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Sample records for activated barrier hopping

  1. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. II. Thermal liquids.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-05-21

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement. PMID:24852550

  2. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-05-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  3. Correlated barrier hopping of CuO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshy, Jiji; Soosen, Samuel. M.; Chandran, Anoop; George, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ac conduction mechanism in copper oxide nanoparticles with 8 nm size, synthesized by a precipitation method was studied by analyzing ac conductivity in the frequency range of 50 Hz-1 MHz and in the temperature range of 373-573 K. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed for the structural and morphological characterization of CuO nanoparticles. The experimental and theoretical investigations suggested that the ac conduction mechanism in CuO nanoparticles can be successfully explained by a correlated barrier hopping model, which provided reasonable values for the maximum barrier height and characteristic relaxation time. It was also found that bipolaron hopping become prominent up to a particular temperature and beyond that single polaron hopping predominates. Physical parameters such as hopping distance and density of defect states were also calculated. Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of a surface defect in CuO nanoparticles.

  4. Isoxanthohumol--Biologically active hop flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Żołnierczyk, Anna Katarzyna; Mączka, Wanda Krystyna; Grabarczyk, Małgorzata; Wińska, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Edyta; Anioł, Mirosław

    2015-06-01

    Isoxanthohumol (IXN), apart from xanthohumol (XN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), is one of the most important prenylflavonoids found in hops. Another natural source of this compound is a shrub Sophora flavescens, used in traditional Chinese medicine. Main dietary source of IXN is beer, and the compound is produced from XN during wort boiling. In the human body, the compound is O-demethylated to 8PN, the strongest known phytoestrogen. This process takes place in the liver and in the intestine, where it is mediated by local microflora. It has been reported in some studies that even though beer contains small amounts of hops and its preparations, these compounds may affect the functioning of the human body. IXN exhibits an antiproliferative activity against human cell lines typical for breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian cancer (A-2780), prostate cancer (DU145 and PC-3), and colon cancer (HT-29 and SW620) cells. It strongly inhibits the activation of the following carcinogens: 2-amino-3-methylimidazol-[4,5-f]quinoline and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) via human cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2). It also inhibits the production of prostate specific antigen (PSA). IXN significantly reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the case of invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It interferes with JAK/STAT signaling pathway and inhibits the expression of pro1inflammatory genes in the monoblastic leukemia cell line (MonoMac6). It activates apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). In addition, IXN shows an antiviral activity towards herpes viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). PMID:25771121

  5. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivity (σac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  6. Coherent charge transport through an interface between a superconductor and hopping insulator: Role of barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkengen, M.; Bergli, J.; Galperin, Y. M.

    2006-11-01

    At low temperatures and voltages tunneling transport through an interface between a superconductor and hopping insulator is dominated by coherent two-electron tunneling between the Cooper-pair condensate and pairs of localized states [Kozub , Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 107004 (2006)]. By detailed analysis of such transport we show that the interface resistance is extremely sensitive to the properties of the tunneling barriers, as well as to the asymptotic behavior of the localized states. In particular, a dramatic cancellation takes place for hydrogenlike impurities and ideal barriers. However, some disorder can lift the cancellations, restoring the interface transport. We also study the non-Ohmic behavior of the interface resistor and show that it is sensitive to the Coulomb correlation of the occupation probabilities of the involved localized states. It is expected that the non-Ohmic contribution to the I-V curve will experience pronounced mesoscopic (fingerprint) fluctuations.

  7. Ab initio calculation of diffusion barriers for Cu adatom hopping on Cu(1 0 0) surface and evolution of atomic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Gan, Jie; Li, Qian; Gao, Kun; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Wu, Jiada

    2011-06-01

    The self-diffusion dynamics of Cu adatoms on Cu(1 0 0) surface has been studied based on the calculation of the energy barriers for various hopping events using lattice-gas based approach and a modified model. To simplify the description of the interactions and the calculation of the energy barrier, a three-tier hierarchy of description of atomic configurations was conceived in which the active adatom and its nearest atoms were chosen to constitute basic configuration and taken as a whole to study many-body interactions of the atoms in various atomic configurations, whereas the impacts of the next nearest atoms on the diffusion of the active adatom were considered as multi-site interactions. Besides the simple hopping of single adatoms, the movements of dimers and trimers as the results of multiple hopping events have also been examined. Taking into account the hopping events of all adatoms, the stability of atomic configurations has been examined and the evolution of atomic configurations has also been analyzed.

  8. Three-dimensional numerical simulations for activated hopping conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Dan S.; Shegelski, Mark R. A.

    1988-07-01

    We model hopping conduction in a three-dimensional, lightly doped compensated semiconductor using a Miller-Abrahams-type resistor network. A flat density of states of width Δɛ is used. We work with the full expression for the resistances instead of the T-->0 asymptotic form usually employed. We report the first detailed numerical calculations of the overall resistance of a three-dimensional resistor network using this full expression. We find a temperature regime where the hopping conduction has a ratio of activation energy to bandwidth ɛ~3=ɛ3/Δɛ=0.217(8). This value agrees with the analytically determined value calculated by Shegelski and Barrie (SB), and disagrees with results reported by other workers, thereby validating SB's analytic theory and their claim that the full expression for the resistor network should be used in calculations of ɛ~3. An investigation is made into the dependence of ɛ~3 on Δɛ we find, in qualitative agreement with SB, that ɛ~3 decreases with Δɛ and we present improved values for ɛ~3 as a function of Δɛ.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of hop extracts against Listeria monocytogenes in media and in food.

    PubMed

    Larson, A E; Yu, R R; Lee, O A; Price, S; Haas, G J; Johnson, E A

    1996-12-01

    Growth of Listeria monocytogenes was inhibited in culture media and in certain foods by four hop extracts (I-IV) containing varying concentrations of alpha-and beta-acids. Extracts (II and III) containing the highest concentrations of beta-acids were inhibitory at 0.01 mg/l in trypticase soy broth. In food, these hop extracts showed varying magnitudes of inhibition. In coleslaw, hop extract III at 1 mg/g enhanced the rate of inactivation of L. monocytogenes Scott A. Hop extract II was inhibitory at 0.1 and 1 mg/ml in skim and 2% milk, and was inhibitory at 1 mg/ml in whole milk. Hop extract II was listericidal in cottage cheese at 0.1 to 3 g/kg. No inhibition of L. monocytogenes by hop extract III was observed in Camembert cheese. Overall, the antimicrobial activity of hop extracts in food appeared to increase with acidity and lower fat content. Our results indicate that hop extracts could be used to control L. monocytogenes in minimally processed food with low fat content. PMID:8930705

  10. Hop, an active Mutator-like element in the genome of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, Fabienne; Grimaldi, Christine; Kaper, Fiona; Langin, Thierry; Daboussi, Marie-Josée

    2003-08-01

    A new type of active DNA transposon has been identified in the genome of Fusarium oxysporum by its transposition into the niaD target gene. Two insertions within the final exon, in opposite orientations at the same nucleotide site, have been characterized. These elements, called Hop, are 3,299 bp long, with perfect terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 99 bp. The sequencing of genomic copies reveals a 9-bp target site duplication and no apparent sequence specificity at the insertion sites. The sequencing of a cDNA indicates that Hop does not contain an intron and encodes a putative transposase of 836 amino acids. The structural features (length, TIRs size, and 9-bp duplication), together with the presence of conserved domains in the transposase, strongly suggest that Hop is a Mutator-like element (MULE). Hop is thus the first active member of this family found beyond plants. The high rate of excision observed indicates that Hop is very active and thus represents a promising efficient tagging system for the isolation of fungal genes. The distribution of Hop elements within the Fusarium genus revealed that they are present in different species, suggesting that related elements could be present in other fungal genomes. In fact, Hop-related sequences have been identified in the survey of the entire genome sequence of three other ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa, and Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:12777515

  11. Electrochemical versus spectrophotometric assessment of antioxidant activity of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) products and individual compounds.

    PubMed

    Gorjanović, Stanislava; Pastor, Ferenc T; Vasić, Radica; Novaković, Miroslav; Simonović, Mladen; Milić, Sonja; Sužnjević, Desanka

    2013-09-25

    Antioxidant (AO) activity of extracts of hop cones (Serbian domestic varieties) and commercial hop products (Saaz, Spalter, Spalter select, and Magnum pellets) was determined by parallel application of recently developed direct current (DC) polarographic and widely used DPPH assay. Correlations between 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging and total phenolics (TPC) determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay (FC) (0.99), and between H2O2 scavenging (HPS) and humulone content (H) determined by conductometric method (0.94), total resins (TR) (0.85), and hop storage index (HIS) (-0.90), were found statistically significant at p < 0.05 level while complete lack of HPS correlation with TPC and DPPH was observed. To obtain an insight into differences between results of AO assays applied, activity of individual compounds, prevalent hop phenolics, and bitter acids was determined. By far superior HPS activity of humulone was followed by catechin, quercetin, xanthohumol, lupulone, and rutin. In contrast, DPPH scavenging activity of phenolics (quercetin > catechin > rutin > xantohumol) was found substantially higher than activity of bitter acids. According to ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and scavenging of 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), higher AO activity was ascribed to phenolics, while almost neglecting humulone. Besides reliability, low cost, and an easy-to-handle procedure, an ability to recognize humulone as the major contributor of hop AO activity could allow DC polarographic assay to be applied in analysis of various hop-derived products. PMID:23971792

  12. Oestrogenicity of prenylflavonoids from hops: activation of pro-oestrogens by intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Possemiers, Sam; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-04-01

    For many centuries, hops (Humulus lupulus L.) have been used as essential ingredient in beers, providing the typical bitterness and hoppy flavour. However, the last few years the plant has gained increasing attention as a source of prenylflavonoids and in 1999, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) was identified as the most potent phyto-oestrogen known so far. Hop extracts are therefore now marketed to reduce menopausal complaints. However, 8-PN concentrations in hops are very low, and variable efficiency of these extracts was observed. Yet, hops also contain isoxanthohumol (IX) in much higher amounts (IX/8-PN ratio in hop extracts is typically 10-20). This article reviews our recent findings on how the human intestinal microbiota may activate IX. Depending on inter-individual differences in the intestinal transformation potential, this conversion could easily increase the 8-PN exposure 10-fold. The variability in efficacy of hop extracts may therefore be explained by variable intestinal metabolism. Based on this scientific knowledge, an innovative strategy was developed to decrease this variability. First, Eubacterium limosum, capable of rapidly metabolizing all IX into 8-PN, was isolated from the complex intestinal ecosystem. This bacterium was then used to develop a new generation of hop products with increased reliability in effect. This strategy involves the use of the bacterium as probiotic, in which the bacterium is administered in combination with the original hop extract. This leads to efficient intestinal 8-PN production, also in individuals who originally did not harbour the appropriate bacteria. The findings presented in this review can therefore be considered as a typical example that good insight in the specific metabolic potential of complex microbial communities and individual bacterial species may offer important opportunities for the management and modulation of the microbial organization towards a certain metabolic function. PMID:23765740

  13. Competition between thermally activated and tip-induced hopping of indium atoms on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setvín, Martin; Javorský, Jakub; Majzik, Zsolt; Sobotík, Pavel; Kocán, Pavel; Ošt'Ádal, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and dynamics of single indium atoms on a Si(100) surface were studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy in a temperature range from 30 to 130 K. Single In adatoms are strongly influenced by a tip-surface interaction which is proportional to the tunneling current. The surface hopping of the In adatoms was recorded and conditions minimizing the tip-surface interaction were investigated. The activation energies and frequency prefactors for thermally activated hopping were calculated from a temperature dependence of lifetimes of In adatoms in adsorption positions.

  14. ATPase Activity and ATP-dependent Conformational Change in the Co-chaperone HSP70/HSP90-organizing Protein (HOP)*

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Soh; Subedi, Ganesh Prasad; Hanashima, Shinya; Satoh, Tadashi; Otaka, Michiro; Wakui, Hideki; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kubota, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Co-chaperones help to maintain cellular homeostasis by modulating the activities of molecular chaperones involved in protein quality control. The HSP70/HSP90-organizing protein (HOP) is a co-chaperone that cooperates with HSP70 and HSP90 in catalysis of protein folding and maturation in the cytosol. We show here that HOP has ATP-binding activity comparable to that of HSP70/HSP90, and that HOP slowly hydrolyzes ATP. Analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the ATPase domain of HOP is in the N-terminal TPR1-DP1-TPR2A segment. In addition, HOP changes its conformation in the presence of ATP. These results indicate that HOP is a unique co-chaperone that undergoes an ATP-dependent conformational change. PMID:24535459

  15. Systematic assessment of scaffold hopping versus activity cliff formation across bioactive compound classes following a molecular hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation define opposite ends of the activity landscape feature spectrum. To rationalize these events at the level of scaffolds, active compounds involved in scaffold hopping were required to contain topologically distinct scaffolds but have only limited differences in potency, whereas compounds involved in activity cliffs were required to share the same scaffold but have large differences in potency. A systematic search was carried out for compounds involved in scaffold hopping and/or activity cliff formation. Results obtained for compound data sets covering more than 300 human targets revealed clear trends. If scaffolds represented multiple but fewer than 10 active compounds, nearly 90% of all scaffolds were exclusively involved in hopping events. With increasing compound coverage, the fraction of scaffolds involved in both scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation significantly increased to more than 50%. However, ∼40% of the scaffolds representing large numbers of active compounds continued to be exclusively involved in scaffold hopping. More than 200 scaffolds with broad target coverage were identified that consistently represented potent compounds and yielded an abundance of scaffold hops in the low-nanomolar range. These and other subsets of scaffolds we characterized are of prime interest for structure-activity relationship (SAR) exploration and compound design. Therefore, the complete scaffold classification generated in the course of our analysis is made freely available. PMID:25982076

  16. Involvement of Vacuolar Sequestration and Active Transport in Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Hop Iso-α-Acids▿ † ¶

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop α-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-α-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-α-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-α-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-α-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-α-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-α-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-α-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-α-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators. PMID:19915041

  17. Elastically Cooperative Activated Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Liquids. I. General Formulation and Application to Hard Sphere Fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  18. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids. PMID:25475328

  19. Observation of correlated barrier hopping in blue luminescent PbI2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, N.; Mukherjee, A.; Sinha, S.; Basu, S.; Meikap, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    Hexagonally shaped lead iodide nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple chemical route. Well crystallized nature of the sample was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the particles are hexagonally shaped and the average particle size is estimated to be 16-18 nm. The band gap of the nanoparticles was found to be 3.54 eV. Photoluminescence spectra show some distinct blue light emission in the visible region around 408 nm. Mechanism of dc and ac transport was analyzed in the temperature range 298-523 K and in the frequency range 20 Hz-2 MHz. The activation energies are estimated from both dc and ac data and found to be in good agreement.

  20. Barriers to Physical Activity Among Gay Men.

    PubMed

    Cary, Miranda A; Brittain, Danielle R; Dinger, Mary K; Ford, Melissa L; Cain, Meagan; Sharp, Teresa A

    2016-09-01

    Gay men may not be physically active at recommended levels to achieve health benefits. Thus, a need exists to identify general (i.e., common across populations) and population-specific barriers that hinder or stop gay men from participating in physical activity (PA). Salient barriers may be identified through the extent each barrier limits PA (i.e., barrier limitation) and the level of one's confidence to overcome barriers and engage in PA (i.e., self-regulatory efficacy). The purposes of this study were to (1) provide a description of general and population-specific barriers to PA among sufficiently and insufficiently active gay men, (2) identify barrier limitation and self-regulatory efficacy for the reported barriers, and (3) examine the associations between meeting the current PA recommendation, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy. Participants were 108 self-identified gay males aged 21 to 64 years who completed a web-based survey. A total of 35 general barriers and no population-specific barriers were identified by the sufficiently and insufficiently active groups. The sufficiently active group reported higher self-regulatory efficacy and lower barrier limitation for nearly all reported barriers. A binary logistic regression used to examine the associations between PA, barrier limitation, and self-regulatory efficacy was statistically significant, χ(2)(2, N = 108) = 19.26, p < .0001, R(2) = .16. Only barrier limitation significantly contributed to the model. Future research should continue to examine barriers to PA among gay men to determine whether an intervention needs to be designed specifically for gay men or whether a one-size-fits-all intervention would be effective in helping all men overcome common barriers to engaging in PA. PMID:25643585

  1. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1HOP1 Receptor Activation Coordinates Multiple Neurotrophic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor; Lutz, Eve; MacKenzie, Christopher; Schutz, Kristin C.; Dozark, Kate; Braas, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    MAPK and Akt pathways are predominant mediators of trophic signaling for many neuronal systems. Among the vasoactive intestinal peptide/secretin/glucagon family of related peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) binding to specific PAC1 receptor isoforms can engage multiple signaling pathways and promote neuroprotection through mechanisms that are not well understood. Using a primary sympathetic neuronal system, the current studies demonstrate that PACAP activation of PAC1HOP1 receptors engages both MAPK and Akt neurotrophic pathways in an integrated program to facilitate neuronal survival after growth factor withdrawal. PACAP not only stimulated prosurvival ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation but also abrogated SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK signaling in parallel. In contrast to the potent and rapid effects of PACAP in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, PACAP stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a late phase of PAC1HOP1 receptor signaling. From inhibitor and immunoprecipitation analyses, the PACAP/PAC1HOP1 receptor-mediated Akt responses did not represent transactivation mechanisms but appeared to depend on Gαq/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ activity and vesicular internalization pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ-selective inhibitors blocked PACAP-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary neuronal cultures and in PAC1HOP1-overexpressing cell lines; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the receptor effectors attenuated PACAP-mediated Akt activation. Similarly, perturbation of endocytic pathways also blocked Akt phosphorylation. Between ERK and Akt pathways, PACAP-stimulated Akt signaling was the primary cascade that attenuated cultured neuron apoptosis after growth factor withdrawal. The partitioning of PACAP-mediated Akt signaling in endosomes may be a key mechanism contributing to the high spatial and temporal specificity in signal transduction necessary for survival pathways. PMID:20093365

  2. Thermally activated band conduction and variable range hopping conduction in Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair Ansari, Mohd; Khare, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of the Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films has been measured in order to identify the dominant conduction mechanism. These CZTS film have been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition method at different substrate temperatures in a single step process. All the films exhibit p-type semiconducting behaviour. In the high temperature range (> 250 K), the dominance of thermally activated band conduction is observed, whereas in the lower temperature region (250-70 K), the hopping conduction is present. Detailed analysis of the temperature dependence of conductivity of the films reveals that in the temperature range from 250-170 K, nearest neighbour hopping dominates, whereas in the lower temperature region (170-70 K), the dominant hopping conduction is Mott's 3D variable range hopping and not Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping. The value of Mott's temperature is found to decrease for the CZTS films deposited at higher temperature, which has been attributed to enhanced density of states at the Fermi level.

  3. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  4. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Simmler, Charlotte; Yuan, Yang; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M; Pauli, Guido F; van Breemen, Richard B; Bolton, Judy L

    2013-01-01

    The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec.) to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata) in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE)-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of botanical

  5. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity of Licorice Species in Comparison with Hops Used in Botanicals for Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Simmler, Charlotte; Yuan, Yang; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M.; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec.) to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata) in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE)-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of botanical

  6. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  7. Hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  8. Eubacterium limosum activates isoxanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) into the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin in vitro and in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Possemiers, Sam; Rabot, Sylvie; Espín, Juan Carlos; Bruneau, Aurélia; Philippe, Catherine; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Heyerick, Arne; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; De Keukeleire, Denis; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-07-01

    Recently, it was shown that the exposure to the potent hop phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) depends on intestinal bacterial activation of isoxanthohumol (IX), but this occurs in only one-third of tested individuals. As the butyrate-producing Eubacterium limosum can produce 8-PN from IX, a probiotic strategy was applied to investigate whether 8-PN production could be increased in low 8-PN producers, thus balancing phytoestrogen exposure. Using fecal samples from high (Hop +) and low (Hop -) 8-PN-producing individuals, a Hop + and Hop - dynamic intestinal model was developed. In parallel, Hop + and Hop - human microbiota-associated rats were developed, germ-free (GF) rats acting as negative controls. IX and then IX + E. limosum were administered in the intestinal model and to the rats, and changes in 8-PN production and exposure were assessed. After dosing IX, 80% was converted into 8-PN in the Hop + model and highest 8-PN production, plasma concentrations, and urinary and fecal excretion occurred in the Hop + rats. Administration of the bacterium triggered 8-PN production in the GF rats and increased 8-PN production in the Hop - model and Hop - rats. 8-PN excretion was similar in the feces (294.1 +/- 132.2 nmol/d) and urine (8.5 +/- 1.1 nmol/d ) of all rats (n = 18). In addition, butyrate production increased in all rats. In conclusion, intestinal microbiota determined 8-PN production and exposure after IX intake. Moreover, E. limosum administration increased 8-PN production in low producers, resulting in similar 8-PN production in all rats. PMID:18567753

  9. Identification of new SUMO activating enzyme 1 inhibitors using virtual screening and scaffold hopping.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ito, Akihiro; Hirohama, Mikako; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2016-02-15

    Sumoylation involves the enzymatic conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein to their substrate proteins. Sumoylation is not only crucial for maintaining normal cellular physiology but also implicated in the development of several diseases including cancer. SUMO E1, the first protein in sumoylation pathway is of particular significance due to its confirmed role in tumorogenesis. However, notwithstanding its role as potential drug target, only a few small molecule inhibitors of SUMO E1 have been identified. Here, we report the identification of pyrazole and thiazole urea containing compounds as inhibitors of SUMO E1. We have utilized 3D-shape matching, electrostatic potential similarity evaluations and molecular docking to scaffold hop from previously known aryl urea scaffold with SUMO E1 activity to thiazole and pyrazole urea based scaffolds. These two classes of compounds were found to have moderate SUMO E1 inhibitory activity and can be used as starting points for the development of highly potent lead compounds against cancer. PMID:26810265

  10. Understanding Motivators and Barriers to Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patay, Mary E.; Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Fahey, Kathleen; Sinclair, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors that influence physical activity among year-round residents in an isolated summer resort community. Specifically, we explored the personal, environmental, social, and culture-specific perceived motivators and barriers to physical activity. Participants were formally interviewed about their…

  11. A cluster expansion model for predicting activation barrier of atomic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Tafizur; Jaipal, M.; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2013-06-15

    We introduce a procedure based on cluster expansion models for predicting the activation barrier of atomic processes encountered while studying the dynamics of a material system using the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method. Starting with an interatomic potential description, a mathematical derivation is presented to show that the local environment dependence of the activation barrier can be captured using cluster interaction models. Next, we develop a systematic procedure for training the cluster interaction model on-the-fly, which involves: (i) obtaining activation barriers for handful local environments using nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations, (ii) identifying the local environment by analyzing the NEB results, and (iii) estimating the cluster interaction model parameters from the activation barrier data. Once a cluster expansion model has been trained, it is used to predict activation barriers without requiring any additional NEB calculations. Numerical studies are performed to validate the cluster expansion model by studying hop processes in Ag/Ag(100). We show that the use of cluster expansion model with KMC enables efficient generation of an accurate process rate catalog.

  12. Selenium compounds activate early barriers of tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium chemoprevention by apoptosis has been well studied, but it is not clear whether selenium can activate early barriers of tumorigenesis, namely senescence and DNA damage response. To address this issue, we treated normal and cancerous cells with a gradient concentration of sodium selenite, me...

  13. Pre- and post-infection activity of fungicides in control of hop downy mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimum timing and use of fungicides for disease control are improved by an understanding of the characteristics of fungicide physical mode of action, although this information is lacking for hop downy mildew. Control of downy mildew on leaves was similar among fungicides tested when applied prevent...

  14. Circularly polarized antennas for active holographic imaging through barriers

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L; Severtsen, Ronald H; Lechelt, Wayne M; Prince, James M

    2011-07-26

    Circularly-polarized antennas and their methods of use for active holographic imaging through barriers. The antennas are dielectrically loaded to optimally match the dielectric constant of the barrier through which images are to be produced. The dielectric loading helps to remove barrier-front surface reflections and to couple electromagnetic energy into the barrier.

  15. Isohumulones, bitter acids derived from hops, activate both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma and reduce insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Ikeshima, Emiko; Shiraki, Maho; Kanaya, Tomoka; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Odai, Hideharu; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Ezaki, Osamu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Kondo, Keiji

    2004-08-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are dietary lipid sensors that regulate fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. The hypolipidemic effects of fibrate drugs and the therapeutic benefits of the thiazolidinedione drugs are due to their activation of PPARalpha and -gamma, respectively. In this study, isohumulones, the bitter compounds derived from hops that are present in beer, were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma in transient co-transfection studies. Among the three major isohumulone homologs, isohumulone and isocohumulone were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma. Diabetic KK-Ay mice that were treated with isohumulones (isohumulone and isocohumulone) showed reduced plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels (65.3, 62.6, and 73.1%, respectively, for isohumulone); similar reductions were found following treatment with the thiazolidinedione drug, pioglitazone. Isohumulone treatment did not result in significant body weight gain, although pioglitazone treatment did increase body weight (10.6% increase versus control group). C57BL/6N mice fed a high fat diet that were treated with isohumulones showed improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulin resistance. Furthermore, these animals showed increased liver fatty acid oxidation and a decrease in size and an increase in apoptosis of their hypertrophic adipocytes. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study for studying the effect of isohumulones on diabetes suggested that isohumulones significantly decreased blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels after 8 weeks (by 10.1 and 6.4%, respectively, versus week 0). These results suggest that isohumulones can improve insulin sensitivity in high fat diet-fed mice with insulin resistance and in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:15178687

  16. Anti-proliferative activity of hop-derived prenylflavonoids against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Noor, Seema; Leischner, Christian; Burkard, Markus; Lauer, Ulrich M; Venturelli, Sascha

    2015-06-01

    Flavonoids form a substantial group of secondary plant metabolites that display several health-promoting effects. Therefore, prenylflavonoids, a subclass of flavonoids, have attracted increasing attention. Here, we investigated the possible anti-cancer potential of 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), two prenylflavonoids present in hops and beer and demonstrate an unexpectedly pronounced, dose-dependent reduction of cellular proliferation of human PC-3 prostate cancer and UO.31 renal carcinoma cells upon treatment. Based on these findings 6-PN and 8-PN are currently further clinically evaluated in detail. PMID:25925225

  17. The hop constituent xanthohumol exhibits hepatoprotective effects and inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells at different levels

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Mahli, Abdo; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant. In recent years, various beneficial xanthohumol effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic activities, and anticancer effects have been revealed. This review summarizes present studies indicating that xanthohumol also inhibits several critical pathophysiological steps during the development and course of chronic liver disease, including the activation and pro-fibrogenic genotype of hepatic stellate cells. Also the various mechanism of action and molecular targets of the beneficial xanthohumol effects will be described. Furthermore, the potential use of xanthohumol or a xanthohumol-enriched hop extract as therapeutic agent to combat the progression of chronic liver disease will be discussed. It is notable that in addition to its hepatoprotective effects, xanthohumol also holds promise as a therapeutic agent for treating obesity, dysregulation of glucose metabolism and other components of the metabolic syndrome including hepatic steatosis. Thus, therapeutic xanthohumol application appears as a promising strategy, particularly in obese patients, to inhibit the development as well as the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:25999863

  18. Hop Shoot Proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop shoot proliferation disease has been described in Poland., and is associated with phytoplasma infection. Hop shoot proliferation occurs rarely and seems to be of little economic concern in most regions of hop production. Hop shoot proliferation is thought to be caused by aster yellows phytoplas...

  19. A novel approach for identification of biologically active phenolic compounds in complex matrices using hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer: A promising tool for testing antimicrobial activity of hops.

    PubMed

    Dušek, Martin; Jandovská, Vladimíra; Čermák, Pavel; Mikyška, Alexandr; Olšovská, Jana

    2016-08-15

    The phenolic compounds, secondary metabolites of hops represent a large family of compounds that could be subsequently divided into smaller groups based on the similarities between their chemical structures. The antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties of hops are well known, but there is a lack of information about antimicrobial activities of individual hop compounds. This study was carried out with an objective to identify compounds present in hops that have potential antibacterial activity. In the first stage of experiment, the active compounds with potential anti-microbial activity had to be extracted from hop cones. Therefore, minced hop cones were applied on solid growth medium inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. The active substances that migrated into the medium created an inhibition zone. In the second stage of experiment, the inhibition zones were cut out from Petri dishes, active compounds were extracted from these zones and consequently analyzed using LC-HRMS. These complex assays were developed and optimized. The data were acquired by using a quadrupole-orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer by targeted-MS2 experiment in both ionization modes. The MS method has been developed as a screening method with a subsequent fragmentation of compound of interest on the base of inclusion mass list. The unknown compounds extracted from inhibition zones have been identified either by searching against a database or their structure has been elucidated on the basis of their fragmentation spectra. On the basis of this experiment the list of active compounds with potential anti-microbial activities was enhanced. PMID:27260455

  20. Promoting Physical Activity: Addressing Barriers and Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Morrow, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The barriers that keep individuals from adopting and maintaining active lifestyles are very complex. Strategies for overcoming these barriers and to incentivize and assist inactive individuals to benefit from physical activity are necessary. In addition, it is important to examine the impact of public policy on active living. As youth physical…

  1. Perceived Intrinsic Barriers to Physical Activity Among Rural Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Keith M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Longacre, Meghan R.; Hendricks, Kristy M.; Beach, Michael L.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify and determine the influence of perceived intrinsic barriers to physical activity among mothers living in rural areas. Methods Mothers were identified through a study of child-parent dyads in the predominantly rural states of New Hampshire and Vermont. Using a telephone interview, we asked mothers (n = 1691) about their level of physical activity and assessed eight potential barriers to physical activity. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) comparisons for groups within each variable. We used multiple regression analysis to assess associations between perceived barriers to physical activity and self-reported levels of physical activity. Results Each barrier was inversely associated with physical activity. Multivariate models that included terms for all potential barriers and covariates identified three barriers associated with lower levels of physical activity: lack of self-discipline, lack of time, and lack of interest. Conclusions Rural mothers are less likely to be physically active if they identify lack of self-discipline, time, or interest as barriers, suggesting that they have difficulty prioritizing exercise for themselves. Interventions aimed at increasing physical activity for mothers should specifically consider these barriers. One possible solution may be to support infrastructure that facilitates active living as the default option, to remove the issue of having to purposefully engage in physical activity as a separate aspect of a mother's life. PMID:20973674

  2. The diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Alex O.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2010-03-01

    Using the biogeochemical model CCBATCH, which we expanded to include transport processes, we study a novel approach for the treatment of aquifers contaminated with toxic concentrations of metals, the diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier (DAPRB), which is based on generation of sulfide by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) as the groundwater moves through a layered treatment zone. In the DAPRB, layers of low conductivity (low-K) containing reactive materials are intercalated between layers of high conductivity (high-K) that transport the groundwater across the barrier. Because diffusion dominates transport in the reactive layers, microbial communities can take advantage there of the chemical-gradient mechanism for protection from toxicants. The ideal sulfidic DAPRB design includes particulate organic matter (POM) and solid sulfate mineral inside the reactive (low-K) layer. This leads to sulfate reduction and the formation of sulfide ligands that complex with toxic metals, such as Zn 2+ in the high-K layer. We perform a theoretical biogeochemical analysis of the ideal configuration of a DAPRB for treatment of Zn-contaminated groundwater. Our analysis using the expanded CCBATCH confirms the gradient-resistance mechanism for bio-protection, with the ZnS bio-sink forming at the intersection of the Zn and sulfide plumes inside the high-K layers of the DAPRB. The detailed DAPRB analysis also shows that total alkalinity and pH distributions are representative footprints of the two key biogeochemical processes taking place, sulfidogenesis and Zn immobilization as sulfide mineral. This is so because these two reactions consume or produce acidic hydrogen and alkalinity. Additionally, because Zn immobilization is due to ZnS mineral precipitation, the ZnS mineral distribution is a good indicator for the bio-sink. Bio-sinks are located for the most part within the high-K layers, and their exact position depends on the relative magnitude of metal and sulfide fluxes. Finally

  3. Hop extracts and hop substances in treatment of menopausal complaints.

    PubMed

    Keiler, Annekathrin M; Zierau, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Georg

    2013-05-01

    Hop extract is a long used medicinal product and, regarding hormonal activities, in 1999 a number of prenylflavanones have been identified as its major constituents with 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) being the main active estrogenic compound. There have been several in vivo studies performed that demonstrate the potential of hop extract and the single compound 8-PN to alleviate climacteric symptoms like osteoporosis, vasomotoric complaints, and sexual motivation. On the other hand, only a few clinical studies have been performed so far, and these mainly focused on menopausal discomforts, especially hot flushes, yielding rather inconclusive results. Despite preferentially activating estrogen receptor α, 8-PN is only slightly uterotrophic, but it also elucidates estrogenic effects on the mammary gland. In conclusion, although hop extract and especially 8-PN are promising candidates as a relief for climacteric symptoms, data on the safety and efficacy is still scarce. PMID:23512496

  4. Physical Activity Beliefs, Barriers, and Enablers among Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Aytur, Semra A.; Borodulin, Katja

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background and Methods Physical activity during postpartum is both a recommended and an essential contributor to maternal health. Understanding the beliefs, barriers, and enablers regarding physical activity during the postpartum period can more effectively tailor physical activity interventions. The objective of this study was to document self-reported beliefs, barriers, and enablers to physical activity among a cohort of women queried at 3 and 12 months postpartum. Five questions about beliefs and two open-ended questions about their main barriers and enablers regarding physical activity and exercise were asked of 667 women at 3 months postpartum. Among the sample, 530 women answered the same questions about barriers and enablers to physical activity at 12 months postpartum. Results Agreement on all five beliefs statements was high (≥89%), indicating that women thought that exercise and physical activity were appropriate at 3 months postpartum, even if they continued to breastfeed. For the cohort, the most common barriers to physical activity at both 3 and 12 months postpartum were lack of time (47% and 51%, respectively) and issues with child care (26% and 22%, respectively). No barrier changed by more than 5% from 3 to 12 months postpartum. For the cohort, the most common enablers at 3 months postpartum were partner support (16%) and desire to feel better (14%). From 3 to 12 months postpartum, only one enabler changed by >5%; women reported baby reasons (e.g., baby older, healthier, not breastfeeding, more active) more often at 12 months than at 3 months postpartum (32% vs. 10%). Environmental/policy and organizational barriers and enablers were reported less often than intrapersonal or interpersonal barriers at both time points. Conclusions A number of barriers and enablers were identified for physical activity, most of which were consistent at 3 and 12 months postpartum. This study provides information to create more successful interventions to

  5. Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity among Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Moos, Merry-K; Carrier, Kathryn; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2008-01-01

    Objective Physical activity generally declines during pregnancy, but barriers to activity during this time period are not well understood. The objective was to examine barriers to physical activity in a large cohort of pregnant women and to explore these barriers in more depth with qualitative data derived from a separate focus group study using a socioecologic framework. Method A total of 1535 pregnant women (27–30 weeks’ gestation) enrolled in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study were asked an open-ended question about their primary barrier to physical activity; responses were coded into categories according to the socioecologic framework. To further elucidate, 13 focus groups of a total of 58 pregnant women (20–37 weeks’ gestation) were conducted among Hispanic, African American, and White participants. Results Among the 1535 pregnant women participating in the survey, 85% reported an intrapersonal barrier to physical activity, of which almost two-thirds were health related. Only 2% of the women reported their main barrier to physical activity as interpersonal and 3% reported a neighborhood or environmental barrier. These results were supported by the focus group data, overall and by race/ethnicity and body mass index. Although women discussed barriers to physical activity at a variety of levels, the intrapersonal level was the most frequently cited and discussed factor in both studies. Conclusions Since pregnancy may trigger the development of obesity and since physical activity is recommended for healthy pregnant women, it is imperative to promote physical activity in a more relevant way. These quantitative and qualitative studies revealed many barriers to physical activity among pregnant women and some suggestions for interventions. PMID:18478322

  6. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity and efflux drug transporters' expression by xanthohumol. from hops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Sun; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kang, Bok Yun

    2007-11-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) and its related compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against four different human cancer cell lines, A549 (lung), SK-OV-3 (ovarian), SK-MEL-2 (melanoma), and HCT-15 (colon) using a sulforhodamine B assay. XN showed the most active cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Isoxanthohumol, 8-prenylnaringenin, and xanthohumol 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside showed comparable cytotoxicity and (2S)-5-methoxy-8-prenylnaringenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside was the least cytotoxic compound. The anticancer properties of XN, the most active cytotoxic compound, were further investigated. XN showed an inhibitory effect on the activity of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), which was measured from the relaxation of supercoiled DNA. The inhibition of topo I by XN might explain the cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines. Moreover, the expression of the drug efflux genes was investigated to predict the drug resistance. XN clearly decreased the mRNA levels of ABCB1 (MDR1), ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC2 (MRP2), and ABCC3 (MRP3). These results suggest that XN has anticancer properties by inhibiting the topo I activity and it might be used in conjunction with other anticancer chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the drug resistance inhibiting the efflux drug transporters. PMID:18087812

  7. Physical activity barriers and facilitators among working mothers and fathers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The transition to parenthood is consistently associated with declines in physical activity. In particular, working parents are at risk for inactivity, but research exploring physical activity barriers and facilitators in this population has been scarce. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine perceptions of physical activity among working parents. Methods Working mothers (n = 13) and fathers (n = 12) were recruited to participate in one of four focus group sessions and discuss physical activity barriers and facilitators. Data were analyzed using immersion/crystallization in NVivo 10. Results Major themes for barriers included family responsibilities, guilt, lack of support, scheduling constraints, and work. Major themes for facilitators included being active with children or during children’s activities, being a role model for children, making time/prioritizing, benefits to health and family, and having support available. Several gender differences emerged within each theme, but overall both mothers and fathers reported their priorities had shifted to focus on family after becoming parents, and those who were fitting in physical activity had developed strategies that allowed them to balance their household and occupational responsibilities. Conclusions The results of this study suggest working mothers and fathers report similar physical activity barriers and facilitators and would benefit from interventions that teach strategies for overcoming barriers and prioritizing physical activity amidst the demands of parenthood. Future interventions might consider targeting mothers and fathers in tandem to create an optimally supportive environment in the home. PMID:24974148

  8. The Formation of "Hip-Hop Academicus"--How American Scholars Talk about the Academisation of Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Social activism and education have been associated with hip-hop since it emerged in New York City 38 years ago. Therefore, it might not be surprising that universities have become interested in hip-hop. This article aims to highlight this "hip-hop academisation" and analyse the discursive mechanisms that manifest in these academisation…

  9. Physical Activity and Youth with Disabilities: Barriers and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.; Taliaferro, Andrea; Moran, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity and active use of leisure time is important for everyone but particularly important for youth with disabilities. Unfortunately, youth with disabilities often have a difficult time or are even excluded from participating in physical activity due to limited physical and cognitive skills, attitudinal barriers in the community, lack…

  10. Wheeled hopping robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2010-08-17

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  11. Photon-activated electron hopping in a single-electron trap enhanced by Josephson radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkhov, S. V.; Jalali-Jafari, B.; Zorin, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Using a Josephson junction interferometer (DC SQUID) as a microwave source for irradiating a single-electron trap, both devices fabricated on the same chip, we study the process of photon-assisted tunneling as an effective mechanism of single photon detection. High sensitivity down to a very small oscillation amplitude v J ˜ 10 nV ≪ E act ≲ h f J and down to low photon absorption rates Γph ˜ (1-50) Hz, as well as a clear threshold type of operation with an activation energy Eact ˜ 400 μeV, is demonstrated for the trap with respect to the microwave photons of frequency fJ ˜ (100-200) GHz. Tunable generation is demonstrated with respect to the power and frequency of the microwave signal produced by the SQUID source biased within the subgap voltage range. A much weaker effect is observed at the higher junction voltages along the quasiparticle branch of the I-V curve; this response mostly appears due to the recombination phonons.

  12. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Smrcka, Alan V; Glading, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability. PMID:27612188

  13. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  14. Hopping Robot with Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Edward; Marzwell, Nevellie; Fuller, Sawyer; Fionni, Paolo; Tretton, Andy; Burdick, Joel; Schell, Steve

    2003-01-01

    A small prototype mobile robot is capable of (1) hopping to move rapidly or avoid obstacles and then (2) moving relatively slowly and precisely on the ground by use of wheels in the manner of previously reported exploratory robots of the "rover" type. This robot is a descendant of a more primitive hopping robot described in "Minimally Actuated Hopping Robot" (NPO- 20911), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 50. There are many potential applications for robots with hopping and wheeled-locomotion (roving) capabilities in diverse fields of endeavor, including agriculture, search-and-rescue operations, general military operations, removal or safe detonation of land mines, inspection, law enforcement, and scientific exploration on Earth and remote planets. The combination of hopping and roving enables this robot to move rapidly over very rugged terrain, to overcome obstacles several times its height, and then to position itself precisely next to a desired target. Before a long hop, the robot aims itself in the desired hopping azimuth and at a desired takeoff angle above horizontal. The robot approaches the target through a series of hops and short driving operations utilizing the steering wheels for precise positioning.

  15. Hop Cultivars and Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pest management decision making in hops varies among cultivars. Historically, the primary objective of hop breeding programs has been to increase the yield or characteristics associated with either bittering (high alpha-acids) or aroma (unique volatile oil profiles) cultivars. Other factors consid...

  16. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions. PMID:24978345

  17. Measuring Perceived Benefits and Perceived Barriers for Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Seth A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the psychometric properties and relationship to physical activity levels of the Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale (EBBS) among college students. Methods: A total of 398 college students completed the EBBS and a measure of self-efficacy, the Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. In addition, a subsample of 275 students also…

  18. The lunar hopping transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degner, R.; Kaplan, M. H.; Manning, J.; Meetin, R.; Pasternack, S.; Peterson, S.; Seifert, H.

    1971-01-01

    Research on several aspects of lunar transport using the hopping mode is reported. Hopping exploits the weak lunar gravity, permits fuel economy because of partial recompression of propellant gas on landing, and does not require a continuous smooth surface for operation. Three questions critical to the design of a lunar hopping vehicle are addressed directly in this report: (1) the tolerance of a human pilot for repeated accelerations; (2) means for controlling vehicle attitude during ballistic flight; and (3) means of propulsion. In addition, a small scale terrestrial demonstrator built to confirm feasibility of the proposed operational mode is described, along with results of preliminary study of unmanned hoppers for moon exploration.

  19. Density functional theory based direct comparison of coherent tunneling and electron hopping in redox-active single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastlunger, Georg; Stadler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    To define the conductance of single-molecule junctions with a redox functionality in an electrochemical cell, two conceptually different electron transport mechanisms, namely, coherent tunneling and vibrationally induced hopping, compete with each other, where implicit parameters of the setup such as the length of the molecule and the applied gate voltage decide which mechanism is the dominant one. Although coherent tunneling is most efficiently described within Landauer theory and the common theoretical treatment of electron hopping is based on Marcus theory, both theories are adequate for the processes they describe without introducing accuracy-limiting approximations. For a direct comparison, however, it has to be ensured that the crucial quantities obtained from electronic structure calculations, i.e., the transmission function T (E ) in Landauer theory and the transfer integral V , the reorganization energy λ , and the driving force Δ G0 in Marcus theory, are derived from similar grounds, as pointed out by Nitzan and coworkers in a series of publications. In this paper our framework is a single-particle picture, for which we perform density functional theory calculations for the conductance corresponding to both transport mechanisms for junctions with the central molecule containing one, two, or three Ruthenium centers, from which we extrapolate our results in order to define the critical length of the transition point of the two regimes which we identify at 5.76nm for this type of molecular wire. We also discuss trends in the dependence on an electrochemically induced gate potential.

  20. Polaron hopping in olivine phosphates studied by nuclear resonant scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Sally June

    Valence fluctuations of Fe2+ and Fe3+ were studied in a solid solution of LixFePO4 by nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron x rays while the sample was heated in a diamond-anvil pressure cell. The spectra acquired at different temperatures and pressures were analyzed for the frequencies of valence changes using the Blume-Tjon model of a system with a fluctuating Hamiltonian. These frequencies were analyzed to obtain activation energies and an activation volume for polaron hopping. There was a large suppression of hopping frequency with pressure, giving an anomalously large activation volume. This large, positive value is typical of ion diffusion, which indicates correlated motions of polarons, and Li+ ions that alter the dynamics of both. In a parallel study of NaxFePO4, the interplay between sodium ordering and electron mobility was investigated using a combination of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and nuclear resonant scattering. Conventional Mossbauer spectra were collected while the sample was heated in a resistive furnace. An analysis of the temperature evolution of the spectral shapes was used to identify the onset of fast electron hopping and determine the polaron hopping rate. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out in the same temperature range. Reitveld analysis of the diffraction patterns was used to determine the temperature of sodium redistribution on the lattice. The diffraction analysis also provides new information about the phase stability of the system. The temperature evolution of the iron site occupancies from the Mossbauer measurements, combined with the synchrotron diffraction results give strong evidence for a relationship between the onset of fast electron dynamics and the redistribution of sodium in the lattice. Measurements of activation barriers for polaron hopping gave fundamental insights about the correlation between electronic carriers and mobile ions. This work established that polaron-ion interactions

  1. Photochemical activity in waters of the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, R.; Waite, T. D.

    1991-12-01

    Photochemical activity in waters of the Great Barrier Reef was investigated through studies on the vertical, horizontal and temporal distribution of hydrogen peroxide and factors influencing its generation and decay processes. Surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations varied from 15 to 110 nM and generally decreased with depth, though a number of anomalies were detected. Photochemical activity decreased with increasing distance from the coast reflecting the positive influence of terrestrial inputs to the hydrogen peroxide generation and decay processes. Increases in photochemical activity were observed in the proximity of coral reefs. Hydrogen peroxide concentrations in the region were influenced by wind-induced mixing processes, atmospheric inputs, anthropogenic activity and seasonal light regimes.

