clinical involvement of ABC transporters in MDR to antineoplastic drugs and highlights approaches undertaken so far to overcome ABC transporter-mediated MDR in cancer. PMID:21118094

  2. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  3. Regulation of IL-17A Production Is Distinct from IL-17F in a Primary Human Cell Co-culture Model of T Cell-Mediated B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Andrew C.; Melrose, Jennifer; Alajoki, Liisa; Privat, Sylvie; Cho, Hannah; Brown, Naomi; Plavec, Ana Marija; Nguyen, Dat; Johnston, Elijah D.; Yang, Jian; Polokoff, Mark A.; Plavec, Ivan; Berg, Ellen L.; O'Mahony, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Improper regulation of B cell responses leads to excessive production of antibodies and contributes to the development of autoimmune disease. T helper 17 (Th17) cells also drive the development of autoimmune disease, but the role of B cells in shaping Th17 cell-mediated immune responses, as well as the reciprocal regulation of B cell responses by IL-17 family cytokines, remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the regulation of IL-17A and IL-17F in a model of T cell-dependent B cell activation. Stimulation of primary human B cell and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (BT) co-cultures with α-IgM and a non-mitogenic concentration of superantigens for three days promoted a Th17 cell response as evidenced by increased expression of Th17-related gene transcripts, including Il17f, Il21, Il22, and Il23r, in CD4 T cells, as well as the secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F protein. We tested the ability of 144 pharmacologic modulators representing 91 different targets or pathways to regulate IL-17A and IL-17F production in these stimulated BT co-cultures. IL-17A production was found to be preferentially sensitive to inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, while prostaglandin EP receptor agonists, including PGE2, increased IL-17A concentrations. In contrast, the production of IL-17F was inhibited by PGE2, but selectively increased by TLR2 and TLR5 agonists. These results indicate that IL-17A regulation is distinct from IL-17F in stimulated BT co-cultures and that this co-culture approach can be used to identify pathway mechanisms and novel agents that selectively inhibit production of IL-17A or IL-17F. PMID:23505568

  4. Germinal center B cells recognize antigen through a specialized immune synapse architecture.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Carla R; Spillane, Katelyn M; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    B cell activation is regulated by B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling and antigen internalization in immune synapses. Using large-scale imaging across B cell subsets, we found that, in contrast with naive and memory B cells, which gathered antigen toward the synapse center before internalization, germinal center (GC) B cells extracted antigen by a distinct pathway using small peripheral clusters. Both naive and GC B cell synapses required proximal BCR signaling, but GC cells signaled less through the protein kinase C-β-NF-κB pathway and produced stronger tugging forces on the BCR, thereby more stringently regulating antigen binding. Consequently, GC B cells extracted antigen with better affinity discrimination than naive B cells, suggesting that specialized biomechanical patterns in B cell synapses regulate T cell-dependent selection of high-affinity B cells in GCs. PMID:27183103

  5. Roles of B Cell-Intrinsic TLR Signals in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kongyang; Li, Jingyi; Fang, Yongfei; Lu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a large family of pattern recognition receptors. TLR signals are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Mouse and human B cells constitutively express most TLRs. Many B cell subpopulations are highly responsive to certain TLR ligation, including B-1 B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cell and memory B cells. The B cell-intrinsic TLR signals play critical roles during lupus process. In this review, roles of B cell-intrinsic TLR2, 4, 7, 8 and 9 signals are discussed during lupus pathogenesis in both mouse model and patients. Moreover, mechanisms underlying TLR ligation-triggered B cell activation and signaling pathways are highlighted. PMID:26068236

  6. The ABC's of Learning in Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Minta M.

    Learning in infancy is based on activity, beginnings, and curiosity, the so-called ABC's. Earliest behavior consists of mass activity, the period from birth to 24 months of sensory-motor development which provides the foundation for all future learning. Adults must provide space, toys, and affectionate care to help infants proceed through…

  7. ABC's of Being Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Determining what giftedness is all about means focusing on many aspects of the individual. In this paper, the author focuses on letter D of the ABC's of being smart. She starts with specifics about giftedness (details), and then moves on to some ways of thinking (dispositions).

  8. Plant ABC Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Park, Jiyoung; Choi, Hyunju; Burla, Bo; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    ABC transporters constitute one of the largest protein families found in all living organisms. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis and can act as exporters as well as importers. The plant genome encodes for more than 100 ABC transporters, largely exceeding that of other organisms. In Arabidopsis, only 22 out of 130 have been functionally analyzed. They are localized in most membranes of a plant cell such as the plasma membrane, the tonoplast, chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes and fulfill a multitude of functions. Originally identified as transporters involved in detoxification processes, they have later been shown to be required for organ growth, plant nutrition, plant development, response to abiotic stresses, pathogen resistance and the interaction of the plant with its environment. To fulfill these roles they exhibit different substrate specifies by e.g. depositing surface lipids, accumulating phytate in seeds, and transporting the phytohormones auxin and abscisic acid. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the functions of plant ABC transporters and to show their importance for plant development and survival. PMID:22303277

  9. The Role of the Atypical Kinases ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 in Abscisic Acid Responses

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Anna; DalCorso, Giovanni; Furini, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The ABC1K family of atypical kinases (activity of bc1 complex kinase) is represented in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. In plants they regulate diverse physiological processes in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, but their precise functions are poorly defined. ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 are probably involved in oxidative stress responses, isoprenyl lipid synthesis and distribution of iron within chloroplasts. Because reactive oxygen species take part in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated processes, we investigated the functions of ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 during germination, stomatal movement, and leaf senescence. Both genes were upregulated by ABA treatment and some ABA-responsive physiological processes were affected in abc1k7 and abc1k8 mutants. Germination was more severely affected by ABA, osmotic stress and salt stress in the single and double mutants; the stomatal aperture was smaller in the mutants under standard growth conditions and was not further reduced by exogenous ABA application; ABA-induced senescence symptoms were more severe in the leaves of the single and double mutants compared to wild type leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that ABC1K7 and ABC1K8 might be involved in the cross-talk between ABA and ROS signaling. PMID:27047531

  10. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  11. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  12. Retinoic acid-induced IgG production in TLR-activated human primary B cells involves ULK1-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Abrahamsen, Greger; Spurkland, Anne; Moskaug, Jan Øivind; Simonsen, Anne; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have established a vital role of autophagy in retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated human B cells into Ig-secreting cells. Thus, RA enhanced autophagy in TLR9- and CD180-stimulated peripheral blood B cells, as revealed by increased levels of the autophagosomal marker LC3B-II, enhanced colocalization between LC3B and the lysosomal marker Lyso-ID, by a larger percentage of cells with more than 5 characteristic LC3B puncta, and by the concomitant reduction in the level of SQSTM1/p62. Furthermore, RA induced expression of the autophagy-inducing protein ULK1 at the transcriptional level, in a process that required the retinoic acid receptor RAR. By inhibiting autophagy with specific inhibitors or by knocking down ULK1 by siRNA, the RA-stimulated IgG production in TLR9- and CD180-mediated cells was markedly reduced. We propose that the identified prominent role of autophagy in RA-mediated IgG-production in normal human B cells provides a novel mechanism whereby vitamin A exerts its important functions in the immune system. PMID:25749095

  13. Translocations activating IRF4 identify a subtype of germinal center-derived B-cell lymphoma affecting predominantly children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Philipp, Claudia; Oschlies, Ilske; Kohler, Christian W; Kreuz, Markus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Burkhardt, Birgit; Trautmann, Heiko; Gesk, Stefan; Andrusiewicz, Miroslaw; Berger, Hilmar; Fey, Miriam; Harder, Lana; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Loeffler, Markus; Mahn, Friederike; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Pellissery, Shoji; Pott, Christiane; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Reiter, Alfred; Richter, Julia; Rosolowski, Maciej; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trümper, Lorenz; Wessendorf, Swen; Spang, Rainer; Küppers, Ralf; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2011-07-01

    The prognosis of germinal center-derived B-cell (GCB) lymphomas, including follicular lymphoma and diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), strongly depends on age. Children have a more favorable outcome than adults. It is not known whether this is because of differences in host characteristics, treatment protocols, or tumor biology, including the presence of chromosomal alterations. By screening for novel IGH translocation partners in pediatric and adult lymphomas, we identified chromosomal translocations juxtaposing the IRF4 oncogene next to one of the immunoglobulin (IG) loci as a novel recurrent aberration in mature B-cell lymphoma. FISH revealed 20 of 427 lymphomas to carry an IG/IRF4-fusion. Those were predominantly GCB-type DLBCL or follicular lymphoma grade 3, shared strong expression of IRF4/MUM1 and BCL6, and lacked PRDM1/BLIMP1 expression and t(14;18)/BCL2 breaks. BCL6 aberrations were common. The gene expression profile of IG/IRF4-positive lymphomas differed from other subtypes of DLBCL. A classifier for IG/IRF4 positivity containing 27 genes allowed accurate prediction. IG/IRF4 positivity was associated with young age and a favorable outcome. Our results suggest IRF4 translocations to be primary alterations in a molecularly defined subset of GCB-derived lymphomas. The probability for this subtype of lymphoma significantly decreases with age, suggesting that diversity in tumor biology might contribute to the age-dependent differences in prognosis of lymphoma. PMID:21487109