  2. Barriers associated with reduced physical activity in COPD patients*

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Priscila Batista; Stelmach, Rafael; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Carvalho-Pinto, Regina Maria; Cukier, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of COPD patients to perform activities of daily living (ADL); to identify barriers that prevent these individuals from performing ADL; and to correlate those barriers with dyspnea severity, six-minute walk test (6MWT), and an ADL limitation score. METHODS: In COPD patients and healthy, age-matched controls, the number of steps, the distance walked, and walking time were recorded with a triaxial accelerometer, for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire regarding perceived barriers and the London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL) scale were used in order to identify the factors that prevent the performance of ADL. The severity of dyspnea was assessed with two scales, whereas submaximal exercise capacity was determined on the basis of the 6MWT. RESULTS: We evaluated 40 COPD patients and 40 controls. In comparison with the control values, the mean walk time was significantly shorter for COPD patients (68.5 ± 25.8 min/day vs. 105.2 ± 49.4 min/day; p < 0.001), as was the distance walked (3.9 ± 1.9 km/day vs. 6.4 ± 3.2 km/day; p < 0.001). The COPD patients also walked fewer steps/day. The most common self-reported barriers to performing ADL were lack of infrastructure, social influences, and lack of willpower. The 6MWT distance correlated with the results obtained with the accelerometer but not with the LCADL scale results. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD are less active than are healthy adults of a comparable age. Physical inactivity and the barriers to performing ADL have immediate implications for clinical practice, calling for early intervention measures. PMID:25410838

  3. Discovery of quinoline small molecules with potent dispersal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms using a scaffold hopping strategy.

    PubMed

    Abouelhassan, Yasmeen; Garrison, Aaron T; Burch, Gena M; Wong, Wilson; Norwood, Verrill M; Huigens, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are recognized as the most frequent cause of biofilm-associated nosocomial and indwelling medical device infections. Biofilm-associated infections are known to be highly resistant to our current arsenal of clinically used antibiotics and antibacterial agents. To exacerbate this problem, no therapeutic option exists that targets biofilm-dependent machinery critical to Staphylococcal biofilm formation and maintenance. Here, we describe the discovery of a series of quinoline small molecules that demonstrate potent biofilm dispersal activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis using a scaffold hopping strategy. This interesting class of quinolines also has select synthetic analogues that demonstrate potent antibacterial activity and biofilm inhibition against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. PMID:25264073

  4. Attempting to be active: Self-efficacy and barrier limitation differentiate activity levels of working mothers.

    PubMed

    Gierc, Madelaine; Locke, Sean; Jung, Mary; Brawley, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Working mothers are less physically active than working women without children and mothers who do not work. The purpose of this study was to examine concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and barriers to physical activity in a sample of working mothers. Women completed a mixed-methods survey which included measures of physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy, and barriers. Sufficiently active women experienced significantly greater concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and significantly less barrier limitation and frequency. No significant group differences were found for age, domestic duties performed, and children's extracurricular activities. Thematic analysis of barriers revealed six themes of common and unique factors, including limited time and family activities. PMID:27357921

  5. A molecular explanation of the transition from viscous to hopping mechanism of mass transport in the supercooled liquid near the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Biman

    1994-12-01

    When the viscosity of a supercooled liquid becomes large, the mechanism of mass transport is known to undergo a change from viscosity dependent, Stokes-Einstein behavior to an activated hopping dominated, almost viscosity independent behavior. This change is known to occur rather sharply near the temperature Tc where the mode coupling theory predicts singularities in the transport properties of the liquid. However, the origin of this change in the transport mechanism is not well-understood. Here we suggest a simple microscopic interpretation of this crossover. Our analysis is based on a scaled particle theory calculation of the activation energy for hopping and the non-Markovian rate theory of activated barrier crossing. We find that as the liquid is progressively supercooled, the activation barrier for hopping increases rapidly which makes the curvature at the barrier top also to increase. At high densities the latter gives almost a viscosity independent hopping rate which becomes more dominant at large viscosities where the collective diffusion becomes inefficient. The suddenness of the crossover is because as the density is increased, the hopping rate also decreases rapidly because of the increase in the activation energy, and a rapid increase in viscosity is required to tilt the balance in favor of the hopping mechanism. The latter can only happen at a dynamic singularity where the viscosity undergoes a sharp increase. The present analysis also offers an explanation of the decoupling of structural relaxation from the viscosity at large values of latter—such a decoupling has been suggested recently by Angell. Our analysis also provides a tentative explanation of the recent simulation results of Keyes and co-workers.

  6. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    PubMed

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  7. Effects of Powdery Mildew Fungicide Programs on Twospotted Spider Mite (Acari: Tetranychidae), Hop Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae), and Their Natural Enemies in Hop Yards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari:Tetranychidae), and hop aphid, Phorodon humuli (Schrank) (Homoptera:Aphidiae), are the most important arthropod pests of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) in the Northern Hemisphere. A potential barrier for greater adoption of conservation biological c...

  8. Hopping Diffusion of Nanoparticles in Polymer Matrices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hopping mechanism for diffusion of large nonsticky nanoparticles subjected to topological constraints in both unentangled and entangled polymer solids (networks and gels) and entangled polymer liquids (melts and solutions). Probe particles with size larger than the mesh size ax of unentangled polymer networks or tube diameter ae of entangled polymer liquids are trapped by the network or entanglement cells. At long time scales, however, these particles can diffuse by overcoming free energy barrier between neighboring confinement cells. The terminal particle diffusion coefficient dominated by this hopping diffusion is appreciable for particles with size moderately larger than the network mesh size ax or tube diameter ae. Much larger particles in polymer solids will be permanently trapped by local network cells, whereas they can still move in polymer liquids by waiting for entanglement cells to rearrange on the relaxation time scales of these liquids. Hopping diffusion in entangled polymer liquids and networks has a weaker dependence on particle size than that in unentangled networks as entanglements can slide along chains under polymer deformation. The proposed novel hopping model enables understanding the motion of large nanoparticles in polymeric nanocomposites and the transport of nano drug carriers in complex biological gels such as mucus. PMID:25691803

  9. Registration of 'Teamaker' Hop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Teamaker' is a new hop (Humulus lupulus L.) variety exhibiting high beta-acids and near-zero alpha acids soft resins contents, a unique situation in the Humulus species. Teamaker arose as a selection from the cross, USDA 19105 x USDA 19046M, and as such has the genetic composition of 5/16th Fuggle...

  10. Physical Activity Pattern of Malaysian Preschoolers: Environment, Barriers, and Motivators for Active Play.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shoo Thien; Wong, Jyh Eiin; Ong, Wei Wen; Ismail, Mohd Noor; Deurenberg, Paul; Poh, Bee Koon

    2016-07-01

    Children's physical activity has been correlated with child characteristics and social or physical environment. This study aimed to compare preschoolers' physical activity among various sociodemographic characteristics and to determine barriers, motivators, and environmental factors for active play. A total of 835 preschoolers were included in this analysis. Time spent on active play, quiet play, and screen time was reported by parents. Boys spent significantly more time on active play and screen time than girls. Time spent on quiet play was highest in East Coast Peninsular Malaysia and lowest in Sarawak. Some 40% of children achieved active play recommendation while 27% exceeded daily screen time recommendation. Most parents reported that their child played actively in the house area; and that the main barrier and motivator to active play were safety and child's enjoyment, respectively. These findings demonstrate that sociodemographic characteristics and environment should be considered in designing physical activity intervention programs. PMID:27026634

  11. Factors Influencing the Implementation of Organized Physical Activity and Fruit and Vegetable Snacks in the HOP'N After-School Obesity Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastmann, Tanis J.; Bopp, Melissa; Fallon, Elizabeth A.; Rosenkranz, Richard R.; Dzewaltowski, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify barriers and facilitators for improving the after-school organized physical activity (PA) and snack quality. Methods: After-school staff (Year 1, n = 20; Year 2, n = 17) participated in qualitative, semistructured interviews about the implementation of an after-school obesity prevention intervention. Interviews were…

  12. Barriers to Leisure-Time Physical Activities in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eric J; Groves, Mary D; Sanchez, Jacqueline N; Hudson, Cassandra E; Jao, Rachel G; Kroll, Meghan E

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the personal, environmental, and activity barriers to leisure-time physical activities (LTPAs) among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). A survey instrument was administered to 85 participants with SCI. Personal barriers to LTPAs included issues involving motivation, pain, scheduling, and financial resources. Environmental barriers marked the issues regarding availability and accessibility to specialized programs, activities, and professional services. Activity barriers included limitations in equipment, training, and personal skills required by the selected activities. Significant negative correlations were found between these barriers and the levels of physical activity and satisfaction with physical activity. While working with clients with SCI, occupational therapists should identify those LTPA barriers and possible solutions in order to establish individualized action plans for enhancing participation in LTPAs. PMID:27218889

  13. Scaffold hopping in drug discovery using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Kazuhisa; Amini, Ata; Sternberg, Michael J E; Muggleton, Stephen H

    2008-05-01

    In chemoinformatics, searching for compounds which are structurally diverse and share a biological activity is called scaffold hopping. Scaffold hopping is important since it can be used to obtain alternative structures when the compound under development has unexpected side-effects. Pharmaceutical companies use scaffold hopping when they wish to circumvent prior patents for targets of interest. We propose a new method for scaffold hopping using inductive logic programming (ILP). ILP uses the observed spatial relationships between pharmacophore types in pretested active and inactive compounds and learns human-readable rules describing the diverse structures of active compounds. The ILP-based scaffold hopping method is compared to two previous algorithms (chemically advanced template search, CATS, and CATS3D) on 10 data sets with diverse scaffolds. The comparison shows that the ILP-based method is significantly better than random selection while the other two algorithms are not. In addition, the ILP-based method retrieves new active scaffolds which were not found by CATS and CATS3D. The results show that the ILP-based method is at least as good as the other methods in this study. ILP produces human-readable rules, which makes it possible to identify the three-dimensional features that lead to scaffold hopping. A minor variant of a rule learnt by ILP for scaffold hopping was subsequently found to cover an inhibitor identified by an independent study. This provides a successful result in a blind trial of the effectiveness of ILP to generate rules for scaffold hopping. We conclude that ILP provides a valuable new approach for scaffold hopping. PMID:18457387

  14. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  15. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender differences in children’s perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. Methods Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools) with in total 111 children (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to rank the children’s perceived barriers. This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. Results The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said they would like to have more secluded areas added to the school playground, even in large schoolyards where lack of space was not a barrier. This aligned with girls’ requests for more “hanging-out” facilities, whereas boys primarily wanted activity promoting facilities. Conclusion Based on the results from this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and

  16. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology's energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  17. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  18. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  19. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  20. Barriers Affecting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Perceptions of Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhinney, Sharon; McDonald, Andrea; Dawkins-Moultin, Lenna; Outley, Corliss; McKyer, E. Lisako; Thomas, Audrene

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the barriers inhibiting physical activity among children is critical in the fight against childhood obesity. This qualitative interview study examined parents' and children's perceptions of the barriers to physical activity in rural communities of low socioeconomic status. Parents and children concurred that the…

  1. Facilitators, barriers, and components of a culturally-tailored afterschool physical activity program in preadolescent African-American girls and their mothers

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Greever, Cory; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Mendoza, Albert; Barr-Anderson, Daheia J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Traditional physical activity (PA) programs have not been effective in increasing PA in African-American girls. Currently, there is limited information regarding the components of PA programs that drive participation in African-American girls. The purpose of this investigation was to describe the facilitators, barriers, and components of a culturally-tailored afterschool PA program that will potentially inspire the participation of African-American mother-daughter dyads. Methods Six focus groups (n=12 mother-daughter dyads; daughters, 7–10 yrs in age) were conducted between March and May 2012. Focus group semi-structured interviews were transcribed, coded, and systematically analyzed using NVivo. Results Mothers reported a preference for non-traditional (dancing, household chores) types of PA. While daughters preferred to participate in both dance-based and traditional types (walking, riding bikes) of PA. Participants felt that the use of a culturally-tailored dance program would be appealing because it highlights the cultural and historical legacy of the African-American culture. Mothers wanted programs that would allow them time to spend with their daughters. Top three dance styles that mothers wanted to participate in were African, Hip-hop, and Salsa/samba. While, daughters reported that they would enjoy participating in Hip-hop, African, and Jazz. The most common responses given for resources needed for participating in a culturally-tailored afterschool dance program were the location of the program, transportation, and childcare for siblings. Conclusions The present investigation highlights some cultural factors related to facilitators and barriers of PA that should be addressed in designing PA studies for African-American girls and their mothers. PMID:24620442

  2. Identification of Significant Amino Acids in Multiple Transmembrane Domains of Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) for Activation by Eudesmol, an Oxygenized Sesquiterpene in Hop Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Takafumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kitao, Sayoko; Ishida, Yuko; Kato, Kyoko; Takahashi, Chika; Katayama, Mikio; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a calcium-permeable non-selective cation channel that is activated by various noxious or irritant substances in nature, including spicy compounds. Many TRPA1 chemical activators have been reported; however, only limited information is available regarding the amino acid residues that contribute to the activation by non-electrophilic activators, whereas activation mechanisms by electrophilic ligands have been well characterized. We used intracellular Ca2+ measurements and whole-cell patch clamp recordings to show that eudesmol, an oxygenated sesquiterpene present at high concentrations in the essential oil of hop cultivar Hallertau Hersbrucker, could activate human TRPA1. Gradual activation of inward currents with outward rectification by eudesmol was observed in human embryonic kidney-derived 293 cells expressing human TRPA1. This activation was completely blocked by a TRPA1-specific inhibitor, HC03–0031. We identified three critical amino acid residues in human TRPA1 in putative transmembrane domains 3, 4, and 5, namely threonine at 813, tyrosine at 840, and serine at 873, for activation by β-eudesmol in a systematic mutational study. Our results revealed a new TRPA1 activator in hop essential oil and provide a novel insight into mechanisms of human TRPA1 activation by non-electrophilic chemicals. PMID:25525269

  3. "Bigger than Hip-Hop?" Impact of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program on Youth Living in a Disadvantaged Neighborhood in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulac, Julie; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Calhoun, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study explored whether a hip-hop dance program was associated with improved well-being for adolescents living in a multicultural, socio-economically disadvantaged urban community in Ottawa. Sixty-seven youths between 11 and 16 years of age participated in a 13-week program. A primarily qualitative approach was used to assess perceived impact…

  4. Assessment of an active dry barrier for a landfill cover system

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C.; Ankeny, M.D.; Burkhard, M.E.; Tansey, M.K.; Kelsey, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    A dry barrier is a layer of geologic material that is dried by air flow. An active dry barrier system can be designed, installed, and operated as part of a landfill cover system. An active system uses blowers and fans to move air through a high-permeability layer within the cover system. Depending principally on the air-flow rate, it is possible for a dry barrier to remove enough water to substantially reduce the likelihood of water percolating through the cover system. If a material with a relatively great storage capacity, such as processed tuff, is used as the coarse layer, then the efficiency of the dry barrier will be increased.

  5. Barriers to involvement in physical activities of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2016-03-01

    Participating in physical activities could be essential for reducing the multiple risk factors for health problems that persons with severe mental illness (SMI) may suffer. However, people with SMI are significantly less active than the general population. To develop knowledge about factors related to the perceived barriers hindering this population's participation in physical activities and the benefits this participation would have, a study was conducted in Israel with 86 people with mental illness living in community mental health facilities prior to their participation in a health promotion program. A mixed method was implemented and included: a scale designed to measure participants' perceptions of the barriers to and benefits of involvement in physical activities; instruments focusing on bio-psycho-social factors that may affect the level of barriers experienced; and personal interviews. The findings revealed high ranking for accessibility barriers hindering the participation in physical activities. Bio-psycho-social factors stemming from the participants' mental health, such as level of depression, were correlated with higher ranking of accessibility barriers. Bio-psycho-social factors reflecting positive mental health and health, such as positive appraisal of body weight, were correlated with lower ranking of accessibility barriers. Other barriers may include organizational and broader systemic barriers in the mental health facilities where the participants reside. These findings illuminate the need to consider the unique challenges that persons with mental illness may face in any attempt to advance their involvement in physical activity. PMID:25204451

  6. Signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Americo, Tatiana A.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Linden, Rafael . E-mail: rlinden@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-06-29

    The co-chaperone hop/STI-1 is a ligand of the cell surface prion protein (PrP{sup C}), and their interaction leads to signaling and biological effects. Among these, hop/STI-1 induces proliferation of A172 glioblastoma cells, dependent on both PrP{sup C} and activation of the Erk pathway. We tested whether clathrin-mediated endocytosis affects signaling induced by hop/STI-1. Both hyperosmolarity induced by sucrose and monodansyl-cadaverine blocked Erk activity induced by hop/STI-1, without affecting the high basal Akt activity typical of A172. The endocytosis inhibitors also affected the sub-cellular distribution of phosphorylated Erk, consistent with blockade of the latter's activity. The data indicate that signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis. These findings are consistent with a role of sub-cellular trafficking in signal transduction following engagement by PrP{sup C} by ligands such as hop/STI-1, and may help help unravel both the functions of the prion protein, as well as possible loss-of-function components of prion diseases.

  7. Reliable and efficient hop-by-hop flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozveren, Cuneyt M.; Simcoe, Robert; Varghese, George

    1995-05-01

    Hop-by-hop flow control can be used to fairly share the bandwidth of a network among competing flows. No data is lost even in overload conditions; yet each flow gets access to the maximum throughput when the network is lightly loaded. However, some schemes for hop-by-hop flow control require too much memory; some of them are not resilient to errors. We propose a scheme for making hop-by-hop flow control resilient and show that it has advantages over the first several schemes proposed by Kung. We also describe a novel method for sharing the available buffers among the flows on a link; our scheme allows us to potentially reduce the memory requirement (or increase the number of flows that can be supported) by an order of magnitude. Most of the work is described in the context of an ATM network that uses credit-based flow control. However, our ideas extend to networks in which flows can be distinguished, and to rate-based flow control schemes.

  8. Perceived benefits and barriers of physical activity: A social marketing formative study.

    PubMed

    Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Gruneklee, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain formative research insights that can be used to design social marketing campaigns. One thousand four hundred fifty-nine people participated in an online survey. Factor analysis was undertaken to establish perceived benefits and barriers, and indexes were created for barriers, benefits, and healthy living knowledge. Four attitude groups were formed and analysis of variance was undertaken to explore group differences. Consumers with high perceived barriers report less physical activity than consumers with low perceived barriers to exercise. The current study provides evidence to suggest that exchange theory can offer important insights to inform social marketing intervention planning. PMID:27210584

  9. Bipolaron Hopping Conduction in Boron Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    ASELAGE, TERRENCE L.; EMIN, D.; MCCREADY, STEVEN S.

    1999-09-20

    The electrical conductivities of boron carbides, B{sub 12+x}C{sub 3{minus}x} with 0.1 < x < 1.7, between 300 and 1200K suggest the hopping of a nearly temperature-independent density of small (bi)polarons. The activation energies of the nobilities are low, {approx} 0.16 eV, and are nearly independent of the composition. At lower temperatures, conductivities have non-Arrhenius temperature dependencies and strong sensitivity to carbon concentration. Percolative aspects of low-temperature hopping are evident in this sensitivity to composition. Boron carbides' Seebeck coefficients are anomalous in that (1) they are much larger than expected from boron carbides' large carrier densities and (2) they depend only weakly on the carrier density. Carrier-induced softening of local vibrations gives contributions to the Seebeck coefficient that mirror the magnitudes and temperature dependencies found in boron carbides.

  10. Star-Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, Robert A.

    1997-07-01

    Introduction; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. How to use this book and what you are going to see; 2. How the sky works, determining your field of view, observing tips and how to navigate in the night sky; 3. January - Taurus and Orion: the bull and hunter; 4. February - Canis Minor, Canis Major, and Puppis: dog days in February and Jason's Argo; 5. March - Cancer, Leo, and Corvus: a crab, the king of the beasts, and a crow; 6. April - Ursa Major: a dipper round tripper; 7. May - Coma Berenices and Virgo: the sparkling hair of Berenice and the wheat maiden and her bushel of galaxies; 8. June - Libra and Lupus: the balance scales and the wolf; 9. July - Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Scutum: the scorpion, archer, and shield of John Sobieski; 10. August - Draco: following the trail of the dragon; 11. September - Cygnus, Lyra, Vulpecula, and Sagitta: the swan, lyre, fox, and arrow; 12. October - Andromeda and Perseus: the chained lady and her rescuer; 13. November - Cepheus and Cassiopeia: the king and queen of Joppa; 14. December - Pisces, Triangulum, and Aries: of fishes, a triangle, and a ram; 15. Messier Marathon, a sundown to sunup hop across the skies; Appendix A: Classification tables; Appendix B: The constellations; Appendix C: The Greek alphabet; Appendix D: Decimalization of the day; Glossary; Bibliography; Index.

  11. Lateral Hopping of CO on Ag(110) by Multiple Overtone Excitation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Arafune, Ryuichi; Jung, Jaehoon; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of action spectrum representing multiple overtone excitations of the v(M-C) mode was observed for lateral hopping of a CO molecule on Ag(110) induced by inelastically tunneled electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The yield of CO hopping shows sharp increases at 261±4  mV, corresponding to the C-O internal stretching mode, and at 61±2, 90±2, and 148±7  mV, even in the absence of corresponding fundamental vibrational modes. The mechanism of lateral CO hopping on Ag(110) was explained by the multistep excitation of overtone modes of v(M-C) based on the numerical fitting of the action spectra, the nonlinear dependence of the hopping rate on the tunneling current, and the hopping barrier obtained from thermal diffusion experiments. PMID:26894720

  12. Lateral Hopping of CO on Ag(110) by Multiple Overtone Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Arafune, Ryuichi; Jung, Jaehoon; Kawai, Maki; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-02-01

    A novel type of action spectrum representing multiple overtone excitations of the v (M -C ) mode was observed for lateral hopping of a CO molecule on Ag(110) induced by inelastically tunneled electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The yield of CO hopping shows sharp increases at 261 ±4 mV , corresponding to the C-O internal stretching mode, and at 61 ±2 , 90 ±2 , and 148 ±7 mV , even in the absence of corresponding fundamental vibrational modes. The mechanism of lateral CO hopping on Ag(110) was explained by the multistep excitation of overtone modes of v (M -C ) based on the numerical fitting of the action spectra, the nonlinear dependence of the hopping rate on the tunneling current, and the hopping barrier obtained from thermal diffusion experiments.

  13. Change of the surface potential barrier of GaAs photocathode during two-step activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jun; Gao, Youtang; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang

    2014-09-01

    High and low temperature activation experiments were carried out for a transmission-mode GaAs photocathode sample, and the activation photocurrent curves were recorded. The variety of the activation photocurrent curves between high and low temperatures was studied. By using fitting calculation, the surface potential barrier parameters of NEA photocathode after high and low temperature activations were obtained, respectively, and the change of the surface potential barriers between high and low -temperature activations is indicated. Besides, The NEA cathode surface after high-temperature activation and low temperature activation were analyzed respectively by using angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Above investigation results indicate that, with contrast to high-temperature activation, the thickness of surface potential barriers after low-temperature activation become thin and the vacuum level is reduced further. As a result, the cathode spectral sensitivity is improved remarkably.

  14. Extreme Kinematics in Selected Hip Hop Dance Sequences.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Woo, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Hip hop dance has many styles including breakdance (breaking), house, popping and locking, funk, streetdance, krumping, Memphis jookin', and voguing. These movements combine the complexity of dance choreography with the challenges of gymnastics and acrobatic movements. Despite high injury rates in hip hop dance, particularly in breakdance, to date there are no published biomechanical studies in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare representative hip hop steps found in breakdance (toprock and breaking) and house and provide descriptive statistics of the angular displacements that occurred in these sequences. Six expert female hip hop dancers performed three choreographed dance sequences, top rock, breaking, and house, to standardized music-based tempos. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during sequences that were 18 to 30 sec long. Hip, knee, and ankle three-dimensional peak joint angles were compared in repeated measures ANOVAs with post hoc tests where appropriate (p<0.01). Peak angles of the breaking sequence, which included floorwork, exceeded the other two sequences in the majority of planes and joints. Hip hop maximal joint angles exceeded reported activities of daily living and high injury sports such as gymnastics. Hip hop dancers work at weight-bearing joint end ranges where muscles are at a functional disadvantage. These results may explain why lower extremity injury rates are high in this population. PMID:26395613

  15. Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2006-03-20

    The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

  16. Municipal Officials’ Perceived Barriers to Consideration of Physical Activity in Community Design Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Karin Valentine; Schneider, Kristin L.; Brownson, Ross; Carnoske, Cheryl; Evenson, Kelly; Eyler, Amy; Heinrich, Katie; Litt, Jill; Lyn, Rodney; Maddock, Jay; Reed, Hannah; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Built environment-focused interventions and policies are recommended as sustainable approaches for promoting physical activity. Physical activity has not traditionally been considered in land use and transportation decision making. Effective collaboration with non-public health partners requires knowledge of their perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in decision making. Objective This study aimed to 1) identify barriers to the consideration of physical activity in community design and planning decisions among municipal decision makers and 2) explore differences in these barriers among a wide range of job functions and departments in a geographically diverse sample. Design A web-based survey was conducted among municipal officials in 94 cities and towns with populations of at least 50,000 residents in eight states. Participants 453 municipal officials from public health, planning, transportation/public works, community and economic development, parks and recreation, city management, and municipal legislatures responded to the survey. Main Outcome Measures Five barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design and layout were assessed. Results The most common barriers included lack of political will (23.5%), limited staff (20.4%) and lack of collaboration across municipal departments (16.2%). Fewer participants reported opposition from the business community or residents as barriers. Compared to other professionals, public health department personnel were more likely to report the barriers of limited staff and lack of collaboration across municipal departments. They were also more likely to report lack of political will compared to city managers or mayors and municipal legislators. Conclusions Barriers to increasing consideration of physical activity in decision making about community design and layout are encouragingly low. Implications for public health practice include the need to strategically increase political will

  17. "What I Wish You Knew": Social Barriers toward Physical Activity in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moola, Fiona; Fusco, Caroline; Kirsh, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the benefits of physical activity for youth with congenital heart disease (CHD), most patients are inactive. Although literature has addressed medical and psychological barriers to participation, little is known about the social barriers that youth encounter. This qualitative study explored sociocultural barriers to physical activity from…

  18. An Activity Theory Approach to Analyze Barriers to a Virtual Management Information Systems (MIS) Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaradat, Suhair; Qablan, Ahmad; Barham, Areej

    2011-01-01

    This paper explains how the activity theory is used as a framework to analyze the barriers to a virtual Management Information Stream (MIS) Curriculum in Jordanian schools, from both the sociocultural and pedagogical perspectives. Taking the activity system as a unit of analysis, this study documents the processes by which activities shape and are…

  19. Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, I.; Lal, J.; Mamontov, E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Huppert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments, in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  20. Fast Proton Hopping Detection in Ice Ih by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Presiado, Itay; Lal, Jyotsana; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Huppert, Dan I

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was employed on samples of HCl-doped polycrystalline ice I{sub h}. The analysis of the scattering signal provides the excess proton hopping time, {tau}{sub hop}, in the temperature range of 140-195 K. The hopping time strongly depends on the temperature of the sample, and the activation energy of a hopping step is 17 kJ/mol. The values of {tau}{sub hop} of the current experiment are in good agreement with calculated values derived from previous photochemical experiments,(1) in which we found that the proton hopping time at T > 242 K is on the order of 200 fs, roughly 10 times shorter than in liquid water at room temperature.

  1. Barriers to Physical Activity Among African American Women: An Integrative Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Rodney P.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Keller, Colleen; Dodgson, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    A key aspect for researchers to consider when developing culturally appropriate physical activity (PA) interventions for African American (AA) women are the specific barriers AA women face that limit their participation in PA. Identification and critical examination of these barriers is the first step in developing comprehensive culturally relevant approaches to promote PA and help resolve PA-related health disparities in this underserved population. We conducted a systematic integrative literature review to identify barriers to PA among AA women. Five electronic databases were searched, and 42 studies (27 qualitative, 14, quantitative, 1 mixed method) published since 1990 (Range 1998–2013) in English language journals met inclusion criteria for review. Barriers were classified as intrapersonal, interpersonal, or environment/community according to their respective level of influence within our social ecological framework. Intrapersonal barriers included: lack of time, knowledge, and motivation; physical appearance concerns; health concerns; monetary cost of exercise facilities; and tiredness/fatigue. Interpersonal barriers included: family/caregiving responsibilities; lack of social support; and lack of a PA partner. Environmental barriers included: safety concerns; lack of facilities; weather concerns; lack of sidewalks; and lack of physically active AA role models. Results provide key leverage points for researchers to consider when developing culturally relevant PA interventions for AA women. PMID:25909603

  2. Activation of toll like receptor-3 induces corneal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Jiang, Hua; Gao, Hongrui; Wang, Guangjie

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial barrier is critical in the maintenance of the homeostasis of the cornea. A number of eye disorders are associated with the corneal epithelial barrier dysfunction. Viral infection is one common eye disease type. This study aims to elucidate the mechanism by which the activation of toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) in the disruption of the corneal epithelial barrier. In this study, HCE cells (a human corneal epithelial cell line) were cultured into epithelial layers using as an in vitro model of the corneal epithelial barrier. PolyI:C was used as a ligand of TLR3. The transepithelial electric resistance (TER) and permeability of the HCE epithelial layer were assessed using as the parameters to evaluate the corneal epithelial barrier integrity. The results showed that exposure to PolyI:C markedly decreased the TER and increased the permeability of the HCE epithelial layers; the levels of cell junction protein, E-cadherin, were repressed by PolyI:C via increasing histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), the latter binding to the promoter of E-cadherin and repressed the transcription of E-cadherin. The addition of butyrate (an inhibitor of HDAC1) to the culture blocked the corneal epithelial barrier dysfunction caused by PolyI:C. In conclusion, activation of TLR3 can disrupt the corneal epithelial barrier, which can be blocked by the inhibitor of HDAC1. PMID:25912142

  3. Barriers to Physical Activity Among African American Women: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Rodney P; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Keller, Colleen; Dodgson, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    A key aspect for researchers to consider when developing culturally appropriate physical activity (PA) interventions for African American (AA) women are the specific barriers AA women face that limit their participation in PA. Identification and critical examination of these barriers is the first step in developing comprehensive culturally relevant approaches to promote PA and help resolve PA-related health disparities in this underserved population. We conducted a systematic integrative literature review to identify barriers to PA among AA women. Five electronic databases were searched, and forty-two studies (twenty-seven qualitative, fourteen quantitative, one mixed method) published since 1990 (range 1998-2013) in English language journals met inclusion criteria for review. Barriers were classified as intrapersonal, interpersonal, or environment/community according to their respective level of influence within our social ecological framework. Intrapersonal barriers included lack of time, knowledge, and motivation; physical appearance concerns; health concerns; monetary cost of exercise facilities; and tiredness/fatigue. Interpersonal barriers included family/caregiving responsibilities; lack of social support; and lack of a PA partner. Environmental barriers included safety concerns; lack of facilities; weather concerns; lack of sidewalks; and lack of physically active AA role models. Results provide key leverage points for researchers to consider when developing culturally relevant PA interventions for AA women. PMID:25909603

  4. Colloidal Oatmeal (Avena Sativa) Improves Skin Barrier Through Multi-Therapy Activity.

    PubMed

    Ilnytska, Olha; Kaur, Simarna; Chon, Suhyoun; Reynertson, Kurt A; Nebus, Judith; Garay, Michelle; Mahmood, Khalid; Southall, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Oats (Avena sativa) are a centuries-old topical treatment for a variety of skin barrier conditions, including dry skin, skin rashes, and eczema; however, few studies have investigated the actual mechanism of action for the skin barrier strengthening activity of colloidal oatmeal. Four extracts of colloidal oatmeal were prepared with various solvents and tested in vitro for skin barrier related gene expression and activity. Extracts of colloidal oatmeal were found to induce the expression of genes related to epidermal differentiation, tight junctions and lipid regulation in skin, and provide pH-buffering capacity. Colloidal oatmeal boosted the expression of multiple target genes related to skin barrier, and resulted in recovery of barrier damage in an in vitro model of atopic dermatitis. In addition, an investigator-blinded study was performed with 50 healthy female subjects who exhibited bilateral moderate to severe dry skin on their lower legs. Subjects were treated with a colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion. Clinically, the colloidal oatmeal lotion showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, moisturization, and barrier. Taken together, these results demonstrate that colloidal oatmeal can provide clinically effective benefits for dry and compromised skin by strengthening skin barrier.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(6):684-690. PMID:27272074

  5. Barriers to physical activity in an on-site corporate fitness center.

    PubMed

    Schwetschenau, Heather M; O'Brien, William H; Cunningham, Christopher J L; Jex, Steve M

    2008-10-01

    Many corporations provide employees the option of participating in on-site fitness centers, but utilization rates are low. Perceived barriers to physical activity have been established as important correlates of physical activity, and recent research indicates that barriers may vary across settings. Work-site fitness centers may present unique barriers to participation, but there are currently no standardized measures that assess such barriers. Eighty-eight employees of a midwestern corporation completed a survey designed to identify and evaluate the extent to which barriers influence participation in an on-site corporate fitness center. Regression analyses revealed that external environmental barriers (e.g., inadequate exercise facilities) significantly accounted for not joining the fitness center, and for decreased duration of visits to the facility among members. Internal barriers (e.g., feeling embarrassed to exercise around coworkers) significantly accounted for frequency of fitness center visits among members. This corporate specific measure may lead to more effective interventions aimed to increase use of on-site corporate fitness centers. PMID:18837631

  6. Barrier Crossing and Transport Activated by Kangaroo Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostur, M.; Luczka, J.

    1999-01-01

    We study barrier crossing of Brownian particles in a bistable symmetric potential and transport of Brownian particles in spatially periodic structures, driven by both kangaroo fluctuations and thermal equilibrium noise of zero mean values. We consider exponentially and algebraically correlated kangaroo fluctuations. Starting with the full Newton--Langevin equation for the Brownian particle and by introducing scaling as well as dimensionless variables, we show that the equation is very well approximated by overdamped dynamics in which inertial effects can be neglected. We analyze properties of selected macroscopic characteristics of the system such as the mean first passage time (MFPT) of particles from one minimum of the bistable potential to the other and mean stationary velocity of particles moving in a spatially periodic potential. In dependence upon statistics of kangaroo fluctuations and temperature of the system, macroscopic characteristics exhibit distinctive non-monotonic behavior. Accordingly, there exist optimal statistics of fluctuations optimizing macroscopic characteristics.

  7. Gender Differences in Barriers to Physical Activity among College Students Reporting Varying Levels of Regular Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munford, Shawn N.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have studied the primary determinants of physical activity in an effort to enhance health promotion initiatives nationwide. These physical activity determinants have been observed to differ among various segments of the population, suggesting a further examination of physical activity barriers among differing populations. Little…

  8. Do perceived cues, benefits, and barriers to physical activity differ between male and female adolescents?

    PubMed

    Tergerson, Jennifer L; King, Keith A

    2002-11-01

    A four-page survey was administered to 535 adolescents at two single-sex (one male, one female) high schools in Cincinnati, Ohio, to examine whether perceptions of physical activity differed by gender. More specifically, the survey assessed perceived cues, benefits, and barriers to exercising. Results indicated that the most helpful cue to physical activity for both female and male students was "having a friend to exercise with." The most commonly reported benefit of exercising among females was "to stay in shape," whereas the most commonly reported benefit to exercising among males was "to become strong." Among females, the most common barrier to exercising was "having no time to exercise," whereas males were most likely to report "wanting to do other things with my time." Multivariate analyses of covariance revealed that perceived cues, benefits, and barriers to physical activity differed significantly based on gender. Recommendations on specific strategies to increasing male and female adolescent physical activity levels are offered. PMID:12557633

  9. Barriers to Participation in Physical Activity Among South Sudanese Children in South Australia: Parents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mude, William; Mwanri, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the determinants of childhood obesity. Although its facilitators are well documented for the general community, limited evidence exists informing newly arrived and emerging migrant communities in Australia. To explore parents' perspectives of barriers to participation in physical activity among South Sudanese children in South Australia. Qualitative, face-to-face interviews were conducted with parents. Data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically using NVivo software. Multiple and complex barriers to physical activity participation were described. Enabling and supportive programs are needed to improve physical activity participation and health outcomes of new migrants. PMID:27536934

  10. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  11. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  12. Physical Activity Behavior, Barriers to Activity, and Opinions About a Smartphone-Based Physical Activity Intervention Among Rural Residents

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Henrietta; Manini, Todd; Dallery, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rural Americans engage in less physical activity (PA) and experience higher rates of consequent health problems (i.e., obesity, cardiovascular disease) than urban Americans. Although geographic barriers have historically made this population hard to reach, rural individuals are increasingly gaining access to smartphones. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate PA behavior and barriers to PA among rural residents and to gauge their receptiveness to a smartphone-based PA intervention that is currently in the development stage. Materials and Methods: Rural Floridian adults (n=113), 18 years of age and older, completed surveys to assess PA behavior, PA barriers, and opinions about an intervention to increase PA. Specifically, they were asked to imagine a program that would require them to do PA with their mobile phones and whether they viewed intended aspects of the program as helpful. The present work is therefore formative research that sought to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a smartphone-based intervention among rural residents. Results of the survey will inform the development of a tailored, smartphone-based PA intervention. Results: The 37.2% of participants with low PA levels (<600 metabolic equivalent [MET]-min per week) were more likely to report personal and environmental barriers to PA than the 47.8% of participants with moderate PA levels (≥600 MET-min per week). More barriers were reported among participants who self-reported as white and among participants of older age, lower education level, and lower socioeconomic status. Additionally, 75.9% of participants reported features of the intervention as at least somewhat helpful. Conclusions: The growing ubiquity of smartphones among rural residents, combined with participants' positive response to the program description, supports the acceptability of a smartphone-based PA intervention for rural communities. Given the participants' receptiveness, future research

  13. Motives for and barriers to physical activity in twin pairs discordant for leisure time physical activity for 30 years.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, S; Leskinen, T; Morris, T; Alen, M; Kaprio, J; Liukkonen, J; Kujala, U

    2012-02-01

    Long-term persistent physical activity is important in the prevention of chronic diseases, but a large number of people do not participate in physical activity to obtain health benefits. The purpose of this study was to examine the motives and perceived barriers to long-term engagement in leisure time physical activity. Same-sex twin pairs (N=16, mean age 60) discordant for physical activity over 30 years were identified from the Finnish Twin Cohort. We evaluated participants' physical activity motivation with the 73-item Recreational Exercise Motivation Measure and assessed barriers to physical activity with a 25-item questionnaire. The characteristics of physical activity motivation and perceived barriers between the active and inactive co-twins were analysed using paired tests. Motives related to the sub-dimensions of enjoyment and physical fitness and psychological state were the most important reasons for participation in physical activity among all the twin individuals analysed. The sub-dimensions mastery (p=0.018, Cohen's d=0.76), physical fitness (p=0.029, Cohen's d=0.69), and psychological state (p=0.039, Cohen's d=0.65) differed significantly between active and inactive co-twins. More than half of the participants reported no reasons for not being physically active. If reasons existed, participation in physical activity was deterred mostly by pain and various health problems. This study found no differences in perceived barriers between active and inactive co-twins. We conclude from our results that the main factors promoting persistent leisure time physical activity were participants' wish to improve or maintain their physical skills or techniques, a feeling that exercise would improve their mental and physical health and that they found the activity enjoyable. This study helps us understand the importance of the role of motives and the minor role of perceived barriers for engagement in persistent physical activity. PMID:22318531

  14. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  15. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  16. Do Perceived Cues, Benefits, and Barriers to Physical Activity Differ between Male and Female Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tergerson, Jennifer L.; King, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed adolescents at single-sex high schools to examine whether perceptions of physical activity differed by gender. The most helpful cue to physical activity for males and females was having a friend to exercise with. Parental encouragement and having a parent who exercised were also helpful. Wanting to do other things was a common barrier to…

  17. Making Ethics an Everyday Activity: How Can We Reduce the Barriers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2004-01-01

    I propose that for ethics to become a normal activity, practiced by citizens on a daily basis, we begin by identifying barriers to this activity. Once things that get in the way have been identified, I examine ways that environmental educators can create conditions for ethics to become part of mainstream practices and processes of inquiry--to…

  18. Midlife Women's Negotiations of Barriers to and Facilitators of Physical Activity: Implications for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Petra; Solmon, Melinda; Choate, Laura H.; Autrey, Pam; Landry, Joan B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated barriers to exercise and facilitators that enable midlife women to engage in an active lifestyle. Findings provide counselors with insight into the meanings that women ascribe to physical activity so they can better assist clients in making choices that enhance their overall health and wellness.

  19. Barriers to Physical Activity for People with Long-Term Neurological Conditions: A Review Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Hilda F.; Hale, Leigh A.; Whitehead, Lisa; Baxter, G. David

    2012-01-01

    People with disability are insufficiently physically active for health. This study identified the volume, quality, and findings of research that exposes environmental and personal barriers of physical activity participation for people with neurological conditions. CINAHL, Sport Discus, EMBASE, Medline, and AMED were systematically searched between…

  20. Levels of Engagement and Barriers to Physical Activity in a Population of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Andrew; Look, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This study examined levels of, and barriers to, physical activity in a population of 19 adults with learning disabilities living in community supported accommodation, using diary records and semi-structured interviews with staff. The levels of physical activity were higher in the sample population than previous figures for adults with learning…

  1. Identifying Facilitators and Barriers to Physical Activity for Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahy, J.; Shields, N.; Taylor, N. F.; Dodd, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome are typically sedentary, and many do not participate in the recommended levels of physical activity per week. The aim of this study was to identify the facilitators and barriers to physical activity for this group. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit the views of adults with Down…

  2. Identifying the Barriers and Facilitators to Participation in Physical Activity for Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, M.; Shields, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many children with Down syndrome do not undertake the recommended amount of daily physical activity. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to physical activity for this group. Methods: Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 parents (16 mothers, 4 fathers) of children with Down syndrome aged…

  3. Non-Critical-Care Nurses' Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sheryl Henry; Astroth, Kim Schafer; Woith, Wendy Mann

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams can save lives but are only effective when activated. We surveyed 50 nurses for their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to activation. Findings showed that participants need more education on their role and when to activate the rapid response team. Nurses who comprise the team need help building their communication skills. We recommend nursing professional development specialists increase the frequency of offerings and expand the focus on roles, activation criteria, and communication skills. PMID:26381336

  4. Sampling Practices and Social Spaces: Exploring a Hip-Hop Approach to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2010-01-01

    Much more than a musical genre, hip-hop culture exists as an animating force in the lives of many young adults. This article looks beyond the moral concerns often associated with rap music to explore how hip-hop as a larger set of expressions and practices implicates the educational experiences, activities, and approaches for students. The article…

  5. Barriers to participation in physical activity and exercise among middle-aged and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Justine, Maria; Azizan, Azliyana; Hassan, Vaharli; Salleh, Zoolfaiz; Manaf, Haidzir

    2013-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Although the benefits of physical activity and exercise are widely acknowledged, many middle-aged and elderly individuals remain sedentary. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the external and internal barriers to physical activity and exercise participation among middle-aged and elderly individuals, as well as identify any differences in these barriers between the two groups. METHODS Recruited individuals were categorised into either the middle-aged (age 45-59 years, n = 60) or elderly (age ≥ 60 years, n = 60) group. Data on demographics, anthropometry, as well as external and internal barriers to participation in physical activity and exercise were collected. RESULTS Analysis showed no significant differences in the total scores of all internal barriers between the two groups (p > 0.05). The total scores for most external barriers between the two groups also showed no significant differences (p > 0.05); only 'cost' (p = 0.045) and 'exercise interferes with social/family activities' (p = 0.011) showed significant differences. The most common external barriers among the middle-aged and elderly respondents were 'not enough time' (46.7% vs. 48.4%), 'no one to exercise with' (40.0% vs. 28.3%) and 'lack of facilities' (33.4% vs. 35.0%). The most common internal barriers for middle-aged respondents were 'too tired' (48.3%), 'already active enough' (38.3%), 'do not know how to do it' (36.7%) and 'too lazy' (36.7%), while those for elderly respondents were 'too tired' (51.7%), 'lack of motivation' (38.4%) and 'already active enough' (38.4%). CONCLUSION Middle-aged and elderly respondents presented with similar external and internal barriers to physical activity and exercise participation. These factors should be taken into account when healthcare policies are being designed and when interventions such as the provision of facilities to promote physical activity and exercise among older people are being considered. PMID:24154584

  6. Physical activity barriers and enablers in older Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Littman, Alyson J; Boyko, Edward J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Arterburn, David E

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the types of physical activities that older individuals with lower-limb loss perform, correlates of regular physical activity (PA), and barriers and facilitators to PA. We conducted an exploratory study in 158 older Veterans from the Pacific Northwest with a partial foot (35%), below-knee (39%) and above-knee (26%) amputation. Ninety-eight percent of survey respondents were male, on average 65 yr of age and 15 yr postamputation; 36% of amputations were trauma-related. The most commonly reported physical activities were muscle strengthening (42%), yard work and/or gardening (30%), and bicycling (11%). Forty-three percent were classified as physically active based on weekly moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA. History of vigorous preamputation PA was positively associated with being active, while low wealth and watching ≥5 h/d of television/videos were inversely associated. While pain- and resource-related barriers to PA were most frequently reported, only knowledge-related and interest/motivation-related barriers were inversely associated with being active. Family support and financial assistance to join a gym were the most commonly reported factors that would facilitate PA. To increase PA in the older amputee population, interventions should address motivational issues, knowledge gaps, and television watching; reduce financial barriers to exercising; and consider involving family members. PMID:25356624

  7. Physical activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence of inactivity and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Joanna; Ingles, Jodie; Timperio, Anna; Patterson, Jillian; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to determine potential demographic, clinical and health-related factors influencing likelihood of meeting physical activity guidelines. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients (n=198) with HCM attending a specialist HCM centre from July 2014 to November 2015. The primary outcome measure was physical activity (minutes per day), as measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)) and objective means (ActiGraph accelerometer). For both, participants were classified as meeting guidelines if they did at least 150 min per week of physical activity. Quality of life (Short Form-36 V.2, SF-36v2), barriers to exercise and clinical–demographic data were also collected. Results In total, 54.8% of participants did not meet physical activity recommendations based on IPAQ, and 12.7% did not meet guidelines based on accelerometer data. The most commonly identified barriers to exercise were ‘pain interferes with my exercise’ (33%) and ‘I have an injury/disability that stops me’ (29%). Independent factors associated with meeting guidelines included older age (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p=0.002), higher education level (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.93, p=0.03), better physical quality of life (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.09, p=0.05) and more reported barriers (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91, p=0.01). Conclusions More than half of the patients with HCM did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Several barriers to exercise among individuals with HCM exist, and provide the basis for targeted interventions to promote physical activity and improve overall health in patients with HCM. PMID:27547438

  8. PATTERNS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN CHILDREN: AN ASSESSMENT OF BARRIERS AND SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janice L.; Davis, Sally M.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Going, Scott; Becenti, Alberta; Metcalfe, Lauve; Stone, Elaine; Harnack, Lisa; Ring, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Estimates indicate that 10% to 50% of American Indian and non-Indian children in the U.S. are obese, defined as a body mass index ≥ 95th percentile of the NHANES II reference data. Pathways is a two-phase, multi-site study to develop and test a school-based obesity prevention program in American Indian schoolchildren in grades three through five. During Phase I feasibility prior to initiation of the Pathways trial, data were collected related to physical activity patterns, and the supports of, and barriers to, physical activity. Nine schools from communities representing six different tribal groups participated in this study. Multiple measures were used for data collection including direct observation, paired child interviews, and in-depth interviews and focus groups with adults. Students completed the self-administered Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors (KAB) survey, and a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Barriers to physical activity at schools included a lack of facilities, equipment, and trained staff persons for PE. Adults were not consistently active with their children, but they were highly supportive of their children’s activity level. Children reported a strong enjoyment of physical activity and strong peer support to be physically active. Weather conditions, safety concerns, and homework/chores were common barriers to physical activity reported by children and adult caregivers. The information was used to design culturally and age-appropriate, practical interventions including the five physical activity programs for schoolchildren in the Pathways study. PMID:11759094

  9. Patterns of physical activity among American Indian children: an assessment of barriers and support.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J L; Davis, S M; Gittelsohn, J; Going, S; Becenti, A; Metcalfe, L; Stone, E; Harnack, L; Ring, K

    2001-12-01

    Estimates indicate that 10% to 50% of American Indian and non-Indian children in the U.S. are obese, defined as a body mass index > or = 95th percentile of the NHANES II reference data. Pathways is a two-phase, multi-site study to develop and test a school-based obesity prevention program in American Indian schoolchildren in grades three through five. During Phase I feasibility prior to initiation of the Pathways trial, data were collected related to physical activity patterns, and the supports of, and barriers to, physical activity. Nine schools from communities representing six different tribal groups participated in this study. Multiple measures were used for data collection including direct observation, paired child interviews, and in-depth interviews and focus groups with adults. Students completed the self-administered Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors (KAB) survey, and a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). Barriers to physical activity at schools included a lack of facilities, equipment, and trained staff persons for PE. Adults were not consistently active with their children, but they were highly supportive of their children's activity level. Children reported a strong enjoyment of physical activity and strong peer support to be physically active. Weather conditions, safety concerns, and homework/chores were common barriers to physical activity reported by children and adult caregivers. The information was used to design culturally and age-appropriate, practical interventions including the five physical activity programs for schoolchildren in the Pathways study. PMID:11759094

  10. Assessment of active play, inactivity and perceived barriers in an inner city neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Gregg; Kottyan, Leah; Edwards, Nicholas M; Unaka, Ndidi I

    2014-06-01

    Avondale, a disadvantaged neighborhood in Cincinnati, lags behind on a number of indicators of child well-being. Childhood obesity has become increasingly prevalent, as one-third of Avondale's kindergarteners are obese or overweight. The study objective was to determine perceptions of the quantity of and obstacles to childhood physical activity in the Avondale community. Caregivers of children from two elementary schools were surveyed to assess their child's physical activity and barriers to being active. Three hundred and forty surveys were returned out of 1,047 for a response rate of 32%. On school days, 41% of caregivers reported that their children spent more than 2 h watching television, playing video games, or spending time on the computer. While over half of respondents reported that their children get more than 2 h of physical activity on school days, 14% of children were reported to be physically active less than 1 h per day. Caregivers identified violence, cost of extracurricular activities, and lack of organized activities as barriers to their child's physical activity. The overwhelming majority of caregivers expressed interest in a program to make local playgrounds safer. In conclusion, children in Avondale are not participating in enough physical activity and are exposed to more screen time than is recommended by the AAP. Safety concerns were identified as a critical barrier to address in future advocacy efforts in this community. This project represents an important step toward increasing the physical activity of children in Avondale and engaging the local community. PMID:24306236

  11. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations.

  12. Charge transport in molecular junctions: From tunneling to hopping with the probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-14

    We demonstrate that a simple phenomenological approach can be used to simulate electronic conduction in molecular wires under thermal effects induced by the surrounding environment. This “Landauer-Büttiker’s probe technique” can properly replicate different transport mechanisms, phase coherent nonresonant tunneling, ballistic behavior, and hopping conduction. Specifically, our simulations with the probe method recover the following central characteristics of charge transfer in molecular wires: (i) the electrical conductance of short wires falls off exponentially with molecular length, a manifestation of the tunneling (superexchange) mechanism. Hopping dynamics overtakes superexchange in long wires demonstrating an ohmic-like behavior. (ii) In off-resonance situations, weak dephasing effects facilitate charge transfer, but under large dephasing, the electrical conductance is suppressed. (iii) At high enough temperatures, k{sub B}T/ϵ{sub B} > 1/25, with ϵ{sub B} as the molecular-barrier height, the current is enhanced by a thermal activation (Arrhenius) factor. However, this enhancement takes place for both coherent and incoherent electrons and it does not readily indicate on the underlying mechanism. (iv) At finite-bias, dephasing effects may impede conduction in resonant situations. We further show that memory (non-Markovian) effects can be implemented within the Landauer-Büttiker’s probe technique to model the interaction of electrons with a structured environment. Finally, we examine experimental results of electron transfer in conjugated molecular wires and show that our computational approach can reasonably reproduce reported values to provide mechanistic information.

  13. Charge transport in molecular junctions: From tunneling to hopping with the probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate that a simple phenomenological approach can be used to simulate electronic conduction in molecular wires under thermal effects induced by the surrounding environment. This "Landauer-Büttiker's probe technique" can properly replicate different transport mechanisms, phase coherent nonresonant tunneling, ballistic behavior, and hopping conduction. Specifically, our simulations with the probe method recover the following central characteristics of charge transfer in molecular wires: (i) the electrical conductance of short wires falls off exponentially with molecular length, a manifestation of the tunneling (superexchange) mechanism. Hopping dynamics overtakes superexchange in long wires demonstrating an ohmic-like behavior. (ii) In off-resonance situations, weak dephasing effects facilitate charge transfer, but under large dephasing, the electrical conductance is suppressed. (iii) At high enough temperatures, kBT/ɛB > 1/25, with ɛB as the molecular-barrier height, the current is enhanced by a thermal activation (Arrhenius) factor. However, this enhancement takes place for both coherent and incoherent electrons and it does not readily indicate on the underlying mechanism. (iv) At finite-bias, dephasing effects may impede conduction in resonant situations. We further show that memory (non-Markovian) effects can be implemented within the Landauer-Büttiker's probe technique to model the interaction of electrons with a structured environment. Finally, we examine experimental results of electron transfer in conjugated molecular wires and show that our computational approach can reasonably reproduce reported values to provide mechanistic information.

  14. Surface Proton Hopping and Coupling Pathway of Water Oxidation on Cobalt Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Frei, Heinz; Wang, Lin-Wang

    We propose an oxidation pathway of water splitting on cobalt oxide surface with clear thermodynamic and kinetic details. The density-functional theory studies suggest that the coupled proton-electron transfer is not necessarily sequential and implicit in every elementary step of this mechanistic cycle. Instead, the initial O-O bond could be formed by the landing of water molecule on the surface oxos, which is then followed by the dispatch of protons through the hopping manner and subsequent release of di-oxygen. Our theoretical investigations of intermediates and transition states indicate that all chemical conversions in this pathway, including the proton transfers, are possible with low activation barriers, in addition to their favorable thermodynamics. Our hypothesis is supported by recent experimental observations of surface superoxide that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding to adjacent hydroxyl group, as an intermediate on fast-kinetics catalytic site.

  15. Similar barriers and facilitators to physical activity across different clinical groups experiencing lower limb spasticity.

    PubMed

    Hundza, Sandra; Quartly, Caroline; Kim, Jasmine M; Dunnett, James; Dobrinsky, Jill; Loots, Iris; Choy, Kim; Chow, Brayley; Hampshire, Alexis; Temple, Viviene A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Given the importance of physical activity in maintaining health and wellness, an improved understanding of physical activity patterns across different clinical populations is required. This study examines the facilitators for, and barriers to, participation in physical activity across multiple contexts for three clinical groups with chronic lower limb spasticity (individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and incomplete spinal cord injury). Method This cross-sectional study employed quantitative measures for spasticity, ankle range of motion, pain, falls, cognition, mobility, and physical activity as well as qualitative semi-structured interviews. Results There were similar impairments in body functions and structures and limitations in activities across the clinical groups. These impairments and limitations negatively impacted participation in physical activity, which was low. Environmental and personal factors exacerbated or mitigated the limiting effects of body functions and structures and activities on physical activity in many areas of life. Conclusions In this population, participation in physical activity includes activities such as housework which are different than what is typically considered as physical activity. Further, the presence of similar barriers and facilitators across the groups suggests that support and services to promote valued forms of physical activity could be organised and delivered based on limitations in mobility and functioning rather than clinical diagnosis. Implications for rehabilitation Physical activity is of utmost importance in maintaining health and wellness in clinical populations. This research highlights the desired and actual physical activity for these populations can look different than what may traditionally be considered as physical activity (e.g. housework is not typically considered participation physical activity). Therefore, rehabilitation interventions need to be directly designed to enhance clients

  16. Hall effect in hopping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-02-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO.

  17. Hip-Hop--What's in It for the Academy? Self-Understanding, Pedagogy and Aesthetical Learning Processes in Everyday Cultural Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Söderman, Johan; Sernhede, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Since hip-hop first appeared in New York over 35 years ago, it has been associated with social activism and education. Accordingly, it is not surprising that academic institutions in universities and K-12 schools are interested in hip-hop. In this article, we will highlight the "hip-hop academisation" and map out a new direction in a…

  18. High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments: HOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program during April, 2012 â€" April, 2015. HOPS is an enabler for science missions with extremely high data processing rates. In this three-year effort of HOPS, Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) and 3-D Winds were of interest in particular. As for ASCENDS, HOPS replaces time domain data processing with frequency domain processing while making the real-time on-board data processing possible. As for 3-D Winds, HOPS offers real-time high-resolution wind profiling with 4,096-point fast Fourier transform (FFT). HOPS is adaptable with quick turn-around time. Since HOPS offers reusable user-friendly computational elements, its FPGA IP Core can be modified for a shorter development period if the algorithm changes. The FPGA and memory bandwidth of HOPS is 20 GB/sec while the typical maximum processor-to-SDRAM bandwidth of the commercial radiation tolerant high-end processors is about 130-150 MB/sec. The inter-board communication bandwidth of HOPS is 4 GB/sec while the effective processor-to-cPCI bandwidth of commercial radiation tolerant high-end boards is about 50-75 MB/sec. Also, HOPS offers VHDL cores for the easy and efficient implementation of ASCENDS and 3-D Winds, and other similar algorithms. A general overview of the 3-year development of HOPS is the goal of this presentation.

  19. Confronting Physical Activity Programming Barriers for People with Disabilities: The Empowerment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Thomas Eugene; Taliaferro, Andrea R.; Pate, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Community-based physical activity programs for people with disabilities have barriers that are unique to their program leader qualifications and the population they serve. Moran and Block (2010) argued that there is a need for practical strategies that are easy for communities to implement, maximize resources, and minimize the impact of barriers…

  20. Ethnic and Socioeconomic Comparisons of Fitness, Activity Levels, and Barriers to Exercise in High School Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahlman, Mariane M.; Hall, Heather L.; Lock, Robyn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if high school females differed in individual measures of health-related physical fitness, barriers to exercise, or activity level based on ethnicity or socioeconomic status. A cross-sectional sample consisting of African American (28%), Hispanic (23%), and white (49%) female high school students, 46%…

  1. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jeyan S; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P; Simpson, R Mark; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  2. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jeyan S.; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P.; Simpson, R. Mark; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  3. A Comparison of Motivational Factors and Barriers to Physical Activity among Traditional versus Nontraditional College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulavic, Kimberly; Hultquist, Cherilyn N.; McLester, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the motivational factors and the barriers to physical activity (PA) in traditional college students (TS) and nontraditional college students (NTS) and determine if differences exist between these 2 groups. Participants: A total of 746 college students; 628 were TS (19.1 [plus-minus] 1.2 years), and 118 were NTS (31.2…

  4. A Qualitative Examination of Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Physical Activity for Urban and Rural Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Justin B.; Jilcott, Stephanie B.; Shores, Kindal A.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Brownson, Ross C.; Novick, Lloyd F.

    2010-01-01

    Many adolescents, both rural and urban, are not meeting the recommended levels for physical activity (PA). This investigation was designed to elicit socioecologic barriers and facilitators for PA in rural and urban middle school youth and their parents. Thirteen focus groups were conducted with 41 youth and 50 parents from eastern North Carolina.…

  5. Young adult males' motivators and perceived barrier towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a lack of understanding of young men's perspectives in obesity-related research. This study aims to: (1) identify young men's perceived motivators and barriers in adopting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors, and (2) explore any differences in responses by weight status categorie...

  6. Perceived Barriers to Faculty Achievement in the Area of Scholarly Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehrle, Mary Beth; Gross, Sanford M.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 35 Illinois College of Optometry faculty investigated perceived barriers to scholarly activity, including time management, communication skills, knowledge of research design and statistics, computer literacy, institutional support, use of human or material resources, and library resource skills. A majority felt their skills were…

  7. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

  8. Adolescents' Perspectives on the Barriers and Facilitators of Physical Activity: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, João; Marques, Adilson; Sarmento, Hugo; Carreiro da Costa, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This article examined qualitative studies of adolescents' perspectives about the facilitators and barriers of physical activity, published from 2007 to 2014. A systematic review of "Web of Science", "EBSCO", "Psychinfo" and "ERIC" databases was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic…

  9. Adolescents' perspectives on the barriers and facilitators of physical activity: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Martins, João; Marques, Adilson; Sarmento, Hugo; Carreiro da Costa, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    This article examined qualitative studies of adolescents' perspectives about the facilitators and barriers of physical activity, published from 2007 to 2014. A systematic review of 'Web of Science', 'EBSCO', 'Psychinfo' and 'ERIC' databases was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. The following keywords were used: 'physical activity' and 'physical education', each one individually associated with 'correlate', 'determinant', 'facilitator', 'barrier', 'factor influen*', and with 'qualitative', 'focus group', 'interview', "narrative'. Out of 3815 studies initially identified, due to inclusion and quality criteria, only 12 were fully reviewed. Studies' outcomes were analyzed through thematic analysis. The majority of these reported research with young adolescent girls. Few studies have considered the socioeconomic status influence. According to young people's perspectives, the main facilitators and hampering factors to their participation in physical activity were the following: attitude toward physical activity; motivation; perceptions of competence and body image; fun; influence of friends, family and physical education teachers and environmental physical activity opportunities. Specific life transition periods were referred only as a barrier to physical activity. Strategies of pedagogical actions and for developing physical activity intervention programs were discussed, in order to effectively promote the adoption of active lifestyles among youth. PMID:26324394

  10. Solution Structure and DNA-binding Properties of the Winged Helix Domain of the Meiotic Recombination HOP2 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F.; Eyster, Craig A.; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2014-01-01

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination. PMID:24711446

  11. Theoretical study of thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance: Switching paths and barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, H.; Kudo, K.; Nagasawa, T.; Kanao, T.; Mizushima, K.; Sato, R.; Okamoto, S.; Kikuchi, N.; Kitakami, O.

    2015-03-01

    Energy barrier height for magnetization switching is theoretically studied for a system with uniaxial anisotropy in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field. A formulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a rotating frame introduces an effective energy that includes the effects of both the microwave field and static field. This allows the effective-energy profiles to rigorously describe the switching paths and corresponding barrier height, which govern thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance. We show that fixed points and limit cycles in the rotating frame lead to various switching paths and that under certain conditions, switching becomes a two-step process with an intermediate state.

  12. Barriers to physical activity in people at risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, J

    Scotland has a high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a literature search identified the risk factors and the importance that physical activity plays in reducing the risk. The search also revealed that patients at risk of CHD find it difficult to increase their exercise levels. In an attempt to understand this, barriers to exercise were explored from a psychological perspective. The study uses the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLCS) (Wallston and Wallston, 1978) in conjunction with a specifically designed exercise questionnaire. The results show that differences in exercise levels exist between different age groups and between males and females. Differences in MHLCS scores and in barriers to exercise are also shown between the different age groups and sexes, as well as between those working and those not working. The main barriers to exercises were time, ill health, preference to do other things, money, having nobody to go with and lack of confidence. PMID:10426012

  13. Barrier properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes containing carbon nanotubes or activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Surdo, Erin M; Khan, Iftheker A; Choudhury, Atif A; Saleh, Navid B; Arnold, William A

    2011-04-15

    Carbon nanotube addition has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of some polymers. Because of their unique adsorptive properties, carbon nanotubes may also improve the barrier performance of polymers used in contaminant containment. This study compares the barrier performance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to that for PVA containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Raw and surface-functionalized versions of each sorbent were tested for their abilities to adsorb 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and Cu(2+), representing the important hydrophobic organic and heavy metal contaminant classes, as they diffused across the PVA. In both cases, PAC (for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) and functionalized PAC (for Cu(2+)) outperformed SWCNTs on a per mass basis by trapping more of the contaminants within the barrier membrane. Kinetics of sorption are important in evaluating barrier properties, and poor performance of SWCNT-containing membranes as 1,2,4-TCB barriers is attributed to kinetic limitations. PMID:21349636

  14. Perceived Barriers by University Students in the Practice of Physical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-López, Manuel; Gallegos, Antonio Granero; Extremera, Antonio Baena

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to study in detail the main characteristics of university students in order to find out the reasons why they have adopted an inactive lifestyle. In order to do so, a questionnaire on the analysis of sports habits and lifestyle was given to 323 students. They were taken from a representative sample of 1834 students. These 323 students had pointed out at the moment of the fieldwork, not having practiced any sport in their spare time. Our findings point out that there are diverse reasons for this. On one hand, reasons referred to as external barriers such as lack of time, on the other hand, internal barriers such as not liking the physical activity, not seeing its practicality or usefulness, feeling lazy or with apathy, or thinking that they are not competent in this type of activities. Other reasons such as the lack of social support are grouped within the external barriers. Finally, it is important to stress that there are also differences based on gender with respect to motivation. Key points External barriers prevail in university students. The lack of time is among the most highlighted ones. Statistically significant results have been found regarding the gender variable. The results are very important since they are considered to be valuable information for university institutions when guiding and diversifying their offer of physical and sport activities. Also as a guide in the design of support policies and national sport management guidelines. PMID:24149629

  15. Mechanical and barrier properties of starch-based films plasticized with two- or three component deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Zdanowicz, Magdalena; Johansson, Caisa

    2016-10-20

    The aim of this work was to prepare two- and three-components deep eutectic solvents (DES) and investigate their potential as starch plasticizers. Starch/DES films were prepared via casting method. Mechanical properties, water vapor- and oxygen transmission rates were measured; additionally contact angle and moisture sorption were determined and FTIR analysis was applied on the films. Native potato starch and hydroxypropylated and oxidized starch (HOPS) with common plasticizers (e.g. polyols, urea) and DES were studied. Moreover, influence of three methods of DES introduction and concentration of plasticizer on the films properties were compared. HOPS films were prepared by two methods: as non-cured and cured samples. Some of DESs containing citrate anion exhibited crosslinking ability of polysaccharide matrix. Non-cured HOPS/DES films exhibited more favourable mechanical and barrier properties than cured analogue films. Samples prepared with unmodified potato starch had higher mechanical and barrier properties than films made with HOPS. Starch-based films plasticized with novel DESs with parallel crosslinking activity exhibited satisfactory mechanical and barrier properties. PMID:27474548

  16. The biomechanics of vertical hopping: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Mario; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive vertical hopping is a simple and relatively controlled task useful for studying basic neuromuscular properties and tissue mechanics. However, several biomechanical and physiological factors are involved. This article provides an overview of muscle and tendon properties and how these interact during vertical hopping. Muscle properties discussed are force-velocity and force-length relationships, electromechanical delay, muscle fiber type, stretch induced contraction amplification, and muscle spindle afferent feedback. Tendon properties include storage and reuse of elastic energy, tendon stiffness, afferent information from Golgi tendon organs, and failure points. These muscle and tendon properties interact to generate vertical hopping force and power. In addition to these basic properties, there are other more complicated factors to consider when analyzing vertical hopping such as balance and coordination. A wealth of information can be gathered by studying vertical hopping. Caution should be taken, however, to prevent inappropriate conclusions being drawn about hop performance due to oversimplification. PMID:24067123

  17. Differences between direct current and alternating current capacitance nonlinearities in high-k dielectrics and their relation to hopping conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaldi, O.; Gonon, P.; Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Kassmi, M.; Sylvestre, A.; Jomni, F.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitance nonlinearities were studied in atomic layer deposited HfO2 films using two types of signals: a pure ac voltage of large magnitude (ac nonlinearities) and a small ac voltage superimposed to a large dc voltage (dc nonlinearities). In theory, ac and dc nonlinearities should be of the same order of magnitude. However, in practice, ac nonlinearities are found to be an order of magnitude higher than dc nonlinearities. Besides capacitance nonlinearities, hopping conduction is studied using low-frequency impedance measurements and is discussed through the correlated barrier hopping model. The link between hopping and nonlinearity is established. The ac nonlinearities are ascribed to the polarization of isolated defect pairs, while dc nonlinearities are attributed to electrode polarization which originates from defect percolation paths. Both the ac and dc capacitance nonlinearities display an exponential variation with voltage, which results from field-induced lowering of the hopping barrier energy.

  18. Differences between direct current and alternating current capacitance nonlinearities in high-k dielectrics and their relation to hopping conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Khaldi, O.; Kassmi, M.; Gonon, P. Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Jomni, F.

    2014-08-28

    Capacitance nonlinearities were studied in atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} films using two types of signals: a pure ac voltage of large magnitude (ac nonlinearities) and a small ac voltage superimposed to a large dc voltage (dc nonlinearities). In theory, ac and dc nonlinearities should be of the same order of magnitude. However, in practice, ac nonlinearities are found to be an order of magnitude higher than dc nonlinearities. Besides capacitance nonlinearities, hopping conduction is studied using low-frequency impedance measurements and is discussed through the correlated barrier hopping model. The link between hopping and nonlinearity is established. The ac nonlinearities are ascribed to the polarization of isolated defect pairs, while dc nonlinearities are attributed to electrode polarization which originates from defect percolation paths. Both the ac and dc capacitance nonlinearities display an exponential variation with voltage, which results from field-induced lowering of the hopping barrier energy.

  19. Motivation and Barriers for Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Women

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Inês; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David; Teixeira, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between motivation and barriers for physical activity, and physical activity behavior in women living in socioeconomic disadvantage. This study also examined whether weight control intentions moderate those associations. Methods Data from 1664 women aged 18–46 years was collected at baseline and three-year follow-up as part of the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality study. In mail-based surveys, women reported sociodemographic and neighborhood environmental characteristics, intrinsic motivation, goals and perceived family barriers to be active, weight control intentions and leisure-time physical activity (assessed through the IPAQ-L). Linear regression models assessed the association of intrinsic motivation, goals and barriers with physical activity at baseline and follow-up, adjusting for environmental characteristics and also physical activity at baseline (for longitudinal analyses), and the moderating effects of weight control intentions were examined. Results Intrinsic motivation and, to a lesser extent, appearance and relaxation goals for being physically active were consistently associated with leisure-time physical activity at baseline and follow-up. Perceived family barriers, health, fitness, weight and stress relief goals were associated with leisure-time physical activity only at baseline. Moderated regression analyses revealed that weight control intentions significantly moderated the association between weight goals and leisure-time physical activity at baseline (β = 0.538, 99% CI = 0.057, 0.990) and between intrinsic motivation and leisure-time physical activity at follow-up (β = 0.666, 99% CI = 0.188, 1.145). For women actively trying to control their weight, intrinsic motivation was significantly associated with leisure-time physical activity at follow-up (β = 0.184, 99% CI = 0.097, 0.313). Conclusions Results suggest that

  20. Zelda overcomes the high intrinsic nucleosome barrier at enhancers during Drosophila zygotic genome activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujia; Nien, Chung-Yi; Chen, Kai; Liu, Hsiao-Yun; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia; Rushlow, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila genome activator Vielfaltig (Vfl), also known as Zelda (Zld), is thought to prime enhancers for activation by patterning transcription factors (TFs). Such priming is accompanied by increased chromatin accessibility, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the effect of Zld on genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and binding of the patterning TF Dorsal (Dl). Our results show that early enhancers are characterized by an intrinsically high nucleosome barrier. Zld tackles this nucleosome barrier through local depletion of nucleosomes with the effect being dependent on the number and position of Zld motifs. Without Zld, Dl binding decreases at enhancers and redistributes to open regions devoid of enhancer activity. We propose that Zld primes enhancers by lowering the high nucleosome barrier just enough to assist TFs in accessing their binding motifs and promoting spatially controlled enhancer activation if the right patterning TFs are present. We envision that genome activators in general will utilize this mechanism to activate the zygotic genome in a robust and precise manner. PMID:26335633

  1. Motivators of and Barriers to Engaging in Physical Activity: Perspectives of Low-Income Culturally Diverse Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Marie A.; Tucker, Carolyn M.; Kaye, Lily B.; Desmond, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity rates are rising in the United States, especially among low-income and racial/ethnic minority individuals. Exploring motivators and barriers relative to engaging in physical activity is imperative. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify motivators and barriers relative to engagement in physical activity as reported…

  2. Cover Story: The Miseducation of Hip-Hop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    2000-01-01

    Some higher education officials believe that hip-hop music is eating away at the morals, and ultimately the classroom experience, of today's college students. Discusses why the gap exists between student and faculty attitudes toward hip-hop, how hip-hop music represents blackness, how people perceive hip-hop youth, the positive side of hip-hop,…

  3. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Antonio Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria; Dionisio, Madalena

    2012-09-17

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  4. Active barrier films of PET for solar cell application: Processing and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2014-05-15

    A preliminary investigation was carried out on the possibility to improve the protective action offered by the standard multilayer structures used to encapsulate photovoltaic devices. With this aim, a commercial active barrier PET-based material, able to absorb oxygen when activated by liquid water, was used to produce flexible and transparent active barrier films, by means of a lab-scale film production plant. The obtained film, tested in terms of thermal, optical and oxygen absorption properties, shows a slow oxygen absorption kinetics, an acceptable transparency and an easy roll-to-roll processability, so proving itself as a good candidate for the development of protective coating for solar cells against the atmospheric degradation agents like the rain.

  5. A coculture model of the lung–blood barrier: the role of activated phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Luyts, Katrien; Napierska, Dorota; Dinsdale, David; Klein, Sebastian G; Serchi, Tommaso; Hoet, Peter H M

    2015-02-01

    We developed a coculture model of the lung–blood barrier using human bronchial epithelial cells(16HBE14o-), monocytes (THP-1) and human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) in which several parameters can be assessed simultaneously. The epithelial and endothelial cells were grown on opposite sides of a microporous membrane. Electron and confocal microscopic pictures show the presence of the cells in their appropriate compartment and both cell types do not show evidence of growing through the pores. Out of three endothelial cell types (EAhy.926, HUVEC and HLMVEC), the last was chosen as the most appropriate cell type, best resembling the pulmonary endothelium and allowing the expression of functional tight junctions in the 16HBE14o- monolayer with sufficiently high transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values. Finally, monocytes were added to the apical compartment. PMA-activated macrophages significantly affected barrier integrity (73% TEER reduction compared to control after 24 h) and disrupted the epithelial tight junctions as shown by redistribution of ZO-1 labeling. Alternatively, monocytes could be activated using lipopolysaccharide, at a sub-toxic level int he apical compartment and only induced a small, though significant, reduction in TEER.This coculture system is a representative model of the lung–blood barrier with barrier integrity as the main toxicity endpoint. PMID:25448809

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hop Latent Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The hop latent virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that mainly infects hop plants. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a hop latent virus, which was de novo assembled by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Our study indicates that transcriptome data are useful for identifying a complete viral genome. PMID:25908127

  7. Barriers to physical activity in children with autism spectrum disorders: Relationship to physical activity and screen time

    PubMed Central

    Must, A.; Phillips, S. M.; Carol, Curtin; Bandini, L. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual, social, and community barriers to physical activity (PA) experienced by children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) make PA participation more difficult and may contribute to increased screen time. Methods We compared the prevalence of parent-reported barriers to PA among 58 typically developing (TD) children and 53 children with an ASD, 3-11 years, and assessed the association between barriers and PA participation and screen time among children with ASD. Results Parents of children with ASD reported significantly more barriers than parents of TD children. Based on parent-report, 60% of children with ASD required too much supervision compared to no TD children (p<0.001). Parents of children with ASD were more likely to report that adults lack skills needed to include their child (58%), that their child has few friends (45%), and that other children exclude their child (23%). The number of parent-reported barriers to PA was inversely correlated with the hours spent in PA per year (r=−0.27, p=0.05) and positively related to total screen time (r=0.32, p<0.03). Conclusions These findings underscore the need for community-based PA programs designed to meet the special requirements of this population and policies that compel schools and other government-supported organizations for inclusion and/or targeted programming. PMID:25920014

  8. TOPICAL ANTIHISTAMINES DISPLAY POTENT ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY LINKED IN PART TO ENHANCED PERMEABILITY BARRIER FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Kai; Man, Mao-Qiang; Santiago, Juan-Luis; Park, Kyungho; Roelandt, Truus; Oda, Yuko; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Lee, Hae-Jin; Gschwandtner, Maria; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Trullas, Carles; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antagonists of the histamine type 1 and 2 receptors (H1/2r) are widely used as anti-pruritics and central sedatives, but demonstrate only modest anti-inflammatory activity. Because many inflammatory dermatoses result from defects in cutaneous barrier function, and because keratinocytes express both Hr1 and Hr2, we hypothesized that H1/2r antagonists might be more effective, if they were used topically to treat inflammatory dermatoses. Topical H1/2r antagonists additively enhanced permeability barrier homeostasis in normal mouse skin by: i) stimulation of epidermal differentiation, leading to thickened cornified envelopes; and ii) enhanced epidermal lipid synthesis and secretion. Since barrier homeostasis was enhanced to a comparable extent in mast cell-deficient mice, with no further improvement following application of topical H1/2r antagonists, H1/2r antagonists likely oppose mast cell-derived histamine. In four immunologically-diverse, murine disease models, characterized by either inflammation alone (acute irritant contact dermatitis, acute allergic contact dermatitis), or by prominent barrier abnormalities (subacute allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis), topical H1/2r agonists aggravated, while H1/2r antagonists improved inflammation and/or barrier function. The apparent ability of topical H1r/2r antagonists to target epidermal H1/2r could translate into increased efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, likely due to decreased inflammation and enhanced barrier function. These results could shift current paradigms of antihistamine utilization from a predominantly-systemic to a topical approach. PMID:23014339

  9. Rap1 GTPase Activation and Barrier Enhancement in RPE Inhibits Choroidal Neovascularization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Manabu; Wang, Haibo; Quilliam, Lawrence A.; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Loss of barrier integrity precedes the development of pathologies such as metastasis, inflammatory disorders, and blood-retinal barrier breakdown present in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Rap1 GTPase is involved in regulating both endothelial and epithelial cell junctions; the specific role of Rap1A vs. Rap1B isoforms is less clear. Compromise of retinal pigment epithelium barrier function is a contributing factor to the development of AMD. We utilized shRNA of Rap1 isoforms in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells, along with knockout mouse models to test the role of Rap1 on promoting RPE barrier properties, with emphasis on the dynamic junctional regulation that is triggered when the adhesion between cells is challenged. In vitro, Rap1A shRNA reduced steady-state barrier integrity, whereas Rap1B shRNA affected dynamic junctional responses. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model of macular degeneration, Rap1b−/− mice exhibited larger CNV volumes compared to wild-type or Rap1a−/−. In vivo, intravitreal injection of a cAMP analog (8CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP) that is a known Rap1 activator significantly reduced laser-induced CNV volume, which correlated with the inhibition of CEC transmigration across 8CPT-2′O-Me-cAMP-treated RPE monolayers in vitro. Rap1 activation by 8CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP treatment increased recruitment of junctional proteins and F-actin to cell-cell contacts, increasing both the linearity of junctions in vitro and in cells surrounding laser-induced lesions in vivo. We conclude that in vitro, Rap1A may be important for steady state barrier integrity, while Rap1B is involved more in dynamic junctional responses such as resistance to junctional disassembly induced by EGTA and reassembly of cell junctions following disruption. Furthermore, activation of Rap1 in vivo inhibited development of choroidal neovascular lesions in a laser-injury model. Our data suggest that targeting Rap1 isoforms in vivo with 8

  10. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  11. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis. PMID:24063883

  12. Differential regulation of detoxification enzymes in hepatic and mammary tissue by hops (Humulus lupulus) in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Birgit M.; Hagos, Ghenet K.; Eskra, Jillian N.; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Nikolic, Dejan; Guo, Jian; Wright, Brian; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Hops contain the phytoestrogen, 8-prenylnaringenin, and the cytoprotective compound, xanthohumol (XH). XH induces the detoxification enzyme, NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in vitro; however, the tissue distribution of XH and 8-prenylnaringenin and their tissue specific activity have not been analyzed. Methods and results A standardized hop extract (p.o.) and XH (s.c.) were administered to Sprague-Dawley rats over four days. LC-MS-MS analysis of plasma, liver and mammary gland revealed that XH accumulated in liver and mammary glands. Compared with the low level in the original extract, 8-prenylnaringenin was enriched in the tissues. Hops and XH induced NQO1 in the liver, while only hops reduced NQO1 activity in the mammary gland. Mechanistic studies revealed that hops modulated NQO1 through three mechanisms. In liver cells, 1) XH modified Keap1 leading to Nrf2 translocation and antioxidant response element (ARE) activation; 2) hop-mediated ARE induction was partially mediated through phosphorylation of Nrf2 by PKC; 3) in breast cells, 8-prenylnaringenin reduced NQO1 likely through binding to ERα, recruiting Nrf2, and downregulating ARE-regulated genes. Conclusions XH and 8-prenylnaringenin in dietary hops are bioavailable to the target tissues. While hops and XH might be cytoprotective in the liver, 8-prenylnaringenin seems responsible for hop-mediated NQO1 reduction in the mammary gland. PMID:23512484

  13. I Feel What He Was Doin': Responding to Justice-Oriented Teaching through Hip-Hop Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrates a set of learning activities designed from two hip-hop aesthetics and explores their use among a classroom of African American preservice teachers who graduated from urban school districts. Based on the two hip-hop aesthetics of kinetic consumption and autonomy/distance, the specific goal of these learning activities is to…

  14. Hops

    MedlinePlus

    ... health provider.Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates)Some medications are changed and ... health provider.Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates)Some medications are changed and ...

  15. Hops

    MedlinePlus

    ... changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates)Some medications are changed and broken down by ... changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates)Some medications are changed and broken down by ...

  16. Physical activity in patients with heart failure: barriers and motivations with special focus on sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Klompstra, Leonie; Jaarsma, Tiny; Strömberg, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to recommendations for physical activity is low in both male and female patients with heart failure (HF). Men are more physically active than women. In order to successfully promote physical activity, it is therefore essential to explore how much and why HF patients are physically active and if this is related to sex. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate physical activity in HF patients, to describe the factors related to physical activity, and to examine potential barriers and motivations to physical activity with special focus on sex differences. Methods The study had a cross-sectional survey design. HF patients living at home received a questionnaire during May–July 2014, with questions on physical activity (from the Short Form-International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and potential barriers and motivations to physical activity. Results A total of 154 HF patients, 27% women, with a mean age of 70±10 were included. In total, 23% of the patients reported a high level of physical activity, 46% a moderate level, and 34% a low level. Higher education, self-efficacy, and motivation were significantly associated with a higher amount of physical activity. Symptoms or severity of the disease were not related to physical activity. All the potential barriers to exercise were reported to be of importance. Psychological motivations were most frequently rated as being the most important motivation (41%) to be physically active. Physical motivations (33%) and social motivations were rated as the least important ones (22%). Women had significantly higher total motivation to be physically active. These differences were found in social, physical, and psychological motivations. Discussion One-third of the HF patients had a low level of physical activity in their daily life. Severity of the disease or symptoms were not related, whereas level of education, exercise self-efficacy, and motivation were important factors to take into account when

  17. Anomalous hopping exponents of ultrathin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2001-07-01

    Under the above title Markovic et al. [Phys. Rev. B 62, 2195 (2000)] summarized their and others' low-temperature data that show that a consistent underlying conduction mechanism is needed to explain thermally activated resistivities, with an exponent x=0.75(5), on films of Ag, Bi, Pb, and Pd, with thicknesses of 5-15 Å. While this x cannot be explained by any kind of conventional continuum hopping model, with or without Coulomb interactions, here it is shown that the exponent x=34 is the direct result of a filamentary vibron quantum percolation model appropriate to a granular network film. The concepts used in this model were recently used to derive finite-size scaling exponents and/or phase diagrams in many other contexts, including network glasses, the impurity band metal-insulator transition, high-temperature superconductors, and evolutionary biology.

  18. Somali Perspectives on Physical Activity: Photovoice to Address Barriers and Resources in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kate; Mohamed, Amina Sheik; Dawson, Darius B.; Syme, Maggie; Abdi, Sahra; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background Though many immigrants enter the U.S. with a healthy body weight, this health advantage disappears the longer they reside in the U.S. To better understand the complexities of obesity change within a cultural framework, a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, Photovoice, was utilized focusing on physical activity among Muslim Somali women. Objectives The CBPR partnership was formed to identify barriers and resources to engaging in physical activity with goals of advocacy and program development. Methods Muslim Somali women (n = 8) were recruited to participate, trained and provided cameras, and engaged in group discussions about the scenes they photographed. Results Participants identified several barriers, including safety concerns, minimal culturally appropriate resources, and financial constraints. Strengths included public resources and a community support system. The CBPR process identified opportunities and challenges to collaboration and dissemination processes. Conclusions The findings laid the framework for subsequent program development and community engagement. PMID:25981428

  19. The benefits and barriers to physical activity and lifestyle interventions for osteoarthritis affecting the adult knee

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis prevalence is increasing, placing greater demands on healthcare and future socioeconomic costing models. Exercise and non-pharmacological methods should be employed to manage this common and disabling disease. Expectations at all stages of disease are increasing with a desire to remain active and independent. Three key areas have been reviewed; the evidence for physical activity, lifestyle changes and motivational techniques concerning knee osteoarthritis and the barriers to instituting such changes. Promotion of activity in primary care is discussed and evidence for compliance has been reviewed. This article reviews a subject that is integral to all professionals involved with osteoarthritis care. PMID:22462601

  20. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R.; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E.; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B.; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI−/− and KtyII−/−K8 mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  1. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI(-/-) and KtyII(-/-)(K8) mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  2. Analytical methods for quantitation of prenylated flavonoids from hops

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The female flowers of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used as a flavoring agent in the brewing industry. There is growing interest in possible health benefits of hops, particularly as estrogenic and chemopreventive agents. Among the possible active constituents, most of the attention has focused on prenylated flavonoids, which can chemically be classified as prenylated chalcones and prenylated flavanones. Among chalcones, xanthohumol (XN) and desmethylxanthohumol (DMX) have been the most studied, while among flavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) have received the most attention. Because of the interest in medicinal properties of prenylated flavonoids, there is demand for accurate, reproducible and sensitive analytical methods to quantify these compounds in various matrices. Such methods are needed, for example, for quality control and standardization of hop extracts, measurement of the content of prenylated flavonoids in beer, and to determine pharmacokinetic properties of prenylated flavonoids in animals and humans. This review summarizes currently available analytical methods for quantitative analysis of the major prenylated flavonoids, with an emphasis on the LC-MS and LC-MS-MS methods and their recent applications to biomedical research on hops. This review covers all methods in which prenylated flavonoids have been measured, either as the primary analytes or as a part of a larger group of analytes. The review also discusses methodological issues relating to the quantitative analysis of these compounds regardless of the chosen analytical approach. PMID:24077106

  3. Contribution of afferent feedback and descending drive to human hopping

    PubMed Central

    Zuur, Abraham T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Taube, Wolfgang; Grey, Michael J; Gollhofer, Albert; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Gruber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    During hopping an early burst can be observed in the EMG from the soleus muscle starting about 45 ms after touch-down. It may be speculated that this early EMG burst is a stretch reflex response superimposed on activity from a supra-spinal origin. We hypothesised that if a stretch reflex indeed contributes to the early EMG burst, then advancing or delaying the touch-down without the subject's knowledge should similarly advance or delay the burst. This was indeed the case when touch-down was advanced or delayed by shifting the height of a programmable platform up or down between two hops and this resulted in a correspondent shift of the early EMG burst. Our second hypothesis was that the motor cortex contributes to the first EMG burst during hopping. If so, inhibition of the motor cortex would reduce the magnitude of the burst. By applying a low-intensity magnetic stimulus it was possible to inhibit the motor cortex and this resulted in a suppression of the early EMG burst. These results suggest that sensory feedback and descending drive from the motor cortex are integrated to drive the motor neuron pool during the early EMG burst in hopping. Thus, simple reflexes work in concert with higher order structures to produce this repetitive movement. PMID:20064857

  4. Analytical methods for quantitation of prenylated flavonoids from hops.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The female flowers of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used as a flavoring agent in the brewing industry. There is growing interest in possible health benefits of hops, particularly as estrogenic and chemopreventive agents. Among the possible active constituents, most of the attention has focused on prenylated flavonoids, which can chemically be classified as prenylated chalcones and prenylated flavanones. Among chalcones, xanthohumol (XN) and desmethylxanthohumol (DMX) have been the most studied, while among flavanones, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) have received the most attention. Because of the interest in medicinal properties of prenylated flavonoids, there is demand for accurate, reproducible and sensitive analytical methods to quantify these compounds in various matrices. Such methods are needed, for example, for quality control and standardization of hop extracts, measurement of the content of prenylated flavonoids in beer, and to determine pharmacokinetic properties of prenylated flavonoids in animals and humans. This review summarizes currently available analytical methods for quantitative analysis of the major prenylated flavonoids, with an emphasis on the LC-MS and LC-MS-MS methods and their recent applications to biomedical research on hops. This review covers all methods in which prenylated flavonoids have been measured, either as the primary analytes or as a part of a larger group of analytes. The review also discusses methodological issues relating to the quantitative analysis of these compounds regardless of the chosen analytical approach. PMID:24077106

  5. Physical activity perceptions, context, barriers, and facilitators from a Hispanic child's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sharon E. Taverno; Francis, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to develop effective physical activity interventions and to address the burden of obesity in Hispanic children, qualitative studies are needed to build descriptive theory and expand the state of the science. The purpose of this study is to describe physical activity perceptions, context, facilitators, and barriers from the perspective of Hispanic immigrant-origin children. Method This in-depth, ethnographic study included 14, 6- to 11-year old, first- and second- generation Hispanic children recruited from an afterschool program in Southeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Methods included child observation, field notes, semi-structured interviews, and a PhotoVoice activity. Transcripts and field notes were coded and analyzed using the constant comparison method to identify overarching themes and patterns in the data. Results Data analysis yielded four overarching themes regarding children's perspectives on physical activity. Children engaged in a variety of physical activities and sedentary behaviors, which differed by physical (e.g., park, outside home, and afterschool programs) and social (e.g., parents, siblings, and friends) contexts. Children discussed specific benefits of physical activity. Children's negative attitudes toward physical activity were related to physical discomfort, low athletic competence, and safety concerns. Children perceived physical activity and play to be one in the same, and “fun” was identified as a primary driver of physical activity preferences. The facilitators and barriers to physical activity were related to specific parent/home, school, and neighborhood factors. Conclusion Findings from this study suggest that an emphasis on fun and active play, while taking into account family and neighborhood context, may be a desirable intervention approach in Hispanic immigrant-origin children. This study lays the groundwork for future studies to further explore some of the themes identified here to better understand children

  6. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  7. Compendium of Hop Diseases and Pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This compendium of diseases, pests and other disorders of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) is designed to be a practical reference for anyone interested in growing hops, whether for commercial production, ornamental or home use. Growers, crop advisors, private consultants, home brewers, students, extension...

  8. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopAF1 suppresses plant immunity by targeting methionine recycling to block ethylene induction

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Erica J.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Finkel, Omri M.; Wan, Li; Kieber, Joseph J.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    HopAF1 is a type III effector protein of unknown function encoded in the genomes of several strains of Pseudomonas syringae and other plant pathogens. Structural modeling predicted that HopAF1 is closely related to deamidase proteins. Deamidation is the irreversible substitution of an amide group with a carboxylate group. Several bacterial virulence factors are deamidases that manipulate the activity of specific host protein substrates. We identified Arabidopsis methylthioadenosine nucleosidase proteins MTN1 and MTN2 as putative targets of HopAF1 deamidation. MTNs are enzymes in the Yang cycle, which is essential for the high levels of ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that HopAF1 inhibits the host defense response by manipulating MTN activity and consequently ethylene levels. We determined that bacterially delivered HopAF1 inhibits ethylene biosynthesis induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that Arabidopsis mtn1 mtn2 mutant plants phenocopy the effect of HopAF1. Furthermore, we identified two conserved asparagines in MTN1 and MTN2 from Arabidopsis that confer loss of function phenotypes when deamidated via site-specific mutation. These residues are potential targets of HopAF1 deamidation. HopAF1-mediated manipulation of Yang cycle MTN proteins is likely an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby HopAF1 orthologs from multiple plant pathogens contribute to disease in a large variety of plant hosts. PMID:27274076

  9. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. PMID:23791780

  10. Small polaron hopping transport along DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triberis, G. P.; Simserides, C.; Karavolas, V. C.