  14. B-cell acquisition of antigen: Sensing the surface.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) recognition and acquisition of antigen by B cells is the essential first step in the generation of effective antibody responses. As B-cell-mediated antigen presentation is also believed to play a significant role in the activation of CD4(+) Th-cell responses, considerable effort has focused on clarifying the nature of antigen/BCR interactions. Following earlier descriptions of interactions of soluble antigens with the BCR, it is now clear that B cells also recognize, physically extract and present antigens that are tethered to, or integral components of, the surfaces or extracellular matrix of other cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Zeng et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] examine how the physical property or "stiffness" of the surface displaying antigens to B cells influences the B-cell response. This commentary reports that antigen tethered on "less stiff" surfaces induces increased B-cell activation and antibody responses. I then infer how "sensing the surface" by B cells may represent a new component of the immune system's ability to detect "damage," and how this understanding may influence approaches to clinical therapies where immune activity is either unwanted or desired. PMID:25929718

  15. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of B Cell Antigen Gathering and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom, Robbert; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Generation of high-affinity, protective antibodies requires B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, as well as antigen internalization and presentation to helper T cells. B cell antigen internalization is initiated by antigen capture, either from solution or from immune synapses formed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, and proceeds via clathrin-dependent endocytosis and intracellular routing to late endosomes. Although the components of this pathway are still being discovered, it has become clear that antigen internalization is actively regulated by BCR signaling at multiple steps and, vice versa, that localization of the BCR along the endocytic pathway modulates signaling. Accordingly, defects in BCR internalization or trafficking contribute to enhanced B cell activation in models of autoimmune diseases and in B cell lymphomas. In this review, we discuss how BCR signaling complexes regulate each of the steps of this endocytic process and why defects along this pathway manifest as hyperactive B cell responses in vivo. PMID:26336965

  17. Genomic Uracil Homeostasis during Normal B Cell Maturation and Loss of This Balance during B Cell Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Shalhout, Sophia; Haddad, Dania; Sosin, Angela; Holland, Thomas C.; Al-Katib, Ayad; Martin, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) converts DNA cytosines to uracils in immunoglobulin genes, creating antibody diversification. It also causes mutations and translocations that promote cancer. We examined the interplay between uracil creation by AID and its removal by UNG2 glycosylase in splenocytes undergoing maturation and in B cell cancers. The genomic uracil levels remain unchanged in normal stimulated B cells, demonstrating a balance between uracil generation and removal. In stimulated UNG−/− cells, uracil levels increase by 11- to 60-fold during the first 3 days. In wild-type B cells, UNG2 gene expression and enzymatic activity rise and fall with AID levels, suggesting that UNG2 expression is coordinated with uracil creation by AID. Remarkably, a murine lymphoma cell line, several human B cell cancer lines, and human B cell tumors expressing AID at high levels have genomic uracils comparable to those seen with stimulated UNG−/−splenocytes. However, cancer cells express UNG2 gene at levels similar to or higher than those seen with peripheral B cells and have nuclear uracil excision activity comparable to that seen with stimulated wild-type B cells. We propose that more uracils are created during B cell cancer development than are removed from the genome but that the uracil creation/excision balance is restored during establishment of cell lines, fixing the genomic uracil load at high levels. PMID:25154417

  18. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  19. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  20. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  1. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  2. Iron-binding activity of FutA1 subunit of an ABC-type iron transporter in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Katoh, H; Hagino, N; Ogawa, T

    2001-08-01

    The futA1 (slr1295) and futA2 (slr0513) genes encode periplasmic binding proteins of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type iron transporter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. FutA1 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST-tagged recombinant protein (rFutA1). Solution containing purified rFutA1 and ferric chloride showed an absorption spectrum with a peak at 453 nm. The absorbance at this wavelength rose linearly as the amount of iron bound to rFutA1 increased to reach a plateau when the molar ratio of iron to rFutA1 became unity. The association constant of rFutA1 for iron in vitro was about 1 x 10(19). These results demonstrate that the FutA1 binds the ferric ion with high affinity. The activity of iron uptake in the Delta futA1 and Delta futA2 mutants was 37 and 84%, respectively, of that in the wild-type and the activity was less than 5% in the Delta futA1/Delta futA2 double mutant, suggesting their redundant role for binding iron. High concentrations of citrate inhibited ferric iron uptake. These results suggest that the natural iron source transported by the Fut system is not ferric citrate. PMID:11522907

  3. Methamphetamine activates nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription in human microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wires, Emily S.; Alvarez, David; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Wang, Yun; Morales, Marisela; Karn, Jonathan; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) primarily infects glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent evidence suggests that HIV-infected individuals who abuse drugs such as methamphetamine (METH) have higher viral loads and experience more severe neurological complications than HIV-infected individuals who do not abuse drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of METH on HIV expression from the HIV long terminal repeats (LTR) promoter and on an HIV integrated provirus in microglial cells, the primary host cells for HIV in the CNS. Primary human microglial cells immortalized with SV40 T-antigen (CHME-5 cells) were co-transfected with an HIV LTR reporter and the HIV Tat gene, a key regulator of viral replication and gene expression, and exposed to METH. Our results demonstrate that METH treatment induced LTR activation, an effect potentiated in the presence of Tat. We also found that METH increased the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key cellular transcriptional regulator of the LTR promoter, and the activity of an NF-κB-specific reporter plasmid in CHME-5 cells. The presence of a dominant-negative regulator of NF-κB blocked METH-related activation of the HIV LTR. Furthermore, treatment of HIV-latently infected CHME-5 (CHME-5/HIV) cells with METH induced HIV expression in a dose-dependent manner, and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. These results suggest that METH can stimulate HIV gene expression in microglia cells through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. This mechanism may outline the initial biochemical events leading to the observed increased neurodegeneration in HIV-positive individuals who use METH. PMID:22618514

  4. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  5. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  6. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P‐Glycoprotein (P‐gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The transmembrane ABC transporters P‐glycoprotein (P‐gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug–drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand‐transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P‐gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC‐transporters. PMID:26970257

  7. Expression of the gene for resistance to phaseolotoxin (argK) depends on the activity of genes phtABC in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Selene; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Murillo, Jesús; Bravo, Jaime; Alvarez-Morales, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola produces phaseolotoxin in a temperature dependent manner, being optimally produced between 18°C and 20°C, while no detectable amounts are present above 28°C. Phaseolotoxin is an effective inhibitor of ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCTase) activity from plant, mammalian and bacterial sources and causes a phenotypic requirement for arginine. To protect the cell from its own toxin, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola synthesizes a phaseolotoxin-resistant OCTase (ROCT). The ROCT is the product of the argK gene and is synthesized only under conditions leading to phaseolotoxin synthesis. The argK gene is included in a chromosomal fragment named Pht cluster, which contains genes involved in the synthesis of phaseolotoxin. The aim of the present work was to investigate the possible involvement of other genes included in the Pht cluster in the regulation of gene argK. We conducted transcriptional analyses of argK in several mutants unable to produce phaseolotoxin, transcriptional fusions and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, which allowed us to determine that genes phtABC, located within the Pht cluster, participate in the transcriptional repression of gene argK at temperatures not permissive for phaseolotoxin biosynthesis. This repression is mediated by a protein present in both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of P. syringae and in E. coli, and requires the coordinated participation of phtA, phtB and phtC products in order to carry out an efficient argK repression. PMID:23056465

  8. Expression of the Gene for Resistance to Phaseolotoxin (argK) Depends on the Activity of Genes phtABC in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Selene; De la Torre-Zavala, Susana; Hernández-Flores, José Luis; Murillo, Jesús; Bravo, Jaime; Alvarez-Morales, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola produces phaseolotoxin in a temperature dependent manner, being optimally produced between 18°C and 20°C, while no detectable amounts are present above 28°C. Phaseolotoxin is an effective inhibitor of ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCTase) activity from plant, mammalian and bacterial sources and causes a phenotypic requirement for arginine. To protect the cell from its own toxin, P. syringae pv. phaseolicola synthesizes a phaseolotoxin-resistant OCTase (ROCT). The ROCT is the product of the argK gene and is synthesized only under conditions leading to phaseolotoxin synthesis. The argK gene is included in a chromosomal fragment named Pht cluster, which contains genes involved in the synthesis of phaseolotoxin. The aim of the present work was to investigate the possible involvement of other genes included in the Pht cluster in the regulation of gene argK. We conducted transcriptional analyses of argK in several mutants unable to produce phaseolotoxin, transcriptional fusions and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, which allowed us to determine that genes phtABC, located within the Pht cluster, participate in the transcriptional repression of gene argK at temperatures not permissive for phaseolotoxin biosynthesis. This repression is mediated by a protein present in both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of P. syringae and in E. coli, and requires the coordinated participation of phtA, phtB and phtC products in order to carry out an efficient argK repression. PMID:23056465