    2005-05-01

    We present a small polaron hopping model for interpreting the strong temperature (T) dependence of the electrical conductivity, σ, observed at high (h) temperatures along DNA molecules. The model takes into account the one-dimensional character of the system and the presence of disorder in the DNA double helix. Percolation-theoretical considerations lead to analytical expressions for the high temperature multiphonon-assisted small polaron hopping conductivity, the hopping distance and their temperature dependence. The experimental data for lambda phage DNA (λ-DNA) and poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA follow nicely the theoretically predicted behaviour (lnσh~T-2/3). Moreover, our model leads to realistic values of the maximum hopping distances, supporting the idea of multiphonon-assisted hopping of small polarons between next nearest neighbours of the DNA molecular 'wire'. The low temperature case is also investigated.

  11. On transition rates in surface hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartín, J. M.; Romaniello, P.; Stella, L.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2012-12-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) is one of the most widely used quantum-classical algorithms for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Despite its empirical effectiveness and popularity, a rigorous derivation of TSH as the classical limit of a combined quantum electron-nuclear dynamics is still missing. In this work, we aim to elucidate the theoretical basis for the widely used hopping rules. Naturally, we concentrate thereby on the formal aspects of the TSH. Using a Gaussian wave packet limit, we derive the transition rates governing the hopping process at a simple avoided level crossing. In this derivation, which gives insight into the physics underlying the hopping process, some essential features of the standard TSH algorithm are retrieved, namely (i) non-zero electronic transition rate ("hopping probability") at avoided crossings; (ii) rescaling of the nuclear velocities to conserve total energy; (iii) electronic transition rates linear in the nonadiabatic coupling vectors. The well-known Landau-Zener model is then used for illustration.

  12. Optimization of Benzoisothiazole dioxide inhibitory activity of the NS5B polymerase of HCV genotype 4 using ligand-steered homological modeling, reaction-driven scaffold-hopping and Enovo workflow.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Amr Hamed; Mohamed Abouzid, Khaled Abouzid; El Ella, Dalal Abd El Rahman Abou; Hamid Ismail, Mohamed Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Infection caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant world health problem for which novel therapies are in urgent demand. The virus is highly prevalent in the Middle East and Africa particularly Egypt with more than 90% of infections due to genotype 4. Nonstructural (NS5B) viral proteins have emerged as an attractive target for HCV antivirals discovery. A potent class of inhibitors having benzisothiazole dioxide scaffold has been identified on this target, however they were mainly active on genotype 1 while exhibiting much lowered activity on other genotypes due to the high degree of mutation of its binding site. Based on this fact, we employed a novel strategy to optimize this class on genotype 4. This strategy depends on using a refined ligand-steered homological model of this genotype to study the mutation binding energies of the binding site amino acid residues, the essential features for interaction and provide a structure-based pharmacophore model that can aid optimization. This model was applied on a focused library which was generated using a reaction-driven scaffold-hopping strategy. The hits retrieved were subjected to Enovo pipeline pilot optimization workflow that employs R-group enumeration, core-constrained protein docking using modified CDOCKER and finally ranking of poses using an accurate molecular mechanics generalized Born with surface area method. PMID:22355232

  13. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A.; Topping, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  14. Polyphenol-Rich Propolis Extracts Strengthen Intestinal Barrier Function by Activating AMPK and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; Chen, Yifan; Song, Zehe; Jiang, Xiasen; Hu, Fuliang; Conlon, Michael A; Topping, David L

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has abundant polyphenolic constituents and is used widely as a health/functional food. Here, we investigated the effects of polyphenol-rich propolis extracts (PPE) on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, as well as in rats. In Caco-2 cells, PPE increased transepithelial electrical resistance and decreased lucifer yellow flux. PPE-treated cells showed increased expression of the tight junction (TJ) loci occludin and zona occludens (ZO)-1. Confocal microscopy showed organized expressions in proteins related to TJ assembly, i.e., occludin and ZO-1, in response to PPE. Furthermore, PPE led to the activation of AMPK, ERK1/2, p38, and Akt. Using selective inhibitors, we found that the positive effects of PPE on barrier function were abolished in cells in which AMPK and ERK1/2 signaling were inhibited. Moreover, rats fed a diet supplemented with PPE (0.3% in the diet) exhibited increased colonic epithelium ZO-1 expression. Overall, these data suggest that PPE strengthens intestinal barrier function by activating AMPK and ERK signaling and provide novel insights into the potential application of propolis for human gut health. PMID:27164138

  15. Safety assessment of discharge chute isolation barrier preparation and installation activities. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Meichle, R.H.

    1994-11-08

    This revision adds a section addressing impacts of dropping surfacing tool and rack cutter on the basin floor, and corrects typographical errors. The safety assessment is made for the activities for the preparation and installation of the discharge chute isolation barriers. The safety assessment includes a hazard assessment and comparisons of potential accidents/events to those addressed by the current safety basis documentation. No significant hazards were identified. An evaluation against the USQ evaluation questions was made and the determination made that the activities do not represent a USQ. Hazard categorization techniques were used to provide a basis for readiness review classifications.

  16. Pseudomonas syringae Effector HopF2 Suppresses Arabidopsis Immunity by Targeting BAK1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinggeng; Wu, Shujing; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chenglong; Sheen, Jen; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas syringae delivers a plethora of effector proteins into host cells to sabotage immune responses and modulate physiology to favor infection. We have previously shown that P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 effector HopF2 suppresses Arabidopsis innate immunity triggered by multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMP) at the plasma membrane. We show here that HopF2 possesses distinct mechanisms in the suppression of two branches of MAMP-activated MAP kinase (MPK) cascades. Besides blocking MKK5 (MPK kinase 5) activation in the MEKK1/MEKKs-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade, HopF2 targets additional component(s) upstream of MEKK1 in the MEKK1-MKK1/2-MPK4 cascade and plasma membrane-localized receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 and its homologs. We further show that HopF2 directly targets BAK1, a plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase involved in multiple MAMP signaling. The interaction between BAK1 and HopF2 or two other P. syringae effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB, was confirmed in vivo and in vitro. Consistent with BAK1 as a physiological target of AvrPto, AvrPtoB and HopF2, the strong growth defects or lethality associated with ectopic expression of these effectors in wild-type Arabidopsis transgenic plants were largely alleviated in bak1 mutant plants. Thus, our results provide genetic evidence to further support that BAK1 is a physiological target of AvrPto, AvrPtoB and HopF2. Identification of BAK1 as an additional target of HopF2 virulence not only explains HopF2 suppression of multiple MAMP signaling at the plasma membrane, but also supports the notion that pathogen virulence effectors act through multiple targets in host cells. PMID:24237140

  17. The Pseudomonas syringae effector HopF2 suppresses Arabidopsis immunity by targeting BAK1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinggeng; Wu, Shujing; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chenglong; Sheen, Jen; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae delivers a plethora of effector proteins into host cells to sabotage immune responses and modulate physiology to favor infection. The P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 effector HopF2 suppresses Arabidopsis innate immunity triggered by multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMP) at the plasma membrane. We show here that HopF2 possesses distinct mechanisms for suppression of two branches of MAMP-activated MAP kinase (MAPK) cascades. In addition to blocking MKK5 (MAPK kinase 5) activation in the MEKK1 (MAPK kinase kinase 1)/MEKKs-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 cascade, HopF2 targets additional component(s) upstream of MEKK1 in the MEKK1-MKK1/2-MPK4 cascade and the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 and its homologs. We further show that HopF2 directly targets BAK1, a plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase that is involved in multiple MAMP signaling. The interaction between BAK1 and HopF2 and between two other P. syringae effectors, AvrPto and AvrPtoB, was confirmed in vivo and in vitro. Consistent with BAK1 as a physiological target of AvrPto, AvrPtoB and HopF2, the strong growth defects or lethality associated with ectopic expression of these effectors in wild-type Arabidopsis transgenic plants were largely alleviated in bak1 mutant plants. Thus, our results provide genetic evidence to show that BAK1 is a physiological target of AvrPto, AvrPtoB and HopF2. Identification of BAK1 as an additional target of HopF2 virulence not only explains HopF2 suppression of multiple MAMP signaling at the plasma membrane, but also supports the notion that pathogen virulence effectors act through multiple targets in host cells. PMID:24237140

  18. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  19. Storm surge forecasting for operating the Venice Flood Barrier with minimal impact on port activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    The operation of the Venice storm barrier, due to enter into operation by the end of 2017 , is particularly demanding in terms of the required accuracy of the forecast of the max water level for the time lead of 3-6 hours. With present sea level and safeguard level established at 1.1 m a.s.l. of 1895 the barrier is expected to be operated 10 times a year to cope with an average of 5 storms with around 15 redirections of the navigation through the locks. The 5 extra closures and the 10 extra interferences with navigation are needed for compensating the present forecast uncertainty of 10 cm in the maximum storm high for the required time lead of three hours, the time needed to stop navigation before the closures of the lagoon inlets. A decision support system based on these rules have been tested along the last four year with satisfactory results in term of reliability easy of operations. The forecast is presently based on a statistical model associated with a deterministic local model; the main source of uncertainty is related to the prediction of the local wind. Due to delays in the completion of Venice local protection till 1.1 m it is expected that the population will urge a reduction of the safeguard level from 1.1m to 0.9m with an exponential increase in the number of closures with greater impact on navigation. The present acceleration in sea level rise will also contribute to the increase in the number of closures. To reduce the impact on port activity, better forecast accuracy is required together with experimenting new operational closures : e.g. activating only the northern barriers. The paper evaluate the problem and the possible solutions in terms of improving storm surge forecast and developing new schemes for partial operation of the barriers for predicted limited floods not requiring complete closures.

  20. Surface-active phospholipid: a Pandora's box of clinical applications. Part II. Barrier and lubricating properties.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2002-01-01

    In Part I, it was described how their configuration renders phospholipid molecules surface active and capable of acting at interfaces in addition to the liquid-air interface to which conventional theory has hitherto confined the study of 'surfactant' in the lung. Surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) appears no different to comparable surfactants studied in the physical sciences for the highly desirable properties that their adsorption (reversible binding) can impart to solid surfaces. In Part II, these properties are considered in sites where there is no air. Highly desirable properties include boundary lubrication (lubricity), release (antistick) and the ability of the strongly adsorbed and strongly cohesive SAPL linings to act as barriers against abrasion, corrosion and, possibly, against invasion by microorganisms. As the 'sealant', it could be the true barrier rather than the cells providing its mechanical support. Evidence is reviewed for SAPL providing the gastric mucosal barrier to acid in the stomach and preventing the digestion of Helicobacter pylori until that barrier is broken by bile in the duodenum, where H. pylori cause ulcers. The concept that SAPL provides effortless sliding of many tissues, including pleura, pericardium and peritoneum is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the load-bearing joints, where a deficiency has been associated with osteoarthritis. The ability of the same SAPL lining to perform multiple roles is discussed in relation to the peritoneum, where it could provide the lubricant/release agent preventing surgical adhesions, while imparting semipermeability to 'the membrane' vital for peritoneal dialysis. In each site, the prophylactic use of exogenous SAPL is discussed for its potential clinical applications. PMID:12036223

  1. RILP interacts with HOPS complex via VPS41 subunit to regulate endocytic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaosi; Yang, Ting; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Yun, Ye; Sun, Lixiang; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2014-01-01

    The HOPS complex serves as a tethering complex with GEF activity for Ypt7p in yeast to regulate late endosomal membrane maturation. While the role of HOPS complex is well established in yeast cells, its functional and mechanistic aspects in mammalian cells are less well defined. In this study, we report that RILP, a downstream effector of Rab7, interacts with HOPS complex and recruits HOPS subunits to the late endosomal compartment. Structurally, the amino-terminal portion of RILP interacts with HOPS complex. Unexpectedly, this interaction is independent of Rab7. VPS41 subunit of HOPS complex was defined to be the major partner for interacting with RILP. The carboxyl-terminal region of VPS41 was mapped to be responsible for the interaction. Functionally, either depletion of VPS41 by shRNA or overexpression of VPS41 C-terminal half retarded EGF-induced degradation of EGFR. These results suggest that interaction of RILP with HOPS complex via VPS41 plays a role in endocytic trafficking of EGFR. PMID:25445562

  2. Influence of sportive activity on skin barrier function: a quantitative evaluation of 60 athletes.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Kolbe, Lea; Kerscher, Martina

    2013-06-01

    While sports-related diseases are well documented in the literature, no study regarding the physiology of athlete's skin has been published yet. However, some evidence is given for impairment of the skin barrier due to sportive activity accompanied by an increase in sweating. In this explorative study, we investigated the effect of sportive activity on skin physiology, namely stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, and sebum content. A total of 60 healthy Caucasian volunteers (35 females, 25 males; mean 27.35 ± 4.09) were enrolled in this study. Measurements were done before and after 45 minutes of endurance cardio training at forehead, chest, forearm, and armpits. Hydration level, sebum secretion, and pH value of hydrolipid acid film were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods. Stratum corneum hydration significantly increased after sportive activity. The increase was about 51.9% at the forearm and 31.9% at the chest. Sebum content at the forehead significantly decreased during exercising, from 87.36 μg/cm2 to 62.41 μg/cm2. At all investigated body sites, measured values for skin surface pH increased after sportive activity. Highest pH value was measured in armpits (pH 5.64-5.98) and lowest at forearm (pH 4.75-4.93). Sportive activity is accompanied by significant changes of skin physiology that could stress the barrier function of the skin. Higher skin surface pH and hyperhydration of the stratum corneum as well as increased lipid content on the skin surface are probably caused by an increased sweat production. The impaired skin barrier may also be the reason for some reported sports-related dermatoses. PMID:23488867

  3. Standardization of Weed Pollen Extracts, Japanese Hop and Mugwort, in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Choi, Soo-Young; Park, Kyung Hee; Park, Hye Jung; Hong, Chein-Soo; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Japanese hop (Humulus spp.) and mugwort (Artemisia spp.) are notable causes of autumn pollinosis in East Asia. However, Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts, which are widely used for the diagnosis, have not been standardized. This study was performed to standardize Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts. Materials and Methods Allergen extracts were prepared in a standardized way using locally collected Humulus japonicus and purchased Artemisia vulgaris pollens. The immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivities of prepared extracts were compared with commercial extracts via IgE immunoblotting and inhibition analyses. Intradermal skin tests were performed to determine the bioequivalent allergy unit (BAU). Results The IgE reactive components of the extracts via IgE immunoblotting were similar to those of commercial extracts. A 11-kDa allergen showed the strongest IgE reactivity in Japanese hop, as did a 28-kDa allergen in mugwort pollen extracts. Allergenic potencies of the investigatory Japanese hop and mugwort extracts were essentially indistinguishable from the commercial ones. Sums of erythema of 50 mm by the intradermal skin test (ΣED50) were calculated to be 14.4th and 13.6th three-fold dilutions for Japanese hop and mugwort extracts, respectively. Therefore, the allergenic activity of the prepared extracts was 90827.4 BAU/mg for Japanese hop and 34412 BAU/mg for mugwort. Conclusion We produced Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts using a standardized method. Standardized Japanese hop and mugwort pollen extracts will facilitate the production of improved diagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents. PMID:26847293

  4. Ischemic neurons activate astrocytes to disrupt endothelial barrier via increasing VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Na; Pan, Rong; Qin, Xu-Jun; Yang, Wei-Lin; Qi, Zhifeng; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurring within the first few hours of ischemic stroke onset is closely associated with hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic therapy. However, the mechanism of this acute BBB disruption remains unclear. In the neurovascular unit, neurons do not have direct contact with the endothelial barrier, however they are highly sensitive and vulnerable to ischemic injury, and may act as the initiator for disrupting BBB when cerebral ischemia occurs. Herein we employed oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and an in vitro BBB system consisting of brain microvascular cells and astrocytes to test this hypothesis. Neurons (CATH.a cells) were exposed to OGD for 3-hours before co-culturing with endothelial monolayer (bEnd 3 cells), or endothelial cells plus astrocytes (C8-D1A cells). Incubation of OGD-treated neurons with endothelial monolayer alone did not increase endothelial permeability. However, when astrocytes were present, the endothelial permeability was significantly increased, which was accompanied by loss of occludin and claudin-5 proteins as well as increased VEGF secretion into the conditioned medium. Importantly, all these changes were abolished when VEGF was knocked down in astrocytes by siRNA. Our findings suggest that ischemic neurons activate astrocytes to increase VEGF production, which in turn induces endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:24251624

  5. Checkpoint Kinase 1 Activation Enhances Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via Regulation of Claudin-5 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Maki; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2016-01-01

    Several stressors are known to influence epithelial tight junction (TJ) integrity, but the association between DNA damage and TJ integrity remains unclear. Here we examined the effects of daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, two anti-tumor chemicals that induce DNA damage, on TJ integrity in human intestinal epithelial cells. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin dose-dependently enhanced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and decreased flux of the 4 kDa FITC-dextran in Caco-2 cell monolayer. Daunorubicin- or rebeccamycin-induced enhancement of the TJ barrier function partly rescued attenuation of the barrier function by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin increased claudin-5 expression and the product was distributed in the actin cytoskeleton fraction, which was enriched with TJ proteins. Caffeine, which is an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related protein (ATR), and the Chk1 inhibitor inhibited the TER increases induced by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, whereas a Chk2 inhibitor did not. Treatment with Chk1 siRNA also significantly inhibited the TER increases. Induction of claudin-5 expression was inhibited by Chk1 inhibitor and by siRNA treatment. Our results suggest that Chk1 activation by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin induced claudin-5 expression and enhanced TJ barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, which suggests a link between DNA damage and TJ integrity in the human intestine. PMID:26727128

  6. Bacterial pathogens activate plasminogen to breach tissue barriers and escape from innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Peetermans, Marijke; Vanassche, Thomas; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Lijnen, Roger H; Verhamme, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Both coagulation and fibrinolysis are tightly connected with the innate immune system. Infection and inflammation cause profound alterations in the otherwise well-controlled balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis. Many pathogenic bacteria directly exploit the host's hemostatic system to increase their virulence. Here, we review the capacity of bacteria to activate plasminogen. The resulting proteolytic activity allows them to breach tissue barriers and evade innate immune defense, thus promoting bacterial spreading. Yersinia pestis, streptococci of group A, C and G and Staphylococcus aureus produce a specific bacterial plasminogen activator. Moreover, surface plasminogen receptors play an established role in pneumococcal, borrelial and group B streptococcal infections. This review summarizes the mechanisms of bacterial activation of host plasminogen and the role of the fibrinolytic system in infections caused by these pathogens. PMID:26485450

  7. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  8. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  9. Endothelium-Derived 5-Methoxytryptophan Protects Endothelial Barrier Function by Blocking p38 MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yi-Fu; Cheng, Huei-Hsuan; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial junction is tightly controlled to restrict the passage of blood cells and solutes. Disruption of endothelial barrier function by bacterial endotoxins, cytokines or growth factors results in inflammation and vascular damage leading to vascular diseases. We have identified 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP) as an anti-inflammatory factor by metabolomic analysis of conditioned medium of human fibroblasts. Here we postulated that endothelial cells release 5-MTP to protect the barrier function. Conditioned medium of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) prevented endothelial hyperpermeability and VE-cadherin downregulation induced by VEGF, LPS and cytokines. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of HUVEC conditioned medium and detected 5-MTP but not melatonin, serotonin or their catabolites, which was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Addition of synthetic pure 5-MTP preserved VE-cadherin and maintained barrier function despite challenge with pro-inflammatory mediators. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1, an enzyme required for 5-MTP biosynthesis, was downregulated in HUVECs by pro-inflammatory mediators and it was accompanied by reduction of 5-MTP. 5-MTP protected VE-cadherin and prevented endothelial hyperpermeability by blocking p38 MAPK activation. A chemical inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB202190, exhibited a similar protective effect as 5-MTP. To determine whether 5-MTP prevents vascular hyperpermeability in vivo, we evaluated the effect of 5-MTP administration on LPS-induced murine microvascular permeability with Evans blue. 5-MTP significantly prevented Evans blue dye leakage. Our findings indicate that 5-MTP is a new class of endothelium-derived molecules which protects endothelial barrier function by blocking p38 MAPK. PMID:27002329

  10. Use of active barriers to reduce eutrophication problems in urban lakes.

    PubMed

    Hart, B; Roberts, S; James, R; Taylor, J; Donnert, D; Furrer, R

    2003-01-01

    Excessive concentration of phosphorus is one of the main causes of algal blooms and eutrophic conditions in lakes. In many urban lakes, it appears that a large proportion of the phosphorus in the water column comes from the sediments, particularly when these are anaerobic. Sub-aqueous capping is a relatively new method that has become an attractive option for isolating contaminated sediments from the environment, thus preventing or delaying the release of contaminants into surface waters. Active barrier materials (i.e. capping layers that consist of one or more reactive components) are gaining increasing attention for their greater efficiency in inactivating contaminants held in sediment layers. This paper reports laboratory bioreactor experiments to test the effectiveness of three forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in reducing the release of phosphorus from anaerobic sediment from Lake Carramar, a small urban lake in Melbourne. Two of the CaCO3 active barrier materials tested proved to be quite effective, the most effective materials being the fine particle size, precipitated forms of CaCO3. Over the 20-day experimental period, a 2% layer of the German material SoCal reduced the amount of phosphorus released by almost 100 times over that occurring with no barrier. The Australian product ESCal, while not as effective as the SoCal, still reduced the phosphorus released by around 15 times that with no barrier. A finely ground Lilydale limestone was essentially ineffective in reducing phosphorus release from the sediments. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that SoCal is unlikely to be attractive for use in Australia, given the estimated application cost of around 3,800 dollars per tonne. However, although the ESCal is slightly less effective in retaining phosphorus, its potential application cost estimated at 2,000 dollars per tonne, makes it an attractive option. On the basis of these most promising preliminary results, we intend to further test the use of

  11. Barriers and Facilitators to Being Physically Active on a Rural U.S. Northern Plains American Indian Reservation

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Lisa; McDonald, Leander R.; Wadsworth, Ann; Morin, Charles; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify barriers to and facilitators of physical activity among American Indian adults living on a rural, U.S. Northern Plains reservation using the nominal group technique (NGT). NGT is a method of data generation and interpretation that combines aspects of qualitative (free generation of responses) and quantitative (systematic ranking of responses) methodologies. Adults participated in one of two NGT sessions asking about either barriers to (n = 6), or facilitators of (n = 5), being physically active. Participants nominated and ranked 21 barriers and 18 facilitators. Barriers indicated lack of knowledge of how to fit physical activity into a daily schedule, work, caring for family members, and prioritizing sedentary pursuits. Other responses included environmental barriers such as lack of access and transportation to a gym, unsafe walking conditions, and inclement weather. Facilitators to following recommendations included knowledge of health benefits of physical activity and the perception of physical activity as enjoyable, including feeling good when working out. Environmental facilitators included being outdoors walking and biking as well as parks and exercise facilities. Responses provided direction for locally designed community-based programs to promote facilitators and decrease barriers to individual’s engagement in physical activity. PMID:25421064

  12. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  13. Activation of muscarinic cholinoceptor ameliorates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Yazawa, Takashi; Islam, Md Tariqul; Krug, Susanne M; Fromm, Michael; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Yuichi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Sada, Kiyonao; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2015-11-30

    Impaired intestinal barrier function is one of the critical issues in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate muscarinic cholinoceptor (mAChR)-mediated signaling for the amelioration of cytokine-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelium. Rat colon challenged with TNF-α and interferon γ reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). This barrier injury was attenuated by muscarinic stimulation. In HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells, muscarinic stimulation suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption. Finally, muscarinic stimulation promoted the shedding of TNFR1, which would be a mechanism for the attenuation of TNF-α/NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption via mAChR. PMID:26519558

  14. Aerobic Damage to [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Activation Barriers for the Chemical Attachment of O2**

    PubMed Central

    Kubas, Adam; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are the best natural hydrogen-producing enzymes but their biotechnological exploitation is hampered by their extreme oxygen sensitivity. The free energy profile for the chemical attachment of O2 to the enzyme active site was investigated by using a range-separated density functional re-parametrized to reproduce high-level ab initio data. An activation free-energy barrier of 13 kcal mol−1 was obtained for chemical bond formation between the di-iron active site and O2, a value in good agreement with experimental inactivation rates. The oxygen binding can be viewed as an inner-sphere electron-transfer process that is strongly influenced by Coulombic interactions with the proximal cubane cluster and the protein environment. The implications of these results for future mutation studies with the aim of increasing the oxygen tolerance of this enzyme are discussed. PMID:24615978

  15. Methane activation using Kr and Xe in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Lee, Dae Hoon Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Woo Seok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-10-15

    Methane has interested many researchers as a possible new energy source, but the high stability of methane causes a bottleneck in methane activation, limiting its practical utilization. To determine how to effectively activate methane using non-thermal plasma, the conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—Ar, Kr, and Xe—as additives. In addition to the methane conversion results at various applied voltages, the discharge characteristics such as electron temperature and electron density were calculated through zero-dimensional calculations. Moreover, the threshold energies of excitation and ionization were used to distinguish the dominant particle for activating methane between electrons, excited atoms, and ionized atoms. From the experiments and calculations, the selection of the additive noble gas is found to affect not only the conversion of methane but also the selectivity of product gases even under similar electron temperature and electron density conditions.

  16. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy. PMID:20364316

  17. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  18. Degradation of hop bitter acids by fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Huszcza, Ewa Bartmanska, Agnieszka; Aniol, Miroslaw; Maczka, Wanda; Zolnierczyk, Anna; Wawrzenczyk, Czeslaw

    2008-07-01

    Nine fungal strains related to: Trametes versicolor, Nigrospora oryzae, Inonotus radiatus, Crumenulopsis sororia, Coryneum betulinum, Cryptosporiopsis radicicola, Fusarium equiseti, Rhodotorula glutinis and Candida parapsilosis were tested for their ability to degrade humulones and lupulones. The best results were obtained for T. versicolor culture, in which humulones and lupulones were fully degraded after 4 days of incubation in the dark or after 36 h in the light. The experiments were performed on a commercial hop extract and on sterilized spent hops.

  19. Dielectric relaxation and hopping conduction in reduced graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guidan; Yu, Ji; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite oxide reduced by sodium borohydride was characterised and its electrical conduction investigated with impedance spectroscopy. Thermal dependence of electrical modulus (instead of permittivity, its inverse) was calculated from complex impedance spectra, an approach that prevents any peak in dielectric loss (imaginary component) from being swarmed by large dc conductivity. Two loss peaks appeared at each tested frequency, in a sample of either degree of reduction. The set of weaker peak should arise from the relaxation of some polar bonds, as proposed earlier by us. The stronger loss peaks may correspond to the hopping of conduction electrons; variable range hopping is also consistent with the observed thermal dependence of conductivity. However, nearer ambient temperature there is a change in mechanism, to band transport, with an activation energy of fairly similar values as derived from both loss peaks and conductivity.

  20. Discovery of molluscicidal and cercaricidal activities of 3-substituted quinazolinone derivatives by a scaffold hopping approach using a pseudo-ring based on the intramolecular hydrogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Lv-Yin; Li, Yong-Dong; Wu, Ren-Miao; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Ding-Qiao; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2016-06-10

    Discovery of novel topological agents against Oncomelania hupensis snails and cercariae remains a significant challenge in current Schistosomiasis control. A pseudo-ring formed from salicylanilide by an intramolecular hydrogen bond led to the discovery of 3-substituted quinazolinone derivatives which showed a potent molluscicidal and cercaricidal activities. PMID:27017555

  1. Characterization of the Migration of Hop Volatiles into Different Crown Cork Liner Polymers and Can Coatings.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Philip C; Glattfelder, Richard; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Methner, Frank-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Absorption of hop volatiles by crown cork liner polymers and can coatings was investigated in beer during storage. All hop volatiles measured were prone to migrate into the closures, and the absorption kinetics was demonstrated to fit Fick's second law of diffusion well for a plane sheet. The extent and rate of diffusion were significantly dissimilar and were greatly dependent upon the nature of the volatile. Diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.32 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (limonene) to 0.26 × 10(-5) cm(2)/day (α-humulene). The maximum amounts absorbed into the material at equilibrium were in the following order: limonene > α-humulene > trans-caryophyllene > myrcene ≫ linalool > α-terpineol > geraniol. With the application of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) liners with oxygen-scavenging functionality, oxygen-barrier liners made up from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or liner polymers from a different manufacturer had no significant effect on the composition of hop volatiles in beers after prolonged storage of 55 days; however, significantly higher amounts of myrcene and limonene were found in the oxygen-barrier-type crown cork, while all other closures behaved similarly. Can coatings were demonstrated to absorb hop volatiles in a similar pattern as crown corks but to a lesser extent. Consequently, significantly higher percentages of myrcene were found in the beers. PMID:26996287

  2. First-principles multiple-barrier diffusion theory. The case study of interstitial diffusion in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Park, Ji -Sang; Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su -Huai

    2015-02-17

    The diffusion of particles in solid-state materials generally involves several sequential thermal-activation processes. However, presently, diffusion coefficient theory only deals with a single barrier, i.e., it lacks an accurate description to deal with multiple-barrier diffusion. Here, we develop a general diffusion coefficient theory for multiple-barrier diffusion. Using our diffusion theory and first-principles calculated hopping rates for each barrier, we calculate the diffusion coefficients of Cd, Cu, Te, and Cl interstitials in CdTe for their full multiple-barrier diffusion pathways. As a result, we found that the calculated diffusivity agrees well with the experimental measurement, thus justifying our theory, which is general for many other systems.

  3. First-principles multiple-barrier diffusion theory. The case study of interstitial diffusion in CdTe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Park, Ji -Sang; Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su -Huai

    2015-02-17

    The diffusion of particles in solid-state materials generally involves several sequential thermal-activation processes. However, presently, diffusion coefficient theory only deals with a single barrier, i.e., it lacks an accurate description to deal with multiple-barrier diffusion. Here, we develop a general diffusion coefficient theory for multiple-barrier diffusion. Using our diffusion theory and first-principles calculated hopping rates for each barrier, we calculate the diffusion coefficients of Cd, Cu, Te, and Cl interstitials in CdTe for their full multiple-barrier diffusion pathways. As a result, we found that the calculated diffusivity agrees well with the experimental measurement, thus justifying our theory, which is generalmore » for many other systems.« less

  4. Understanding barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and active living in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Rebecca; Connor, Leah; Nelson, Miriam; LaCroix, Andrea; Eldridge, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Studies demonstrate that people's food and physical activity (PA) environments influence behavior, yet research examining this in rural communities is limited. Methods. Focus groups of 8-15 women were conducted in rural communities in seven US states. Questions were designed to identify factors within residents' food and PA environments they felt helped or hindered them from eating healthfully and being physically active. Results. Participants were aged 30-84 years; mean (SD) = 61 (14) (N = 95). On average, communities had fewer than 5,000 residents. Limited time, social norms, and distances from or lack of exercise facilities were common PA barriers. Facilitators for PA included social support, dog walking, and availability of affordable facilities. Healthy eating barriers included the perception that healthy foods were too expensive; calorically dense large portion sizes served at family meals; and frequency of eating foods away from home, which were perceived as generally unhealthy. Healthy eating supports included culture/value around local food gathering (e.g., hunting and gardening) and preservation (e.g., canning and smoking). Friends and family were frequently identified as key influencers of eating and PA behavior. Conclusions. Targeting both social and built environment factors, particularly those unique to rural locales, may enhance support for healthy eating and PA behavior change interventions. PMID:25574386

  5. Understanding Barriers and Facilitators to Healthy Eating and Active Living in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca; Nelson, Miriam; LaCroix, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Studies demonstrate that people's food and physical activity (PA) environments influence behavior, yet research examining this in rural communities is limited. Methods. Focus groups of 8–15 women were conducted in rural communities in seven US states. Questions were designed to identify factors within residents' food and PA environments they felt helped or hindered them from eating healthfully and being physically active. Results. Participants were aged 30–84 years; mean (SD) = 61 (14) (N = 95). On average, communities had fewer than 5,000 residents. Limited time, social norms, and distances from or lack of exercise facilities were common PA barriers. Facilitators for PA included social support, dog walking, and availability of affordable facilities. Healthy eating barriers included the perception that healthy foods were too expensive; calorically dense large portion sizes served at family meals; and frequency of eating foods away from home, which were perceived as generally unhealthy. Healthy eating supports included culture/value around local food gathering (e.g., hunting and gardening) and preservation (e.g., canning and smoking). Friends and family were frequently identified as key influencers of eating and PA behavior. Conclusions. Targeting both social and built environment factors, particularly those unique to rural locales, may enhance support for healthy eating and PA behavior change interventions. PMID:25574386

  6. The impact of microglial activation on blood-brain barrier in brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Anna Carolina Carvalho; Matias, Diana; Garcia, Celina; Amaral, Rackele; Geraldo, Luiz Henrique; Freitas, Catarina; Lima, Flavia Regina Souza

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), constituted by an extensive network of endothelial cells (ECs) together with neurons and glial cells, including microglia, forms the neurovascular unit (NVU). The crosstalk between these cells guarantees a proper environment for brain function. In this context, changes in the endothelium-microglia interactions are associated with a variety of inflammation-related diseases in brain, where BBB permeability is compromised. Increasing evidences indicate that activated microglia modulate expression of tight junctions, which are essential for BBB integrity and function. On the other hand, the endothelium can regulate the state of microglial activation. Here, we review recent advances that provide insights into interactions between the microglia and the vascular system in brain diseases such as infectious/inflammatory diseases, epilepsy, ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25404894

  7. Detection of hydroxyl radicals during regeneration of granular activated carbon in dielectric barrier discharge plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shoufeng; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    To understand the reactions taking place in the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma system of activated carbon regeneration, the determination of active species is necessary. A method based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography with radical trapping by salicylic acid, has been developed to measure hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the DBD plasma reactor. The effects of applied voltage, treatment time, and gas flow rate and atmosphere were investigated. Experimental results indicated that increasing voltage, treatment time and air flow rate could enhance the formation of •OH. Oxygen atmosphere and a suitable GAC water content were contributed to •OH generation. The results give an insight into plasma chemical processes, and can be helpful to optimize the design and application for the plasma system.

  8. Imbalance in expression of hop (Humulus lupulus) chalcone synthase H1 and its regulators during hop stunt viroid pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Füssy, Zoltán; Patzak, Josef; Stehlík, Jan; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    2013-05-01

    Viroid-derived small RNAs generated during hop stunt viroid (HSVd) pathogenesis may induce the symptoms found in the hop cultivar "Admiral", including observed shifts in phenylpropanoid metabolites and changes in petiole coloration. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we examined hop lupulin gland-specific genes that have been shown to be involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism, for altered expression in response to infection with two HSVd isolates, HSVd-g and CPFVd. Most notably, the expression of a gene encoding a key enzyme for phenylpropanoid synthesis, naringenin-chalcone synthase H1 (chs_H1), decreased up to 40-fold in infected samples. In addition, a marked decrease in the expression of HlbHLH2 and an increase in the expression of HlMyb3 were observed. These two genes encode transcription factors that form a ternary complex with HlWDR1 for chs_H1 promoter activation. In a transient expression assay, a decrease in the ternary complex potential to activate the chs_H1 promoter was observed upon the decrease of HlbHLH2 expression. In addition, targeting of the chs_H1 transcript by vd-sRNAs may contribute to these expression changes. Our data show that HSVd infection causes a significant imbalance in the expression of phenylpropanoid metabolite-affecting genes via a complex mechanism, possibly involving regulatory disorders and direct targeting by vd-sRNA. PMID:23395540

  9. The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an alternative invention strategy for research-based argumentative writing. Investigates the coincidental usage of the term "whatever" in hip-hop, theory, and composition studies. Presents a "whatever-pedagogy" identified as "hip-hop pedagogy," a writing practice that models itself after digital sampling's rhetorical strategy of…

  10. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  11. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B.

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  12. Double group transfer reactions: role of activation strain and aromaticity in reaction barriers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Cossío, Fernando P

    2009-12-01

    Double group transfer (DGT) reactions, such as the bimolecular automerization of ethane plus ethene, are known to have high reaction barriers despite the fact that their cyclic transition states have a pronounced in-plane aromatic character, as indicated by NMR spectroscopic parameters. To arrive at a way of understanding this somewhat paradoxical and incompletely understood phenomenon of high-energy aromatic transition states, we have explored six archetypal DGT reactions using density functional theory (DFT) at the OLYP/TZ2P level. The main trends in reactivity are rationalized using the activation strain model of chemical reactivity. In this model, the shape of the reaction profile DeltaE(zeta) and the height of the overall reaction barrier DeltaE( not equal)=DeltaE(zeta=zeta(TS)) is interpreted in terms of the strain energy DeltaE(strain)(zeta) associated with deforming the reactants along the reaction coordinate zeta plus the interaction energy DeltaE(int)(zeta) between these deformed reactants: DeltaE(zeta)=DeltaE(strain)(zeta)+DeltaE(int)(zeta). We also use an alternative fragmentation and a valence bond model for analyzing the character of the transition states. PMID:19852009

  13. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  14. Tackling Barriers to Social Development: The Role of Physical Activity Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Okseon

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to share the author's observations of children's broader experiences in school as they relate to barriers to positive social development. In this article, the author enumerates the four barriers together with its barrier bluster to social development. Furthermore, the author states that a well-organized physical…

  15. HOPS: a novel cAMP-dependent shuttling protein involved in protein synthesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Castelli, Marilena; Bartoli, Daniela; Pieroni, Stefania; Pettirossi, Valentina; Piobbico, Danilo; Viola-Magni, Mariapia; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2005-07-15

    The liver has the ability to autonomously regulate growth and mass. Following partial hepatectomy, hormones, growth factors, cytokines and their coupled signal transduction pathways have been implicated in hepatocyte proliferation. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the proliferative response, we studied liver regeneration by characterization of novel genes that are activated in residual hepatocytes. A regenerating liver cDNA library screening was performed with cDNA-subtracted probes derived from regenerating and normal liver. Here, we describe the biology of Hops (for hepatocyte odd protein shuttling). HOPS is a novel shuttling protein that contains an ubiquitin-like domain, a putative NES and a proline-rich region. HOPS is rapidly exported from the nucleus and is overexpressed during liver regeneration. Evidence shows that cAMP governs HOPS export in hepatocytes of normal and regenerating liver and is mediated via CRM-1. We demonstrate that HOPS binds to elongation factor eEF-1A and interferes in protein synthesis. HOPS overexpression in H-35-hepatoma and 3T3-NIH cells strongly reduces proliferation. PMID:16014383

  16. Linking the mechanics and energetics of hopping with elastic ankle exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2012-12-15

    The springlike mechanics of the human leg during bouncing gaits has inspired the design of passive assistive devices that use springs to aid locomotion. The purpose of this study was to test whether a passive spring-loaded ankle exoskeleton could reduce the mechanical and energetic demands of bilateral hopping on the musculoskeletal system. Joint level kinematics and kinetics were collected with electromyographic and metabolic energy consumption data for seven participants hopping at four frequencies (2.2, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.2 Hz). Hopping was performed without an exoskeleton; with an springless exoskeleton; and with a spring-loaded exoskeleton. Spring-loaded ankle exoskeletons reduced plantar flexor muscle activity and the biological contribution to ankle joint moment (15-25%) and average positive power (20-40%). They also facilitated reductions in metabolic power (15-20%) across frequencies from 2.2 to 2.8 Hz compared with hopping with a springless exoskeleton. Reductions in metabolic power compared with hopping with no exoskeleton were restricted to hopping at 2.5 Hz only (12%). These results highlighted the importance of reducing the rate of muscular force production and work to achieve metabolic reductions. They also highlighted the importance of assisting muscles acting at the knee joint. Exoskeleton designs may need to be tuned to optimize exoskeleton mass, spring stiffness, and spring slack length to achieve greater metabolic reductions. PMID:23065760

  17. Performance evaluation of frequency-hopped spread spectrum multi-hop networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, J. W.; Geraniotis, Evaggelos A.

    1988-11-01

    Primary and secondary multiple-access interference processes are characterized for multi-hop packet radio networks, in which users are assumed to be Poisson-distributed in the plane and to use frequency hopped spread-spectrum signaling with a receiver-oriented assignment of frequency-hopping patterns. The throughput per node and the average forward progress are then evaluated for frequency-hopped multi-hop networks that employ Random Forward Routing with fixed transmission radius (RFR) and most forward progress routing with fixed transmission radius (MFR). The optimal average number of neighbors and transmission radius are derived for these cases when Reed-Solomon forward-error-control coding with minimum distance decoding or binary convolutional coding with Viterbi decoding is employed.

  18. Barriers to and Facilitators of Physical Activity Program Use Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bethancourt, Hilary J.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Beatty, Tara; Arterburn, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regular physical activity (PA) is important for maintaining long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional health. However, few older adults engage in routine PA, and even fewer take advantage of programs designed to enhance PA participation. Though most managed Medicare members have free access to the Silver Sneakers and EnhanceFitness PA programs, the vast majority of eligible seniors do not utilize these programs. The goal of this qualitative study was to better understand the barriers to and facilitators of PA and participation in PA programs among older adults. Design This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews. Setting Focus groups took place at three Group Health clinics in King County, Washington. Participants Fifty-two randomly selected Group Health Medicare members between the ages of 66 to 78 participated. Methods We conducted four focus groups with 13 participants each. Focus group discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach and a social-ecological framework. Results Men and women were nearly equally represented among the participants, and the sample was largely white (77%), well-educated (69% college graduates), and relatively physically active. Prominent barriers to PA and PA program participation were physical limitations due to health conditions or aging, lack of professional guidance, and inadequate distribution of information on available and appropriate PA options and programs. Facilitators included the motivation to maintain physical and mental health and access to affordable, convenient, and stimulating PA options. Conclusion Older adult populations may benefit from greater support and information from their providers and health care systems on how to safely and successfully improve or maintain PA levels through later adulthood. Efforts among health care systems to boost PA among older adults may need to consider patient-centered adjustments to current PA programs, as

  19. Novel Nrf2 activators from microbial transformation products inhibit blood–retinal barrier permeability in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kayoko; Hatano, Emiko; Inoue, Tatsuya; Matsuyama, Takuya; Iizuka, Mayumi; Ono, Yasunori; Ohnuki, Takashi; Murakami, Yoko; Iwasaki, Masaru; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Kasuya, Yuji; Komoriya, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that binds to antioxidant response elements located in the promoter region of genes encoding many antioxidant enzymes and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway seems protective for many organs, and although a well-known Nrf2 activator, bardoxolone methyl, was evaluated clinically for treating chronic kidney disease, it was found to induce adverse events. Many bardoxolone methyl derivatives, mostly derived by chemical modifications, have already been studied. However, we adopted a biotransformation technique to obtain a novel Nrf2 activator. Experimental Approach The potent novel Nrf2 activator, RS9, was obtained from microbial transformation products. Its Nrf2 activity was evaluated by determining NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-1 induction activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. We also investigated the effects of RS9 on oxygen-induced retinopathy in rats and glycated albumin-induced blood–retinal barrier permeability in rabbits because many ocular diseases are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Key Results Bardoxolone methyl doubled the specific activity of Nrf2 in Hepa1c1c7 cells at a much higher concentration than RS9. Moreover, the induction of Nrf2-targeted genes was observed at a one-tenth lower concentration of RS9. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of RS9 was substantially reduced compared with bardoxolone methyl. Oral and intravitreal administration of RS9 ameliorated the pathological scores and leakage in the models of retinopathy in rats and ocular inflammation in rabbits respectively. Conclusion and Implications Nrf2 activators are applicable for treating ocular diseases and novel Nrf2 activators have potential as a unique method for prevention and treatment of retinovascular disease. PMID:25363737

  20. Significance of ligand interactions involving Hop2-Mnd1 and the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases in homologous DNA repair and XX ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick

    2015-04-30

    The evolutionarily conserved Hop2-Mnd1 complex is a key cofactor for the meiosis-specific recombinase Dmc1. However, emerging evidence has revealed that Hop2-Mnd1 is expressed in somatic tissues, primary human fibroblasts and cell lines, and that it functions in conjunction with the Rad51 recombinase to repair damaged telomeres via the alternate lengthening of telomeres mechanism. Here, we reveal how distinct DNA-binding activities of Hop2-Mnd1 mediate the stabilization of the RAD51-ssDNA presynaptic filament or stimulate the homologous DNA pairing reaction. We have also endeavored to define the interface that governs the assembly of the higher order complex of Hop2-Mnd1 with RAD51. Unexpectedly, we find that ATP enhances the interaction between Hop2-Mnd1 and RAD51, and that both Hop2 and Mnd1 are involved in RAD51 interaction via their C-terminal regions. Importantly, mutations introduced into these Hop2 and Mnd1 domains, including the HOP2 p.del201Glu mutation present in a patient of XX ovarian dysgenesis, diminish the association and functional synergy of Hop2-Mnd1 with both RAD51 and DMC1. Our findings help delineate the intricate manner in which Hop2-Mnd1 engages and functions with RAD51 and DMC1 in mammalian cells and speak to the possible cause of XX ovarian dysgenesis. PMID:25820426

  1. On transition rates in surface hopping.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J M; Romaniello, P; Stella, L; Reinhard, P-G; Suraud, E

    2012-12-21

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) is one of the most widely used quantum-classical algorithms for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. Despite its empirical effectiveness and popularity, a rigorous derivation of TSH as the classical limit of a combined quantum electron-nuclear dynamics is still missing. In this work, we aim to elucidate the theoretical basis for the widely used hopping rules. Naturally, we concentrate thereby on the formal aspects of the TSH. Using a Gaussian wave packet limit, we derive the transition rates governing the hopping process at a simple avoided level crossing. In this derivation, which gives insight into the physics underlying the hopping process, some essential features of the standard TSH algorithm are retrieved, namely (i) non-zero electronic transition rate ("hopping probability") at avoided crossings; (ii) rescaling of the nuclear velocities to conserve total energy; (iii) electronic transition rates linear in the nonadiabatic coupling vectors. The well-known Landau-Zener model is then used for illustration. PMID:23267477

  2. Correlation between astrocyte activity and recovery from blood-brain barrier breakdown caused by brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ikeshima-Kataoka, Hiroko; Yasui, Masato

    2016-08-17

    Glial activation is associated with cell proliferation and upregulation of astrocyte marker expression following traumatic injury in the brain. However, the biological significance of these processes remains unclear. In the present study, astrocyte activation was investigated in a murine brain injury model. Brain injury induces blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and immunoglobulin G (IgG) leak into the brain parenchyma. The recovery of BBB breakdown was evaluated by analyzing immunofluorescent staining with mouse IgG antibody. IgG leakage was greatest at 1 day after stab wound injury and decreased thereafter, and almost diminished after 7 days. Bromodeoxy uridine incorporation was used, and astrocyte proliferation rates were examined by coimmunostaining with anti-bromodeoxy uridine and anti-glial fibrillary acid protein antibodies. Consistent with IgG leakage assays, astrocyte activation was the highest at day 3 and decreased after 7 days. Moreover, in reverse transcriptase-quantitative-PCR experiments, genes associated with BBB integrity were downregulated immediately after BBB breakdown and recovered to basal expression levels within 7 days. These data indicated that astrocyte activation correlated with BBB recovery from breakdown following brain injury. PMID:27362437

  3. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Brief Overview of SKB-EBS Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-10-01

    Research collaborations with international partners on the behavior and performance of engineered barrier systems (EBS) are an important aspect of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign strategy in the evaluation of disposal design concepts. These international partnerships are a cost-effective way of engaging in key R&D activities with common goals resulting in effective scientific knowledge exchanges thus enhancing existing and future research programs in the USA. This report provides a brief description of the activities covered by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) EBS Task Force (TF) (referred hereafter as SKB EBS TF) and potential future directions for engagement of the DOE-NE UFDC program in relevant R&D activities. Emphasis is given to SKB EBS TF activities that are still ongoing and aligned to the UFDC R&D program. This include utilization of data collected in the bentonite rock interaction experiment (BRIE) and data sets from benchmark experiments produced by the chemistry or “C” part of the SKB EBS TF. Potential applications of information generated by this program include comparisons/tests between model and data (e.g., reactive diffusion), development and implementation of coupled-process models (e.g., HM), and code/model benchmarking.

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on the blood brain barrier permeability to pharmacologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Trnovec, T.; Kallay, Z.; Bezek, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can impair the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Data on early and late damage after brain irradiation are usually reported separately, yet a gradual transition between these two types has become evident. Signs appearing within 3 weeks after irradiation are considered to be early manifestations. The mechanism of radiation-effected integrity impairment of the BBB is discussed in relation to changes in morphological structures forming the BBB, the endothelium of intracerebral vessels, and in the surrounding astrocytes. Alterations in the function of the BBB are manifested in the endothelium by changes in the ultrastructural location of the activity of phosphatases and by the activation of pinocytotic vesicular transport, and in astrocyte cytoplasm by glycogen deposition. The changes in ultrastructure were critically surveyed with regard to increasing doses of radiation to the brain in the range of 5 Gy to 960 Gy. The qualitative as well as the semiquantitative and quantitative observations on the passage of substances across the damaged BBB were treated separately. Qualitative changes are based mainly on findings of extravasation of vital stains and of labelled proteins. The quantitative studies established differences in radiation-induced changes in the permeability of the BBB depending on the structure and physico-chemical properties of the barrier penetrating tracers. Indirect evaluation of radiation-induced BBB changes is based on studies of pharmacological effects of substances acting on the CNS. In conclusion, radiation impairs significantly the integrity of the BBB following single irradiation of the brain with a dose exceeding 10-15 Gy. The response of the BBB to ionizing radiation is dependent both on the dose to which the brain is exposed and on specific properties of the tracer. 68 references.

  5. Driving reactions: Surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry using hydroxide melts and RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Todd Lawrence

    1997-11-01

    This thesis explores several techniques for surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry. The two major issues addressed are the use of a solution-based molten hydroxide system to increase the rate of reactant diffusion over that in the solid state, and the use of an RF plasma to break bonds in gaseous reactants for subsequent reaction with a solid. Part I describes the use of molten alkali metal hydroxides as a low-temperature solvent system for both electrodeposition and precipitation of high valent copper oxides. Cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the effects of various reaction conditions on copper dissolved in the melts, including copper activity, temperature, and atmosphere composition. The results of this study indicate that copper oxide phases become less soluble at higher copper activities, temperatures, and pHsb2O values. Also, the Cu(II)/Cu(III) redox wave, important for the electrodeposition of cuprate phases with high copper formal oxidation states, is observed below 300sp°C in air and at 350sp°C in dry argon. NaCuOsb2 was electrodeposited under constant current conditions. Iodometric titrations and annealing studies indicate that NaCuOsb2 is oxygen deficient and tends to lose additional oxygen on heating. The hydroxide method was also successful in the deposition of thin films of superconducting EuBasb2Cusb4Osb8 on SrTiOsb3 substrates. The films were found to be superconducting with a Tsbc of 75 K in the absence of annealing. In Part II, the idea of circumventing activation energy barriers is applied to the problem of environmentally harmful perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Mass spectrometry was used to determine the PFC emissions from two semiconductor manufacturing processes: oxide etch and post-CVD chamber clean. Because of radical recombination to thermodynamically stable species, most of the PFCs used in these processes are emitted to the atmosphere. A prototype abatement device which uses an RF plasma to provide the activation energy

  6. Physical Activity and Reported Barriers to Activity Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, Juma; Al-Maskari, Fatma; Afandi, Bachar; Parkar, Hasratali; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the physical activity practice among type 2 diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients who participated in the outpatient clinics in Al-Ain District, during 2006. The patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, and measurements of blood pressure, body mass index, body fat, abdominal circumference, glycemic control (HbA1c), and fasting lipid profile. RESULTS: Of the 390 patients recruited, only 25% reported an increase in their physical activity levels following the diagnosis of diabetes, and only 3% reported physical activity levels that meet the recommended guidelines. More than half of the study subjects had uncontrolled hypertension (53%) and unacceptable lipid profiles; 71% had a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and 59% had hypertriglyceridemia. Forty-four percent were obese and a further 34% were overweight. Abdominal obesity was also common (59%). Only 32% had an acceptable glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS: The physical activity practice of type 2 diabetic patients in the UAE is largely inadequate to meet the recommended level necessary to prevent or ameliorate diabetic complications. Interventions aiming at overcoming the barriers to physical activity are urgently needed. PMID:20043039

  7. Landau-Zener type surface hopping algorithms.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-06-14

    A class of surface hopping algorithms is studied comparing two recent Landau-Zener (LZ) formulas for the probability of nonadiabatic transitions. One of the formulas requires a diabatic representation of the potential matrix while the other one depends only on the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. For each classical trajectory, the nonadiabatic transitions take place only when the surface gap attains a local minimum. Numerical experiments are performed with deterministically branching trajectories and with probabilistic surface hopping. The deterministic and the probabilistic approach confirm the affinity of both the LZ probabilities, as well as the good approximation of the reference solution computed by solving the Schrödinger equation via a grid based pseudo-spectral method. Visualizations of position expectations and superimposed surface hopping trajectories with reference position densities illustrate the effective dynamics of the investigated algorithms. PMID:24929375

  8. High-mobility group box 1 impairs airway epithelial barrier function through the activation of the RAGE/ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WUFENG; ZHAO, HAIJIN; DONG, HANGMING; WU, YUE; YAO, LIHONG; ZOU, FEI; CAI, SHAOXI

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. However, whether the activation of the HMGB1/RAGE axis mediates airway epithelial barrier dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of HMGB1 and its synergistic action with interleukin (IL)-1β on airway epithelial barrier properties. We evaluated the effects of recombinant human HMGB1 alone or in combination with IL-1β on ionic and macromolecular barrier permeability, by culturing air-liquid interface 16HBE cells with HMGB1 to mimic the differentiated epithelium. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were utilized to examine the level and structure of major junction proteins, namely E-cadherin, β-catenin, occludin and claudin-1. Furthermore, we examined the effects of RAGE neutralizing antibodies and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors on epithelial barrier properties in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved. HMGB1 increased FITC-dextran permeability, but suppressed epithelial resistance in a dose-and time-dependent manner. HMGB1-mediated barrier hyperpermeability was accompanied by a disruption of cell-cell contacts, the selective downregulation of occludin and claudin-1, and the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. HMGB1 in synergy with IL-1β induced a similar, but greater barrier hyperpermeability and induced the disruption of junction proteins. Furthermore, HMGB1 elicited the activation of the RAGE/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway, which correlated with barrier dysfunction in the 16HBE cells. Anti-RAGE antibody and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, attenuated the HMGB1-mediated changes in barrier permeability, restored the expression levels of occludin and claudin-1 and pevented the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Taken together, the findings of our study

  9. High-mobility group box 1 impairs airway epithelial barrier function through the activation of the RAGE/ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wufeng; Zhao, Haijin; Dong, Hangming; Wu, Yue; Yao, Lihong; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. However, whether the activation of the HMGB1/RAGE axis mediates airway epithelial barrier dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of HMGB1 and its synergistic action with interleukin (IL)-1β on airway epithelial barrier properties. We evaluated the effects of recombinant human HMGB1 alone or in combination with IL-1β on ionic and macromolecular barrier permeability, by culturing air-liquid interface 16HBE cells with HMGB1 to mimic the differentiated epithelium. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were utilized to examine the level and structure of major junction proteins, namely E-cadherin, β-catenin, occludin and claudin-1. Furthermore, we examined the effects of RAGE neutralizing antibodies and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors on epithelial barrier properties in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved. HMGB1 increased FITC-dextran permeability, but suppressed epithelial resistance in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HMGB1-mediated barrier hyperpermeability was accompanied by a disruption of cell-cell contacts, the selective downregulation of occludin and claudin-1, and the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. HMGB1 in synergy with IL-1β induced a similar, but greater barrier hyperpermeability and induced the disruption of junction proteins. Furthermore, HMGB1 elicited the activation of the RAGE/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway, which correlated with barrier dysfunction in the 16HBE cells. Anti-RAGE antibody and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, attenuated the HMGB1-mediated changes in barrier permeability, restored the expression levels of occludin and claudin-1 and pevented the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Taken together, the findings of our study

  10. Activation of epidermal toll-like receptor 2 enhances tight junction function: implications for atopic dermatitis and skin barrier repair.

    PubMed

    Kuo, I-Hsin; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; Yoshida, Takeshi; McGirt, Laura Y; Ivanov, Andrei I; Barnes, Kathleen C; Gallo, Richard L; Borkowski, Andrew W; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Leung, Donald Y; Georas, Steve N; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal tight junction (TJ) defects and a propensity for Staphylococcus aureus skin infections. S. aureus is sensed by many pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). We hypothesized that an effective innate immune response will include skin barrier repair, and that this response is impaired in AD subjects. S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and synthetic TLR2 agonists enhanced TJ barrier and increased expression of TJ proteins, claudin-1 (CLDN1), claudin-23 (CLDN23), occludin, and Zonulae occludens 1 (ZO-1) in primary human keratinocytes. A TLR2 agonist enhanced skin barrier recovery in human epidermis wounded by tape stripping. Tlr2(-/-) mice had a delayed and incomplete barrier recovery following tape stripping. AD subjects had reduced epidermal TLR2 expression as compared with nonatopic subjects, which inversely correlated (r=-0.654, P=0.0004) with transepidermal water loss (TEWL). These observations indicate that TLR2 activation enhances skin barrier in murine and human skin and is an important part of a wound repair response. Reduced epidermal TLR2 expression observed in AD patients may have a role in their incompetent skin barrier. PMID:23223142

  11. HOP'N after-school project: an obesity prevention randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper reports the primary outcomes of the Healthy Opportunities for Physical Activity and Nutrition (HOP'N) after-school project, which was an effectiveness trial designed to evaluate the prevention of childhood obesity through building the capacity of after-school staff to increase physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (FV) opportunities. Methods We conducted a three-year, nested cross-sectional group randomized controlled effectiveness trial. After a baseline assessment year (2005-2006), schools and their after-school programs were randomized to the HOP'N after-school program (n = 4) or control (n = 3), and assessed for two subsequent years (intervention year 1, 2006-2007; intervention year 2, 2007-2008). Across the three years, 715 fourth grade students, and 246 third and fourth grade after-school program participants were included in the study. HOP'N included community government human service agency (Cooperative Extension) led community development efforts, a three-time yearly training of after-school staff, daily PA for 30 minutes following CATCH guidelines, a daily healthful snack, and a weekly nutrition and PA curriculum (HOP'N Club). Child outcomes included change in age- and gender-specific body mass index z-scores (BMIz) across the school year and PA during after-school time measured by accelerometers. The success of HOP'N in changing after-school program opportunities was evaluated by observations over the school year of after-school program physical activity sessions and snack FV offerings. Data were analyzed in 2009. Results The intervention had no impact on changes in BMIz. Overweight/obese children attending HOP'N after-school programs performed 5.92 minutes more moderate-to-vigorous PA per day after intervention, which eliminated a baseline year deficit of 9.65 minutes per day (p < 0.05) compared to control site overweight/obese children. Active recreation program time at HOP'N sites was 23.40 minutes (intervention year 1

  12. Glycodermorphins: opioid peptides with potent and prolonged analgesic activity and enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration.

    PubMed

    Negri, L; Lattanzi, R; Tabacco, F; Scolaro, B; Rocchi, R

    1998-08-01

    1. In order to improve the in vivo stability of the opioid peptide dermorphin we synthesized O-betaglucosylated analogs ([Ser7-O-betaGlc]dermorphin and [Ser7-O-betaGlc(Ac)4]-dermorphin) and C-alphagalactosylated analogs ([Ala7-C-alphaGal]dermorphin and [Ala7-C-alphaGal(Ac)4]-dermorphin). 2. O- and C-glycosylation of dermorphin halved the peptide affinity for brain mu-opioid receptors and the biological potency in guinea-pig ileum assay (GPI). Despite their lower opioid receptor affinity, when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v., 8-40 pmol) and subcutaneously (s.c., 0.5-3 micromol kg(-1)) in rats, glycosylated analogs were two times more potent than dermorphin in reducing the nociceptive response to radiant heat. Acetylation of sugar hydroxyl groups reduces 5-10 times both biological activity on GPI and mu-receptor affinity, whereas the antinociceptive potency was equal to (i.c.v.) or only two-three times lower (s.c.) than dermorphin potency. 3. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Index (BBB-PI) of the glycodermorphins was significantly higher than that of dermorphin, indicating a facilitated entry into the brain: O-beta-linked glucoconiugates are expected to enter CNS by the glucose transporter GLUT-1 of the endothelial barrier. However the calculated BBB-PI for the C-alphagalactoside was about two times higher than that of the O-betaglucoside, excluding the implication of GLUT-1 that is known to be selective for O-beta-links and preferring for the exose glucose. 4. The enhanced brain permeability with the subsequent decrease in peripheral dosage of these opioid peptides did not result in lowering constipation. PMID:9723966

  13. Epigenetic Stability of Cryopreserved and Cold-Stored Hops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three hop accessions representative of commercially cultivated hops were selected for the analysis of epigenetic stability; females of different origins, including a cultivar developed in New Zealand (Calicross) from American cultivars, a landrace derived European cultivar (Tardif de Bourgogne), and...

  14. Lack of facilities rather than sociocultural factors as the primary barrier to physical activity among female Saudi university students

    PubMed Central

    Samara, Anastasia; Nistrup, Anne; AL-Rammah, Tamader Y; Aro, Arja R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is experiencing a dramatic increase in physical inactivity, with women having higher levels of inactivity than men among all age groups. It is assumed that factors such as dress codes, restrictions on going outdoors, and conservative norms are the main reasons for women’s low physical activity. Our aim was to explore the different parameters related to physical activity, including self-efficacy, as well as the perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity in young Saudi females. Patients and methods Ninety-four first-year female Saudi university students in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the present study in 2014. The students were from eight bachelor’s programs in health and well-being, and each completed a questionnaire with questions divided into five parts as follows: 1) socioeconomic status, 2) physical activity, 3) self-efficacy 4) social factors, and 5) barriers and facilitators related to physical activity. Results The students exercised at home and alone, and there was low self-efficacy for physical activity (mean score =42±14). Among social factors, attending university was the only factor that hindered physical activity (32%). Physical activity was positively perceived overall (mean score =131±10). Students showed awareness of the benefits of physical activity for health and well-being. The most important barrier was the lack of designated areas available for physical activity. Students disagreed that family or the Islamic community were barriers to physical activity. Conclusion The lack of facilities and lack of encouragement from the university, but not a lack of knowledge (a high level of knowledge is to be expected given their health and well-being studies backgrounds) and/or restrictions from families and society, seem to hinder female students’ physical activity, at least young Saudi students. PMID:25834468

  15. Electroacupuncture activates enteric glial cells and protects the gut barrier in hemorrhaged rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sen; Zhao, Zeng-Kai; Liu, Rui; Wang, Hai-Bin; Gu, Chun-Yu; Luo, Hong-Min; Wang, Huan; Du, Ming-Hua; Lv, Yi; Shi, Xian

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture ST36 activates enteric glial cells, and alleviates gut inflammation and barrier dysfunction following hemorrhagic shock. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to approximately 45% total blood loss and randomly divided into seven groups: (1) sham: cannulation, but no hemorrhage; (2) subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS); (3) electroacupuncture (EA) ST36 after hemorrhage; (4) vagotomy (VGX)/EA: VGX before hemorrhage, then EA ST36; (5) VGX: VGX before hemorrhage; (6) α-bungarotoxin (BGT)/EA: intraperitoneal injection of α-BGT before hemorrhage, then EA ST36; and (7) α-BGT group: α-BGT injection before hemorrhage. Morphological changes in enteric glial cells (EGCs) were observed by immunofluorescence, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; a protein marker of enteric glial activation) was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Intestinal cytokine levels, gut permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran, and the expression and distribution of tight junction protein zona occludens (ZO)-1 were also determined. RESULTS: EGCs were distorted following hemorrhage and showed morphological abnormalities. EA ST36 attenuated the morphological changes in EGCs at 6 h, as compared with the VGX, α-BGT and HS groups. EA ST36 increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than in the other groups. EA ST36 decreased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (760.5 ± 96.43 ng/mL vs 2466.7 ± 131.60 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and preserved ZO-1 protein expression and localization at 6 h after hemorrhage compared with the HS group. However, abdominal VGX and α-BGT treatment weakened or eliminated the effects of EA ST36. EA ST36 reduced tumor necrosis factor-α levels in intestinal homogenates after blood loss, while vagotomy or intraperitoneal injection of α-BGT before EA ST36 abolished its anti-inflammatory effects. CONCLUSION: EA ST36 attenuates hemorrhage

  16. Leg stiffness adjustment during hopping at different intensities and frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mrdakovic, Vladimir; Ilic, Dusko; Vulovic, Radun; Matic, Milan; Jankovic, Nenad; Filipovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding leg and joint stiffness adjustment during maximum hopping may provide important information for developing more effective training methods. It has been reported that ankle stiffness has major influence on stable spring-mass dynamics during submaximal hopping, and that knee stiffness is a major determinant for hopping performance during maximal hopping task. Furthermore, there are no reports on how the height of the previous hop could affect overall stiffness modulation of the subsequent maximum one. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether and how the jump height of the previous hop affects leg and joint stiffness for subsequent maximum hop. Ten participants completed trials in which they repeatedly hopped as high as possible (MX task) and trials in which they were instructed to perform several maximum hops with 3 preferred (optimal) height hops between each of them (P3MX task). Both hopping tasks were performed at 2.2 Hz hopping frequency and at the participant's preferred (freely chosen) frequency as well. By comparing results of those hopping tasks, we found that ankle stiffness at 2.2 Hz ( p = 0.041) and knee stiffness at preferred frequency ( p = 0.045) was significantly greater for MX versus P3MX tasks. Leg stiffness for 2.2 Hz hopping is greater than for the preferred frequency. Ankle stiffness is greater for 2.2 Hz than for preferred frequencies; opposite stands for knee stiffness. The results of this study suggest that preparatory hop height can be considered as an important factor for modulation of maximum hop. PMID:25308379

  17. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  18. Removal of atrazine in water by combination of activated carbon and dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Vanraes, Patrick; Willems, Gert; Nikiforov, Anton; Surmont, Pieter; Lynen, Frederic; Vandamme, Jeroen; Van Durme, Jim; Verheust, Yannick P; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Dumoulin, Ann; Leys, Christophe

    2015-12-15

    Efficiency of modern wastewater treatment plants to remove or decompose persistent contaminants in low concentration is often insufficient to meet the demands imposed by governmental laws. Novel, efficient and cheap methods are required to address this global issue. We developed a new type of plasma reactor, in which atrazine decomposition by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in dry air is combined with micropollutant adsorption on activated carbon textile and with extra bubbling of generated ozone. Investigation of reaction kinetics and by-product analysis shows that increasing input power with a factor 3.5 leads to deeper atrazine oxidation without significantly changing energy yield of atrazine removal. By-products of first and later generations are detected with HPLC-MS analysis in water and adsorbed on the activated carbon textile. Our reactor is compared in energy efficiency with reactors described in literature, showing that combination of plasma discharge with pollutant adsorption and ozone recycling is attractive for future applications of water treatment. PMID:26282086

  19. Surface alkaline phosphatase activities of macroalgae on coral reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffelke, B.

    2001-05-01

    Inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are subject to episodic nutrient supply, mainly by flood events, whereas midshelf reefs have a more consistent low nutrient availability. Alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) enables macroalgae to increase their phosphorus (P) supply by using organic P. APA was high (~4.0 to 15.5 µmol PO4 3- g DW-1 h-1) in species colonising predominantly inshore reefs and low (<2 µmol PO4 3- g DW-1 h-1) in species with a cross-shelf distribution. However, APA values of GBR algae in this study were much lower than data reported from other coral reef systems. In experiments with two Sargassum species tissue P levels were correlated negatively, and N:P ratios were positively correlated with APA. High APA can compensate for a relative P-limitation of macroalgae in coral reef systems that are subject to significant N-inputs, such as the GBR inshore reefs. APA and other mechanisms to acquire a range of nutrient species allow inshore species to thrive in habitats with episodic nutrient supply. These species also are likely to benefit from an increased nutrient supply caused by human activity, which currently is a global problem.

  20. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 50–86) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  1. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Haskó, János; Fazakas, Csilla; Molnár, Judit; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Herman, Hildegard; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Persidsky, Yuri; Krizbai, István A.

    2014-01-01

    During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2); therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1) and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2), GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma. PMID:24815068

  2. Women bound to be active (years 3 and 4): can a book club help women overcome barriers to physical activity and improve self-worth?

    PubMed

    Huberty, Jennifer L; Vener, Jamie; Ransdell, Lynda; Schulte, Laura; Budd, Melissa A; Gao, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Little progress has been made toward increasing physical activity in women. This study aimed to determine if an 8-month theory-based book club intervention (Women Bound to Be Active) was effective in increasing: (a) self-worth, (b) benefits relative to barriers to physical activity, and (c) physical activity in women (n = 51). Findings suggested a book club was effective for improving: self-worth, the benefits relative to barriers to physical activity, and possibly participation in physical activity. This is an innovative model to help women become more active and learn skills that may enable them to be active on their own long after a physical activity program has ended. PMID:20349397

  3. A Case Study: Significance, Epidemiology, and Management of Hop Viruses.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop latent carlavirus (HpLV), Hop mosaic carlavirus (HpMV), and Apple mosaic ilarvirus (ApMV) are viruses that have been shown to have deleterious effects on cone yield and brewing organic acids in several cultivars in Australian hop gardens, and pose a significant threat to the continued production...

  4. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  5. Hip-Hopping across China: Intercultural Formulations of Local Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Catrice

    2012-01-01

    The linguistic dimensions of globalized hip-hop cannot be understood simply as a byproduct of English as an American export. As hip-hop mobilizes, it is common (and arguably necessary) for global hip-hop communities to struggle through purposeful, semiotically rooted dialectics over what constitutes "authentic" and respectable forms of local…

  6. Genomics of the hop psuedo-autosomal regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop is one of the few crop species with female and male plants with sex being determined by either XX or XY chromosomes. Hop cones are only produced in female hops with or without fertilization. This has lead to most genomic research being directed toward female plants. Very little work has been don...

  7. HPLC Analysis of [Alpha]- and [Beta]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenhower, Travis M.; Force, Leyna J.; Petersen, Kenneth J.; Betts, Thomas A.; Baker, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Hops have been used for centuries to impart aroma and bitterness to beer. The cones of the female hop plant contain both essential oils, which include many of the fragrant components of hops, and a collection of compounds known as [alpha]- and [beta]-acids that are the precursors to bittering agents. In order for brewers to predict the ultimate…

  8. Suppression of Hop Looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) by the fungicide Pyraclostrobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hop looper, Hypena humuli Harris, is a reemergent pest of hop that often requires treatment to mitigate crop damage. In four years of field trials, plots treated with fungicides were observed to sustain less hop looper defoliation as compared to nontreated plots. Further investigation revealed...

  9. Barriers to and Suggestions for a Healthful, Active Lifestyle as Perceived by Rural and Urban Costa Rican Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monge-Rojas, Rafael; Garita-Arce, Carlos; Sanchez-Lopez, Marta; Colon-Ramos, Uriyoan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the perceptions of rural and urban Costa Rican adolescents regarding which barriers and motivators affect their adoption of an active lifestyle. Design: Data were collected in focus group discussions. Participants: 108 male and female adolescents aged 12 to 18 from the 7th to 11th grades. Setting: Two urban and 1 rural high…

  10. Facilitators and Barriers to HIV Activities in Religious Congregations: Perspectives of Clergy and Lay Leaders from a Diverse Urban Sample

    PubMed Central

    Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Werber, Laura; Palar, Kartika; Kanouse, David E.; Mata, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines facilitators and barriers to HIV activities within religious congregations, the relative internal or external sources of these influences, and suggestive differences across congregational types. Results are based on in-depth interviews with clergy and lay leaders (n = 57) from 14 congregations in Los Angeles County, California, purposively selected to reflect diversity in racial-ethnic composition, denomination, size, and HIV activity level. Many common facilitators and barriers were related to norms and attitudes, only a few of which appeared overtly associated with theological orientations. Clergy support was a facilitator particularly prevalent among congregations having higher HIV activity levels, indicating its importance in sustaining and expanding HIV programs. Resource issues were also prominent, with material resource barriers more frequently mentioned by smaller congregations and human resource barriers more among larger congregations. Organizational structure issues were mostly centered on external linkages with various social service, public health, and faith-based entities. Analysis of internal versus external sources highlights the roles of different stakeholders within and outside congregations in promoting HIV activities. Potential differences across congregational types represent fruitful areas for future research. PMID:23990037

  11. 75 FR 5804 - Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: U.S. and EU Export Activities, and Barriers and Opportunities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... published in the Federal Registers of October 28, 2009 (74 FR 55581); December 1, 2009 (74 FR 62812); and... COMMISSION Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: U.S. and EU Export Activities, and Barriers and Opportunities Experienced by U.S. Firms and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: Characteristics and Performance...

  12. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Craig C.

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) “probability” of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  13. The Rap on Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekarski, Bill

    2004-01-01

    From its humble origins some 30 years ago in New York's bombed-out, poverty-ravaged South Bronx, hip-hop has risen to become a dominant cultural force both here and abroad. Strictly defined, the term refers to the entire cultural constellation that accompanies rap music, which in 2001 surpassed country music as the most popular musical genre in…

  14. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment. PMID:20807386

  15. Multimodal Hip Hop Productions as Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on ethnographic data from a year-long multimodal media production (MMP) course and the experience of an African American female adolescent who used the production of multimodal Hip Hop texts to express her creativity and growing socially conscious view of the world. The study demonstrates how students made meaning multimodally and…

  16. Forecasting and management of hop downy mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Downy mildew of hop, caused by Pseudoperonospora humuli, is managed in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. by regular application of fungicides. A degree-day model that forecasts the first emergence of shoots systemically infection with P. humuli (termed basal spikes) and a risk index for secondary sprea...

  17. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Craig C.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) "probability" of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  18. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  19. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by hops (Humulus lupulus) and hop prenylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Dejan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Huang, Ke; Li, Guannan; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    As hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer and by menopausal women as estrogenic dietary supplements, the potential for hop extracts and hop constituents to cause drug-botanical interactions by inhibiting human cytochrome P450 enzymes was investigated. Inhibition of major human cytochrome P450 enzymes by a standardized hop extract and isolated hop prenylated phenols was evaluated using a fast and efficient assay based on ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The hop extract at 5 μg/mL inhibited CYP2C8 (93%), CYP2C9 (88%), CYP2C19 (70%), and CYP1A2 (27%) with IC50 values of 0.8, 0.9, 3.3, and 9.4 μg/mL, respectively, but time-dependent inactivation was observed only for CYP1A2. Isoxanthohumol from hops was the most potent inhibitor of CYP2C8 with an IC50 of 0.2 μM, whereas 8-prenylnaringenin was the most potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with IC50 values of 1.1 μM, 1.1 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. Extracts of hops contain prenylated compounds such as the flavanones isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin and the chalcone xanthohumol that can inhibit CYP450s, especially the CYP2C family, which may affect the efficacy and safety of some CYP2C substrate drugs when co-administered. PMID:24342125

  20. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by hops (Humulus lupulus) and hop prenylphenols.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Qiu, Xi; Nikolić, Dejan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Huang, Ke; Li, Guannan; Pauli, Guido F; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-03-12

    As hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer and by menopausal women as estrogenic dietary supplements, the potential for hop extracts and hop constituents to cause drug-botanical interactions by inhibiting human cytochrome P450 enzymes was investigated. Inhibition of major human cytochrome P450 enzymes by a standardized hop extract and isolated hop prenylated phenols was evaluated using a fast and efficient assay based on ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The hop extract at 5 μg/mL inhibited CYP2C8 (93%), CYP2C9 (88%), CYP2C19 (70%), and CYP1A2 (27%) with IC50 values of 0.8, 0.9, 3.3, and 9.4 μg/mL, respectively, but time-dependent inactivation was observed only for CYP1A2. Isoxanthohumol from hops was the most potent inhibitor of CYP2C8 with an IC50 of 0.2 μM, whereas 8-prenylnaringenin was the most potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with IC50 values of 1.1 μM, 1.1 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. Extracts of hops contain prenylated compounds such as the flavanones isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin and the chalcone xanthohumol that can inhibit CYP450s, especially the CYP2C family, which may affect the efficacy and safety of some CYP2C substrate drugs when co-administered. PMID:24342125

  1. Sampling Memories: Using Hip-Hop Aesthetics to Learn from Urban Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2012-01-01

    This article theorizes and charts the implementation of a learning activity designed from the hip-hop aesthetic of sampling. The purpose of this learning activity was to enable recent urban school graduates to reflect upon their previous schooling experiences as a platform for future learning in higher education. This article illustrates what…

  2. Scaffold hopping towards potent and selective JAK3 inhibitors: discovery of novel C-5 substituted pyrrolopyrazines.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, Javier; Lemoine, Remy; Bartlett, Mark; Hermann, Johannes C; Hekmat-Nejad, Mohammad; Henningsen, Robert; Jin, Sue; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Li, Hongju; Lovey, Allen J; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Patel, Vaishali; Petersen, Ann; Setti, Lina; Shao, Ada; Tivitmahaisoon, Parcharee; Vu, Minh Diem; Soth, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of a novel series of pyrrolopyrazines as JAK inhibitors with comparable enzyme and cellular activity to tofacitinib is described. The series was identified using a scaffold hopping approach aided by structure based drug design using principles of intramolecular hydrogen bonding for conformational restriction and targeting specific pockets for modulating kinase activity. PMID:25262541

  3. HopRec: Hop-Based Recommendation Ability Enhanced Reputation Ranking in P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufeng; Nakao, Akihiro; Ma, Jianhua

    As a concept stemmed from social field, we argued that, in P2P networks, peers' recommendation behaviors and functional behaviors should be explicitly separated, thus we propose the HopRec scheme which uses hop-based recommendation ability to improve the accuracy of reputation ranking in P2P networks. Our contributions lie in the following aspects: firstly, we adopt the simple but effective idea to infer peer's recommendation ability (RA): the farer away that peer is from the initial malicious seeds, the higher RA that peer should have; Then, the computation of reputation rankings appropriately reflects peer's different RA. The simulation results show that, in comparison with Eigentrust-like algorithms, HopRec can be robust to sybils and front peers attacks, and achieve significant performance improvement. Moreover, we compare HopRec with two related schemes, Poisonedwater and CredibleRank, and found that: in hospitable P2P environment, HopRec can obtain better performance than Poisonedwater, and can achieve the comparable performance as CredibleRank, with less computation overhead then CredibleRank. Finally, we also show that, if the initial good and malicious seeds could be selected based on peers' degrees, then HopRec and CredibleRank can achieve perfect performance.

  4. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Dai, Weiqi; Mao, Yuqing; Li, Sainan; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  5. Featherless Dinosaurs and the Hip-Hop Simulacrum: Reconsidering Hip-Hop's Appropriateness for the Music Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    This article offers considerations for music teachers interested in including hip-hop music in their classrooms but who might feel concerned with or overwhelmed by issues of appropriateness. Two concerns related to hip-hop music are examined: language and negative social themes. Commercial interests in hip-hop music have created a simulacrum (or…

  6. Dissipated power and induced velocity fields data of a micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for active flow control☆

    PubMed Central

    Pescini, E.; Martínez, D.S.; De Giorgi, M.G.; Francioso, L.; Ficarella, A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have gained great interest among all the active flow control devices typically employed in aerospace and turbomachinery applications [1,2]. Compared with the macro SDBDs, the micro single dielectric barrier discharge (MSDBD) actuators showed a higher efficiency in conversion of input electrical power to delivered mechanical power [3,4]. This article provides data regarding the performances of a MSDBD plasma actuator [5,6]. The power dissipation values [5] and the experimental and numerical induced velocity fields [6] are provided. The present data support and enrich the research article entitled “Optimization of micro single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator models based on experimental velocity and body force fields” by Pescini et al. [6]. PMID:26425667

  7. Comparison Between Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma and Ozone Regenerations of Activated Carbon Exhausted with Pentachlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Qu, Dong; Huang, Yimei; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    In this study, two regeneration methods (dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma and ozone (O3) regeneration) of saturated granular activated carbon (GAC) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) were compared. The results show that the two regeneration methods can eliminate contaminants from GAC and recover its adsorption properties to some extent. Comparing the DBD plasma with O3 regeneration, the adsorption rate and the capacity of the GAC samples after DBD plasma regeneration are greater than those after O3 regeneration. O3 regeneration decreases the specific surface area of GAC and increases the acidic surface oxygen groups on the surface of GAC, which causes a decrease in PCP on GAC uptake. With increasing regeneration cycles, the regeneration efficiencies of the two methods decrease, but the decrease in the regeneration efficiencies of GAC after O3 regeneration is very obvious compared with that after DBD plasma regeneration. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted by the Freundlich and Langmuir models using the non-linear regression technique, and all the adsorption equilibrium isotherms fit the Langmuir model fairly well, which demonstrates that the DBD plasma and ozone regeneration processes do not appear to modify the adsorption process, but to shift the equilibrium towards lower adsorption concentrations. Analyses of the weight loss of GAC show that O3 regeneration has a lower weight loss than DBD plasma regeneration.

  8. Active transport of 131I across the blood—brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Davson, Hugh; Hollingsworth, Jillian R.

    1973-01-01

    The ventricular space of rabbits was perfused with a low-viscosity silicone oil for the purpose of (1) collecting freshly secreted cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) uninfluenced by diffusional exchanges with the brain and (2) studying passage of solutes from the blood into the brain, uncomplicated by exchanges with c.s.f. The freshly secreted c.s.f. appeared as fine droplets suspended in the less dense silicone, and accumulated at the bottom of the collected silicone. Studies on the penetration of 24Na from blood into this fluid indicated that considerable exchanges with the brain had occurred between its secretion and collection, in spite of this method of collection. The second objective was attained, in that the exchanges between the freshly secreted fluid and the brain were quantitatively insufficient to affect the measure of kinetics of uptake by brain from the blood. In consequence, it was possible to demonstrate unequivocally that the increased uptake by brain of 131I, when treated with perchlorate, was due to inhibition of an active process occurring across the blood—brain barrier. Other studies, involving ventriculo-cisternal perfusion with artificial c.s.f., lent further support to this concept. 131I distribution is some 32% of the brain weight, a figure close to the `chloride-space'. PMID:4355804

  9. Degradation of triclosan in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lu; Sun, Yabing; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Jian; He, Dong

    2016-02-01

    The degradation of triclosan (TCS) in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with activated carbon fibers (ACFs) was investigated. In this study, ACFs and DBD plasma coexisted in a planar DBD plasma reactor, which could synchronously achieve degradation of TCS, modification and in situ regeneration of ACFs, enhancing the effect of recycling of ACFs. The properties of ACFs before and after modification by DBD plasma were characterized by BET and XPS. Various processing parameters affecting the synergetic degradation of TCS were also investigated. The results exhibited excellent synergetic effects in DBD plasma-ACFs system on TCS degradation. The degradation efficiency of 120 mL TCS with initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1) could reach 93% with 1 mm thick ACFs in 18 min at input power of 80 W, compared with 85% by single DBD plasma. Meanwhile, the removal rate of total organic carbon increased from 12% at pH 6.26-24% at pH 3.50. ACFs could ameliorate the degradation efficiency for planar DBD plasma when treating TCS solution at high flow rates or at low initial concentrations. A possible degradation pathway of TCS was investigated according to the detected intermediates, which were identified by liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) combined with theoretical calculation of Gaussian 09 program. PMID:26421625

  10. SEMA4D compromises blood-brain barrier, activates microglia, and inhibits remyelination in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ernest S; Jonason, Alan; Reilly, Christine; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Fisher, Terrence; Doherty, Michael; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Mallow, Crystal; Cornelius, Chad; Leonard, John E; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Pham, Trinh; Seils, Jennifer; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Bowers, William J; John, Gareth; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of CNS, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, localized myelin destruction, and progressive neuronal degeneration. There exists a significant need to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies that effectively and safely disrupt and even reverse disease pathophysiology. Signaling cascades initiated by semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) induce glial activation, neuronal process collapse, inhibit migration and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and disrupt endothelial tight junctions forming the BBB. To target SEMA4D, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognizes mouse, rat, monkey and human SEMA4D with high affinity and blocks interaction between SEMA4D and its cognate receptors. In vitro, anti-SEMA4D reverses the inhibitory effects of recombinant SEMA4D on OPC survival and differentiation. In vivo, anti-SEMA4D significantly attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in multiple rodent models by preserving BBB integrity and axonal myelination and can be shown to promote migration of OPC to the site of lesions and improve myelin status following chemically-induced demyelination. Our study underscores SEMA4D as a key factor in CNS disease and supports the further development of antibody-based inhibition of SEMA4D as a novel therapeutic strategy for MS and other neurologic diseases with evidence of demyelination and/or compromise to the neurovascular unit. PMID:25461192

  11. Parents' Perceived Barriers to Healthful Eating and Physical Activity for Low-Income Adolescents Who Are at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon L.; Bell, Toya Wilson; Hasin, Afroza

    2009-01-01

    Healthful eating and regular physical activity are vitally important for low-income adolescents who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). To design a relevant, community-based intervention for these at risk adolescents, parent perceptions of barriers to healthful eating and physical activity should be assessed. Such barriers have been…

  12. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2015-12-07

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  13. Community Needs and Barriers to Healthy Dietary Intake and Physical Activity in a Native American Reservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: Identify unique cultural needs, priorities, program delivery preferences and barriers to achieving a healthy diet and lifestyle in one Native American community. DESIGN: A novel modified nominal group technique (NGT). SETTING: Four community district’s recreation centers. PARTICIPANTS...

  14. Polymers for subterranean containment barriers for underground storage tanks (USTs). Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.; Colombo, P.; Clinton, J.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) set up the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program (USTID) to demonstrate technologies for the retrieval and treatment of tank waste, and closure of underground storage tanks (USTs). There are more than 250 underground storage tanks throughout the DOE complex. These tanks contain a wide variety of wastes including high level, low level, transuranic, mixed and hazardous wastes. Many of the tanks have performed beyond the designed lifetime resulting in leakage and contamination of the local geologic media and groundwater. To mitigate this problem it has been proposed that an interim subterranean containment barrier be placed around the tanks. This would minimize or prevent future contamination of soil and groundwater in the event that further tank leakages occur before or during remediation. Use of interim subterranean barriers can also provide sufficient time to evaluate and select appropriate remediation alternatives. The DOE Hanford site was chosen as the demonstration site for containment barrier technologies. A panel of experts for the USTID was convened in February, 1992, to identify technologies for placement of subterranean barriers. The selection was based on the ability of candidate grouts to withstand high radiation doses, high temperatures and aggressive tank waste leachates. The group identified and ranked nine grouting technologies that have potential to place vertical barriers and five for horizontal barriers around the tank. The panel also endorsed placement technologies that require minimal excavation of soil surrounding the tanks.

  15. Nucleosome positioning and kinetics near transcription-start-site barriers are controlled by interplay between active remodeling and DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jyotsana J.; Marko, John F.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how DNA sequence, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and nucleosome-depleted ‘barriers’ co-operate to determine the kinetics of nucleosome organization, in a stochastic model of nucleosome positioning and dynamics. We find that ‘statistical’ positioning of nucleosomes against ‘barriers’, hypothesized to control chromatin structure near transcription start sites, requires active remodeling and therefore cannot be described using equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show that, unlike steady-state occupancy, DNA site exposure kinetics near a barrier is dominated by DNA sequence rather than by proximity to the barrier itself. The timescale for formation of positioning patterns near barriers is proportional to the timescale for active nucleosome eviction. We also show that there are strong gene-to-gene variations in nucleosome positioning near barriers, which are eliminated by averaging over many genes. Our results suggest that measurement of nucleosome kinetics can reveal information about sequence-dependent regulation that is not apparent in steady-state nucleosome occupancy. PMID:24068556

  16. Effects of xanthohumol-rich hop extract on the differentiation of preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiyofuji, Ayane; Yui, Kazuki; Takahashi, Koki; Osada, Kyoichi

    2014-01-01

    Xanthohumol is a major prenylated, hydrophobic flavonoid found in the female inflorescences of the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). In this study, we examined the effects of xanthohumol-rich hop extract containing 17.8% xanthohumol and 12.4% isoxanthohumol on the differentiation and adipogenesis of 3T3L1 cells. We observed that the extract inhibited the differentiation of 3T3L1 cells and intracellular fat droplets via the regulation of adipogenic factors such as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha, and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein. PMID:24829131

  17. Perceived Barriers, Facilitators and Benefits for Regular Physical Activity and Exercise in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J C S; Rouse, Peter C; Hale, Elizabeth D; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Metsios, George S; Duda, Joan L; Kitas, George D

    2015-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, which not only affects the joints but can also impact on general well-being and risk for cardiovascular disease. Regular physical activity and exercise in patients with RA have numerous health benefits. Nevertheless, the majority of patients with RA are physically inactive. This indicates that people with RA might experience additional or more severe barriers to physical activity or exercise than the general population. This narrative review provides an overview of perceived barriers, benefits and facilitators of physical activity and exercise in RA. Databases were searched for articles published until September 2014 using the terms 'rheumatoid arthritis', 'physical activity', 'exercise', 'barriers', 'facilitators', 'benefits', 'motivation', 'motivators' and 'enablers'. Similarities were found between disease-specific barriers and benefits of physical activity and exercise, e.g. pain and fatigue are frequently mentioned as barriers, but reductions in pain and fatigue are perceived benefits of physical activity and exercise. Even though exercise does not influence the existence of barriers, physically active patients appear to be more capable of overcoming them. Therefore, exercise programmes should enhance self-efficacy for exercise in order to achieve long-term physical activity and exercise behaviour. Encouragement from health professionals and friends/family are facilitators for physical activity and exercise. There is a need for interventions that support RA patients in overcoming barriers to physical activity and exercise and help sustain this important health behaviour. PMID:26219268

  18. Critical Hamiltonians with long range hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitov, L. S.

    1999-11-01

    Critical states are studied by a real space RG in the problem with strong diagonal disorder and long range power law hopping. The RG ow of the distribution of coupling parameters is characterized by a family of non-trivial fix points. We consider the RG flow of the distribution of participation ratios of eigenstates. Scaling of participation ratios is sensitive to the nature of the RG fix point. For some fix points, scaling of participation ratios is characterized by a distribution of exponents, rather than by a single exponent.The RG method can be generalized to treat certain fermionic Hamiltonians with disorder and long range hopping. We derive the RG for a model of interacting two-level systems. Besides couplings, in this problem the RG includes the density of states. The density of states is renormalized so that it develops a singularity near zero energy.