  9. Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, G.; Musto, P.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is an asymptomatic hematologic condition defined by the presence of a small (<5 x 109/L) clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood in the absence of lymph-node enlargement, cytopenias or autoimmune diseases. It is found in approximately 3-12% of normal persons depending on the accuracy of analytical techniques applied. According to the immunophenotypic profile of clonal B-cells, the majority of MBL cases (75%) are classified as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-like. This form may progress into CLL at a rate of 1–2% per year. It is thought that CLL is always preceded by MBL. The remaining MBL cases are defined as atypical CLL-like (CD5+/CD20bright) and CD5- MBL. The MBL clone size is quite heterogenous. Accordingly, two forms of MBL are identified: i) high-count, or ‘clinical’ MBL, in which an evidence of lymphocytosis (<5 x 109/L clonal B-cells) is seen, and ii) a low-count MBL, in which a normal leukocyte count is found and that is identified only in population-screening studies. Both forms of MBL may carry the cytogenetic abnormalities that are the hallmark of CLL, including 13q-, 17p- and trisomy 12. Consistent with the indolent phenotype of this condition, genetic lesions, such as TP53, ATM, NOTCH1 and SF3B1 mutations, usually associated with high-risk CLL, are rarely seen. Overall, no prognostic indicator of evolution of MBL to overt CLL has been found at present time. However, taking into account this possibility, a clinical and lab monitoring (at least annually), is recommended. PMID:24779000

  10. The ABC of ABCS: a phylogenetic and functional classification of ABC systems in living organisms.

    PubMed

    Dassa, E; Bouige, P

    2001-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the most abundant superfamilies of proteins. They are involved not only in the transport of a wide variety of substances, but also in many cellular processes and in their regulation. In this paper, we made a comparative analysis of the properties of ABC systems and we provide a phylogenetic and functional classification. This analysis will be helpful to accurately annotate ABC systems discovered during the sequencing of the genome of living organisms and to identify the partners of the ABC ATPases. PMID:11421270

  11. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  12. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  13. BTK Signaling in B Cell Differentiation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Corneth, Odilia B J; Klein Wolterink, Roel G J; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-01-01

    Since the original identification of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as the gene defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) in 1993, our knowledge on the physiological function of BTK has expanded impressively. In this review, we focus on the role of BTK during B cell differentiation in vivo, both in the regulation of expansion and in the developmental progression of pre-B cells in the bone marrow and as a crucial signal transducer of signals downstream of the IgM or IgG B cell antigen receptor (BCR) in mature B cells governing proliferation, survival, and differentiation. In particular, we highlight BTK function in B cells in the context of host defense and autoimmunity. Small-molecule inhibitors of BTK have very recently shown impressive anti-tumor activity in clinical studies in patients with various B cell malignancies. Since promising effects of BTK inhibition were also seen in experimental animal models for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, BTK may be a good target for controlling autoreactive B cells in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:26341110

  14. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  15. B cell fate decisions following influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Summary Rapidly induced, specific antibodies generated in extrafollicular foci are important components of early immune protection to influenza virus. The signal(s) that prompt B cells to participate in extrafollicular rather than germinal center responses are incompletely understood. To study the regulation of early B cell differentiation events following influenza infection, we exploited earlier findings of a strong contribution of C12 idiotype-expressing B cells to the primary hemagglutinin (HA)-specific response against influenza A/PR/8/34. Using an idiotype-specific mAb to C12 and labeled-HA, in conjunction with multicolor flow cytometry, we followed the fate of C12Id-expressing influenza HA-specific B cells in wildtype BALB/c mice, requiring neither genetic manipulation nor adoptive cell transfer. Our studies demonstrate that HA-specific C12Id+ B cells are phenotypically indistinguishable from follicular B cells. While they induced both extrafollicular and germinal center responses, extrafollicular responses were strongly predominant. Provision of increased HA-specific T cell help increased the magnitude of the extrafollicular response, but did not shift the C12Id+ response towards germinal center formation. Collectively the data are consistent with the hypothesis that B cell fate-determination following activation is a stochastic process in which infection-induced innate signals might drive the preferential expansion of the early extrafollicular response. PMID:19946883

  16. LPS stimulates IgM production in vivo without help from non-B cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingfang; Munford, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative bacterial LPS induce murine B-cell activation and innate (polyclonal) Ab production. Mouse B cells express the LPS signaling receptor (TLR4), yet how LPS activates B-cell responses in vivo is not known. Can LPS directly stimulate B cells to induce innate Ab production? Is activation of non-B cells also required? To address these questions, we transfused LPS-responsive (Tlr4(+/+)) or non-responsive (Tlr4(-/-)) B cells into LPS-responsive or non-responsive mice. Increased expression of the early activation markers CD69 and CD86 could be induced on transfused Tlr4(-/-) B cells by injecting LPS subcutaneously into Tlr4(+/+) mice, demonstrating indirect activation of B cells by TLR4-responsive non-B cells in vivo, but the Tlr4(-) (/) (-) B cells did not increase serum IgM levels. In contrast, when Tlr4(-/-) recipients were transfused with Tlr4(+/+) B cells, LPS induced large amounts of serum IgM and LPS could also enhance specific Ab production to a protein that was co-injected with it (adjuvant response). Thus, LPS-exposed non-B cells mediated increased surface expression of early B-cell activation markers, but this response did not predict innate Ab responses or LPS adjuvanticity in vivo Direct stimulation of B cells by LPS via TLR4 was necessary and sufficient to induce B cells to produce Ab in vivo. PMID:27189424

  17. Do You Know Your ABC?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Within primary schools, the core subjects of literacy and numeracy are highly regarded, and rightly so, as children need to learn to read, write and be numerically literate. This means that all children learn their ABCs at an early age, But, what about the "other ABC"--"Airway, Breathing and Circulation?" Accidents and medical…

  18. Intravenous IgG (IVIG) and subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have comparable inhibitory effect on T cell activation, which is not dependent on IgG sialylation, monocytes or B cells.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, Andrew C; Rowter, Derek; Miescher, Sylvia; Käsermann, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    IVIG modulates T cell activation in vitro and inflammatory-autoimmune conditions in vivo. Sialylation of IgG, Fc receptor interactions, modulation of monocyte/macrophage/B cell functions have been implicated in IVIG effects. Subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) therapy is increasingly used for IgG replacement but whether these preparations share the effects of IVIG on T cell modulation is not documented. We compared the potency of SCIG-Hizentra™ (20% IgG preparation) with IVIG-Privigen® (10% IgG) for T cell inhibition, and assessed the involvement of IgG sialylation, monocytes and B cells in this process. Human PBMCs or sorted cells were cultured 3-7 days, and T cells were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 mAb or Candida antigen. Thymidine incorporation into DNA was quantitated and cytokines assayed by ELISA/Luminex® assay. IVIG and SCIG both dose-dependently (1-20mg/ml) inhibited (up to >80%) T cell proliferation to anti-CD3 mAb. Response to Candida albicans was comparably inhibited by IVIG and SCIG by 50-80% at 10mg/ml with inhibition even at 3mg/ml (P<0.05). These effects were not affected by depletion of sialic acid containing IgG using neuraminidase treatment or lectin affinity chromatography. With anti-CD3 or Candida stimulation, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, GMCSF, TNF-α, interferon-γ (with anti-CD3) and IL-17 (with Candida) levels were suppressed by IVIG or SCIG, with no effect on IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15 or TGFβ. Monocytes or B cells were not required for IgG-induced suppression of proliferation, in fact depletion of monocytes potentiated the IgG-induced inhibition. Reconstitution with monocytes restored the original inhibitory effect. These data show that IVIG (Privigen®) and SCIG (Hizentra™) have comparable inhibitory effects on T cell activation, which do not require sialylation of IgG. Inhibition is independent of monocytes or B cells. There is a potent suppression of multiple effector cytokines. Like IVIG, SCIG therapy is expected to show

  19. Activation of Human T-Helper/Inducer Cell, T-Cytotoxic Cell, B-Cell, and Natural Killer (NK)-Cells and induction of Natural Killer Cell Activity against K562 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells with Modified Citrus Pectin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets like T, B and NK-cells. Methods MCP treated human blood samples were incubated with specific antibody combinations and analyzed in a flow cytometer using a 3-color protocol. To test functionality of the activated NK-cells, isolated normal lymphocytes were treated with increasing concentrations of MCP. Log-phase PKH26-labeled K562 leukemic cells were added to the lymphocytes and incubated for 4 h. The mixture was stained with FITC-labeled active form of caspase 3 antibody and analyzed by a 2-color flow cytometry protocol. The percentage of K562 cells positive for PKH26 and FITC were calculated as the dead cells induced by NK-cells. Monosaccharide analysis of the MCP was performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). Results MCP activated T-cytotoxic cells and B-cell in a dose-dependent manner, and induced significant dose-dependent activation of NK-cells. MCP-activated NK-cells demonstrated functionality in inducing cancer cell death. MCP consisted of oligogalacturonic acids with some containing 4,5-unsaturated non-reducing ends. Conclusions MCP has immunostimulatory properties in human blood samples, including the activation of functional NK cells against K562 leukemic cells in culture. Unsaturated oligogalacturonic acids appear to be the immunostimulatory carbohydrates in MCP. PMID:21816083

  20. MLN2238, a proteasome inhibitor, induces caspase-dependent cell death, cell cycle arrest, and potentiates the cytotoxic activity of chemotherapy agents in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive or rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juan J; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Mavis, Cory; Czuczman, Natalie M; Deeb, George; Gibbs, John; Skitzki, Joseph J; Patil, Ritesh; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-11-01

    To further develop therapeutic strategies targeting the proteasome system, we studied the antitumor activity and mechanisms of action of MLN2238, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experiments were conducted in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell lines (RRCL), and primary B-cell lymphoma cells. Cells were exposed to MLN2238 or caspase-dependent inhibitors, and differences in cell viability, alterations in apoptotic protein levels, effects on cell cycle, and the possibility of synergy when combined with chemotherapeutic agents were evaluated. MLN2238 showed more potent dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in lymphoma cells than bortezomib. Our data suggest that MLN2238 can induce caspase-independent cell death in RRCL. MLN2238 (and to a much lesser degree bortezomib) reduced RRCL S phase and induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Exposure of rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines and RRCL to MLN2238 potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel and overcame resistance to chemotherapy in RRCL. MLN2238 is a potent proteasome inhibitor active in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive and rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell models and potentiates the antitumor activity of chemotherapy agents and has the potential of becoming an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of therapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23995855

  1. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  2. High TNF-α levels in resting B cells negatively correlate with their response

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2014-01-01

    Aging significantly decreases the influenza vaccine-specific response as we and others have previously shown. Based on our previous data in aged mice, we hypothesize that the inflammatory status of the individual and of B cells themselves would impact B cell function. We here show that the ability to generate a vaccine-specific antibody response is negatively correlated with levels of serum TNF-α. Moreover, human unstimulated B cells from elderly make higher levels of TNF-α than those from young individuals and these positively correlate with serum TNF-α levels. These all negatively correlate with B cell function, measured by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. Only memory B cells (either IgM or switched), but not naïve B cells, make appreciable levels of TNF-α and more in elderly as compared to young individuals. Finally, an anti-TNF-α antibody can increase the response in cultured B cells from the elderly, suggesting that TNF-α secreted by memory B cells affects IgM memory B cells and naïve B cells in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Our results show an additional mechanism for reduced B cell function in the elderly and propose B cell-derived TNF-α as another predictive biomarker of in vivo and in vitro B cell responses. PMID:24440385

  3. A role for tungsten in the biology of Campylobacter jejuni: tungstate stimulates formate dehydrogenase activity and is transported via an ultra-high affinity ABC system distinct from the molybdate transporter.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jonathan P; Cliff, Matthew J; Kelly, David J

    2009-11-01

    The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni possesses no known tungstoenzymes, yet encodes two ABC transporters (Cj0300-0303 and Cj1538-1540) homologous to bacterial molybdate (ModABC) uptake systems and the tungstate transporter (TupABC) of Eubacterium acidaminophilum respectively. The actual substrates and physiological role of these transporters were investigated. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry of the purified periplasmic binding proteins of each system revealed that while Cj0303 is unable to discriminate between molybdate and tungstate (K(D) values for both ligands of 4-8 nM), Cj1540 binds tungstate with a K(D) of 1.0 +/- 0.2 pM; 50 000-fold more tightly than molybdate. Induction-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy of single and double mutants showed that this large difference in affinity is reflected in a lower cellular tungsten content in a cj1540 (tupA) mutant compared with a cj0303c (modA) mutant. Surprisingly, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity was decreased approximately 50% in the tupA strain, and supplementation of the growth medium with tungstate significantly increased FDH activity in the wild type, while inhibiting known molybdoenzymes. Our data suggest that C. jejuni possesses a specific, ultra-high affinity tungstate transporter that supplies tungsten for incorporation into FDH. Furthermore, possession of two MoeA paralogues may explain the formation of both molybdopterin and tungstopterin in this bacterium. PMID:19818021

  4. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  5. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Adam K; Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV- subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV- controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  6. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  7. Fas Receptor Expression in Germinal-Center B Cells Is Essential for T and B Lymphocyte Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhenyue; Duncan, Gordon S.; Seagal, Jane; Su, Yu-Wen; Hong, Claire; Haight, Jillian; Chen, Nien-Jung; Elia, Andrew; Wakeham, Andrew; Li, Wanda Y.; Liepa, Jennifer; Wood, Geoffrey A.; Casola, Stefano; Rajewsky, Klaus; Mak, Tak W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fas is highly expressed in activated and germinal center (GC) B cells but can potentially be inactivated by misguided somatic hypermutation. We employed conditional Fas-deficient mice to investigate the physiological functions of Fas in various B cell subsets. B cell-specific Fas-deficient mice developed fatal lymphoproliferation due to activation of B cells and T cells. Ablation of Fas specifically in GC B cells reproduced the phenotype, indicating that the lymphoproliferation initiates in the GC environment. B cell-specific Fas-deficient mice also showed an accumulation of IgG1+ memory B cells expressing high amounts of CD80 and the expansion of CD28-expressing CD4+ Th cells. Blocking T cell-B cell interaction and GC formation completely prevented the fatal lymphoproliferation. Thus, Fas-mediated selection of GC B cells and the resulting memory B cell compartment is essential for maintaining the homeostasis of both T and B lymphocytes. PMID:18835195

  8. ABC transporters in fish species: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marta; Costa, Joana; Reis-Henriques, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins were first recognized for their role in multidrug resistance (MDR) in chemotherapeutic treatments, which is a major impediment for the successful treatment of many forms of malignant tumors in humans. These proteins, highly conserved throughout vertebrate species, were later related to cellular detoxification and accounted as responsible for protecting aquatic organisms from xenobiotic insults in the so-called multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR). In recent years, research on these proteins in aquatic species has highlighted their importance in the detoxification mechanisms in fish thus it is necessary to continue these studies. Several transporters have been pointed out as relevant in the ecotoxicological context associated to the transport of xenobiotics, such as P-glycoproteins (Pgps), multidrug-resistance-associated proteins (MRPs 1-5) and breast cancer resistance associated protein (BCRP). In mammals, several nuclear receptors have been identified as mediators of phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and ABC transporters. In aquatic species, knowledge on co-regulation of the detoxification mechanism is scarce and needs to be addressed. The interaction of emergent contaminants that can act as chemosensitizers, with ABC transporters in aquatic organisms can compromise detoxification processes and have population effects and should be studied in more detail. This review intends to summarize the recent advances in research on MXR mechanisms in fish species, focusing in (1) regulation and functioning of ABC proteins; (2) cooperation with phase I and II biotransformation enzymes; and (3) ecotoxicological relevance and information on emergent pollutants with ability to modulate ABC transporters expression and activity. Several lines of evidence are clearly suggesting the important role of these transporters in detoxification mechanisms and must be further investigated in fish to underlay the mechanism to consider their use as

  9. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eμ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Mike I.; Eve, Paul D.; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T.; Valenti, Melanie R.; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K.; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J.; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P.; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E.; Perkins, Neil D.; Aherne, G. Wynne; Reader, John C.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition. PMID:26295308

  10. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eµ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Walton, Mike I; Eve, Paul D; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E; Perkins, Neil D; Aherne, G Wynne; Reader, John C; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D

    2016-01-19

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4 nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220 nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition. PMID:26295308

  11. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited

  12. ZFP521 contributes to pre-B-cell lymphomagenesis through modulation of the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, T; Takei, Y; Ohmori, R; Imai, Y; Ozeki, M; Tamaki, K; Haga, H; Nakamura, T; Tsuruyama, T

    2016-06-23

    ZFP521 was previously identified as a putative gene involved in induction of B-cell lymphomagenesis. However, the contribution of ZFP521 to lymphomagenesis has not been confirmed. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of ZFP521 in B-cell lymphomagenesis. To this end, we used a retroviral insertion method to show that ZFP521 was a target of mutagenesis in pre-B-lymphoblastic lymphoma cells. The pre-B-cell receptor (pre-BCR) signaling molecules BLNK, BTK and BANK1 were positively regulated by the ZFP521 gene, leading to enhancement of the pre-BCR signaling pathway. In addition, c-myc and c-jun were upregulated following activation of ZFP521. Stimulation of pre-BCR signaling using anti-Vpreb antibodies caused aberrant upregulation of c-myc and c-jun and of Ccnd3, which encodes cyclin D3, thereby inducing the growth of pre-B cells. Stimulation with Vpreb affected the growth of pre-B cells, and addition of interleukin (IL)-7 receptor exerted competitive effects on pre-B-cell growth. Knockdown of BTK and BANK1, targets of ZFP521, suppressed the effects of Vpreb stimulation on cell growth. Furthermore, in human lymphoblastic lymphoma, analogous to pre-B-cell lymphoma in mice, the expression of ZNF521, the homolog of ZFP521 in humans, was upregulated. In conclusion, our data showed that the ZFP521 gene comprehensively induced pre-B-cell lymphomagenesis by modulating the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26522721

  13. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  14. Plasticity and complexity of B cell responses against persisting pathogens.