  19. Long-Term Oral Administration of Hop Flower Extracts Mitigates Alzheimer Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaoka, Norio; Sakamoto, Megumi; Kanemori, Shoko; Kan, Michiru; Tsukano, Chihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Kakizuka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coincident with the expanding population of aged people, the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is rapidly increasing in most advanced countries. At present, no effective prophylactics are available. Among several pathological mechanisms proposed for AD, the “amyloid hypothesis” has been most widely accepted, in which accumulation or deposition of Aβ is considered to be the initial event. Thus, prevention of Aβ production would be an ideal strategy for the treatment or prevention of AD. Aβ is produced via the proteolytic cleavage of its precursor protein, APP (amyloid precursor protein), by two different enzymes, β and γ-secretases. Indeed, inhibitors against either or both enzymes have been developed and tested for clinical efficacy. Based on the “amyloid hypothesis”, we developed a luciferase-based screening method to monitor γ-secretase activity, screened more than 1,600 plant extracts, most of which have long been used in Chinese medicine, and observed that Hop extracts significantly inhibit Aβ production in cultured cells. A major component of the inhibitory activity was purified, and its chemical identity was determined by NMR to be Garcinielliptone HC. In vivo, oral administration of Hop extracts to AD model mice decreased Aβ depositions in the cerebral cortex of the parietal lobe, hippocampus, and artery walls (amyloid angiopathy) in the brains. In a Morris water maze test, AD model mice that had daily consumed Hop extracts in their drinking water showed significant mitigation of memory impairment at ages of 9 and 12 months. Moreover, in the open field test oral administration of Hop extracts also prevented an emotional disturbance that appeared in the AD mice at 18 months. Despite lifelong consumption of Hop extracts, no deleterious side effects were observed at any age. These results support the “amyloid hypothesis”, and indicate that Hop extract is a promising candidate for an effective prophylactic for AD. PMID:24489866

  20. Long-term oral administration of hop flower extracts mitigates Alzheimer phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Norio; Sakamoto, Megumi; Kanemori, Shoko; Kan, Michiru; Tsukano, Chihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Kakizuka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coincident with the expanding population of aged people, the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is rapidly increasing in most advanced countries. At present, no effective prophylactics are available. Among several pathological mechanisms proposed for AD, the "amyloid hypothesis" has been most widely accepted, in which accumulation or deposition of Aβ is considered to be the initial event. Thus, prevention of Aβ production would be an ideal strategy for the treatment or prevention of AD. Aβ is produced via the proteolytic cleavage of its precursor protein, APP (amyloid precursor protein), by two different enzymes, β and γ-secretases. Indeed, inhibitors against either or both enzymes have been developed and tested for clinical efficacy. Based on the "amyloid hypothesis", we developed a luciferase-based screening method to monitor γ-secretase activity, screened more than 1,600 plant extracts, most of which have long been used in Chinese medicine, and observed that Hop extracts significantly inhibit Aβ production in cultured cells. A major component of the inhibitory activity was purified, and its chemical identity was determined by NMR to be Garcinielliptone HC. In vivo, oral administration of Hop extracts to AD model mice decreased Aβ depositions in the cerebral cortex of the parietal lobe, hippocampus, and artery walls (amyloid angiopathy) in the brains. In a Morris water maze test, AD model mice that had daily consumed Hop extracts in their drinking water showed significant mitigation of memory impairment at ages of 9 and 12 months. Moreover, in the open field test oral administration of Hop extracts also prevented an emotional disturbance that appeared in the AD mice at 18 months. Despite lifelong consumption of Hop extracts, no deleterious side effects were observed at any age. These results support the "amyloid hypothesis", and indicate that Hop extract is a promising candidate for an effective prophylactic for AD. PMID:24489866

  1. Hopping conduction range of heavily Al-doped 4H-SiC thick epilayers grown by CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shiyang; Eto, Kazuma; Yoshida, Sadafumi; Kojima, Kazutoshi; Ishida, Yuuki; Saito, Shingo; Tsuchida, Hidekazu; Okumura, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    To outline the hopping conduction range, the electrical characteristics of CVD-grown heavily Al-doped 4H-SiC thick epilayers (2.0 × 1019-4.0 × 1020 cm-3) were investigated in a wide temperature regime (20-900 K). It is found that, below 100 K, hopping conduction dominates the carrier transport for all epilayers, and the corresponding hopping conduction activation energy shows a maximum of ˜30 meV at around 1.1 × 1020 cm-3. With increasing doping level, the temperature dependence of resistivity evolves and finally obeys the ˜1/T1/4 law in the entire temperature regime, which gives direct evidence of variable-range hopping conduction.

  2. Targeted analysis of polyphenol metabolism during development of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) cones following treatment with prohexadione-calcium.

    PubMed

    Kavalier, Adam R; Ma, Chunhui; Figueroa, Mario; Kincaid, Dwight; Matthews, Paul D; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-02-15

    Hops (Humulus lupulus), a main ingredient in beer, are valued as a source of bitter flavour and biologically active polyphenols. We treated immature hop cones with prohexadione-calcium (Pro-Ca), a flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H) inhibitor, to perturb the flavonoid pathway, and conducted a targeted analysis of 29 compounds from the phenolic acid, flavonoid, and terpenophenolic pathways, using photodiode array (UHPLC-PDA), and time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) analysis. Hop cones were analysed over four stages of development spanning 22days following Pro-Ca treatment. The content of terpenophenolics as well as metabolic precursors upstream from F3H significantly increased, and levels of flavonoid products downstream from F3H decreased. The methods developed here serve to compliment flavour analysis of polyphenol rich foods, and our results suggest ways to improve upon traditional agricultural methods to produce hops with altered chemical profiles. PMID:24128475

  3. Effects of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Treatment on Pentachlorophenol Removal of Granular Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Puhui; Qu, Guangzhou; Li, Jie

    2013-10-01

    The pentachlorophenol (PCP) adsorbed granular activated carbon (GAC) was treated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. The effects of DBD plasma on the structure of GAC and PCP decomposition were analyzed by N2 adsorption, thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The experimental data of adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of PCP on GAC were fitted with different kinetics and isotherm models, respectively. The results indicate that the types of N2 adsorption isotherm of GAC are not changed by DBD plasma, while the specific surface area and pore volume increase after DBD plasma treatment. It is found that the weight loss of the saturated GAC is the highest, on the contrary, the weight loss of DBD treated GAC is the least because of reduced PCP residue on the GAC. The XPS spectra and SEM image suggest that some PCP on the GAC is removed by DBD plasma, and the surface of GAC treated by DBD plasma presents irregular and heterogeneous morphology. The GC-MS identification of by-products shows that two main dechlorination intermediate products, tetrachlorophenol and trichlorophenol, are distinguished. The fitting results of experimental data of adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics indicate that the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second order models can be used for the prediction of the kinetics of virgin GAC and DBD treated GAC for PCP adsorption, and the Langmuir isotherm model fits better with the data of adsorption isotherm than the Freundlich isotherm in the adsorption of PCP on virgin GAC and DBD treated GAC.

  4. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. PMID:25179615

  5. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cynthia J; Metz, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. PMID:25179615

  6. An Efficient Next Hop Selection Algorithm for Multi-Hop Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahitafti, Vahid; Ngadi, Md Asri; Mohamad Sharif, Johan bin; Abdullahi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Body Area Networks (BANs) consist of various sensors which gather patient’s vital signs and deliver them to doctors. One of the most significant challenges faced, is the design of an energy-efficient next hop selection algorithm to satisfy Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for different healthcare applications. In this paper, a novel efficient next hop selection algorithm is proposed in multi-hop BANs. This algorithm uses the minimum hop count and a link cost function jointly in each node to choose the best next hop node. The link cost function includes the residual energy, free buffer size, and the link reliability of the neighboring nodes, which is used to balance the energy consumption and to satisfy QoS requirements in terms of end to end delay and reliability. Extensive simulation experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm using the NS-2 simulator. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of energy consumption, number of packets forwarded, end to end delay and packet delivery ratio compared to the existing routing protocol. PMID:26771586

  7. Learning Processes and Social Mobilization in a Swedish Metropolitan Hip-Hop Collective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Dennis; Sernhede, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Based on ethnographic research on the encounter between local culture and schools in multicultural suburban areas, this article explores possibilities suggested by autonomous learning activities in a hip-hop collective that may have a potential to break urban segregation patterns. The collective's artistic production raises questions that have not…

  8. "Folkbildning" through Hip-Hop: How the Ideals of Three Rappers Parallel a Scandinavian Educational Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how the rappers' talk about hip-hop and its connection to pedagogy and social activism parallel the Scandinavian tradition of folkbildning. Scandinavian folkbildning can be seen as a movement to provide voluntary education for the general population. It can also be the name of the process of learning in which…

  9. Musculoskeletal modelling deconstructs the paradoxical effects of elastic ankle exoskeletons on plantar-flexor mechanics and energetics during hopping

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Dominic James; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have shown that elastic ankle exoskeletons can be used to reduce ankle joint and plantar-flexor muscle loading when hopping in place and, in turn, reduce metabolic energy consumption. However, recent experimental work has shown that such exoskeletons cause less favourable soleus (SO) muscle–tendon mechanics than is observed during normal hopping, which might limit the capacity of the exoskeleton to reduce energy consumption. To directly link plantar-flexor mechanics and energy consumption when hopping in exoskeletons, we used a musculoskeletal model of the human leg and a model of muscle energetics in simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics during hopping with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. Simulations were driven by experimental electromyograms, joint kinematics and exoskeleton torque taken from previously published data. The data were from seven males who hopped at 2.5 Hz with and without elastic ankle exoskeletons. The energetics model showed that the total rate of metabolic energy consumption by ankle muscles was not significantly reduced by an ankle exoskeleton. This was despite large reductions in plantar-flexor force production (40–50%). The lack of larger metabolic reductions with exoskeletons was attributed to increases in plantar-flexor muscle fibre velocities and a shift to less favourable muscle fibre lengths during active force production. This limited the capacity for plantar-flexors to reduce activation and energy consumption when hopping with exoskeleton assistance. PMID:25278469

  10. Physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension – insights into motivations and barriers from the MOBILE study

    PubMed Central

    Duclos, Martine; Dejager, Sylvie; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; di Nicola, Sylvie; Quéré, Stéphane; Fiquet, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Although physical activity (PA) is key in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hypertension, it is difficult to implement in practice. Methods Cross-sectional, observational study. Participating physicians were asked to recruit two active and four inactive patients, screened with the Ricci-Gagnon (RG) self-questionnaire (active if score ≥16). Patients subsequently completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The objective was to assess the achievement of individualized glycated hemoglobin and blood pressure goals (<140/90 mmHg) in the active vs inactive cohort, to explore the correlates for meeting both targets by multivariate analysis, and to examine the barriers and motivations to engage in PA. Results About 1,766 patients were analyzed. Active (n=628) vs inactive (n=1,138) patients were more often male, younger, less obese, had shorter durations of diabetes, fewer complications and other health issues, such as osteoarticular disorders (P<0.001 for all). Their diabetes and hypertension control was better and obtained despite a lower treatment burden. The biggest difference in PA between the active vs inactive patients was the percentage who declared engaging in regular leisure-type PA (97.9% vs 9.6%), also reflected in the percentage with vigorous activities in International Physical Activity Questionnaire (59.5% vs 9.6%). Target control was achieved by 33% of active and 19% of inactive patients (P<0.001). Active patients, those with fewer barriers to PA, with lower treatment burden, and with an active physician, were more likely to reach targets. The physician’s role emerged in the motivations (reassurance on health issues, training on hypoglycemia risk, and prescription/monitoring of the PA by the physician). A negative self-image was the highest ranked barrier for the inactive patients, followed by lack of support and medical concerns. Conclusion Physicians should consider PA prescription as seriously as any drug

  11. A cross-sectional study of barriers to physical activity among overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Halali, Faranak; Mahdavi, Reza; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mobasseri, Majid; Namazi, Nazli

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify common barriers to physical activity practice among overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran and their associations with physical activity level. In this cross-sectional study, 146 overweight/obese volunteers with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes clinics in Tabriz, Iran, between July 2012 and March 2013. A Persian version of the long-format International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to assess physical activity level. A 12-item structured questionnaire was designed to assess physical activity barriers. The validity and reliability of the latter scale were assessed by related measures. An exploratory factor analysis with the principal component analysis extraction method and varimax rotation was performed to extract the underlying factors. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between barriers and physical activity level. About 73% of patients had moderate physical activity. Factor analysis yielded four factors as barriers to physical activity including: (i) negative attitude towards physical activity, (ii) discouragement, (iii) physical problems and (iv) cost/environmental factors. These factors explained about 51% of the total variance. There was a negative relationship between the factor 'physical problems' and physical activity level (P = 0.024). Overall, there were some barriers to physical activity. Health counsellors should address these barriers to increase the patients' adherence to physical activity recommendations. Physical conditions of the patients must be taken into account. PMID:26099926

  12. NASA GSFC Science Communication Working Group: Addressing Barriers to Scientist and Engineer Participation in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, L.; Hsu, B. C.; Campbell, B. A.; Hess, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Communication Working Group (SCWG) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been in existence since late 2007. The SCWG is comprised of education and public outreach (E/PO) professionals, public affairs specialists, scientists, and engineers. The goals of the SCWG are to identify barriers to scientist and engineer engagement in E/PO activities and to enable those scientists and engineers who wish to contribute to E/PO to be able to do so. SCWG members have held meetings with scientists and engineers across GSFC to determine barriers to their involvement in E/PO. During these meetings, SCWG members presented examples of successful, ongoing E/PO projects, encouraged active research scientists and engineers to talk about their own E/PO efforts and what worked for them, discussed the E/PO working environment, discussed opportunities for getting involved in E/PO (particularly in high-impact efforts that do not take much time), handed out booklets on effective E/PO, and asked scientists and engineers what they need to engage in E/PO. The identified barriers were consistent among scientists in GSFC's four science divisions (Earth science, planetary science, heliophysics, and astrophysics). Common barriers included 1) lack of time, 2) lack of funding support, 3) lack of value placed on doing E/PO by supervisors, 4) lack of training on doing appropriate/effective E/PO for different audiences, 5) lack of awareness and information about opportunities, 6) lack of understanding of what E/PO really is, and 7) level of effort required to do E/PO. Engineers reported similar issues, but the issues of time and funding support were more pronounced due to their highly structured work day and environment. Since the barriers were identified, the SCWG has taken a number of steps to address and rectify them. Steps have included holding various events to introduce scientists and engineers to E/PO staff and opportunities including an E/PO Open House, brown bag seminars on

  13. Blood-Brain Barrier Penetration and in Vivo Activity of an NGF Conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friden, Phillip M.; Walus, Lee R.; Watson, Patricia; Doctrow, Susan R.; Kozarich, John W.; Backman, Cristina; Bergman, Hanna; Hoffer, Barry; Bloom, Floyd; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    1993-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is essential for the survival of both peripheral ganglion cells and central cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain. The accelerated loss of central cholinergic neurons during Alzheimer's disease may be a determinant of dementia in these patients and may therefore suggest a therapeutic role for NGF. However, NGF does not significantly penetrate the blood-brain barrier, which makes its clinical utility dependent on invasive neurosurgical procedures. When conjugated to an antibody to the transferrin receptor, however, NGF crossed the blood-brain barrier after peripheral injection. This conjugated NGF increased the survival of both cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons of the medial septal nucleus that had been transplanted into the anterior chamber of the rat eye. This approach may prove useful for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders that are amenable to treatment by proteins that do not readily cross the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Barriers to Screening and Possibilities for Active Detection of Family Medicine Attendees Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    KOPČAVAR GUČEK, Nena; PETEK, Davorina; ŠVAB, Igor; SELIČ, Polona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 1996 the World Health Organization declared intimate partner violence (IPV) the most important public health problem. Meta-analyses in 2013 showed every third female globally had been a victim of violence. Experts find screening controversial; family medicine is the preferred environment for identifying victims of violence, but barriers on both sides prevent patients from discussing it with doctors. Methods In July 2014, a qualitative study was performed through semi-structured interviews with ten family doctors of different ages and gender, working in rural or urban environments. Sound recordings of the interviews were transcribed, and the record verified. The data were interpreted using content analysis. A coding scheme was developed and later verified and analysed by two independent researchers. The text of the interviews was analysed according to the coding scheme. Results Two coding schemes were developed: one for screening, and the other for the active detection of IPV. The main themes emerging as barriers to screening were lack of time, staff turnover, inadequate finance, ignorance of a clear definition, poor commitment to screening, obligatory follow-up, risk of deterioration of the doctor-patient relationship, and insincerity on the part of the patient. Additionally, cultural aspects of violence, uncertainty/ helplessness, fear, lack of competence and qualifications, autonomy/negative experience, and passive role/stigma/ fear on the part of the patients were barriers to active detection. Conclusion All the participating doctors had had previous experience with active detection of IPV and were aware of its importance. Due to several barriers to screening for violence they preferred active detection.

  15. Staying physically active after spinal cord injury: a qualitative exploration of barriers and facilitators to exercise participation

    PubMed Central

    Kehn, Matthew; Kroll, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Background While enhancing physical activity has been an essential goal of public health officials, people with physical impairments such as spinal cord injury (SCI) are more likely to live a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise has been shown to decrease the risk for many of the secondary conditions associated with SCI, including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections, diabetes and arthritis, yet this population is rarely a target for health promotion efforts. This paper examines the self-reported exercise experiences of people with SCI using a qualitative-exploratory design. Methods We enrolled 26 individuals with SCI (15 self-described 'exercisers' and 11 'non-exercisers') from a non-random pool of survey responders. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted to record participants' experiences with exercise pre/post injury, barriers and facilitators to being active and perceived health impact. Results Regardless of exercise status, all participants reported physical activity prior to injury and expressed interest in becoming active or maintaining an active lifestyle. Participants identified a range of both motivational and socio-environmental factors that were either facilitating or constraining of such a lifestyle. Non-exercisers identified barriers to exercise, including a perceived low return on physical investment, lack of accessible facilities, unaffordable equipment, no personal assistance and fear of injury. Exercisers identified facilitators, including personal motivation, independence, availability of accessible facilities and personal assistants, fear of health complications, and weight management. Exercisers associated a greater range of specific health benefits with being active than non-exercisers. Conclusion Despite motivation and interest in being exercise active, people with SCI face many obstacles. Removal of barriers coupled with promotion of facilitating factors, is vital for enhancing opportunities for

  16. Hops for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Mobedi, Hamid; Roozbeh, Nasibeh

    2016-08-01

    Menopause is a critical stage of women's life associated with various complaints and distresses. Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flushes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, and fatigue, are the most common menopause symptoms affecting about 50% to 80% of middle-aged women. Obviously, these symptoms, resulting from estrogen deficiency during menopause, can exert negative effects on women's health and quality of life and thus require to be managed through approaches such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Many herbal treatments for menopause symptoms contain and its components such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-PN, isoxanthohumol and xanthohumol. Recent in-vivo studies have highlighted the ability of 8-prenylnaringenin to reduce serum-luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), to increase serum prolactin levels and uterine weight, and to induce vaginal hyperplastic epithelium. Previous research has shown that hops extract can strongly bind to both estrogen receptors, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells, and upregulate presenelin-2 and progesterone receptor mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Numerous clinical trials have documented significant reductions in the frequency of hot flushes following the administration of hop-containing preparations. Nevertheless, further clinical trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted to confirm such benefits. PMID:27617238

  17. Frequency hopping millimeter-wave reflectometry in ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Cupido, L.; Graca, S.; Conway, G. D.; Manso, M.; Serra, F.

    2006-10-15

    Millimeter-wave reflectometers for performing density fluctuations have traditionally used either tunable fixed frequency (heterodyne and homodyne) systems or multichannel fixed frequency arrangements. Only recently novel systems were brought into operation with the ability to hop from one frequency to another over a large bandwidth, during each plasma discharge, while retaining the quality of fixed frequency phase locked sources. The new broadband fast hopping millimeter-wave reflectometer incorporates frequency synthesizers for both plasma signal and local oscillators, and the receivers are heterodyne producing full phase/amplitude outputs. Two identical systems were recently installed in (ASDEX upgrade tokamak - IPP-MPG Germany) covering the Q band (33-50 GHz) and the V band (50-75 GHz). In the present article the system is described and the particular implementation on ASDEX, using monostatic antenna system, is presented showing the possibility of correlation studies in fully optimized antenna scenarios. With both Q and V channels in operation it was possible to devise several operation schemes that are described here and a result showing the radial localization of magnetohydrodynamic activity is also presented.

  18. Hops for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Fatemeh; Mobedi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is a critical stage of women's life associated with various complaints and distresses. Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flushes, night sweats, sleep disturbances, and fatigue, are the most common menopause symptoms affecting about 50% to 80% of middle-aged women. Obviously, these symptoms, resulting from estrogen deficiency during menopause, can exert negative effects on women's health and quality of life and thus require to be managed through approaches such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Many herbal treatments for menopause symptoms contain and its components such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-PN, isoxanthohumol and xanthohumol. Recent in-vivo studies have highlighted the ability of 8-prenylnaringenin to reduce serum-luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), to increase serum prolactin levels and uterine weight, and to induce vaginal hyperplastic epithelium. Previous research has shown that hops extract can strongly bind to both estrogen receptors, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells, and upregulate presenelin-2 and progesterone receptor mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Numerous clinical trials have documented significant reductions in the frequency of hot flushes following the administration of hop-containing preparations. Nevertheless, further clinical trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted to confirm such benefits. PMID:27617238

  19. The molecular structure of hop latent viroid (HLV), a new viroid occurring worldwide in hops.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Ramm, K; Sänger, H L

    1988-01-01

    A new viroid which does not seem to produce any symptoms of disease, and is therefore tentatively named hop latent viroid (HLV) was found to occur worldwide in hops. HLV proved to be infectious when mechanically inoculated onto viroid- and virus-free hops. The viroid nature of HLV was also substantiated by sequence analysis which revealed that HLV is a circular RNA consisting of 256 nucleotides, that can be arranged into the viroid-specific, rod-like secondary structure. HLV also contains the central conserved region typical for most of the presently known viroids. However HLV does not contain the viroid-specific oligo(A) stretch in the upper left part of its rod-like molecule. Because of this feature and a sequence similarity with the prototypes of the other viroid groups below 55%, HLV can be regarded as the first member of a new viroid group. Images PMID:2454454

  20. Crystal structure of the effector protein HopA1 from Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Park, Yangshin; Shin, Inchul; Rhee, Sangkee

    2015-03-01

    Plants have evolved to protect themselves against pathogen attack; in these competitions, many Gram-negative bacteria translocate pathogen-originated proteins known as effectors directly into plant cells to interfere with cellular processes. Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is a plant defense mechanism in which plant resistance proteins recognize the presence of effectors and initiate immune responses. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) in Arabidopsis thaliana serves as a central node protein for basal immune resistance and ETI by interacting dynamically with other immune regulatory or resistance proteins. Recently, the effector HopA1 from Pseudomonas syringae was shown to affect these EDS1 complexes by binding EDS1 directly and activating the immune response signaling pathway. Here, we report the crystal structure of the effector HopA1 from P. syringae pv. syringae strain 61 and tomato strain DC3000. HopA1, a sequence-unrelated protein to EDS1, has an α+β fold in which the central antiparallel β-sheet is flanked by helices. A similar structural domain, an α/β fold, is one of the two domains in both EDS1 and the EDS1-interacting protein SAG101, and plays a crucial role in forming the EDS1 complex. Further analyses suggest structural similarity and differences between HopA1 and the α/β fold of SAG101, as well as between two HopA1s from different pathovars. Our structural analysis provides a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of the effect of HopA1 on plant immunity. PMID:25681297

  1. Extended active space CASSCF/MRSD CI calculations of the barrier height for the reaction O + H2 yields OH + H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1987-01-01

    The convergence of the barrier height for the O + H2 yields OH + H reaction is studied as a function of the size of the active space in the CASSCF calculation and the size of the basis set. The basis set employed in this study is described. The sources of the differences between the POL-CI and MRSD-CI calculations for barrier height are examined. It is observed that the barrier height is rapidly convergent with respect to the expansion of the active space. The effects of adding active orbitals on the barrier height are investigated. The barrier height estimated from corrected MRSD-CI data is 12.4 kcal/mol.

  2. Electronic Nature of Step-edge Barriers Against Adatom Descent on Transition-metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yina; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    The activation barriers against adatom migration on terraces and across steps play an essential role in determining the growth morphology of surfaces, interfaces, and thin lms. By studying a series of adatoms on representative transition metal surfaces through extensive rst-principles calculations, we establish a clear correlation between the preferred mechanism and activation energy for adatom descent at a step and the relative degree of electronic shell lling between the adatom and the substrate. We also nd an approximate linear relation between the adatom hopping barriers at step edges and the adatom-surface bonding strength. These results may serve as simple guiding rules for predicting the precise atomic nature of surface morphologies in heteroepitaxial growth such as nanowires.

  3. Optimization of the configuration of a symmetric three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.

    2011-03-15

    On the basis of a model of rectangular potentials and different electron effective masses in wells and barriers of an open resonant-tunneling structure with identical outer barriers, a theory has been developed and the dynamic conductance caused by the interaction of the electromagnetic field with electrons passing through the structure has been calculated. Using the example of the three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As wells and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers, it is shown that, independently of the geometrical sizes of potential wells and barriers, there exist three geometrical configurations (positions of the inner barrier with respect to outer ones) at which the nanosystem, as an active element, provides optimum operating conditions of the quantum cascade detector.

  4. Antimicrobial Activities and Water Vapor Barrier of Starch-Lipid Based Edible Coatings on Fresh Produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The uses of edible antimicrobial films or coatings have been proven to be a novel way of suppressing pathogen contaminations of fresh foods where physical barriers alone aren’t enough. In the present study, we embedded essential oils into a proprietary starch-lipids composite, called Fantesk, to in...

  5. Barriers to Application of E-Learning in Training Activities of SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Randy J.; Wielicki, Tomasz; Anderson, Lydia E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the on-going study of Small and Mid-Size Enterprises (SMEs) in the Central California concerning their use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). This research project analyzed data from a sample of 161 SMEs. Specifically, this part of the study is investigating the major barriers to applications of e-learning…

  6. College and University Waste Reduction and Recycled Product Procurement Activities, Barriers, and Assistance Strategies: Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    In response to an official request for information and evaluation of solid waste production and management at California's public colleges and universities, this study examined existing conditions and barriers to solid waste reduction and recycled product procurement, and suggested assistance strategies. The examination found that these…

  7. Using Rasch modeling to re-evaluate three scales related to physical activity: enjoyment, perceived benefits and perceived barriers.

    PubMed

    Heesch, K C; Mâsse, L C; Dunn, A L

    2006-12-01

    Studies suggest that enjoyment, perceived benefits and perceived barriers may be important mediators of physical activity. However, the psychometric properties of these scales have not been assessed using Rasch modeling. The purpose of this study was to use Rasch modeling to evaluate the properties of three scales commonly used in physical activity studies: the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale, the Benefits of Physical Activity Scale and the Barriers to Physical Activity Scale. The scales were administered to 378 healthy adults, aged 25-75 years (50% women, 62% Whites), at the baseline assessment for a lifestyle physical activity intervention trial. The ConQuest software was used to assess model fit, item difficulty, item functioning and standard error of measurement. For all scales, the partial credit model fit the data. Item content of one scale did not adequately cover all respondents. Response options of each scale were not targeting respondents appropriately, and standard error of measurement varied across the total score continuum of each scale. These findings indicate that each scale's effectiveness at detecting differences among individuals may be limited unless changes in scale content and response format are made. PMID:16849389

  8. Rethinking Pedagogy in Urban Spaces: Implementing Hip-Hop Pedagogy in the Urban Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Emdin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research regarding Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) fails to provide insight on how to incorporate elements of Hip-Hop into daily teaching practices; rather Hip-Hop based educators focus mainly on incorporating Hip-Hop culture into curricula. This study explores the benefits of using two specific Hip-Hop pedagogical practices…

  9. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    westward sediment transport by alongshore currents, and Cat Island is being reshaped as it adjusts to post-formation changes in wave and current patterns associated with deposition of the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi delta. The principal causes of barrier island land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a deficit in the sediment budget. The only factor that has a historical trend that coincides with the progressive increase in rates of land loss is the progressive reduction in sand supply associated with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. Neither rates of relative sea level rise nor storm parameters have long-term historical rends that match the increased rates of land loss since the mid 1800s. The historical rates of relative sea level rise in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been relatively constant and storm frequencies and intensities occur in multidecal cycles. However, the most recent land loss accelerations likely related to the increased storm activity since 1995. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is clear that the barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate without a reversal in trend of at least one of the causal factors. The reduction in sand supply related to disruption of the alongshore sediment transport system is the only factor contributing to land loss that can be managed directly. This can be accomplished by placing dredged material so that the adjacent barrier island shores revive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  10. Acute modulations in permeability barrier function regulate epidermal cornification: role of caspase-14 and the protease-activated receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2(-/-) mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14(-/-) mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  11. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  12. Communication: Optimal parameters for basin-hopping global optimization based on Tsallis statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. Wales, D. J.

    2014-08-21

    A fundamental problem associated with global optimization is the large free energy barrier for the corresponding solid-solid phase transitions for systems with multi-funnel energy landscapes. To address this issue we consider the Tsallis weight instead of the Boltzmann weight to define the acceptance ratio for basin-hopping global optimization. Benchmarks for atomic clusters show that using the optimal Tsallis weight can improve the efficiency by roughly a factor of two. We present a theory that connects the optimal parameters for the Tsallis weighting, and demonstrate that the predictions are verified for each of the test cases.

  13. "My hair or my health:" Overcoming barriers to physical activity in African American women with a focus on hairstyle-related factors.

    PubMed

    Huebschmann, Amy G; Campbell, Lucille Johnson; Brown, Candace S; Dunn, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity disparities among African American (AA) women may be related to sociocultural barriers, including difficulties with restyling hair after exercise. We sought to identify physical activity barriers and facilitators in AA women with a focus on sociocultural factors related to hairstyle maintenance. Participants (n = 51) were AA women aged 19-73 years who completed valid surveys and participated in structured focus groups, stratified by age and physical activity levels, from November 2012 to February 2013. The Constant Comparison method was used to develop qualitative themes for barriers and facilitators. The most frequently reported general physical activity barrier among exercisers was "lack of money" (27%) and among non-exercisers was "lack of self-discipline" (57%). A hairstyle-related barrier of "sweating out my hairstyle" was reported by 7% of exercisers and 29% of non-exercisers. This hairstyle-related barrier included the need for extra time and money to restyle hair due to perspiration. Hairstyle-related facilitators included: prioritizing health over hairstyle and high self-efficacy to restyle hair after perspiration. Participants were interested in resources to simplify hairstyle maintenance. AA women whose hairstyle is affected by perspiration may avoid physical activity due to time and financial burdens. Increasing self-efficacy to restyle hair after perspiration may help to overcome this barrier. PMID:26495938

  14. Diabetes Causes Bone Marrow Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Activation of the RhoA–Rho-Associated Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Katare, Rajesh; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Meloni, Marco; Reni, Carlotta; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus causes bone marrow (BM) microangiopathy. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for BM endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results The analysis of differentially expressed transcripts in BM endothelial cells (BMECs) from type-1 diabetic and nondiabetic mice showed an effect of diabetes mellitus on signaling pathways controlling cell death, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Type-1 diabetic-BMECs displayed high reactive oxygen species levels, increased expression and activity of RhoA and its associated protein kinases Rho-associated kinase 1/Rho-associated kinase 2, and reduced Akt phosphorylation/activity. Likewise, diabetes mellitus impaired Akt-related BMEC functions, such as migration, network formation, and angiocrine factor-releasing activity, and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, high glucose disrupted BMEC contacts through Src tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin. These alterations were prevented by constitutively active Akt (myristoylated Akt), Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and Src inhibitors. Insulin replacement restored BMEC abundance, as assessed by flow cytometry analysis of the endothelial marker MECA32, and endothelial barrier function in BM of type-1 diabetic mice. Conclusion Redox-dependent activation of RhoA/Rho-associated kinase and Src/vascular endothelial cadherin signaling pathways, together with Akt inactivation, contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic BM. Metabolic control is crucial for maintenance of endothelial cell homeostasis and endothelial barrier function in BM of diabetic mice. PMID:23307872

  15. Microglial activation and increased synthesis of complement component C1q precedes blood-brain barrier dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Nicholas J; Willis, Colin L; Nolan, Christopher C; Roscher, Silke; Fowler, Maxine J; Weihe, Eberhard; Ray, David E; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2004-01-01

    A reliable way to visualise the state of microglial activation is to monitor the microglial gene expression profile. Microglia are the only CNS resident cells that synthesise C1q, the recognition sub-component of the classical complement pathway, in vivo. C1q biosynthesis in resting ramified microglia is often low, but it increases dramatically in activated microglia. In this study, the expression of C1q was used to monitor microglial activation at all stages of 3-chloropropanediol-induced neurotoxicity, a new model of blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. In rats, 3-chloropropanediol produces very focused lesions in the brain, characterised by early astrocyte swelling and loss, followed by neuronal death and barrier dysfunction. Using in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR, we found that increased C1q biosynthesis and microglial activation precede BBB dysfunction by at least 18 and peak 48 h after injection of 3-chloropropanediol, which coincides with the onset of active haemorrhage. Microglial activation is biphasic; an early phase of global activation is followed by a later phase in which microglial activation becomes increasingly focused in the lesions. During the early phase, expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-1beta (IL1beta), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and early growth response-1 (Egr-1) increased in parallel with C1q, but was restricted to the lesions. Expression of C1q (but not IL1beta, TNFalpha or Egr-1) remains high after BBB function is restored, and is accompanied by late up-regulation of the C1q-associated serine proteases, C1r and C1s, suggesting that microglial biosynthesis of the activation complex of the classical pathway may support the removal of cell debris by activation of complement. PMID:14644096

  16. A gene in the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Hrp pathogenicity island conserved effector locus, hopPtoA1, contributes to efficient formation of bacterial colonies in planta and is duplicated elsewhere in the genome.

    PubMed

    Badel, J L; Charkowski, A O; Deng, W L; Collmer, A

    2002-10-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas syringae to grow in planta is thought to be dependent upon the Hrp (type III secretion) system and multiple effector proteins that this system injects into plant cells. ORF5 in the conserved effector locus of the P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 Hrp pathogenicity island was shown to encode a Hrp-secreted protein and to have a similarly secreted homolog encoded in an effector-rich pathogenicity island located elsewhere in the genome. These putative effector genes were designated hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2, respectively. DNA gel blot analysis revealed that sequences hybridizing with hopPtoA1 were widespread among P. syringae pathovars, and some strains, like DC3000, appear to have two copies of the gene. uidA transcriptional fusions revealed that expression of hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2 can be activated by the HrpL alternative sigma factor. hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA1/hopPtoA2 double mutants were not obviously different from wild-type P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in their ability to produce symptoms or to increase their total population size in host tomato and Arabidopsis leaves. However, confocal laser-scanning microscopy of GFP (green fluorescent protein)-labeled bacteria in Arabidopsis leaves 2 days after inoculation revealed that the frequency of undeveloped individual colonies was higher in the hopPtoA1 mutant and even higher in the hopPtoA1/hopPtoA2 double mutant. These results suggest that hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2 contribute redundantly to the formation of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 colonies in Arabidopsis leaves. PMID:12437299

  17. The Pseudomonas syringae Effector HopQ1 Promotes Bacterial Virulence and Interacts with Tomato 14-3-3 Proteins in a Phosphorylation-Dependent Manner1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yadeta, Koste A.; Elmore, James Mitch; Coaker, Gitta

    2013-01-01

    A key virulence strategy of bacterial pathogens is the delivery of multiple pathogen effector proteins into host cells during infection. The Hrp outer protein Q (HopQ1) effector from Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pto) strain DC3000 is conserved across multiple bacterial plant pathogens. Here, we investigated the virulence function and host targets of HopQ1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Transgenic tomato lines expressing dexamethasone-inducible HopQ1 exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility to virulent Pto DC3000, the Pto ΔhrcC mutant, and decreased expression of a pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered marker gene after bacterial inoculation. HopQ1-interacting proteins were coimmunoprecipitated and identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 can associate with multiple tomato 14-3-3 proteins, including TFT1 and TFT5. HopQ1 is phosphorylated in tomato, and four phosphorylated peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. HopQ1 possesses a conserved mode I 14-3-3 binding motif whose serine-51 residue is phosphorylated in tomato and regulates its association with TFT1 and TFT5. Confocal microscopy and fractionation reveal that HopQ1 exhibits nucleocytoplasmic localization, while HopQ1 dephosphorylation mimics exhibit more pronounced nuclear localization. HopQ1 delivered from Pto DC3000 was found to promote bacterial virulence in the tomato genotype Rio Grande 76R. However, the HopQ1(S51A) mutant delivered from Pto DC3000 was unable to promote pathogen virulence. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HopQ1 enhances bacterial virulence and associates with tomato 14-3-3 proteins in a phosphorylation-dependent manner that influences HopQ1’s subcellular localization and virulence-promoting activities in planta. PMID:23417089

  18. Hip-Hop Is the Healer: Sense of Belonging and Diversity among Hip-Hop Collegians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, V. Thandi

    2016-01-01

    Sense of belonging is recognized as a factor contributing to persistence to graduation. Furthermore, interactional diversity is associated with learning and civic outcomes--touted higher education goals. Hip-hop culture, one of the most influential cultural creations of the mid-20th century, has succeeded in attracting devotees from diverse…

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Prenylated Hop Phenols in Women Following Oral Administration of a Standardized Extract of Hops

    PubMed Central

    van Breemen, Richard B.; Yuan, Yang; Banuvar, Suzanne; Shulman, Lee P.; Qiu, Xi; Alvarenga, René F. Ramos; Chen, Shao-Nong; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Krause, Elizabeth; Viana, Marlos; Nikolic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE Women seeking alternatives to hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms often try botanical dietary supplements containing extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus L.). Hops contain 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), a potent phytoestrogen, the related flavanones 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN) and isoxanthohumol (IX), and the prenylated chalcone xanthohumol (XN). METHODS AND RESULTS After chemically and biologically standardizing an extract of spent hops to these marker compounds, an escalating dose study was carried out in menopausal women to evaluate safety and pharmacokinetics. 8-PN, 6-PN, IX, and XN, sex hormones, and prothrombin time (PT/INR) were determined in blood samples and/or 24-h urine samples. There was no effect on sex hormones or blood clotting. The maximum serum concentrations of the prenylated phenols were dose-dependent and were reached from 2 to 7 h, indicating slow absorption. The marker compounds formed glucuronides that were found in serum and urine. Secondary peaks at 5 h in the serum concentration-time curves indicated enterohepatic recirculation. The serum concentration-time curves indicated demethylation of IX to form 8-PN and cyclization of XN to IX. Slow absorption and enterohepatic recirculation contributed to half-lives exceeding 20 h. CONCLUSION This human study indicated long half-lives of the estrogenic and proestrogenic prenylated phenols in hops but no acute toxicity. PMID:25045111

  20. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mazo, J J; Fajardo, O Y; Zueco, D

    2013-03-14

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γF[over dot] as the relevant parameter at high damping. PMID:23514463

  1. Thermal activation at moderate-to-high and high damping: Finite barrier effects and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazo, J. J.; Fajardo, O. Y.; Zueco, D.

    2013-03-01

    We study the thermal escape problem in the moderate-to-high and high damping regime of a system with a parabolic barrier. We present a formula that matches our numerical results accounting for finite barrier effects, and compare it with previous works. We also show results for the full damping range. We quantitatively study some aspects on the relation between mean first passage time and the definition of an escape rate. To finish, we apply our results and considerations in the framework of force spectroscopy problems. We study the differences on the predictions using the different theories and discuss the role of γ dot{F} as the relevant parameter at high damping.

  2. Physical activity levels and perceived benefits and barriers to physical activity in HIV-infected women living in the deep south of the United States.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Kristina E; Konkle-Parker, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Engaging in regular physical activity (PA) is important in maintaining health and increasing the overall quality of life of people living with HIV (PLWH). The deep south of the USA is known for its high rate of sedentary behavior although data on the activity levels and perceptions of the benefits and barriers to exercise in women living with HIV in the deep south are lacking. Understanding the perceived benefits and barriers to exercise can guide the development of PA interventions. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the PA levels and perceived benefits and barriers to exercise associated with both age and depression level in a group of HIV+ women living in the deep south. We recruited a total of 50 participants from a cohort site for the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and benefits/barriers to exercise were measured using the Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale (EBBS). We measured PA both subjectively and objectively using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and a Fitbit PA monitor, respectively. Our sample was predominantly African-American (96%) and the mean ±SD age, body mass index, and CES-D score were 42 ± 8.8 years, 36.6 ± 11.5 kg/m(2), and 15.6 ± 11.4, respectively. Both subjective and objective measures of PA indicated that our participants were sedentary. The greatest perceived benefit to exercise was physical performance and the greatest barrier to exercise was physical exertion. Higher overall perceived benefits were reported by women ≥43 years and women reporting higher levels of depression. There was no difference in overall barriers associated with age and depression level, but women with depression felt more fatigued by exercise. The results of this study can be helpful when designing and implementing PA interventions in women living with HIV in the deep south. PMID:27023306

  3. Dynamic control of muscle stiffness and H reflex modulation during hopping and jumping in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Simonsen, E B; Voigt, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional effects of reflexes on muscle mechanics during natural voluntary movements. The excitability of the H (Hoffmann) reflex was used as a measure of the excitability of the central component of the stretch reflex. 2. We recorded EMG, ground reaction forces and the H reflex in the soleus muscle in humans while landing from a downward jump, during drop jumping and during hopping. The movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. 3. The EMG pattern was adapted to the motor task. When landing the EMG in the soleus muscle and in the anterior tibial muscle showed preinnervation and alternating activity after touch down. When hopping there was little preinnervation in the soleus muscle, and the activity was initiated about 45 ms after touch down by a peak and continued unbroken until lift off. In the drop jumps the EMG pattern depended on the jumping style used by the subject. 4. The H reflex in the soleus muscle was strongly modulated in a manner appropriate to the requirements of the motor task. During landing from a downward jump the H reflex was low at touch down whereas while hopping it was high at touch down. During drop jumping it was variable and influenced by the jumping technique. 5. Muscle stiffness in the ankle joint was negative after touch down when landing, but always positive when hopping. 6. It is suggested that during landing the alternating EMG pattern after touch down was programmed and little influenced by reflexes. During hopping reflexes could contribute to the initial peak and the EMG during lift off. 7. The programmed EMG activity and the suppression of the H reflex while landing probably contribute to the development of the negative stiffness and change the muscles from a spring to a damping unit. PMID:1890636

  4. A preliminary analysis of barriers, intentions, and attitudes towards moderate physical activity in women who are overweight.

    PubMed

    Jewson, Elizabeth; Spittle, Michael; Casey, Meghan

    2008-11-01

    Physical activity is important for the health of all individuals, however, the determinants of physical activity behaviour for women who are overweight remain largely unexplored. The purpose of this investigation was to explore a range of factors that influence participation in physical activity for a group of women who are overweight. Participants were 30 women, aged 25-71 years, with a mean age of 46.8 years (+12.95) and an average BMI of 31.2kg/m(2) (+5.6). Self-reported level of physical activity, perceived barriers and facilitators of physical activity, attitudes, intentions and perceived behavioural control to physical activity were measured. Seventeen participants were generally active, with self-reported moderate physical activity of 218.53min (+/-113.82) in the last 7 days; whereas 13 participants were reportedly less active 43.46 (+/-42.98)min. Active participants were more likely to identify social reasons for participating in physical activity, while inactive participants perceived that their laziness prevented them from being physically active. There were no significant differences between active and inactive overweight women for attitude, intention or subjective norm for moderate-intensity physical activity. There was a significant difference between these women in perceived behavioural control (p=.014) for moderate-intensity physical activity, as women who felt more in control of their physical activity behaviour were more likely to engage in physical activity than inactive women. Future research should investigate interventions to increase behavioural control of moderate-intensity physical activity in women who are overweight. PMID:17884730

  5. Amniotic Fluid Activates the Nrf2/Keap1 Pathway to Repair an Epidermal Barrier Defect In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Aaron J.; Dai, Daisy; Morasso, Maria; Schmidt, Edward E.; Schäfer, Matthias; Werner, Sabine; Roop, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The loss of loricrin, a major component of the cornified envelope, results in a delay of epidermal barrier formation. Therefore, the living layers of the epidermis are aberrantly exposed to late-stage amniotic fluid, which may serve as the signal to upregulate genes that functionally compensate for the loss of loricrin. Consistent with this hypothesis, metabolomic studies revealed marked changes in amniotic fluid between E14.5 and E16.5 days postcoitum. In addition, we discovered that the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway detects these compositional changes and directly upregulates the expression of genes involved in the compensatory response, thus ensuring postnatal survival. In support of this finding, we demonstrate that genetically blocking the Nrf2 pathway abolishes the compensatory response and that preemptively activating Nrf2 pharmacologically rescues the delay in barrier formation in utero. Our findings reveal that the functions of Nrf2 and the composition of amniotic fluid have coevolved to ensure the formation of a functional barrier. PMID:23237955

  6. Focal MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at the blood-brain barrier promotes chemokine-induced leukocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Wu, Chuan; Korpos, Eva; Zhang, Xueli; Agrawal, Smriti M; Wang, Ying; Faber, Cornelius; Schäfers, Michael; Körner, Heinrich; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Hallmann, Rupert; Sorokin, Lydia

    2015-02-24

    Although chemokines are sufficient for chemotaxis of various cells, increasing evidence exists for their fine-tuning by selective proteolytic processing. Using a model of immune cell chemotaxis into the CNS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) that permits precise localization of immigrating leukocytes at the blood-brain barrier, we show that, whereas chemokines are required for leukocyte migration into the CNS, additional MMP-2/9 activities specifically at the border of the CNS parenchyma strongly enhance this transmigration process. Cytokines derived from infiltrating leukocytes regulate MMP-2/9 activity at the parenchymal border, which in turn promotes astrocyte secretion of chemokines and differentially modulates the activity of different chemokines at the CNS border, thereby promoting leukocyte migration out of the cuff. Hence, cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine-induced MMP-2/9 activity specifically at the inflammatory border collectively act to accelerate leukocyte chemotaxis across the parenchymal border. PMID:25704809

  7. Collision-based mechanics of bipedal hopping.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Anne K; Lee, David V; McGowan, Craig P

    2013-08-23

    The muscle work required to sustain steady-speed locomotion depends largely upon the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass and the degree to which this energy can be stored and returned elastically. Previous studies have found that large bipedal hoppers can elastically store and return a large fraction of the energy required to hop, whereas small bipedal hoppers can only elastically store and return a relatively small fraction. Here, we consider the extent to which large and small bipedal hoppers (tammar wallabies, approx. 7 kg, and desert kangaroo rats, approx. 0.1 kg) reduce the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass by reducing collisions. We hypothesize that kangaroo rats will reduce collisions to a greater extent than wallabies since kangaroo rats cannot elastically store and return as high a fraction of the mechanical energy of hopping as wallabies. We find that kangaroo rats use a significantly smaller collision angle than wallabies by employing ground reaction force vectors that are more vertical and center of mass velocity vectors that are more horizontal and thereby reduce their mechanical cost of transport. A collision-based approach paired with tendon morphometry may reveal this effect more generally among bipedal runners and quadrupedal trotters. PMID:23843217

  8. Hopping and the Stokes-Einstein relation breakdown in simple glass formers.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Jin, Yuliang; Parisi, Giorgio; Zamponi, Francesco

    2014-10-21

    One of the most actively debated issues in the study of the glass transition is whether a mean-field description is a reasonable starting point for understanding experimental glass formers. Although the mean-field theory of the glass transition--like that of other statistical systems--is exact when the spatial dimension d → ∞, the evolution of systems properties with d may not be smooth. Finite-dimensional effects could dramatically change what happens in physical dimensions,d = 2, 3. For standard phase transitions finite-dimensional effects are typically captured by renormalization group methods, but for glasses the corrections are much more subtle and only partially understood. Here, we investigate hopping between localized cages formed by neighboring particles in a model that allows to cleanly isolate that effect. By bringing together results from replica theory, cavity reconstruction, void percolation, and molecular dynamics, we obtain insights into how hopping induces a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation and modifies the mean-field scenario in experimental systems. Although hopping is found to supersede the dynamical glass transition, it nonetheless leaves a sizable part of the critical regime untouched. By providing a constructive framework for identifying and quantifying the role of hopping, we thus take an important step toward describing dynamic facilitation in the framework of the mean-field theory of glasses. PMID:25288722

  9. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  10. Understanding hopping transport and thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihnatsenka, S.; Crispin, X.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the conductivity σ and the Seebeck coefficient S for the phonon-assisted hopping transport in conducting polymers poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) or PEDOT, experimentally studied by Bubnova et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 16456 (2012)], 10.1021/ja305188r. We use the Monte Carlo technique as well as the semianalytical approach based on the transport energy concept. We demonstrate that both approaches show a good qualitative agreement for the concentration dependence of σ and S . At the same time, we find that the semianalytical approach is not in a position to describe the temperature dependence of the conductivity. We find that both Gaussian and exponential density of states (DOS) reproduce rather well the experimental data for the concentration dependence of σ and S giving similar fitting parameters of the theory. The obtained parameters correspond to a hopping model of localized quasiparticles extending over 2-3 monomer units with typical jumps over a distance of 3-4 units. The energetic disorder (broadening of the DOS) is estimated to be 0.1 eV. Using the Monte Carlo calculation we reproduce the activation behavior of the conductivity with the calculated activation energy close to the experimentally observed one. We find that for a low carrier concentration a number of free carriers contributing to the transport deviates strongly from the measured oxidation level. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. We also study the effect of the dimensionality on the charge transport by calculating the Seebeck coefficient and the conductivity for the cases of three-, two-, and one-dimensional motion.

  11. Chicano Hip-Hop as Interethnic Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Pancho

    2008-01-01

    The critical study of rap music and hip-hop culture has the potential to expand Americans understanding of race and culture in the United States. Hip-hop culture as a multiracial, multiethnic phenomenon reveals the ways in which race relations over the past thirty years have become increasingly complex. The theories and concepts that they use to…

  12. Hip-Hop, the "Obama Effect," and Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher; Lee, Okhee

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: With the ever increasing diversity of schools, and the persistent need to develop teaching strategies for the students who attend today's urban schools, hip-hop culture has been proposed to be a means through which urban youth can find success in school. As a result, studies of the role of hip-hop in urban education have grown…

  13. Hip Hop as Empowerment: Voices in El Alto, Bolivia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarifa, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    In response to neoliberal policies that have been in place since 1985, Bolivian young people have increasingly used hip hop music as a means of protest and to reclaim social and political participation. Hip hop in Latin America tells the story of the struggles that marginalized people have suffered, and speaks to the effects of international…

  14. Towards a Pedagogy of Hip Hop in Urban Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Thurman

    2011-01-01

    This article draws from a qualitative study often Black male K-12 teachers from the Hip Hop Generation who are closely connected to Hip Hop culture and have been effective in addressing the academic and social needs of Black boys. Through an analysis of their social, educational and cultural experiences, this article highlights three organizing…

  15. Hip Hop Is Now: An Evolving Youth Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carl; Taylor, Virgil

    2007-01-01

    Emerging from Rap music, Hip Hop has become a lifestyle to many modern youth around the world. Embodying both creativity and controversy, Hip Hop mirrors the values, violence, and hypocrisy of modern culture. The authors dispel some of the simplistic views that surround this evolving youth movement embraced by millions of young people who are…

  16. Framing and Reviewing Hip-Hop Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop has become relevant to the field of education because of its implications for understanding language, learning, identity, curriculum, and other areas. This integrative review provides historical context and cohesion for the burgeoning and discursive body of hip-hop scholarship by framing it according to three heuristic categories and…

  17. Christian Hip Hop as Pedagogy: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with creators of Christian hip hop music in South Africa, this article demonstrates that this genre of popular music and youth culture is utilised as a form of pedagogy to transmit religious beliefs and values to contemporary youth. The pedagogical aspects of hip hop have been recognised in research on the topic, but the…

  18. Toward Hip-Hop Pedagogies for Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Music education scholarship in the areas of popular, vernacular, and participatory musicianship has grown in the past decades; however, music education research concerned specifically with hip-hop has been relatively scarce. Because hip-hop music can differ tremendously from the traditional western genres with which many music educators are most…

  19. Hop powdery mildew control through alteration of spring pruning practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1997, Podosphaera macularis, the causal agent of hop powdery mildew, has become a recurrent threat to hops in the Pacific Northwest because of the potential to reduce cone yield and quality. Disease management practices often involve preventative fungicide applications, but alternative approac...

  20. Framing Hip Hop: New Methodologies for New Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the central impulse behind early advocacy for ethnographic approaches to hip hop--that critics should try as much as possible to limit their own certainties around what hip hop can and might mean. While ethnographic approaches can engender the kinds of personal dislocations that allow for this negotiation, they do not…

  1. Optimum Detection Of Slow-Frequency-Hopping Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Barry K.; Cheng, Unjeng

    1994-01-01

    Two papers present theoretical analyses of various schemes for coherent and noncoherent detection of M-ary-frequency-shift-keyed (MFSK) signals with slow frequency hopping. Special attention focused on continuous-phase-modulation (CPM) subset of SFH/MFSK signals, for which frequency modulation such carrier phase remains continuous (albeit unknown) during each hop.

  2. Validation and divergence of the activation energy barrier crossing transition at the AOT/lecithin reverse micellar interface.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, S Shankara; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Sarkar, Rupa; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2008-03-13

    In this report, the validity and divergence of the activation energy barrier crossing model for the bound to free type water transition at the interface of the AOT/lecithin mixed reverse micelle (RM) has been investigated for the first time in a wide range of temperatures by time-resolved solvation of fluorophores. Here, picosecond-resolved solvation dynamics of two fluorescent probes, ANS (1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonic acid, ammonium salt) and Coumarin 500 (C-500), in the mixed RM have been carefully examined at 293, 313, 328, and 343 K. Using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique, the size of the mixed RMs at different temperatures was found to have an insignificant change. The solvation process at the reverse micellar interface has been found to be the activation energy barrier crossing type, in which interface-bound type water molecules get converted into free type water molecules. The activation energies, Ea, calculated for ANS and C-500 are 7.4 and 3.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively, which are in good agreement with that obtained by molecular dynamics simulation studies. However, deviation from the regular Arrhenius type behavior was observed for ANS around 343 K, which has been attributed to the spatial heterogeneity of the probe environments. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of the probes has indicated the existence of the dyes in a range of locations in RM. With the increase in temperature, the overall anisotropy decay becomes faster revealing the lability of the microenvironment at elevated temperatures. PMID:18281975

  3. Increased skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate in mice expressing a constitutively active STAT6 in T cells.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Sonia C; Sahu, Ravi P; Konger, Raymond L; Perkins, Susan M; Kaplan, Mark H; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that the ability of Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin-4 (IL-4) to regulate skin barrier function may be a predisposing factor for AD development. The present studies examined the ability of increased Th2 activity to affect cutaneous barrier function in vivo and epidermal thickening. Mice that express a constitutively active Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6VT) have increased Th2 cells and a predisposition to allergic inflammation were used in these studies, they demonstrate that topical treatment with the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) caused increased transepidermal water loss and epidermal thickening in STAT6VT mice over similarly treated wild-type mice. The proliferation marker Ki-67 was increased in the epidermis of STAT6VT compared to the wild-type mice. However, these differences do not appear to be linked to the addition of an irritant as control-treated STAT6VT skin also exhibited elevated Ki-67 levels, suggesting that the increased epidermal thickness in SLS-treated STAT6VT mice is primarily driven by epidermal cell hypertrophy rather than an increase in cellular proliferation. Our results suggest that an environment with increased Th2 cytokines results in abnormal responses to topical irritants. PMID:21959772

  4. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers.

    PubMed

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O; Breslin, Jerome W

    2015-07-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:25948734

  5. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:25948734

  6. Homeobox Protein Hop Functions in the Adult Cardiac Conduction System

    PubMed Central

    Ismat, Fraz A.; Zhang, Maozhen; Kook, Hyun; Huang, Bin; Zhou, Rong; Ferrari, Victor A.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2006-01-01

    Hop is an unusual homeobox gene expressed in the embryonic and adult heart. Hop acts downstream of Nkx2–5 during development, and Nkx2–5 mutations are associated with cardiac conduction system (CCS) defects. Inactivation of Hop in the mouse is lethal in half of the expected null embryos. Here, we show that Hop is expressed strongly in the adult CCS. Hop−/− adult mice display conduction defects below the atrioventricular node (AVN) as determined by invasive electrophysiological testing. These defects are associated with decreased expression of connexin40. Our results suggest that Hop functions in the adult CCS and demonstrate conservation of molecular hierarchies between embryonic myocardium and the specialized conduction tissue of the mature heart. PMID:15790958

  7. Calculating Transition Energy Barriers and Characterizing Activation States for Steps of Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ryham, Rolf J; Klotz, Thomas S; Yao, Lihan; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-03-01

    We use continuum mechanics to calculate an entire least energy pathway of membrane fusion, from stalk formation, to pore creation, and through fusion pore enlargement. The model assumes that each structure in the pathway is axially symmetric. The static continuum stalk structure agrees quantitatively with experimental stalk architecture. Calculations show that in a stalk, the distal monolayer is stretched and the stored stretching energy is significantly less than the tilt energy of an unstretched distal monolayer. The string method is used to determine the energy of the transition barriers that separate intermediate states and the dynamics of two bilayers as they pass through them. Hemifusion requires a small amount of energy independently of lipid composition, while direct transition from a stalk to a fusion pore without a hemifusion intermediate is highly improbable. Hemifusion diaphragm expansion is spontaneous for distal monolayers containing at least two lipid components, given sufficiently negative diaphragm spontaneous curvature. Conversely, diaphragms formed from single-component distal monolayers do not expand without the continual injection of energy. We identify a diaphragm radius, below which central pore expansion is spontaneous. For larger diaphragms, prior studies have shown that pore expansion is not axisymmetric, and here our calculations supply an upper bound for the energy of the barrier against pore formation. The major energy-requiring deformations in the steps of fusion are: widening of a hydrophobic fissure in bilayers for stalk formation, splay within the expanding hemifusion diaphragm, and fissure widening initiating pore formation in a hemifusion diaphragm. PMID:26958888

  8. Physical activity during pregnancy: predictors of change, perceived support and barriers among women at increased risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Marja; Aittasalo, Minna; Raitanen, Jani; Kinnunen, Tarja I; Kujala, Urho M; Luoto, Riitta

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of change in intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) during pregnancy, and the perceived support and barriers of LTPA in Finnish pregnant women at increased risk of gestational diabetes. The study population consisted of 399 pregnant women who participated in a randomized controlled trial aiming to prevent gestational diabetes. Evaluation of LTPA was based on a self-report at baseline, 26-28, and 36-37 weeks' gestation. Data on predictors of change, perceived support and barriers were collected with questionnaires and from the maternity cards. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess associations between the variables. The average weekly minutes of light-intensity LTPA were 179 at baseline, 161 at 26-28 weeks' gestation, and 179 at 36-37 weeks' gestation. The corresponding minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity LTPA were 187, 133 and 99. At 26-28 weeks' gestation, the strongest predictors for light-intensity LTPA were meeting the PA recommendations prior to pregnancy, having polytechnic education and working part-time, while having a physically active spouse prior to pregnancy was the strongest predictor for moderate-to-vigorous-intensity LTPA. The people and/or factors that encouraged women to LTPA the most were the spouse, a child, other family members and weather, whereas tiredness, nausea, perceived health, work and lack of time restricted their LTPA the most. The strongest predictors for maintaining LTPA during pregnancy were pre-pregnancy LTPA, education, working part-time and a spouse's LTPA. Most common barriers were perceived health, work and lack of time. PMID:24615354

  9. Hip Hop Culture's OGs: A Narrative Inquiry into the Intersection of Hip Hop Culture, Black Males and Their Schooling Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Ian P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a critical race lens, this narrative study employs a focus group design to explore the intersections between black males, hip hop culture and schooling experiences. To provide a sociocultural grounding, this study first reviews the research literature around hip hop culture.s sociocultural development and its impact as a culture force that…

  10. Hip-Hop Is My Passport! Using Hip-Hop and Digital Literacies to Understand Global Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Akesha Monique

    2013-01-01

    Hip-hop has exploded around the world among youth. It is not simply an American source of entertainment; it is a global cultural movement that provides a voice for youth worldwide who have not been able to express their "cultural world" through mainstream media. The emerging field of critical hip-hop pedagogy has produced little…

  11. Gender Differences in Leg Stiffness and Stiffness Recruitment Strategy During Two-Legged Hopping

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; Arnold, Brent L.; Carcia, Christopher R.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared leg stiffness (KVERT), muscle activation, and joint movement patterns between 11 men and 10 women during hopping. Physically active and healthy men and women performed continuous 2-legged hopping at their preferred rate and at 3.0 Hz. Compared with men, women demonstrated decreased KVERT; however, after the authors normalized for body mass, gender differences in KVERT were eliminated. In comparison with men, women also demonstrated increased quadriceps and soleus activity, as well as greater quadriceps-to-hamstrings coactivation ratios. There were no significant gender differences for joint movement patterns (p > .05). The relationship between the observed gender differences in muscle recruitment and the increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women requires further study. PMID:15730945

  12. Conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides: Softening bipolaron hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aselage, T. L.; Emin, D.; McCready, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    The electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides B12+xC3-x with 0.06<~x<~1.7 have been measured from 8 K to as high as 1750 K. At high temperature, the temperature dependence of the conductivities is Arrhenius and the activation energy, ~0.16 eV, is independent of the carbon concentration. The preexponential factors of the conductivity exhibit a nonmonotonic dependence on x, peaking near x=1. These results are consistent with a previously proposed model based on holes forming singlet bipolarons on the boron carbide B11C icosahedra. At low temperature, the boron carbide conductivities are non-Arrhenius with a temperature dependence that is a strong function of the composition x. This strong sensitivity to composition indicates that percolation effects, arising from boron carbides having carbon atoms in inequivalent locations, influence the conductivity at low temperature. With x holes per unit cell, boron carbides have very large Seebeck coefficients that depend only weakly on x. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficients are consistent with large contributions from carrier-induced softening of local vibrations. Softening effects can be exceptionally large when singlet bipolarons are stabilized among degenerate electronic energy levels by their softening of symmetry-breaking vibrations: ``softening bipolarons.'' The boron carbide transport properties are generally consistent with those expected of softening bipolarons. Finally, two high-temperature effects are observed in the boron carbide conductivities. The conductivities of samples having high carrier densities, x~1, are suppressed above 700 K. This suppression can arise when the rapid hopping of nearby carriers disrupts the energy coincidence required for a carrier's hop. At even higher temperatures, a sharp increase in the boron carbide conductivities (σ~T4) suggests a radiation-induced excitation of mobile charge carriers.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of proton hopping in a model polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Ram; Idupulapati, Nagesh; Baer, Marcel D; Mundy, Christopher J; Dupuis, Michel

    2013-12-27

    We report the results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a model Nafion polymer membrane initially equilibrated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We studied three hydration levels (λ) of 3, 9, and 15 H2O/SO3(-) corresponding to dry, hydrated, and saturated fuel cell membrane, respectively. The barrier for proton transfer from the SO3(-)-H3O(+) contact ion pair to a solvent-separated ion pair decreased from 2.3 kcal/mol for λ = 3 to 0.8 kcal/mol for λ = 15. The barrier for proton transfer between two water molecules was in the range from 0.7 to 0.8 kcal/mol for the λ values studied. The number of proton shuttling events between a pair of water molecules is an order of magnitude more than the number of proton hops across three distinct water molecules. The proton diffusion coefficient at λ = 15 is about 0.9 × 10(-5) cm(2)/s, which is in good agreement with experiment and our previous quantum hopping molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24320080

  14. Self-Efficacy for Coping with Barriers Helps Students Stay Physically Active during Transition to Their First Year at a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate students' physical activity during transition from high school to first-year university. Students' (N = 127) self-efficacy for coping with barriers to physical activity was investigated both as a predictor of physical activity and mediator of the relationship between pretransition and first-year physical…

  15. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun E; Adderley, Shaquria P; Breslin, Jerome W

    2016-01-01

    Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS). The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process. PMID:27187066

  16. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xun E.; Adderley, Shaquria P.

    2016-01-01

    Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS). The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process. PMID:27187066

  17. Promoting Physical Activity for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi S.; Neumeier, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Many students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fall short of the recommended physical activity levels and experience challenges in physical activity and physical education settings. This article reviews factors that can improve the physical activity statistics of students with ASD, outlines the researched benefits of physical activity for…

  18. Parents report intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, John; Needham, Lisa; Simpson, Janis Randall; Heeney, Elizabeth Shaver

    2008-04-01

    There is an increasing trend in childhood obesity in Canada and many preschool children are overweight or obese. The objective of this study was to explore parents' experiences and challenges in supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their preschool children. A qualitative descriptive study involving 5 focus groups was conducted. A convenience sample of 39 parents from 3 childcare centres in Hamilton, Ontario, participated. Parents were English speaking and had a child aged 2-5 years attending the childcare centre for at least 3 months. The research team read transcripts of the audio-taped sessions and used a constant comparison approach to develop themes, which involved coding comments by continually referring to previously coded comments for comparison. The social ecological model was used to organize the themes into 3 higher-level categories: (i) intrapersonal (individual): preschoolers' preferences and health; (ii) interpersonal (interactions): parents' and others' different views and practices, influence of the childcare centre, parents' lack of time, and family structure; and (iii) physical environment: accessibility of healthy foods, preschoolers with special needs, media influence, weather, lack of safety, and inaccessible resources. Parents perceived that there are various intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers to supporting healthy eating and physical activity among their children. Program planners and health professionals can consider these barriers when developing interventions to promote healthy bodyweights among preschoolers. PMID:18347689

  19. Health/Service Providers' Perspectives on Barriers to Healthy Weight Gain and Physical Activity in Pregnant, Urban First Nations Women.

    PubMed

    Darroch, Francine E; Giles, Audrey R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine health/service providers' perspectives of barriers to healthy weight gain and physical activity for urban, pregnant First Nations women in Ottawa, Canada. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, we explored 15 health/service providers' perspectives on the complex barriers their clients face. By using a postcolonial feminist lens and a social determinants of health framework, we identified three social determinants of health that the health/service providers believed to have the greatest influence on their clients' weight gain and physical activity during pregnancy: poverty, education, and colonialism. Our findings are then contextualized within existing Statistics Canada and the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study data. We found that health/service providers are in a position to challenge colonial relations of power. We conclude by urging health/service providers, researchers, and policymakers alike to take into consideration the ways in which these social determinants of health and their often synergistic effects affect urban First Nations women during pregnancy. PMID:25779985

  20. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ronald E.; Peart, John C.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Campos, Christopher R.; Miller, David S.

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-α) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, 3H-verapamil (threefold increase), 3H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and 3H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain 14C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  1. Communication devices for network-hopping communications and methods of network-hopping communications

    DOEpatents

    Buttles, John W.

    2011-12-20

    Wireless communication devices include a software-defined radio coupled to processing circuitry. The processing circuitry is configured to execute computer programming code. Storage media is coupled to the processing circuitry and includes computer programming code configured to cause the processing circuitry to configure and reconfigure the software-defined radio to operate on each of a plurality of communication networks according to a selected sequence. Methods for communicating with a wireless device and methods of wireless network-hopping are also disclosed.

  2. Communication devices for network-hopping communications and methods of network-hopping communications

    DOEpatents

    Buttles, John W

    2013-04-23

    Wireless communication devices include a software-defined radio coupled to processing circuitry. The system controller is configured to execute computer programming code. Storage media is coupled to the system controller and includes computer programming code configured to cause the system controller to configure and reconfigure the software-defined radio to operate on each of a plurality of communication networks according to a selected sequence. Methods for communicating with a wireless device and methods of wireless network-hopping are also disclosed.

  3. Real-Time On-Board Airborne Demonstration of High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Ng, Tak-Kwong; Davis, Mitchell J.; Adams, James K.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Fay, James J.; Hutchinson, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program since April, 2012. The HOPS team recently completed two flight campaigns during the summer of 2014 on two different aircrafts with two different science instruments. The first flight campaign was in July, 2014 based at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, VA on the NASA's HU-25 aircraft. The science instrument that flew with HOPS was Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) funded by NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). The second campaign was in August, 2014 based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in Palmdale, CA on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft. HOPS flew with the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) instrument developed by Excelis Inc. The goal of the campaigns was to perform an end-to-end demonstration of the capabilities of the HOPS prototype system (HOPS COTS) while running the most computationally intensive part of the ASCENDS algorithm real-time on-board. The comparison of the two flight campaigns and the results of the functionality tests of the HOPS COTS are presented in this paper.

  4. Real-time on-board airborne demonstration of high-speed on-board data processing for science instruments (HOPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Ng, Tak-Kwong; Davis, Mitchell J.; Adams, James K.; Bowen, Stephen C.; Fay, James J.; Hutchinson, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    The project called High-Speed On-Board Data Processing for Science Instruments (HOPS) has been funded by NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program since April, 2012. The HOPS team recently completed two flight campaigns during the summer of 2014 on two different aircrafts with two different science instruments. The first flight campaign was in July, 2014 based at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, VA on the NASA's HU-25 aircraft. The science instrument that flew with HOPS was Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) funded by NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). The second campaign was in August, 2014 based at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) in Palmdale, CA on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft. HOPS flew with the Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) instrument developed by Excelis Inc. The goal of the campaigns was to perform an end-to-end demonstration of the capabilities of the HOPS prototype system (HOPS COTS) while running the most computationally intensive part of the ASCENDS algorithm real-time on-board. The comparison of the two flight campaigns and the results of the functionality tests of the HOPS COTS are presented in this paper.

  5. Grand and Semigrand Canonical Basin-Hopping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce grand and semigrand canonical global optimization approaches using basin-hopping with an acceptance criterion based on the local contribution of each potential energy minimum to the (semi)grand potential. The method is tested using local harmonic vibrational densities of states for atomic clusters as a function of temperature and chemical potential. The predicted global minima switch from dissociated states to clusters for larger values of the chemical potential and lower temperatures, in agreement with the predictions of a model fitted to heat capacity data for selected clusters. Semigrand canonical optimization allows us to identify particularly stable compositions in multicomponent nanoalloys as a function of increasing temperature, whereas the grand canonical potential can produce a useful survey of favorable structures as a byproduct of the global optimization search. PMID:26669731

  6. Physical Activity Behavior Predictors, Reasons and Barriers among Male Adolescents in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Evidence for Obesogenic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Ali S. R.; Omer, Eltigani O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess physical activity, socio-demographic predictors and to determine reasons for practicing and/or not practicing physical activities. Methods Cross-sectional study was conducted among male high school students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data using stratified cluster sampling technique (N= 453 students). Results Although 36.4% of the student reported that they practiced enough exercise during their usual week days, only 15.5% of the students were found to be practicing physical activity at a recommended level (≥5 days/week). On the other hand, 20.1% of the students were found to be inactive and not practicing physical activity at any day. Among the factors that associated with adolescents physical activity, logistic regression showed that students age was associated negatively with physical activity behaviour (OR= 0.6, P <0.001). Also, logistic regression showed that students physical activity behaviour was independently associated with students perceived body weight (OR= 27, P <0.001). The main reasons for practicing physical activity were: to enhance muscle and strength (70.9%), to have fun with friend and entertainment (66%), and to improve physical appearance (53.6%), respectively. The main reported barriers inhibiting adolescents from practicing physical activity were: lack of sports facilities in the community (74%), lack of friends and peer support (59.4%) and lack of suitable public sport club in the community (54.6%). Conclusion This study revealed low prevalence of physical activity among adolescents. National strategies to increase levels of physical activity and minimize obesogenic environmental factors are required. PMID:26715919

  7. African Trypanosome-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction under Shear Stress May Not Require ERK Activation.

    PubMed

    Sumpio, Brandon J; Chitragari, Gautham; Moriguchi, Takeshi; Shalaby, Sherif; Pappas-Brown, Valeria; Khan, Asif M; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Sumpio, Bauer E; Grab, Dennis J

    2015-03-01

    African trypanosomes are tsetse fly transmitted protozoan parasites responsible for human African trypanosomiasis, a disease characterized by a plethora of neurological symptoms and death. How the parasites under microvascular shear stress (SS) flow conditions in the brain cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not known. In vitro studies using static models comprised of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) show that BBB activation and crossing by trypanosomes requires the orchestration of parasite cysteine proteases and host calcium-mediated cell signaling. Here, we examine BMEC barrier function and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and ERK5, mitogen-activated protein kinase family regulators of microvascular permeability, under static and laminar SS flow and in the context of trypanosome infection. Confluent human BMEC were cultured in electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and parallel-plate glass slide chambers. The human BMEC were exposed to 2 or 14 dyn/cm(2) SS in the presence or absence of trypanosomes. Real-time changes in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) were monitored and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and ERK5 analyzed by immunoblot assay. After reaching confluence under static conditions human BMEC TEER was found to rapidly increase when exposed to 2 dyn/cm(2) SS, a condition that mimics SS in brain postcapillary venules. Addition of African trypanosomes caused a rapid drop in human BMEC TEER. Increasing SS to 14 dyn/cm(2), a condition mimicking SS in brain capillaries, led to a transient increase in TEER in both control and infected human BMEC. However, no differences in ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation were found under any condition tested. African trypanosomiasis alters BBB permeability under low shear conditions through an ERK1/2 and ERK5 independent pathway. PMID:27053915

  8. P-glycoprotein activity in the blood-brain barrier is affected by virus-induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Doorduin, Janine; de Vries, Erik F J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Klein, Hans C

    2014-10-01

    A large percentage of schizophrenic patients respond poorly to antipsychotic treatment. This could be explained by inefficient drug transport across the blood-brain barrier due to P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. P-glycoprotein activity and expression in the blood-brain barrier can be affected by inflammation and pharmacotherapy. We therefore investigated the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment on P-glycoprotein activity. Rats were inoculated with HSV-1 or PBS (control) on day 0 and treated with saline, clozapine or risperidone from day 0 up until day 4 post-inoculation. Positron emission tomography with the P-glycoprotein substrate [11C]verapamil was used to assess P-glycoprotein activity at day 6 post-inoculation. Disease symptoms in HSV-1 inoculated rats increased over time and were not significantly affected by treatment. The volume of distribution (VT) of [11C]verapamil was significantly lower (10-22%) in HSV-1 inoculated rats than in control rats. In addition, antipsychotic treatment significantly affected the VT of [11C]verapamil in all brain regions, although this effect was drug dependent. In fact, VT of [11C]verapamil was significantly increased (22-39%) in risperidone treated rats in most brain regions when compared to clozapine treated rats and in midbrain when compared to saline treated rats. No interaction between HSV-1 inoculation and antipsychotic treatment on VT of [11C]verapamil was found. In this study we demonstrated that HSV-1 induced neuroinflammation increased and risperidone treatment decreased P-glycoprotein activity. This finding is of importance for the understanding of treatment resistance in schizophrenia, and warrants further investigation of the underlying mechanism and the importance in clinical practice. PMID:24973705

  9. Perceived Parental Barriers to and Strategies for Supporting Physical Activity and Healthy Eating among Head Start Children.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiying; B Robbins, Lorraine; Hines-Martin, Vicki

    2016-06-01

    Despite the need for parents to support their children's healthy behaviors, knowledge of factors preventing parents from doing so is still rudimentary. This study primarily aimed to explore perceived parental barriers to and strategies for supporting physical activity and healthy eating among Head Start children. A semi-structured interview format was used with four focus groups conducted at two urban Head Start centers in the Midwestern U.S. A qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded sessions was facilitated using ATLAS.ti7. A convenience sample of 32 parents (Mage = 34.97 years) participated. Over half were female (78.1 %), African Americans (65.6 %), and single (65.6 %). About 61.3 % reported an annual family income <$20,000, and 43.8 % were unemployed. Three themes reflected the barriers: (1) intrapersonal (child): short attention span and limited eating preferences; (2) interpersonal (parent): lack of time and cooking skills and a tight family budget; and (3) environmental: inaccessible programs, lack of age-appropriate education, electronic media use, and unsafe environment. Parents across all groups expressed high interest in enrolling in a program with their children. Recommendations included: parents' support team; family outings at parks; taking a walk or enrolling in a class with children; and planting a garden. Many parents showed their preference for face-to-face meetings and a support group, but repulsion of counseling. To promote parental support in future interventions with Head Start children, their perceived intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers should be considered as intervention targets. Involving parents through a support group and face-to-face meetings is recommended. PMID:26660100

  10. Power-Hop: A Pervasive Observation for Real Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Papalexakis, Evangelos; Hooi, Bryan; Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Faloutsos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been shown to exhibit universal properties, with one of the most consistent patterns being the scale-free degree distribution, but are there regularities obeyed by the r-hop neighborhood in real networks? We answer this question by identifying another power-law pattern that describes the relationship between the fractions of node pairs C(r) within r hops and the hop count r. This scale-free distribution is pervasive and describes a large variety of networks, ranging from social and urban to technological and biological networks. In particular, inspired by the definition of the fractal correlation dimension D2 on a point-set, we consider the hop-count r to be the underlying distance metric between two vertices of the network, and we examine the scaling of C(r) with r. We find that this relationship follows a power-law in real networks within the range 2 ≤ r ≤ d, where d is the effective diameter of the network, that is, the 90-th percentile distance. We term this relationship as power-hop and the corresponding power-law exponent as power-hop exponent h. We provide theoretical justification for this pattern under successful existing network models, while we analyze a large set of real and synthetic network datasets and we show the pervasiveness of the power-hop. PMID:26974560

  11. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  12. Facilitators and Barriers to Physical Activity as Perceived by Older Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schijndel-Speet, Marieke; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; van Wijck, Ruud; van Empelen, Pepijn; Echteld, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Older people with intellectual disability (ID) are characterized by low physical activity (PA) levels. PA is important for reducing health risks and maintaining adequate fitness levels for performing activities of daily living. The aim of this study was to explore preferences of older adults with ID for specific physical activities, and to gain…

  13. Perceived Barriers to Teaching Movement and Physical Activity to Kindergarteners in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Seidu; Asola, Eugene F.

    2015-01-01

    Regular participation in physical activity can improve students' health and academic achievement. It is important to develop a positive attitude toward participation in regular physical activity early in life. Thus, an understanding of factors that affect the activity levels of young children is essential. Therefore, the purpose of the study was…

  14. Low Discretionary Time as a Barrier to Physical Activity and Intervention Uptake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Bennett, Gary G.; McNeill, Lorna H.; Sorensen, Glorian; Emmons, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported discretionary time was associated with physical activity and uptake of a physical activity promotion intervention in a multi-ethnic urban sample. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported discretionary time with hours/week of leisure-time physical activity at baseline and physical activity…

  15. Pif1 removes a Rap1-dependent barrier to the strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Katrina N.; Singh, Saurabh P.; Stodola, Joseph L.; Burgers, Peter M.; Galletto, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Using an in vitro reconstituted system in this work we provide direct evidence that the yeast repressor/activator protein 1 (Rap1), tightly bound to its consensus site, forms a strong non-polar barrier for the strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase δ. We propose that relief of inhibition may be mediated by the activity of an accessory helicase. To this end, we show that Pif1, a 5′–3′ helicase, not only stimulates the strand displacement activity of Pol δ but it also allows efficient replication through the block, by removing bound Rap1 in front of the polymerase. This stimulatory activity of Pif1 is not limited to the displacement of a single Rap1 molecule; Pif1 also allows Pol δ to carry out DNA synthesis across an array of bound Rap1 molecules that mimics a telomeric DNA-protein assembly. This activity of Pif1 represents a novel function of this helicase during DNA replication. PMID:27001517

  16. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  17. Jamming effects on code synchronization of burst-mode frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, Mike G.; Wicker, Mark A.

    The authors characterize the performance of a multiple-dwell FHSS (frequency-hopping spread-spectrum) code synchronization scheme in the presence of channel dynamics. Random hop jamming is assumed. The coarse acquisition system uses both passive and active correlation to implement a serial search of the code-uncertainty region. The in-lock monitoring is accomplished using a two-dwell active correlator with a relatively long integration time. Both burst- and continuous-mode communications links are considered. Appropriate performance parameters are developed, and design considerations are discussed. Performance curves are given for the various cases considered. Although a fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme adequately mitigates the effects of dynamic jamming in a continuous-mode communications link, it is shown to be inadequate for a burst-mode communications link.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus faecium L50, a strain producing enterocins L50 (L50A and L50B), P and Q, against beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria in broth, wort (hopped and unhopped), and alcoholic and non-alcoholic lager beers.

    PubMed

    Basanta, Antonio; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E; Cintas, Luis M

    2008-07-31

    Enterococcus faecium L50 produces enterocin L50 (L50A and L50B) (EntL50, EntL50A and EntL50B), enterocin P (EntP) and enterocin Q (EntQ) and displays a broad antimicrobial spectrum against the most relevant beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (i.e., Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus damnosus), which is mainly due to the production of EntL50 (EntL50A and EntL50B). Bacteriocin assays using in vitro-synthesized EntL50 (EntL50A and EntL50B) showed that both individual peptides possess antimicrobial activity on their own, EntL50A being the most active, but when the two peptides were combined a synergistic effect was observed. The only virulence genes detected in E. faecium L50 were efaAfm (cell wall adhesin) and ccf (sex pheromone), and this strain was susceptible to most clinically relevant antibiotics. E. faecium L50 survived but did not grow nor showed antimicrobial activity in hopped and unhopped wort, and alcoholic (1 and 5% ethanol, v/v) and non-alcoholic (0% ethanol, v/v) commercial lager beers. However, when unhopped wort was supplemented with 50% (v/v) MRS broth, E. faecium L50 grew and exerted antimicrobial activity similarly as in MRS broth. The enterocins produced by this strain were bactericidal (5 log decrease) against P. damnosus and Lb. brevis in a dose- and substrate-dependent manner when challenged in MRS broth, wort (hopped and unhopped), and alcoholic (1 and 5% ethanol, v/v) and non-alcoholic (0% ethanol, v/v) lager beers at 32 degrees C, and no bacterial resistances were detected even after incubation for 6-15 days. The enterocins in wort and lager beer (5% ethanol, v/v) withstood the heat treatments commonly employed in the brewing industry during mashing, wort boiling, fermentation, and pasteurization, and retained most of their antimicrobial activity in lager beer (5% ethanol, v/v) after long-term storage at 8 and 25 degrees C. PMID:18544465

  19. Biotransformation of hop aroma terpenoids by ale and lager yeasts.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew J; Dickinson, J Richard

    2003-03-01

    Terpenoids are important natural flavour compounds, which are introduced to beer via hopping. It has been shown recently that yeasts are able to biotransform some monoterpene alcohols. As a first step towards examining whether yeasts are capable of altering hop terpenoids during the brewing of beer, we investigated whether they were transformed when an ale and lager yeast were cultured in the presence of a commercially available syrup. Both yeasts transformed the monoterpene alcohols geraniol and linalool. The lager yeast also produced acetate esters of geraniol and citronellol. The major terpenoids of hop oil, however, were not biotransformed. Oxygenated terpenoids persisted much longer than the alkenes. PMID:12702246

  20. Short and long-term lifestyle coaching approaches used to address diverse participant barriers to weight loss and physical activity adherence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual barriers to weight loss and physical activity goals in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized trial with 3.2 years average treatment duration, have not been previously reported. Evaluating barriers and the lifestyle coaching approaches used to improve adherence in a large, diverse participant cohort can inform dissemination efforts. Methods Lifestyle coaches documented barriers and approaches after each session (mean session attendance = 50.3 ± 21.8). Subjects were 1076 intensive lifestyle participants (mean age = 50.6 years; mean BMI = 33.9 kg/m2; 68% female, 48% non-Caucasian). Barriers and approaches used to improve adherence were ranked by the percentage of the cohort for whom they applied. Barrier groupings were also analyzed in relation to baseline demographic characteristics. Results Top weight loss barriers reported were problems with self-monitoring (58%); social cues (58%); holidays (54%); low activity (48%); and internal cues (thought/mood) (44%). Top activity barriers were holidays (51%); time management (50%); internal cues (30%); illness (29%), and motivation (26%). The percentage of the cohort having any type of barrier increased over the long-term intervention period. A majority of the weight loss barriers were significantly associated with younger age, greater obesity, and non-Caucasian race/ethnicity (p-values vary). Physical activity barriers, particularly thought and mood cues, social cues and time management, physical injury or illness and access/weather, were most significantly associated with being female and obese (p < 0.001 for all). Lifestyle coaches used problem-solving with most participants (≥75% short-term; > 90% long term) and regularly reviewed self-monitoring skills. More costly approaches were used infrequently during the first 16 sessions (≤10%) but increased over 3.2 years. Conclusion Behavioral problem solving approaches have short and long term dissemination potential

  1. RADIAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND MAGNETIC BARRIER FOR SHORT-TYPE GAMMA-RAY-BURST CENTRAL ENGINE ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Hou Shujin; Liang Enwei; Lei Weihua; Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Dai Zigao

    2012-11-20

    Soft extended emission (EE) following initial hard spikes up to 100 s was observed with Swift/BAT for about half of known short-type gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). This challenges the conversional central engine models of SGRBs, i.e., compact star merger models. In the framework of black-hole-neutron-star merger models, we study the roles of radial angular momentum transfer in the disk and the magnetic barrier around the black hole in the activity of SGRB central engines. We show that radial angular momentum transfer may significantly prolong the lifetime of the accretion process, which may be divided into multiple episodes by the magnetic barrier. Our numerical calculations based on models of neutrino-dominated accretion flows suggest that disk mass is critical for producing the observed EE. In the case of the mass being {approx}0.8 M {sub Sun }, our model can reproduce the observed timescale and luminosity of both the main and the EE episodes in a reasonable parameter set. The predicted luminosity of the EE component is lower than the observed EE within about one order of magnitude and the timescale is shorter than 20 s if the disk mass is {approx}0.2 M {sub Sun }. Swift/BAT-like instruments may be not sensitive enough to detect the EE component in this case. We argue that the EE component could be a probe for the merger process and disk formation for compact star mergers.

  2. Arhgap17, a RhoGTPase activating protein, regulates mucosal and epithelial barrier function in the mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-young; Kim, Hwain; Kim, Kyoungmi; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Seungbok; Lee, Daekee

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Rho GTPase family is required for the maintenance of polarity in epithelial cells as well as for their proliferation and migration. A RhoGTPase-activating protein 17 (Arhgap17) is known to be involved in multiple cellular processes in vitro, including the maintenance of tight junctions and vesicle trafficking. However, the function of Arhgap17 has not been studied in the physiological context. Here, we generated Arhgap17-deficient mice and examined the effect in the epithelial and mucosal barriers of the intestine. Reporter staining revealed that Arhgap17 expression is limited to the luminal epithelium of intestine. Arhgap17-deficient mice show an increased paracellular permeability and aberrant localization of the apical junction complex in the luminal epithelium, but do not develop spontaneous colitis. The inner mucus layer is impervious to the enteric bacteria irrespective of Tff3 downregulation in the Arhgap17-deficient mice. Interestingly however, treatment with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) causes an increased accumulation of DSS and TNF production in intraluminal cells and rapid destruction of the inner mucus layer, resulting in increased severity of colitis in mutant mice. Overall, these data reveal that Arhgap17 has a novel function in regulating transcellular transport and maintaining integrity of intestinal barriers. PMID:27229483

  3. A coagulation-powdered activated carbon-ultrafiltration--multiple barrier approach for removing toxins from two Australian cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mike B; Richard, Yann; Ho, Lionel; Chow, Christopher W K; O'Neill, Brian K; Newcombe, Gayle

    2011-02-28

    Cyanobacteria are a major problem for the world wide water industry as they can produce metabolites toxic to humans in addition to taste and odour compounds that make drinking water aesthetically displeasing. Removal of cyanobacterial toxins from drinking water is important to avoid serious illness in consumers. This objective can be confidently achieved through the application of the multiple barrier approach to drinking water quality and safety. In this study the use of a multiple barrier approach incorporating coagulation, powdered activated carbon (PAC) and ultrafiltration (UF) was investigated for the removal of intracellular and extracellular cyanobacterial toxins from two naturally occurring blooms in South Australia. Also investigated was the impact of these treatments on the UF flux. In this multibarrier approach, coagulation was used to remove the cells and thus the intracellular toxin while PAC was used for extracellular toxin adsorption and finally the UF was used for floc, PAC and cell removal. Cyanobacterial cells were completely removed using the UF membrane alone and when used in conjunction with coagulation. Extracellular toxins were removed to varying degrees by PAC addition. UF flux deteriorated dramatically during a trial with a very high cell concentration; however, the flux was improved by coagulation and PAC addition. PMID:21227576

  4. Plasma activated dissociation of CO2 studied in a dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeln, Richard; Brehmer, Florian; Welzel, Stefan; Klarenaar, Bart; van de Sanden, Richard; Tu/E Collaboration; Afs Gmbh Collaboration; Differ Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The ever-increasing emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as well as the intermittency problem of electricity produced by renewable energy sources are challenges that urgently need to be addressed. An approach addressing both issues at the same time is converting CO2 to a fuel using plasma driven by electricity from renewable sources. We will present in this contribution the results of a study on the conversion of CO2 to CO in a dielectric barrier discharge in pure CO2 at pressures up to 1000 mbar: FTIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy were applied to measure CO number densities and gas temperatures as function of the specific injected energy. CO densities with a maximum at 1018 cm-3 (mixing ratio of 4.4%) at 46 kJ/sl, energy efficiencies in the range of a few percent and gas temperatures up to 550 K were detected. The CO production is directly linked with the total number of transferred charges q during the residence time tres of CO2 molecules. Also ozone has been detected with a maximum mixing ratio of 0.075%.

  5. Active species delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments to bacteria biofilms on the surface of apple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, He; Liu, Xin; Lu, Xinpei; Liu, Dawei

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma has shown a significant potential as a novel food decontamination technology. In this paper, we report a computational study of the intersection of negative streamer produced by air dielectric barrier discharge with bacteria biofilm on an apple surface. The structure, conductivities, and permittivities of bacteria biofilm have been considered in the Poisson's equations and transportation equations of charge and neutral species to realize self-consistent transportation of plasma between electrode and charging surfaces of apple. We find that the ionization near the biofilm facilitates the propagation of negative streamer when the streamer head is 1 mm from the biofilm. The structure of the biofilm results in the non-uniform distribution of ROS and RNS captured by flux and time fluence of these reactive species. The mean free path of charged species in μm scale permitted the plasma penetrate into the cavity of the biofilm, therefore, although the density of ROS and RNS decrease by 6-7 order of magnitude, the diffusion results in the uniform distribution of ROS and RNS inside the cavity during the pulse off period.

  6. Fear of Movement and Low Self-Efficacy Are Important Barriers in Physical Activity after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Klaassen, Gerald; Schutte, Elise; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and exercise are commonly used as preventive measures for cardiovascular disease in the general population, and could be effective in the management of post-transplantation cardiovascular risk. PA levels are low after renal transplantation and very few renal transplant recipients (RTR) meet the PA guidelines. Identification of barriers to regular PA is important to identify targets for intervention to improve PA levels after renal transplantation. We investigated fear of movement and physical self-efficacy as barriers to PA in RTR. Methods RTR were investigated between 2001–2003. The Tampa Score of Kinesiophobia–Dutch Version (TSK-11) was used to assess fear of movement. Physical self-efficacy was measured with the LIVAS-scale. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires (Tecumseh Occupational Activity Questionnaire and the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire). Results A total of 487 RTR (age 51±12 years, 55% men) were studied. Median score [interquartile range] on TSK-11 was 22 [17–26]. Low physical self-efficacy (Exp B:0.41[0.31–0.54], p<0.001) and history of myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (Exp B:1.30[1.03–1.63],p = 0.03) were independent determinants for fear of movement. Fear of movement was associated with lower daily PA, occupational, sports and leisure time PA. Mediation-analysis showed that a large part (73%) of the effect of fear of movement on PA was explained by low physical self-efficacy. Conclusions This study was the first to examine fear of movement and self-efficacy in relation to PA in RTR. Fear of movement was associated with a low PA level, and the larger part of this relation was mediated by low physical self-efficacy. Both fear of movement and physical self-efficacy level are important targets for intervention during rehabilitation after renal transplantation. PMID:26844883

  7. Let Me Blow Your Mind: Hip Hop Feminist Futures in Theory and Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Treva B.