    PubMed

    Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines against acute infections execute their protective effects almost exclusively via the induction of antibodies. Development of protective vaccines against persisting pathogens lags behind probably because standard immunogens and application regimen do not sufficiently stimulate those circuits in B cell activation that mediate protection. In general, B cell responses against pathogen derived-antigens are generated through complex cellular interactions requiring the coordination of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent findings from prototypic infection models to exemplify how generation of protective antibodies against persisting pathogens is imprinted by particular pathogen-derived factors and how distinct CD4(+) T cell populations determine the quality of these antibodies. Clearly, it is the high plasticity of these processes that is instrumental to drive tailored B cell responses that protect the host. In sum, application of novel knowledge on B cell plasticity and complexity can guide the development of rationally designed vaccines that elicit protective antibodies against persisting pathogens. PMID:25068435

  15. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  16. An ABC transporter and an outer membrane lipoprotein participate in posttranslational activation of type VI secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Maria G; Silverman, Julie M; Sall, Khady M; Boyer, Frédéric; Couté, Yohann; Poirel, Jessica; Grunwald, Didier; Mougous, Joseph D; Elsen, Sylvie; Attree, Ina

    2013-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of injecting protein toxins into other bacterial cells through one of its three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs). The activity of this T6SS is tightly regulated on the posttranslational level by phosphorylation-dependent and -independent pathways. The phosphorylation-dependent pathway consists of a Threonine kinase/phosphatase pair (PpkA/PppA) that acts on a forkhead domain-containing protein, Fha1, and a periplasmic protein, TagR, that positively regulates PpkA. In the present work, we biochemically and functionally characterize three additional proteins of the phosphorylation-dependent regulatory cascade that controls T6S activation: TagT, TagS and TagQ. We show that similar to TagR, these proteins act upstream of the PpkA/PppA checkpoint and influence phosphorylation of Fha1 and, apparatus assembly and effector export. Localization studies demonstrate that TagQ is an outer membrane lipoprotein and TagR is associated with the outer membrane. Consistent with their homology to lipoprotein outer membrane localization (Lol) components, TagT and TagS form a stable inner membrane complex with ATPase activity. However, we find that outer membrane association of T6SS lipoproteins TagQ and TssJ1, and TagR, is unaltered in a ΔtagTS background. Notably, we found that TagQ is indispensible for anchoring of TagR to the outer membrane fraction. As T6S-dependent fitness of P. aeruginosa requires TagT, S, R and Q, we conclude that these proteins likely participate in a trans-membrane signalling pathway that promotes H1-T6SS activity under optimal environmental conditions. PMID:22765374

  17. The anti-lymphoma activity of antiviral therapy in HCV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peveling-Oberhag, J; Arcaini, L; Bankov, K; Zeuzem, S; Herrmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Many epidemiological studies provide solid evidence for an association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). However, the most convincing evidence for a causal relationship between HCV infection and lymphoma development is the observation of B-NHL regression after HCV eradication by antiviral therapy (AVT). We conducted a literature search to identify studies that included patients with HCV-associated B-NHL (HCV-NHL) who received AVT, with the intention to treat lymphoma and viral disease at the same time. The primary end point was the correlation of sustained virological response (SVR) under AVT with lymphoma response. Secondary end points were overall lymphoma response rates and HCV-NHL response in correlation with lymphoma subtypes. We included 20 studies that evaluated the efficacy of AVT in HCV-NHL (n = 254 patients). Overall lymphoma response rate through AVT was 73% [95%>confidence interval, (CI) 67-78%]. Throughout studies there was a strong association between SVR and lymphoma response (83% response rate, 95%>CI, 76-88%) compared to a failure in achieving SVR (53% response rate, 95%>CI, 39-67%, P = 0.0002). There was a trend towards favourable response for AVT in HCV-associated marginal zone lymphomas (response rate 81%, 95%>CI, 74-87%) compared to nonmarginal zone origin (response rate 71%, 95%>CI, 61-79%, P = 0.07). In conclusion, in the current meta-analysis, the overall response rate of HCV-NHL under AVT justifies the recommendation for AVT as first-line treatment in patients who do not need immediate conventional treatment. The strong correlation of SVR and lymphoma regression supports the hypothesis of a causal relationship of HCV and lymphomagenesis. PMID:26924533

  18. Activation of V(D)J Recombination Induces the Formation of Interlocus Joints and Hybrid Joints in scid Pre-B-Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Sandra; Franco, Daniel; Chang, Yung

    2000-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is the mechanism by which antigen receptor genes are assembled. The site-specific cleavage mediated by RAG1 and RAG2 proteins generates two types of double-strand DNA breaks: blunt signal ends and covalently sealed hairpin coding ends. Although these DNA breaks are mainly resolved into coding joints and signal joints, they can participate in a nonstandard joining process, forming hybrid and open/shut joints that link coding ends to signal ends. In addition, the broken DNA molecules excised from different receptor gene loci could potentially be joined to generate interlocus joints. The interlocus recombination process may contribute to the translocation between antigen receptor genes and oncogenes, leading to malignant transformation of lymphocytes. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of these nonstandard recombination events, we took advantage of recombination-inducible cell lines derived from scid homozygous (s/s) and scid heterozygous (s/+) mice by transforming B-cell precursors with a temperature-sensitive Abelson murine leukemia virus mutant (ts-Ab-MLV). We can manipulate the level of recombination cleavage and end resolution by altering the cell culture temperature. By analyzing various recombination products in scid and s/+ ts-Ab-MLV transformants, we report in this study that scid cells make higher levels of interlocus and hybrid joints than their normal counterparts. These joints arise concurrently with the formation of intralocus joints, as well as with the appearance of opened coding ends. The junctions of these joining products exhibit excessive nucleotide deletions, a characteristic of scid coding joints. These data suggest that an inability of scid cells to promptly resolve their recombination ends exposes the ends to a random joining process, which can conceivably lead to chromosomal translocations. PMID:10982833

  19. The SIRT1/TP53 axis is activated upon B-cell receptor triggering via miR-132 up-regulation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gobessi, Stefania; Zucchetto, Antonella; Dereani, Sara; Rossi, Davide; Zaja, Francesco; Pozzato, Gabriele; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca; Laurenti, Luca; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Efremov, Dimitar G.

    2015-01-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). By global microRNA profiling of CLL cells stimulated or not stimulated by anti-IgM, significant up-regulation of microRNAs from the miR-132~212 cluster was observed both in IGHV gene unmutated (UM) and mutated (M) CLL cells. Parallel gene expression profiling identified SIRT1, a deacetylase targeting several proteins including TP53, among the top-ranked miR-132 target genes down-regulated upon anti-IgM exposure. The direct regulation of SIRT1 expression by miR-132 was demonstrated using luciferase assays. The reduction of SIRT1 mRNA and protein (P = 0.001) upon anti-IgM stimulation was associated with an increase in TP53 acetylation (P = 0.007), and the parallel up-regulation of the TP53 target gene CDKN1A. Consistently, miR-132 transfections of CLL-like cells resulted in down-regulation of SIRT1 and an induction of a TP53-dependent apoptosis. Finally, in a series of 134 CLL samples, miR-132, when expressed above the median value, associated with prolonged time-to-first-treatment in patients with M CLL (HR = 0.41; P = 0.02). Collectively, the miR-132/SIRT1/TP53 axis was identified as a novel pathway triggered by BCR engagement that further increases the complexity of the interactions between tumor microenvironments and CLL cells. PMID:26036258

  20. The SIRT1/TP53 axis is activated upon B-cell receptor triggering via miR-132 up-regulation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Dal Bo, Michele; D'Agaro, Tiziana; Gobessi, Stefania; Zucchetto, Antonella; Dereani, Sara; Rossi, Davide; Zaja, Francesco; Pozzato, Gabriele; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca; Laurenti, Luca; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Efremov, Dimitar G; Gattei, Valter; Bomben, Riccardo

    2015-08-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). By global microRNA profiling of CLL cells stimulated or not stimulated by anti-IgM, significant up-regulation of microRNAs from the miR-132~212 cluster was observed both in IGHV gene unmutated (UM) and mutated (M) CLL cells. Parallel gene expression profiling identified SIRT1, a deacetylase targeting several proteins including TP53, among the top-ranked miR-132 target genes down-regulated upon anti-IgM exposure. The direct regulation of SIRT1 expression by miR-132 was demonstrated using luciferase assays. The reduction of SIRT1 mRNA and protein (P = 0.001) upon anti-IgM stimulation was associated with an increase in TP53 acetylation (P = 0.007), and the parallel up-regulation of the TP53 target gene CDKN1A. Consistently, miR-132 transfections of CLL-like cells resulted in down-regulation of SIRT1 and an induction of a TP53-dependent apoptosis. Finally, in a series of 134 CLL samples, miR-132, when expressed above the median value, associated with prolonged time-to-first-treatment in patients with M CLL (HR = 0.41; P = 0.02). Collectively, the miR-132/SIRT1/TP53 axis was identified as a novel pathway triggered by BCR engagement that further increases the complexity of the interactions between tumor microenvironments and CLL cells. PMID:26036258

  1. Three ways to learn the ABCs.

    PubMed

    Ng, M; Yanofsky, M F

    2000-02-01

    The ABC model of flower development represents a milestone in explaining how the fate of emerging floral organ primordia is specified. This model states that organ identity is specified by different combinations of the activities of the A, B and C class homeotic genes. In spite of the remarkable simplicity of this model, the complex regulatory interactions that establish the initial pattern of A, B and C gene activity have yet to be fully explained. It has been shown that the LEAFY gene functions early to promote flower meristem identity, and that it is subsequently required for the normal expression of the ABC genes. Recently, LEAFY has been identified as an immediate upstream regulator of the floral homeotic genes, thus opening up an avenue to examine the transcriptional interactions that underlie floral patterning. PMID:10679448

  2. Biochemical identification of a neutral sphingomyelinase 1 (NSM1)-like enzyme as the major NSM activity in the DT40 B-cell line: absence of a role in the apoptotic response to endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed Central

    Fensome, Amanda C; Josephs, Michelle; Katan, Matilda; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    DT40 cells have approx. 10-fold higher Mg2+-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase (NSM) activity in comparison with other B-cell lines and contain very low acidic sphingomyelinase activity. Purification of this activity from DT40 cell membranes suggested the presence of one major NSM isoform. Although complete purification of this isoform could not be achieved, partially purified fractions were examined further with regard to the known characteristics of previously partially purified NSMs and the two cloned enzymes exhibiting in vitro NSM activity (NSM1 and NSM2). For a direct comparative study, highly purified brain preparations, purified NSM1 protein and Bacillus cereus enzyme were used. Analysis of the enzymic properties of the partially purified DT40 NSM, such as cation dependence, substrate specificity, redox regulation and stimulation by phosphatidylserine, together with the localization of this enzyme to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggested that this NSM from DT40 cells corresponds to NSM1. Further studies aimed to correlate presence of the high levels of this NSM1-like activity in DT40 cells with the ability of these cells to accumulate ceramide and undergo apoptosis. When DT40 cells were stimulated to apoptose by a variety of agents, including the ER stress, an increase in endogenous ceramide levels was observed. However, these responses were not enhanced compared with another B-cell line (Nalm-6), characterized by low sphingomyelinase activity. In addition, DT40 cells were not more susceptible to ceramide accumulation and apoptosis when exposed to the ER stress compared with other apoptotic agents. Inhibition of de novo synthesis of ceramide partially inhibited its accumulation, indicating that the ceramide production in DT40 cells could be complex and, under some conditions, could involve both sphingomyelin hydrolysis and ceramide synthesis. PMID:12071841

  3. Levels of expression of CD19 and CD20 in chronic B cell leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Ginaldi, L; De Martinis, M; Matutes, E; Farahat, N; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether the antigen levels of the B cell lineage markers CD19 and CD20 can distinguish between normal and neoplastic B cells or characterise distinct expression patterns among the chronic B cell leukaemias. METHODS: Peripheral blood cells from 70 patients with B cell disorders and 17 healthy donors were analysed by quantitative flow cytometry. Direct immunofluorescence staining was performed with phycoerythrin conjugated CD19 and CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values into number of antigen molecules/cell, expressed as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD19 and CD20 ABC values in leukaemic B cells differed from those of normal blood B lymphocytes. The results identified distinct profiles of CD19 and CD20 expression in the various types of B cell leukaemias. In all leukaemias studied except hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), CD19 expression was significantly lower than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (22 (7) x 10(3) molecules/cell), as follows: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), 13 (7) x 10(3); B prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL), 16 (9) x 10(3); splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes (SLVL), 15 (11) x 10(3); mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 10 (7) x 10(3). In HCL there was strong CD19 expression (38 (16) x 10(3)). In contrast, the level of expression of membrane CD20 was higher than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (94 (16) x 10(3) molecules/cell) in MCL (123 (51) x 10(3)); B-PLL (129 (47) x 10(3)); SLVL (167 (72) x 10(3)); and HCL (312 (110) x 10(3)); while it was significantly lower (65 (11) x 10(3)) in CLL compared with normal B cells and the other B cell leukaemias. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative determination of CD19 and CD20 may provide useful diagnostic information for the study of B lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:9708202

  4. The human fetal lymphocyte lineage: identification by CD27 and LIN28B expression in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie; Su, Kuei-Ying; Liang, Xiaoe; Liao, Dongmei; Floyd, Serina; Amos, Joshua; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kuraoka, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    CD27, a member of the TNFR superfamily, is used to identify human memory B cells. Nonetheless, CD27+ B cells are present in patients with HIGM1 syndrome who are unable to generate GCs or memory B cells. CD27+IgD+ fetal B cells are present in umbilical cord blood, and CD27 may also be a marker of the human B1-like B cells. To define the origin of naïve CD27+IgD+ human B cells, we studied B cell development in both fetal and adult tissues. In human FL, most CD19+ cells coexpressed CD10, a marker of human developing B cells. Some CD19+CD10+ B cells expressed CD27, and these fetal CD27+ cells were present in the pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cell compartments. Lower frequencies of phenotypically identical cells were also identified in adult BM. CD27+ pro-B, pre-B, and immature/transitional B cells expressed recombination activating gene-1, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and Vpre-B mRNA comparably to their CD27− counterparts. CD27+ and CD27− developing B cells showed similar Ig heavy chain gene usage with low levels of mutations, suggesting that CD27+ developing B cells are distinct from mutated memory B cells. Despite these similarities, CD27+ developing B cells differed from CD27− developing B cells by their increased expression of LIN28B, a transcription factor associated with the fetal lymphoid lineages of mice. Furthermore, CD27+ pro-B cells efficiently generated IgM+IgD+ immature/transitional B cells in vitro. Our observations suggest that CD27 expression during B cell development identifies a physiologic state or lineage for human B cell development distinct from the memory B cell compartment. PMID:23901121

  5. Analyzing health care operations using ABC.

    PubMed

    Ross, Thomas K

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of health care created a climate in which cost was subordinate to medical treatment. Current reimbursement constraints have increased the need for providers to be cost conscious, but they have discovered that current accounting practices do not provide the appropriate information to determine the cost of service or make decisions. This article argues that activity-based costing (ABC) can bridge the gap between the medical and financial communities and provide a foundation for performance improvement. PMID:15151193

  6. Activation of the p53 pathway by the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin-3a overcomes BCL2 overexpression in a preclinical model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with t(14;18)(q32;q21)

    PubMed Central

    Drakos, E; Singh, R R; Rassidakis, G Z; Schlette, E; Li, J; Claret, F X; Ford, R J; Vega, F; Medeiros, L J

    2011-01-01

    p53 is frequently wild type (wt) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) associated with t(14;18)(q32;q21) that overexpresses BCL2. Nutlin-3a is a small molecule that activates the p53 pathway by disrupting p53–MDM2 interaction. We show that nutlin-3a activates p53 in DLBCL cells associated with t(14;18)(q32;q21), BCL2 overexpression and wt p53, resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Nutlin-3a treatment had similar effects on DLBCL cells of activated B-cell phenotype with wt p53. Cell cycle arrest was associated with upregulation of p21. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis was accompanied by BAX and PUMA upregulation, BCL-XL downregulation, serine-70 dephosphorylation of BCL2, direct binding of BCL2 by p53, caspase-9 upregulation and caspase-3 cleavage. Cell death was reduced when p53-dependent transactivation activity was inhibited by pifithrin-α (PFT-α), or PFT-μ inhibited direct p53 targeting of mitochondria. Nutlin-3a sensitized activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by BCL2 inhibitors in t(14;18)-positive DLBCL cells with wt p53, and enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity against t(14;18)-positive DLBCL cells with wt or mutant p53, the latter in part via p73 upregulation. Nutlin-3a treatment in a xenograft animal lymphoma model inhibited growth of t(14;18)-positive DLBCL tumors, associated with increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. These data suggest that disruption of the p53–MDM2 interaction by nutlin-3a offers a novel therapeutic approach for DLBCL associated with t(14;18)(q32;q21). PMID:21394100

  7. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  8. ABC triblock surface active block copolymer with grafted ethoxylated fluoroalkyl amphiphilic side chains for marine antifouling/fouling-release applications.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Craig J; Finlay, John A; Park, Daewon; Paik, Marvin Y; Krishnan, Sitaraman; Sundaram, Harihara S; Dimitriou, Michael; Sohn, Karen E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Handlin, Dale L; Willis, Carl L; Kramer, Edward J; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-10-20

    An amphiphilic triblock surface-active block copolymer (SABC) possessing ethoxylated fluoroalkyl side chains was synthesized through the chemical modification of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polyisoprene polymer precursor. Bilayer coatings on glass slides consisting of a thin layer of the amphiphilic SABC spray coated on a thick layer of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomer were prepared for biofouling assays with the green alga Ulva and the diatom Navicula. Dynamic water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surfaces. Additionally, the effect of the Young's modulus of the coating on the release properties of sporelings (young plants) of the green alga Ulva was examined through the use of two different SEBS thermoplastic elastomers possessing modulus values of an order of magnitude in difference. The amphiphilic SABC was found to reduce the settlement density of zoospores of Ulva as well as the strength of attachment of sporelings. The attachment strength of the sporelings was further reduced for the amphiphilic SABC on the "low"-modulus SEBS base layer. The weaker adhesion of diatoms, relative to a PDMS standard, further highlights the antifouling potential of this amphiphilic triblock hybrid copolymer. PMID:19821626

  9. CD46-induced human Tregs enhance B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Atkinson, John P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Kemper, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs) are important modulators of the immune response. Different types of Tregs have been identified based on whether they are thymically derived (natural Tregs) or induced in the periphery (adaptive Tregs). We recently reported on an adaptive Treg phenotype that can be induced by the concomitant stimulation of human CD4+ T cells through CD3 and the membrane complement regulator CD46. These complement-induced Treg cells (cTreg) potently inhibit bystander T cell proliferation through high-level secretion of IL-10. In addition, cTreg express granzyme B and exhibit cytotoxic effects towards activated effector T cells. Here we analyzed the effect of cTreg on B cell functions in a co-culture system. We found that cTreg enhance B cell antibody production. This B cell support is dependent on cell/cell contact as well as cTreg-derived IL-10. In addition, we show that T cells from a CD46-deficient patient are not capable of promoting B cell responses, whereas CD46-deficient B cells have no intrinsic defect in Ig production. This finding may relate to a subset of CD46-deficient patients who present with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Thus, the lack of cTreg function in optimizing B cell responses could explain why some CD46-deficient patients develop CVID. PMID:19784949

  10. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership. PMID:25591467

  11. SOCS1 Mutation Subtypes Predict Divergent Outcomes in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Christian W.; Bentink, Stefan; Kreuz, Markus; Melzner, Ingo; Ritz, Olga; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Möller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is frequently mutated in primary mediastinal and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Currently, the prognostic relevance of these mutations in DLBCL is unknown. To evaluate the value of the SOCS1 mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in DLBCL patients, we performed full-length SOCS1 sequencing in tumors of 154 comprehensively characterized DLBCL patients. We identified 90 SOCS1 mutations in 16% of lymphomas. With respect to molecular consequences of mutations, we defined two distinct subtypes: those with truncating (major) and those with non-truncating mutations (minor), respectively. The SOCS1 mutated subgroup or the minor/major subtypes cannot be predicted on clinical grounds; however, assignment of four established gene-expression profile-based classifiers revealed significant associations of SOCS1 major cases with germinal center and specific pathway activation pattern signatures. Above all, SOCS1 major cases have an excellent overall survival, even better than the GCB-like subgroup. SOCS1 minor cases had a dismal survival, even worse than the ABC gene signature group. The SOCS1 mutation subsets retained prognostic significance in uni- and multivariate analyses. Together our data indicate that assessment of the SOCS1 mutation status is a single gene prognostic biomarker in DLBCL. PMID:23296022

  12. The ABCs of Safe BBQing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158343.html The ABCs of Safe BBQing National Fire Protection Association offers tips for outdoor cooking To ... well-seasoned meats also comes a risk of fires and burns, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ...

  13. The ABCs of Sex Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroka, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Cites statistics on extent of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies among adolescents; describes ideological dispute over how to teach sex education; advocates teaching the ABCs of sex education: Abstinence, Be Monogamous, and Condoms. (PKP)

  14. Interleukin 4 reduces expression of inhibitory receptors on B cells and abolishes CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated B cell suppression.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Elizabeth U; Cutler, Antony J; Pritchard, Nicholas R; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2002-04-15

    Inhibitory receptors CD22, Fc gamma RII (CD32), CD72, and paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-B are critically involved in negatively regulating the B cell immune response and in preventing autoimmunity. Here we show that interleukin 4 (IL-4) reduces expression of all four on activated B cells at the level of messenger RNA and protein. This reduced expression is dependent on continuous exposure to IL-4 and is mediated through Stat6. Coligation of Fc gamma RII to the B cell receptor (BCR) via intact IgG increases the B cell activation threshold and suppresses antigen presentation. IL-4 completely abolishes these negative regulatory effects of Fc gamma RII. CD22 coligation with the BCR also suppresses activation -- this suppression too is abolished by IL-4. Thus, IL-4 is likely to enhance the B cell immune response by releasing B cells from inhibitory receptor suppression. By this coordinate reduction in expression of inhibitory receptors, and release from CD22 and Fc gamma RII-mediated inhibition, IL-4 is likely to play a role in T cell help of B cells and the development of T helper cell type 2 responses. Conversely, B cell activation in the absence of IL-4 would be more difficult to achieve, contributing to the maintenance of B cell tolerance in the absence of T cell help. PMID:11956299

  15. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  16. Nodal marginal zone B cells in mice: a novel subset with dormant self-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Friedrich, Heike C.; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, representing a distinct subset of innate-like B cells, mount rapid T-independent responses to blood-borne antigens. They express low-affinity polyreactive antigen receptors that recognize both foreign and self-structures. The spleen is considered the exclusive site for murine MZ B cells. However, we have here identified B cells with a MZ B-cell phenotype in the subcapsular sinuses of mouse lymph nodes. The nodal MZ (nMZ) B cells display high levels of IgM, costimulators and TLRs, and are represented by naïve and memory cells. The frequency of nMZ B cells is about 1–6% of nodal B cells depending on mouse strain, with higher numbers in older mice and a trend of increased numbers in females. There is a significant expansion of nMZ B cells following immunization with an autoantigen, but not after likewise immunization with a control protein or with the adjuvant alone. The nMZ B cells secrete autoantibodies upon activation and can efficiently present autoantigen to cognate T cells in vitro, inducing T-cell proliferation. The existence of self-reactive MZ B cells in lymph nodes may be a source of autoantigen-presenting cells that in an unfortunate environment may activate T cells leading to autoimmunity. PMID:27277419

  17. ABC transporters and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Denise M T; Huynh, Tony; Truong, Alan M; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer of infancy and accounts for 15% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Survival rates of high-risk neuroblastoma remain less than 50%, with amplification of the MYCN oncogene the most important aberration associated with poor outcome. Direct transcriptional targets of MYCN include a number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, of which ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC3 (MRP3), and ABCC4 (MRP4) are the best characterized. These three transporter genes have been shown to be strongly prognostic of neuroblastoma outcome in primary untreated neuroblastoma. In addition to their ability to efflux a number of chemotherapeutic drugs, evidence suggests that these transporters also contribute to neuroblastoma outcome independent of any role in cytotoxic drug efflux. Endogenous substrates of ABCC1 and ABCC4 that may be potential candidates affecting neuroblastoma biology include molecules such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. These bioactive lipid mediators have the ability to influence biological processes contributing to cancer initiation and progression, such as angiogenesis, cell signaling, inflammation, proliferation, and migration and invasion. ABCC1 and ABCC4 are thus potential targets for therapeutic suppression in high-risk neuroblastoma, and recently developed small-molecule inhibitors may be an effective strategy in treating aggressive forms of this cancer, as well as other cancers that express high levels of these transporters. PMID:25640269

  18. Therapeutic targeting of B cells for rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Lozano, Francisco; Bosch, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Autoreactive B cells are characterized by their ability to secrete autoantibodies directed against self-peptides. During the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that B lymphocytes not only produce autoantibodies but also exert important regulatory roles independent of their function as antibody-producing cells. This is especially relevant in the context of autoimmunity, because autoreactive B cells have been shown to possess the ability to activate pathogenic T cells, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to promote the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in target organs. The production of monoclonal antibodies against B-cell-surface molecules has facilitated the characterization of several distinct B lymphocyte subsets. These cell-surface molecules have not only served as useful cell differentiation markers but have also helped to unravel the important biological functions of these cells. Some of these molecules, all of which are expressed on the cell surface, have proven to be effective therapeutic targets. In both animal models and in clinical assays, the efficient elimination of B lymphocytes has been shown to be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The treatment of most rheumatic autoimmune diseases relies mainly on the use of cytotoxic immunosuppressants and corticosteroids. Although this has resulted in improved disease survival, patients may nonetheless suffer severe adverse events and, in some cases, their relapse rate remains high. The increasing need for safer and more effective drugs along with burgeoning new insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders has fueled interest in biological agents; clinical trials involving the B-cell depletion agent rituximab have been especially promising. This article reviews the current knowledge of B-cell biology and pathogenesis as well as the modern therapeutic approaches for rheumatic autoimmune diseases focusing in particular on the targeting of B-cell

  19. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques induces selective tissue specific B cell defects in double positive CD21+CD27+ memory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arpita; Veazey, Ronald S.; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A.; Xu, Huanbin; Pahar, Bapi

    2011-01-01

    B cell dysfunction represents a central feature in HIV infection and pathogenesis. Our recent studies have shown that peripheral and lymphoid double positive CD21+CD27+ B cells were able to become activated and proliferate at higher rates than other B cell subpopulations. Increased proliferation of tonsillar memory B cells were identified compared to other tissues examined. Here, we demonstrate the decreased proliferation of tonsillar memory (CD21+CD27+) B cells during acute SIV infection also suggests that these cells may play an important role in SIV pathogenesis. Our findings demonstrate that SIV infection may induce selective defective responses in specific tissues, by suppressing memory B cell proliferation in tissues. PMID:21622026

  1. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  2. Peroxisomal ABC transporters: functions and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alison; Carrier, David J.; Schaedler, Theresia; Waterham, Hans R.; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are arguably the most biochemically versatile of all eukaryotic organelles. Their metabolic functions vary between different organisms, between different tissue types of the same organism and even between different developmental stages or in response to changed environmental conditions. New functions for peroxisomes are still being discovered and their importance is underscored by the severe phenotypes that can arise as a result of peroxisome dysfunction. The β-oxidation pathway is central to peroxisomal metabolism, but the substrates processed are very diverse, reflecting the diversity of peroxisomes across species. Substrates for β-oxidation enter peroxisomes via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of subfamily D; (ABCD) and are activated by specific acyl CoA synthetases for further metabolism. Humans have three peroxisomal ABCD family members, which are half transporters that homodimerize and have distinct but partially overlapping substrate specificity; Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two half transporters that heterodimerize and plants have a single peroxisomal ABC transporter that is a fused heterodimer and which appears to be the single entry point into peroxisomes for a very wide variety of β-oxidation substrates. Our studies suggest that the Arabidopsis peroxisomal ABC transporter AtABCD1 accepts acyl CoA substrates, cleaves them before or during transport followed by reactivation by peroxisomal synthetases. We propose that this is a general mechanism to provide specificity to this class of transporters and by which amphipathic compounds are moved across peroxisome membranes. PMID:26517910

  3. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  4. FCRL regulation in innate-like B cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall S

    2015-12-01

    Coelomic cavity-derived B-1 and splenic marginal zone (MZ) B lymphocytes play principal roles in frontline host protection at homeostasis and during primary humoral immune responses. Although they share many features that enable rapid and broad-based defense against pathogens, these innate-like subsets have disparate B cell receptor (BCR) signaling features. Members of the Fc receptor-like (FCRL) family are preferentially expressed by B cells and possess tyrosine-based immunoregulatory function. An unusual characteristic of many of these cell surface proteins is the presence of both inhibitory (ITIM) and activating (ITAM-like) motifs in their cytoplasmic tails. In mice, FCRL5 is a discrete marker of splenic MZ and peritoneal B-1 B cells and has both ITIM and ITAM-like sequences. Recent work explored its signaling properties and identified that FCRL5 differentially influences innate-like BCR function. Closer scrutiny of these differences disclosed the ability of FCRL5 to counter-regulate BCR activation by recruiting SHP-1 and Lyn to its cytoplasmic motifs. Furthermore, the disparity in FCRL5 regulation between MZ and B-1 B cells correlated with relative intracellular concentrations of SHP-1. These findings validate and extend our understanding of the unique signaling features in innate-like B cells and provide new insight into the complexity of FCRL modulation. PMID:25964091

  5. Marginal zone B cells emerge as a critical component of pregnancy well-being.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Damián O; Ziegler, Katharina B; Ehrhardt, Jens; Zygmunt, Marek; Jensen, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The success of eutherian mammal evolution was certainly supported by the ability of the already existing immune system to adapt to the presence of the semi-allogeneic fetus without losing the capability to defend the mother against infections. This required the acquisition of highly regulated and coordinated immunological mechanisms. Failures in the development of these strategies not only lead to the interruption of pregnancy but also compromise maternal health. Alongside changes on the cytokine profile - expansion of tolerogenic dendritic and regulatory T cells - a profound adaptation of the B cell compartment during pregnancy was recently described. Among others, the suppression of B cell lymphopoiesis and B cell lymphopenia were proposed to be protective mechanisms tending to reduce the occurrence of autoreactive B cells that might recognize fetal structures and put pregnancy on risk. On the other hand, expansion of the pre-activated marginal zone (MZ) B cell phenotype was described as a compensatory strategy launched to overcome B cell lymphopenia thus ensuring a proper defense. In this work, using an animal model of pregnancy disturbances, we demonstrated that the suppression of B cell lymphopoiesis as well as splenic B cell lymphopenia occur independently of pregnancy outcome. However, only animals undergoing normal pregnancies, but not those suffering from pregnancy disturbances, could induce an expansion and activation of the MZ B cells. Hence, our results clearly show that MZ B cells, probably due to the production of natural protective antibodies, participate in the fine balance of immune activation required for pregnancy well-being. PMID:26493101

  6. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  7. MEK Inhibition Sensitizes Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) Cells to Dexamethasone through Modulation of mTOR Activity and Stimulation of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Polak, Anna; Kiliszek, Przemysław; Sewastianik, Tomasz; Szydłowski, Maciej; Jabłońska, Ewa; Białopiotrowicz, Emilia; Górniak, Patryk; Markowicz, Sergiusz; Nowak, Eliza; Grygorowicz, Monika A; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub; Giebel, Sebastian; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Juszczyński, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to glucocorticosteroids (GCs) is a major adverse prognostic factor in B-ALL, but the molecular mechanisms leading to GC resistance are not completely understood. Herein, we sought to elucidate the molecular background of GC resistance in B-ALL and characterize the therapeutic potential of targeted intervention in these mechanisms. Using exploratory bioinformatic approaches, we found that resistant cells exhibited significantly higher expression of MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway components. We found that GC-resistant ALL cell lines had markedly higher baseline activity of MEK and small-molecule MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib increased GCs-induced cell death. MEK inhibitor similarly increased in vitro dexamethasone activity in primary ALL blasts from 19 of 22 tested patients. To further confirm these observations, we overexpressed a constitutively active MEK mutant in GC-sensitive cells and found that forced MEK activity induced resistance to dexamethasone. Since recent studies highlight the role GC-induced autophagy upstream of apoptotic cell death, we assessed LC3 processing, MDC staining and GFP-LC3 relocalization in cells incubated with either DEX, SEL or combination of drugs. Unlike either drug alone, only their combination markedly increased these markers of autophagy. These changes were associated with decreased mTOR activity and blocked 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. In cells with silenced beclin-1 (BCN1), required for autophagosome formation, the synergy of DEX and SEL was markedly reduced. Taken together, we show that MEK inhibitor selumetinib enhances dexamethasone toxicity in GC-resistant B-ALL cells. The underlying mechanism of this interaction involves inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway and modulation of autophagy markers, likely reflecting induction of this process and required for cell death. Thus, our data demonstrate that modulation of MEK/ERK pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy overcoming GC resistance in B-ALL patients. PMID:27196001

  8. MEK Inhibition Sensitizes Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) Cells to Dexamethasone through Modulation of mTOR Activity and Stimulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Anna; Kiliszek, Przemysław; Sewastianik, Tomasz; Szydłowski, Maciej; Jabłońska, Ewa; Białopiotrowicz, Emilia; Górniak, Patryk; Markowicz, Sergiusz; Nowak, Eliza; Grygorowicz, Monika A.; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub; Giebel, Sebastian; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Juszczyński, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to glucocorticosteroids (GCs) is a major adverse prognostic factor in B-ALL, but the molecular mechanisms leading to GC resistance are not completely understood. Herein, we sought to elucidate the molecular background of GC resistance in B-ALL and characterize the therapeutic potential of targeted intervention in these mechanisms. Using exploratory bioinformatic approaches, we found that resistant cells exhibited significantly higher expression of MEK/ERK (MAPK) pathway components. We found that GC-resistant ALL cell lines had markedly higher baseline activity of MEK and small-molecule MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib increased GCs-induced cell death. MEK inhibitor similarly increased in vitro dexamethasone activity in primary ALL blasts from 19 of 22 tested patients. To further confirm these observations, we overexpressed a constitutively active MEK mutant in GC-sensitive cells and found that forced MEK activity induced resistance to dexamethasone. Since recent studies highlight the role GC-induced autophagy upstream of apoptotic cell death, we assessed LC3 processing, MDC staining and GFP-LC3 relocalization in cells incubated with either DEX, SEL or combination of drugs. Unlike either drug alone, only their combination markedly increased these markers of autophagy. These changes were associated with decreased mTOR activity and blocked 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. In cells with silenced beclin-1 (BCN1), required for autophagosome formation, the synergy of DEX and SEL was markedly reduced. Taken together, we show that MEK inhibitor selumetinib enhances dexamethasone toxicity in GC-resistant B-ALL cells. The underlying mechanism of this interaction involves inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway and modulation of autophagy markers, likely reflecting induction of this process and required for cell death. Thus, our data demonstrate that modulation of MEK/ERK pathway is an attractive therapeutic strategy overcoming GC resistance in B-ALL patients. PMID:27196001

  9. The regulation of the B-cell gene expression programme by Pax5.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa L; Pridans, Clare; Nutt, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    The activity of the transcription factor paired box gene 5 (Pax5) is essential for many aspects of B lymphopoiesis including the initial commitment to the lineage, immunoglobulin rearrangement, pre-B cell receptor signalling and maintaining cell identity in mature B cells. Deregulated or reduced Pax5 activity has also been implicated in B-cell malignancies both in human disease and mouse models. Candidate gene approaches and biochemical analysis have revealed that Pax5 regulates B lymphopoiesis by concurrently activating B cell-specific gene expression as well as repressing the expression of genes, many of which are associated with non-B cell lineages. These studies have b