    2015-01-01

    This essay brings together key theoretical interventions in hip-hop feminism to explore the continued, but undervalued, significance of hip-hop feminism in urban education. More specifically, the essay challenges narrow conceptualizations of the "hip hop subject" as Black and male by using hip-hop feminist theory to incorporate the lived…

  8. Pregnane X Receptor Activation Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Expression and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1/2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditya; Zhao, Angela; Erickson, Sarah L; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Lau, Aik Jiang; Alston, Laurie; Chang, Thomas K H; Mani, Sridhar; Hirota, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders with a complex etiology. IBD is thought to arise in genetically susceptible individuals in the context of aberrant interactions with the intestinal microbiota and other environmental risk factors. Recently, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) was identified as a sensor for microbial metabolites, whose activation can regulate the intestinal epithelial barrier. Mutations in NR1I2, the gene that encodes the PXR, have been linked to IBD, and in animal models, PXR deletion leads to barrier dysfunction. In the current study, we sought to assess the mechanism(s) through which the PXR regulates barrier function during inflammation. In Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell monolayers, tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ exposure disrupted the barrier and triggered zonula occludens-1 relocalization, increased expression of myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Activation of the PXR [rifaximin and [[3,5-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]ethenylidene]bis-phosphonic acid tetraethyl ester (SR12813); 10 μM] protected the barrier, an effect that was associated with attenuated MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. In vivo, activation of the PXR [pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN)] attenuated barrier disruption induced by toll-like receptor 4 activation in wild-type, but not Pxr-/-, mice. Furthermore, PCN treatment protected the barrier in the dextran-sulfate sodium model of experimental colitis, an effect that was associated with reduced expression of mucosal MLCK and phosphorylated JNK1/2. Together, our data suggest that the PXR regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation by modulating cytokine-induced MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. Thus, targeting the PXR may prove beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated barrier disruption in the context of IBD. PMID:27440420

  9. Modulation of breast cancer cell survival by aromatase inhibiting hop (Humulus lupulus L.) flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Faria, Ana; Azevedo, Isabel; Calhau, Conceição

    2007-01-01

    Hop flavonoids are being regarded as attractive molecules to prevent or treat certain forms of cancer. Studies have focused mainly on xanthohumol, the most abundant prenylated chalcone existing in hops extract. However, during the production of beer, or after its ingestion, xanthohumol originates different metabolites, among which isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the prenylflavonoids xanthohumol, isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin on the breast cancer Sk-Br-3 cell line proliferation, apoptosis and activity of the enzyme aromatase (estrogen synthase). Aromatase activity was determined by a tritiated water assay, cell proliferation was assessed by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, sulforhodamine B protein measurement and Ki-67 immunostaining and apoptosis was determined by TUNEL. Our results show that all tested prenylflavonoids were able to inhibit aromatase activity and thus, estrogen formation. Additionally, breast cancer cell line proliferation was decreased and apoptosis induced by all three compounds. The presence of 17beta-estradiol in treatment medium was able to revert the effect of the prenylflavonoids on cellular proliferation. These observations strengthen the idea that hop flavonoids may have anti-breast cancer effects and shed new light on a possible mechanism of action by which these effects occur, namely through their ability to decrease estrogen synthesis. PMID:17643984

  10. The Child as an Active Learner: Views, Practices, and Barriers in Chinese Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengling

    2006-01-01

    The Chinese view of the child is in the process of changing from the dependent child of traditional Chinese society to the child as an active learner in contemporary China. The view of the child as an active learner forces early childhood practitioners to rethink the features of the child's learning and development, individuality, and needs and…

  11. Identifying Barriers, Perceptions and Motivations Related to Healthy Eating and Physical Activity among 6th to 8th Grade, Rural, Limited-Resource Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Janavi; Adhikari, Koushik; Li, Yijing; Lindshield, Erika; Muturi, Nancy; Kidd, Tandalayo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to enable community members to discuss their perceptions of eating habits and physical activity in relation to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders, and reveal facilitators and barriers to healthy eating behavior and physical activity engagement. Design/methodology/approach: Nine focus groups, which included six…

  12. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations.

    PubMed

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-21

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling. PMID:27208937

  13. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  14. Origin of activated combustion in steady-state premixed burner flame with superposition of dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, Kazunori; Akashi, Haruaki; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the mechanism of plasma-assisted combustion in a steady-state premixed burner flame. We examined the spatiotemporal variation of the density of atomic oxygen in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). We also measured the spatiotemporal variations of the optical emission intensities of Ar and OH. The experimental results reveal that atomic oxygen produced in the preheating zone by electron impact plays a key role in the activation of combustion reactions. This understanding is consistent with that described in our previous paper indicating that the production of “cold OH(A2Σ+)” via CHO + O → OH(A2Σ+) + CO has the sensitive response to the pulsed current of DBD [K. Zaima and K. Sasaki, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 53, 110309 (2014)].

  15. Extended active space CASSCF/MRSD CI calculations of the barrier height for the reaction: O + H2 yields OH + H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1986-01-01

    The convergence of the barrier height for the O + H2 yields OH + H reaction was studied as a function of the size of the active space and basis set completeness. The barrier height is rapidly convergent with respect to expansion of the active space. Addition of 2p yields 2p' correlation terms to the active space lowers the barrier to the O + H2 reaction by about 2.0 kcal/mole, but addition of 3d and other terms has little additional effect. Multireference singles and doubles contracted CI plus Davidson's correction calculations using a (5s5p3d2f1g/4s3p2d1f) basis set with a 5 sigma 2 pi active space lead to a barrier height of 12.7 kcal/mole. Including an estimate of the CI contraction error and basis set superposition error leads to 12.4 kcal/mole as the best estimate of the barrier height.

  16. 60. View of lined canal and hop barn, looking southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. View of lined canal and hop barn, looking southwest. Photo by Robin Lee Tedder, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  17. 59. View of lined canal east of bellmouth near hop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. View of lined canal east of bellmouth near hop barn, looking southwest. Photo by Robin Lee Tedder, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  18. GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND CENTER, REDSTONE TEST STAND FOREGROUND RIGHT, SATURN I C TEST STAND BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Fate of xanthohumol and related prenylflavonoids from hops to beer.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J F; Taylor, A W; Clawson, J E; Deinzer, M L

    1999-06-01

    The fate of three prenylated flavonoids of the chalcone type, xanthohumol, desmethylxanthohumol, and 3'-geranylchalconaringenin, was monitored with LC/MS-MS from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) to beer in two brewing trials. The three prenylchalcones were largely converted into their isomeric flavanones, isoxanthohumol, prenylnaringenins, and geranylnaringenins, respectively, in the boiling wort. Losses of prenylflavonoids were due to incomplete extraction from the hops into the wort (13-25%), adsorption to insoluble malt proteins (18-26%), and adsorption to yeast cells (11-32%) during fermentation. The overall yield of xanthohumol, after lagering of the beer and largely in the form of isoxanthohumol, amounted to 22-30% of the hops' xanthohumol. About 10% of the hops' desmethylxanthohumol, completely converted into prenylnaringenins, remained in the beers. 3'-Geranylchalconaringenin behaved similarly to desmethylxanthohumol. Solubility experiments indicated that (1) malt carbohydrates form soluble complexes with xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol and (2) solubility does not dictate the isoxanthohumol levels of finished beers. PMID:10794646

  20. Understanding the Surface Hopping View of Electronic Transitions and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Jain, Amber; Landry, Brian; Petit, Andrew; Ouyang, Wenjun; Bellonzi, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    We present a current, up-to-date review of the surface hopping methodology for solving nonadiabatic problems, 25 years after Tully published the fewest switches surface hopping algorithm. After reviewing the original motivation for and failures of the algorithm, we give a detailed examination of modern advances, focusing on both theoretical and practical issues. We highlight how one can partially derive surface hopping from the Schrödinger equation in the adiabatic basis, how one can change basis within the surface hopping algorithm, and how one should understand and apply the notions of decoherence and wavepacket bifurcation. The question of time reversibility and detailed balance is also examined at length. Recent applications to photoexcited conjugated polymers are discussed briefly.

  1. Motivators and barriers to healthful eating and physical activity among low-income overweight and obese mothers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Wei; Nitzke, Susan; Guilford, Eileen; Adair, Constance H; Hazard, Diana L

    2008-06-01

    Low-income women who are overweight and obese are at high risk for long-term retention of weight gain during pregnancy, in part because they may have poor diets and inadequate physical activity, both of which may be exacerbated by stressful situations. This study identified motivators and barriers to healthful eating and physical activity among low-income overweight and obese non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white mothers. Qualitative data were collected via eight focus group interviews. Eighty low-income overweight and obese non-Hispanic black (n=41) and non-Hispanic white (n=39) mothers, age 18 to 35 years, were recruited from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children sites in six counties in Michigan. Personal appearance, fit in clothes, inability to play with their children, and social support were motivating factors for healthful eating and physical activity. Stressful experiences triggered emotional eating and reduced participants' ability to practice these behaviors. Other factors-for example, wanting quick weight-loss results-made it difficult for these mothers to follow recommended healthful lifestyle practices. Nutrition educators can address these concerns by including information about ways to deal with stress and emotional eating and emphasizing the benefits of healthful eating and physical activity in their program plans. PMID:18502238

  2. Effect of tannic acid-fish scale gelatin hydrolysate hybrid nanoparticles on intestinal barrier function and α-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Jung; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Jiang, Shun-Zhou; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2015-07-01

    Practical application of tannic acid is limited because it readily binds proteins to form insoluble aggregates. In this study, tannic acid was self-assembled with fish scale gelatin hydrolysates (FSGH) to form stable colloidal complex nanoparticles. The nanoparticles prepared from 4 mg ml(-1) tannic acid and 4 mg ml(-1) FSGH had a mean particle size of 260.8 ± 3.6 nm, and showed a positive zeta potential (20.4 ± 0.4 mV). The nanoparticles acted as effective nano-biochelators and free radical scavengers because they provided a large number of adsorption sites for interaction with heavy metal ions and scavenging free radicals. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cu(2+) ions was 123.5 mg g(-1) and EC50 of DPPH radical scavenging activity was 21.6 ± 1.2 μg ml(-1). Hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of the nanoparticles were investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The copper-chelating capacity and free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were associated with their capacity to inhibit Cu(2+) ion-induced barrier impairment and hyperpermeability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ). However, α-amylase inhibitory activity of the nanoparticles was significantly lower than that of free tannic acid. The results suggest that the nanoparticles can ameliorate Cu(2+) ion induced intestinal epithelial TJ dysfunction without severely inhibiting the activity of the digestive enzymes. PMID:26069899

  3. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  4. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Liu, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  5. Manipulation of a grid-generated mixing with an active honeycomb dielectric barrier plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study defines and characterizes an active system for turbulent and scalar mixing enhancement. This system is made of an active grid composed of 121 holes where the gas flows. A high voltage is applied between printed electrodes and embedded ground electrodes in order to produce a non-thermal surface discharge at the hole exits. The goal is to modify the flow downstream of the active grid. First, electrical and optical characterizations of the actuator are proposed. Second, it is shown that the discharge strongly modifies the flow distribution of the multi-jet exhaust, and the flow change depends on the high voltage applied to the active plasma grid. A minimization of the potential core by 40% is reported when discharge frequency corresponds to jet column mode instability.

  6. Depositon Of Silver On Plasma Activated Polypropylene Surface By Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, N.; Dojcinovic, B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Cernák, M.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work is plasma activation and functionalisation by silver ions of nonwoven polypropylene. For analyzing prepared samples we used ICP-OES, SEM and AFM. In this paper we presented some preliminary results.

  7. Spin-memory effect and negative magnetoresistance in hopping conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.; Spivak, Boris

    2014-03-01

    We propose a mechanism for negative isotropic magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. It results from a memory effect encrypted into spin correlations that are not taken into account by the conventional theory of hopping conductivity. The spin correlations are generated by the nonequilibrium electric currents and lead to the decrease of the conductivity. The application of the magnetic field destroys the correlations thus enhancing the conductance. This effect can occur even at magnetic fields as small as a few gauss.

  8. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow. PMID:23576345

  9. Quantum walk on the line through potential barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum walks are well known for their ballistic dispersion, traveling Θ (t) away in t steps, which is quadratically faster than a classical random walk's diffusive spreading. In physical implementations of the walk, however, the particle may need to tunnel through a potential barrier to hop, and a naive calculation suggests that this could eliminate the ballistic transport. We show by explicit calculation, however, that such a loss does not occur. Rather, the Θ (t) dispersion is retained, with only the coefficient changing, which additionally gives a way to detect and quantify the hopping errors in experiments.

  10. Ability of prenylflavanones present in hops to induce apoptosis in a human Burkitt lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Diller, Reinhard A; Riepl, Herbert M; Rose, Oliver; Frias, Corazon; Henze, Günter; Prokop, Aram

    2007-07-01

    The identification of effective cancer preventive compounds from hops has become an important issue in public health-related research. We compared the antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of side chain variants of prenylflavanones, e. g., 8-prenylnaringenin (7) and 8-geranylnaringenin (10), which have been identified in hops (Humulus lupulus), and their synthetic variations 8-furanmethylnaringenin (8) and 8-cinnamylnaringenin (9). These were accessible by a Mitsunobu reaction and Claisen rearrangement. Flavanones 9 and 10 showed cytotoxic and apoptotic activities. Apoptosis was induced in a mitochondrial dependent manner. 8-Cinnamylnaringenin (9) displayed noticeably improved apoptotic effects when compared to 8-prenylnaringenin. The potential of 8-prenylnaringenin (7) is shown in an ex vivo experiment on a multi-drug resistant leukaemia blast. PMID:17715491

  11. Gold Binding by Native and Chemically Modified Hops Biomasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    López, M. Laura; Gardea-Torresdey, J. L.; Peralta-Videa, J. R.; de la Rosa, G.; Armendáriz, V.; Herrera, I.; Troiani, H.; Henning, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metals from mining, smelting operations and other industrial processing facilities pollute wastewaters worldwide. Extraction of metals from industrial effluents has been widely studied due to the economic advantages and the relative ease of technical implementation. Consequently, the search for new and improved methodologies for the recovery of gold has increased. In this particular research, the use of cone hops biomass ( Humulus lupulus ) was investigated as a new option for gold recovery. The results showed that the gold binding to native hops biomass was pH dependent from pH 2 to pH 6, with a maximum percentage bindingmore » at pH 3. Time dependency studies demonstrated that Au(III) binding to native and modified cone hops biomasses was found to be time independent at pH 2 while at pH 5, it was time dependent. Capacity experiments demonstrated that at pH 2, esterified hops biomass bound 33.4 mg Au/g of biomass, while native and hydrolyzed hops biomasses bound 28.2 and 12.0 mg Au/g of biomass, respectively. However, at pH 5 the binding capacities were 38.9, 37.8 and 11.4 mg of Au per gram of native, esterified and hydrolyzed hops biomasses, respectively.« less

  12. Coding for slow frequency hopped differential phase shift keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gulliver, T. A.; Mason, Lloyd J.; Blake, Ian F.

    The performance of Reed-Solomon (RS) error-correcting codes with slow frequency hopped (SFH) differential phase shift keying (DPSK) signaling is analyzed and evaluated under worst-case partial-band noise (PBN) and worst-case multitone (MT) jamming. The results of a study of the bit error rate (BER) performance of this coded system are presented. A representative set of the performance curves is shown. SFH is used because the differential signaling required only the phase of the previous received signal as a reference. Using DPSK eliminates the need to establish a phase reference for the hop, as with coherent signaling. From the results it is clear that the number of codeword symbols per hop must be small in order for the RS code to provide protection against jamming. Otherwise, no improvement over uncoded DPSK is gained. Lowering the symbols per hop can be achieved either by reducing the number of bits per hop, or interleaving the RS codewords to a depth determined by the hop length and RS code parameters.

  13. Accurate water maser positions from HOPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew J.; Purcell, Cormac R.; Longmore, Steven N.; Breen, Shari L.; Green, James A.; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jordan, Christopher H.; Macpherson, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    We report on high spatial resolution water maser observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, towards water maser sites previously identified in the H2O southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS). Of the 540 masers identified in the single-dish observations of Walsh et al., we detect emission in all but 31 fields. We report on 2790 spectral features (maser spots), with brightnesses ranging from 0.06 to 576 Jy and with velocities ranging from -238.5 to +300.5 km s-1. These spectral features are grouped into 631 maser sites. We have compared the positions of these sites to the literature to associate the sites with astrophysical objects. We identify 433 (69 per cent) with star formation, 121 (19 per cent) with evolved stars and 77 (12 per cent) as unknown. We find that maser sites associated with evolved stars tend to have more maser spots and have smaller angular sizes than those associated with star formation. We present evidence that maser sites associated with evolved stars show an increased likelihood of having a velocity range between 15 and 35 km s-1 compared to other maser sites. Of the 31 non-detections, we conclude they were not detected due to intrinsic variability and confirm previous results showing that such variable masers tend to be weaker and have simpler spectra with fewer peaks.

  14. The influence of ecological and conventional plant production systems on soil microbial quality under hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Oszust, Karolina; Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Bilińska, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge about microorganisms-activity and diversity under hop production is still limited. We assumed that, different systems of hop production (within the same soil and climatic conditions) significantly influence on the composition of soil microbial populations and its functional activity (metabolic potential). Therefore, we compared a set of soil microbial properties in the field experiment of two hop production systems (a) ecological based on the use of probiotic preparations and organic fertilization (b) conventional-with the use of chemical pesticides and mineral fertilizers. Soil analyses included following microbial properties: The total number microorganisms, a bunch of soil enzyme activities, the catabolic potential was also assessed following Biolog EcoPlates®. Moreover, the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) of PCR ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene products. Conventional and ecological systems of hop production were able to affect soil microbial state in different seasonal manner. Favorable effect on soil microbial activity met under ecological, was more probably due to livestock-based manure and fermented plant extracts application. No negative influence on conventional hopyard soil was revealed. Both type of production fulfilled fertilizing demands. Under ecological production it was due to livestock-based manure fertilizers and fermented plant extracts application. PMID:24897025

  15. The Influence of Ecological and Conventional Plant Production Systems on Soil Microbial Quality under Hops (Humulus lupulus)

    PubMed Central

    Oszust, Karolina; Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Bilińska, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge about microorganisms—activity and diversity under hop production is still limited. We assumed that, different systems of hop production (within the same soil and climatic conditions) significantly influence on the composition of soil microbial populations and its functional activity (metabolic potential). Therefore, we compared a set of soil microbial properties in the field experiment of two hop production systems (a) ecological based on the use of probiotic preparations and organic fertilization (b) conventional—with the use of chemical pesticides and mineral fertilizers. Soil analyses included following microbial properties: The total number microorganisms, a bunch of soil enzyme activities, the catabolic potential was also assessed following Biolog EcoPlates®. Moreover, the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) was characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) of PCR ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene products. Conventional and ecological systems of hop production were able to affect soil microbial state in different seasonal manner. Favorable effect on soil microbial activity met under ecological, was more probably due to livestock-based manure and fermented plant extracts application. No negative influence on conventional hopyard soil was revealed. Both type of production fulfilled fertilizing demands. Under ecological production it was due to livestock-based manure fertilizers and fermented plant extracts application. PMID:24897025

  16. Low sequence identity but high structural and functional conservation: The case of Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop/Sti1) of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Fernanda A H; Seraphim, Thiago V; Santos, Clelton A; Gonzaga, Marisvanda R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2016-06-15

    Parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania are subjected to extensive environmental changes during their life cycle; molecular chaperones/co-chaperones act as protagonists in this scenario to maintain cellular homeostasis. Hop/Sti1 is a co-chaperone that connects the Hsp90 and Hsp70 systems, modulating their ATPase activities and affecting the fate of client proteins because it facilitates their transfer from the Hsp70 to the Hsp90 chaperone. Hop/Sti1 is one of the most prevalent co-chaperones, highlighting its importance despite the relatively low sequence identity among orthologue proteins. This multi-domain protein comprises three tetratricopeptides domains (TPR1, TPR2A and TPR2B) and two Asp/Pro-rich domains. Given the importance of Hop/Sti1 for the chaperone system and for Leishmania protozoa viability, the Leishmania braziliensis Hop (LbHop) and a truncated mutant (LbHop(TPR2AB)) were characterized. Structurally, both proteins are α-helix-rich and highly elongated monomeric proteins. Functionally, they inhibited the ATPase activity of Leishmania braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) to a similar extent, and the thermodynamic parameters of their interactions with LbHsp90 were similar, indicating that TPR2A-TPR2B forms the functional center for the LbHop interaction with LbHsp90. These results highlight the structural and functional similarity of Hop/Sti1 proteins, despite their low sequence conservation compared to the Hsp70 and Hsp90 systems, which are phylogenetic highly conserved. PMID:27103305

  17. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells. PMID:26523279

  18. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  19. Understanding and Dismantling Barriers for Partnerships for Inclusive Education: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, universities and school districts share responsibility for teacher and student learning. Sharing responsibility demands that both institutions work to develop closer relationships through ongoing engagement, dialogue and negotiation. Drawing from Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), we examined one school/university…

  20. Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most recent Australian Health survey identified that young men (18-24yrs) have numerous health concerns including: 42% overweight/obese, 48% not meeting national physical activity recommendations and 97% failing to consume adequate intakes of fruit and vegetables. There is a lack of engagement a...

  1. Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internationally, young men (aged 18-25 years) have a high prevalence of overweight and obesity and many fail to meet recommended levels of physical activity or dietary guidelines. There is a lack of engagement and understanding of young men's needs in health-related research. Therefore, this study a...

  2. Human BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase activity counteracts chromatin barriers to DNA resection.

    PubMed

    Densham, Ruth M; Garvin, Alexander J; Stone, Helen R; Strachan, Joanna; Baldock, Robert A; Daza-Martin, Manuel; Fletcher, Alice; Blair-Reid, Sarah; Beesley, James; Johal, Balraj; Pearl, Laurence H; Neely, Robert; Keep, Nicholas H; Watts, Felicity Z; Morris, Joanna R

    2016-07-01

    The opposing activities of 53BP1 and BRCA1 influence pathway choice in DNA double-strand-break repair. How BRCA1 counteracts the inhibitory effect of 53BP1 on DNA resection and homologous recombination is unknown. Here we identify the site of BRCA1-BARD1 required for priming ubiquitin transfer from E2∼ubiquitin and demonstrate that BRCA1-BARD1's ubiquitin ligase activity is required for repositioning 53BP1 on damaged chromatin. We confirm H2A ubiquitination by BRCA1-BARD1 and show that an H2A-ubiquitin fusion protein promotes DNA resection and repair in BARD1-deficient cells. BRCA1-BARD1's function in homologous recombination requires the chromatin remodeler SMARCAD1. SMARCAD1 binding to H2A-ubiquitin and optimal localization to sites of damage and activity in DNA repair requires its ubiquitin-binding CUE domains. SMARCAD1 is required for 53BP1 repositioning, and the need for SMARCAD1 in olaparib or camptothecin resistance is alleviated by 53BP1 loss. Thus, BRCA1-BARD1 ligase activity and subsequent SMARCAD1-dependent chromatin remodeling are critical regulators of DNA repair. PMID:27239795

  3. Male Gender Role Strain as a Barrier to African American Men's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Derek M.; Gunter, Katie; Allen, Julie Ober

    2011-01-01

    Despite the potential health consequences, African American men tend to treat their roles as providers, fathers, spouses, and community members as more important than engaging in health behaviors such as physical activity. We conducted 14 exploratory focus groups with 105 urban, middle-aged African American men from the Midwest to examine factors…

  4. Time and Money: A New Look at Poverty and the Barriers to Physical Activity in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinney, Jamie; Millward, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between time, money, and regular participation in physical activities, especially at the intensities and durations required to improve one's health, is an important public health and social policy issue. The objective of this research is to develop a better understanding of the extent to which income poverty and time poverty act…

  5. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier-island chain and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Barrier-island chains worldwide are undergoing substantial changes, and their futures remain uncertain. An historical analysis of a barrier-island chain in the north-central Gulf of Mexico shows that the Mississippi barriers are undergoing rapid systematic land loss and translocation associated with: (1) unequal lateral transfer of sand related to greater updrift erosion compared to downdrift deposition; (2) barrier narrowing resulting from simultaneous erosion of shores along the Gulf and Mississippi Sound; and (3) barrier segmentation related to storm breaching. Dauphin Island, Alabama, is also losing land for some of the same reasons as it gradually migrates landward. The principal causes of land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a sediment-budget deficit. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is certain that the Mississippi-Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate unless the trend of at least one causal factor reverses. Historical land-loss trends and engineering records show that progressive increases in land-loss rate correlate with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. This correlation indicates that channel-maintenance activities along the MS-AL barriers have impacted the sediment budget by disrupting the alongshore sediment transport system and progressively reducing sand supply. Direct management of this causal factor can be accomplished by strategically placing dredged sediment where adjacent barrier-island shores will receive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  6. Fault barriers favor activation of backthrusts near segment ends of megathrust ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that backthrusts may become active during or after megathrust ruptures in subduction zones, such as in Chile and Sumatra areas (Melnick et al., 2012; Singh et al., 2011). Previous studies on relevant mechanisms mainly focused on the interaction between forethrusts and the megathrust. Here we aim to investigate through dynamic rupture simulations how backthrusts may be activated by megathrust ruptures in subduction zone environment. Assuming a single backthrust branch, our preliminary results show that the activation of backthrust is difficult if the megathrust rupture can easily pass through the fault junction, owing to a quickly established stress shadow zone in the wake of the megathrust rupture front. In contrast, if the megathrust rupture is arrested or delayed around the junction, a resultant backward stress lobe of the type discussed by Xu and Ben-Zion (2013) can load the backthrust over a considerable amount of time and facilitates rupture activation along the backthrust. A number of candidates can serve to arrest or delay megathrust ruptures, such as the velocity-strengthening frictional behavior and off-fault weak materials in the shallow portion of subduction zones, fault bend or ramp, and subducted seamount. Moreover, these features are also found capable of generating backthrusts during the long-term quasi-static process, which provide pre-existing weakness to be reactivated by later dynamic ruptures. Our results agree, from a different point of view, with the study based on the critical taper theory (Cubas et al., 2013) that an increase of friction towards the trench favors the activation of backthrusts near the up-dip limit of megathrust ruptures. The results highlight the role of fault geometric or strength heterogeneities in controlling the strain partitioning on and off the main fault plane. Accordingly, activated backthrusts may be treated as markers that reflect the limits of seismogenic zones, and thus may be used

  7. Chlamydia screening for sexually active young women under the Affordable Care Act: new opportunities and lingering barriers.

    PubMed

    Loosier, Penny S; Malcarney, Mary-Beth; Slive, Lauren; Cramer, Ryan C; Burgess, Brittany; Hoover, Karen W; Romaguera, Raul

    2014-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) contains a provision requiring private insurers issuing or renewing plans on or after September 23, 2010, to provide, without cost sharing, preventive services recommended by US Preventive Services Task Force (grades A and B), among other recommending bodies. As a grade A recommendation, chlamydia screening for sexually active young women 24 years and younger and older women at risk for chlamydia falls under this requirement. This article examines the potential effect on chlamydia screening among this population across private and public health plans and identifies lingering barriers not addressed by this legislation. Examination of the impact on women with private insurance touches upon the distinction between coverage under grandfathered plans, where the requirement does not apply, and nongrandfathered plans, where the requirement does apply. Acquisition of private health insurance through health insurance Marketplaces is also discussed. For public health plans, coverage of preventive services without cost sharing differs for individuals enrolled in standard Medicaid, covered under the Medicaid expansion included in the ACA, or those enrolled under the Children's Health Insurance Program or who fall under Early, Periodic, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment criteria. The discussion of lingering barriers not addressed by the ACA includes the uninsured, physician reimbursement, cost sharing, confidentiality, low rates of appropriate sexual history taking by providers, and disclosures of sensitive information. In addition, the role of safety net programs that provide health care to individuals regardless of ability to pay is examined in light of the expectation that they also remain a payer of last resort. PMID:25118966

  8. METEORIN-LIKE is a cytokine associated with barrier tissues and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ushach, Irina; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Martinez, Cynthia; Hevezi, Peter A.; Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Vazquez, Monica I.; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are involved in many functions of the immune system including initiating, amplifying and resolving immune responses. Through bioinformatics analyses of a comprehensive database of gene expression (BIGE: Body Index of Gene Expression) we observed that a small secreted protein encoded by a poorly characterized gene called meteorin-like (METRNL), is highly expressed in mucosal tissues, skin and activated macrophages. Further studies indicate that Metrnl is produced by Alternatively Activated Macrophages (AAM) and M-CSF cultured bone marrow macrophages (M2-like macrophages). In the skin, METRNL is expressed by resting fibroblasts and IFNγ-treated keratinocytes. A screen of human skin-associated diseases showed significant over-expression of METRNL in psoriasis, prurigo nodularis, actinic keratosis and atopic dermatitis. METRNL is also up-regulated in synovial membranes of human rheumatoid arthritis. Taken together, these results indicate that Metrnl represents a novel cytokine, which is likely involved in both innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:25486603

  9. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  10. Trapping hop looper moths, Hypena humuli Harris (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), in hop yards in Washington State with acetic acid and 3-methyl-1-butanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop looper moths, Hypena humuli Harris, in commercial hop yards (Humulus lupulus L.) were captured in traps baited with a combination of acetic acid plus 3-methyl-1-butanol (AAMB). The two chemicals were synergistic in attracting hop looper moths; in a comparison of the lure chemicals, most moths we...

  11. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract and 6-Prenylnaringenin Induce P450 1A1 Catalyzed Estrogen 2-Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Humulus lupulus L. (hops) is a popular botanical dietary supplement used by women as a sleep aid and for postmenopausal symptom relief. In addition to its efficacy for menopausal symptoms, hops can also modulate the chemical estrogen carcinogenesis pathway and potentially protect women from breast cancer. In the present study, an enriched hop extract and the key bioactive compounds [6-prenylnarigenin (6-PN), 8-prenylnarigenin (8-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XH)] were tested for their effects on estrogen metabolism in breast cells (MCF-10A and MCF-7). The methoxyestrones (2-/4-MeOE1) were analyzed as biomarkers for the nontoxic P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation and the genotoxic P450 1B1 catalyzed 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. The results indicated that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially induced the 2-hydroxylation pathway in both cell lines. 8-PN only showed slight up-regulation of metabolism in MCF-7 cells, whereas IX and XH did not have significant effects in either cell line. To further explore the influence of hops and its bioactive marker compounds on P450 1A1/1B1, mRNA expression and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity were measured. The results correlated with the metabolism data and showed that hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhanced P450 1A1 mRNA expression and increased P450 1A1/1B1 activity. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by the isolated compounds was tested using xenobiotic response element (XRE) luciferase construct transfected cells. 6-PN was found to be an AhR agonist that significantly induced XRE activation and inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced XRE activity. 6-PN mediated induction of EROD activity was also inhibited by the AhR antagonist CH223191. These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of

  12. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract and 6-Prenylnaringenin Induce P450 1A1 Catalyzed Estrogen 2-Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Dunlap, Tareisha L; Howell, Caitlin E; Mbachu, Obinna C; Rue, Emily A; Phansalkar, Rasika; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F; Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2016-07-18

    Humulus lupulus L. (hops) is a popular botanical dietary supplement used by women as a sleep aid and for postmenopausal symptom relief. In addition to its efficacy for menopausal symptoms, hops can also modulate the chemical estrogen carcinogenesis pathway and potentially protect women from breast cancer. In the present study, an enriched hop extract and the key bioactive compounds [6-prenylnarigenin (6-PN), 8-prenylnarigenin (8-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XH)] were tested for their effects on estrogen metabolism in breast cells (MCF-10A and MCF-7). The methoxyestrones (2-/4-MeOE1) were analyzed as biomarkers for the nontoxic P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation and the genotoxic P450 1B1 catalyzed 4-hydroxylation pathways, respectively. The results indicated that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially induced the 2-hydroxylation pathway in both cell lines. 8-PN only showed slight up-regulation of metabolism in MCF-7 cells, whereas IX and XH did not have significant effects in either cell line. To further explore the influence of hops and its bioactive marker compounds on P450 1A1/1B1, mRNA expression and ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity were measured. The results correlated with the metabolism data and showed that hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhanced P450 1A1 mRNA expression and increased P450 1A1/1B1 activity. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by the isolated compounds was tested using xenobiotic response element (XRE) luciferase construct transfected cells. 6-PN was found to be an AhR agonist that significantly induced XRE activation and inhibited 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced XRE activity. 6-PN mediated induction of EROD activity was also inhibited by the AhR antagonist CH223191. These data show that the hop extract and 6-PN preferentially enhance the nontoxic estrogen 2-hydroxylation pathway through AhR mediated up-regulation of P450 1A1, which further emphasizes the importance of

  13. Office-Based Physical Activity and Nutrition Intervention: Barriers, Enablers, and Preferred Strategies for Workplace Obesity Prevention, Perth, Western Australia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Jancey, Jonine; Howat, Peter; Ledger, Melissa; Lee, Andy H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Workplace health promotion programs to prevent overweight and obesity in office-based employees should be evidence-based and comprehensive and should consider behavioral, social, organizational, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to and enablers of physical activity and nutrition as well as intervention strategies for health promotion in office-based workplaces in the Perth, Western Australia, metropolitan area in 2012. Methods We conducted an online survey of 111 employees from 55 organizations. The online survey investigated demographics, individual and workplace characteristics, barriers and enablers, intervention-strategy preferences, and physical activity and nutrition behaviors. We used χ2 and Mann–Whitney U statistics to test for differences between age and sex groups for barriers and enablers, intervention-strategy preferences, and physical activity and nutrition behaviors. Stepwise multiple regression analysis determined factors that affect physical activity and nutrition behaviors. Results We identified several factors that affected physical activity and nutrition behaviors, including the most common barriers (“too tired” and “access to unhealthy food”) and enablers (“enjoy physical activity” and “nutrition knowledge”). Intervention-strategy preferences demonstrated employee support for health promotion in the workplace. Conclusion The findings provide useful insights into employees’ preferences for interventions; they can be used to develop comprehensive programs for evidence-based workplace health promotion that consider environmental and policy influences as well as the individual. PMID:24028834

  14. Understanding and Addressing Barriers to Implementation of Environmental and Policy Interventions to Support Physical Activity and Healthy Eating in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Barnidge, Ellen K.; Radvanyi, Catherine; Duggan, Kathleen; Motton, Freda; Wiggs, Imogene; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Rural residents are at greater risk of obesity than urban and suburban residents. Failure to meet physical activity and healthy eating recommendations play a role. Emerging evidence shows the effectiveness of environmental and policy interventions to promote physical activity and healthy eating. Yet most of the evidence comes from urban and suburban communities. The objectives of this study were to 1) identify types of environmental and policy interventions being implemented in rural communities to promote physical activity or healthy eating, 2) identify barriers to the implementation of environmental or policy interventions, and 3) identify strategies rural communities have employed to overcome these barriers. METHODS Key informant interviews with public health professionals working in rural areas in the United States were conducted in 2010. A purposive sample included 15 practitioners engaged in planning, implementing, or evaluating environmental or policy interventions to promote physical activity or healthy eating. FINDINGS Our findings reveal that barriers in rural communities include cultural differences, population size, limited human capital, and difficulty demonstrating the connection between social and economic policy and health outcomes. Key informants identified a number of strategies to overcome these barriers such as developing broad-based partnerships and building on the existing infrastructure. CONCLUSON Recent evidence suggests that environmental and policy interventions have potential to promote physical activity and healthy eating at the population level. To realize positive outcomes, it is important to provide opportunities to implement these types of interventions and document their effectiveness in rural communities. PMID:23289660

  15. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  16. Pincer Ligand Modifications To Tune the Activation Barrier for H2 Elimination in Water Splitting Milstein Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, Karakkadparambil S; Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2015-12-01

    Modifications on the ligand environment of Milstein ruthenium(II) pincer hydride catalysts have been proposed to fine-tune the activation free energy, ΔG(⧧) for the key step of H2 elimination in the water splitting reaction. This study conducted at the B3LYP level of density functional theory including the solvation effect reveals that changing the bulky t-butyl group at the P-arm of the pincer ligand by methyl or ethyl group can reduce the ΔG(⧧) by a substantial margin, ∼ 10 kcal/mol. The reduction in the steric effect of the pincer ligand causes exothermic association of the water molecule to the metal center and leads to significant stabilization of all the subsequent reaction intermediates and the transition state compared to those of the original Milstein catalyst that promotes endothermic association of the water molecule. Though electron donating groups on the pyridyl unit of the pincer ligand are advantageous for reducing the activation barrier in the gas phase, the effect is only 1-1.4 kcal/mol compared to that of an electron withdrawing group. The absolute minimum of the electrostatic potential at the hydride ligand and carbonyl stretching frequency of the catalyst are useful parameters to gauge the effect of ligand environment on the H2 elimination step of the water splitting reaction. PMID:26575086

  17. Primary Care and Public Health Activities in Select US Health Centers: Documenting Successes, Barriers, and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu; Chowdhury, Joya; Sripipatana, Alek; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A. Seiji; Daly, Charles A.; Tomoyasu, Naomi; Nair, Suma; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary care and public health activities among federally funded health centers, to better understand their successes, the barriers encountered, and the lessons learned. Methods. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data from 9 health centers, stratified by administrative division, urban–rural location, and race/ethnicity of patients served. Descriptive data on patient and institutional characteristics came from the Uniform Data System, which collects data from all health centers annually. We administered questionnaires and conducted phone interviews with key informants. Results. Health centers performed well on primary care coordination and community orientation scales and reported conducting many essential public health activities. We identified specific needs for integrating primary care and public health: (1) more funding for collaborations and for addressing the social determinants of health, (2) strong leadership to champion collaborations, (3) trust building among partners, with shared missions and clear expectations of responsibilities, and (4) alignment and standardization of data collection, analysis, and exchange. Conclusions. Lessons learned from health centers should inform strategies to better integrate public health with primary care. PMID:22690975

  18. Stretch reflex improves rolling stability during hopping of a decerebrate biped system.

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Andre; Liu, Xiangxiao; Shimizu, Masahiro; Hosoda, Koh

    2015-01-01

    When humans hop, attitude recovery can be observed in both the sagittal and frontal planes. While it is agreed that the brain plays an important role in leg placement, the role of low-level feedback (the stretch reflex) on frontal plane stabilization remains unclear. Seeking to better understand the contribution of the soleus stretch reflex to rolling stability, we performed experiments on a biomimetic humanoid hopping robot. Various reflex responses to touching the floor, ranging from no response to long muscle activations, were examined, and the effect of a delay upon touching the floor was also examined. We found that the stretch reflex brought the system closer to stable, straight hopping. The presence of a delay did not affect the results; both the cases with and without a delay outperformed the case without a reflex response. The results of this study highlight the importance of low-level control in locomotion for which body stabilization does not require higher-level signals. PMID:25599138

  19. Discovery of Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase by Fragment Hopping

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Li, Huiying; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Selective inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has been shown to prevent brain injury and is important for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders. This study shows that not only greater inhibitory potency and isozyme selectivity, but more drug-like properties can be achieved by fragment hopping. Based on the structure of lead molecule 6, fragment hopping effectively extracted the minimal pharmacophoric elements in the active site of nNOS for ligand hydrophobic and steric interactions and generated appropriate lipophilic fragments for lead optimization. More potent and selective inhibitors with better drug-like properties were obtained within the design of 20 derivatives (compounds 7-26). Our structure-based inhibitor design for nNOS and SAR analysis reveal the robustness and efficiency of fragment hopping in lead discovery and structural optimization, which implicates a broad application of this approach to many other therapeutic targets for which known drug-like small-molecule modulators are still limited. PMID:19125620

  20. In vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acid production from rumen incubation of diets supplemented with hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Lavrenčič, A; Levart, A; Košir, I J; Čerenak, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.) from two varieties Aurora and Dana, differing in their α- and β-acid contents, on rumen microbial activity measured with in vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production. Hop cones were added to the total mixed dairy cow ration (CONT) in concentrations simulating a cow's daily intake of 50, 100 and 200 g of hop cones - the concentrations of hop cones expressed on a substrate basis were 43, 82 and 153 mg/g of substrate. Substrates were anaerobically incubated in glass syringes, and gas production kinetic parameters were determined by fitting data with the Gompertz model. Gas produced after 24 h (Gas24), maximum fermentation rate (MFR) and time of maximum fermentation rate (TMFR) were calculated from the estimated gas production kinetic parameters. After 24 h of incubation, the fermentation liquids of each substrate were taken for the determination of SCFA. Increasing the hop cone concentration decreased the total potential gas production, Gas24, MFR and shortened TMFR. The highest hop cone concentration significantly decreased acetic and butyric acid productions and total SCFA production after 24 h of incubation, but not propionic acid production, resulting in a decreased ratio between acetic acid and propionic acid. PMID:25475691

  1. Reverse genetic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans presenilins reveals redundant but unequal roles for sel-12 and hop-1 in Notch-pathway signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westlund, Bethany; Parry, Dianne; Clover, Ralph; Basson, Michael; Johnson, Carl D.

    1999-01-01

    Mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 cause early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mice indicate that one function of presenilin genes is to facilitate Notch-pathway signaling. Notably, mutations in the C. elegans presenilin gene sel-12 reduce signaling through an activated version of the Notch receptor LIN-12. To investigate the function of a second C. elegans presenilin gene hop-1 and to examine possible genetic interactions between hop-1 and sel-12, we used a reverse genetic strategy to isolate deletion alleles of both loci. Animals bearing both hop-1 and sel-12 deletions displayed new phenotypes not observed in animals bearing either single deletion. These new phenotypes—germ-line proliferation defects, maternal-effect embryonic lethality, and somatic gonad defects—resemble those resulting from a reduction in signaling through the C. elegans Notch receptors GLP-1 and LIN-12. Thus SEL-12 and HOP-1 appear to function redundantly in promoting Notch-pathway signaling. Phenotypic analyses of hop-1 and sel-12 single and double mutant animals suggest that sel-12 provides more presenilin function than does hop-1. PMID:10051671

  2. Blood-brain barrier permeable anticholinesterase aurones: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and drug-like properties.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kok-Fui; Chan, Kit-Lam; Lee, Chong-Yew

    2015-04-13

    A series of novel aurones bearing amine and carbamate functionalities at various positions (rings A and/or B) of the scaffold was synthesized and evaluated for their acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. Structure-activity relationship study disclosed several potent submicromolar acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) particularly aurones bearing piperidine and pyrrolidine moieties at ring A or ring B. Bulky groups particularly methoxyls, and carbamate to a lesser extent, at either rings were also prominently featured in these AChEI aurones as exemplified by the trimethoxyaurone 4-3. The active aurones exhibited a lower butyrylcholinesterase inhibition. A 3'-chloroaurone 6-3 originally designed to improve the metabolic stability of the scaffold was the most potent of the series. Molecular docking simulations showed these AChEI aurones to adopt favourable binding modes within the active site gorge of the Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE) including an unusual chlorine-π interaction by the chlorine of 6-3 to establish additional bondings to hydrophobic residues of TcAChE. Evaluation of the potent aurones for their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and metabolic stability using PAMPA-BBB assay and in vitro rat liver microsomes (RLM) identified 4-3 as an aurone with an optimal combination of high passive BBB permeability and moderate CYP450 metabolic stability. LC-MS identification of a mono-hydroxylated metabolite found in the RLM incubation of 4-3 provided an impetus for further improvement of the compound. Thus, 4-3, discovered within this present series is a promising, drug-like lead for the development of the aurones as potential multipotent agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25768702

  3. Scaffold hopping approach on the route to selective tankyrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liscio, Paride; Carotti, Andrea; Asciutti, Stefania; Ferri, Martina; Pires, Maira M.; Valloscuro, Sara; Ziff, Jacob; Clark, Neil R.; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Pellicciari, Roberto; Camaioni, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    A virtual screening procedure was applied to identify new tankyrase inhibitors. Through pharmacophore screening of a compounds collection from the SPECS database, the methoxy[l]benzothieno[2,3-c]quinolin-6(5H)-one scaffold was identified as nicotinamide mimetic able to inhibit tankyrase activity at low micromolar concentration. In order to improve potency and selectivity, tandem structure-based and scaffold hopping approaches were carried out over the new scaffold leading to the discovery of the 2-(phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one as powerful chemotype suitable for tankyrase inhibition. The best compound 2-(4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-3H-benzo[4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one (23) displayed nanomolar potencies (IC50s TNKS-1 = 21 nM and TNKS-2= 29 nM) and high selectivity when profiled against several other PARPs. Furthermore, a striking Wnt signaling, as well as cell growth inhibition, was observed assaying 23 in DLD-1 cancer cells. PMID:25299683

  4. Surface hopping investigation of benzophenone excited state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Favero, Lucilla; Granucci, Giovanni; Persico, Maurizio

    2016-04-21

    We present a simulation of the photodynamics of benzophenone for the first 20 ps after n →π* excitation, performed by trajectory surface hopping calculations with on-the-fly semiempirical determination of potential energy surfaces and electronic wavefunctions. Both the dynamic and spin-orbit couplings are taken into account, and time-resolved fluorescence emission is also simulated. The computed decay time of the S1 state is in agreement with experimental observations. The direct S1→ T1 intersystem crossing (ISC) accounts for about 2/3 of the S1 decay rate. The remaining 1/3 goes through T2 or higher triplets. The nonadiabatic transitions within the triplet manifold are much faster than ISC and keep the population of T1 at about 3/4 of the total triplet population, and that of the other states (mainly T2) at 1/4. Two internal coordinates are vibrationally active immediately after n →π* excitation: one is the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and the other one is a combination of the conrotatory torsion of phenyl rings and of bending involving the carbonyl C atom. The period of the torsion-bending mode coincides with oscillations in the time-resolved photoelectron spectra of Spighi et al. and substantially confirms their assignment. PMID:27031566

  5. Multi-hop teleportation based on W state and EPR pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Tao, Zhan; Xu-Tao, Yu; Pei-Ying, Xiong; Zai-Chen, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Multi-hop teleportation has significant value due to long-distance delivery of quantum information. Many studies about multi-hop teleportation are based on Bell pairs, partially entangled pairs or W state. The possibility of multi-hop teleportation constituted by partially entangled pairs relates to the number of nodes. The possibility of multi-hop teleportation constituted by double W states is after n-hop teleportation. In this paper, a multi-hop teleportation scheme based on W state and EPR pairs is presented and proved. The successful possibility of quantum information transmitted hop by hop through intermediate nodes is deduced. The possibility of successful transmission is after n-hop teleportation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61571105), the Prospective Future Network Project of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BY2013095-1-18), and the Independent Project of State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves, China (Grant No. Z201504).

  6. Sixth-Grade Boys' Perceived Benefits of and Barriers to Physical Activity and Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Lorraine B.; Talley, Henry C.; Wu, Tsu-Yin; Wilbur, JoEllen

    2010-01-01

    Interventions are needed to reduce the high overweight prevalence noted among boys in early high school. Because decreased physical activity (PA) is a factor for weight gain and a decline in boys' PA occurs across the middle school years, a need exists to intervene, as soon as boys reach middle school, to help them get adequate PA. The purpose of…

  7. Giving the Teacher a Voice: Perceptions Regarding the Barriers and Enablers Associated with the Implementation of Smart Moves (Compulsory Physical Activity) within Primary State Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Anderton, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The specific focus of this study is to explore Queensland (Australia) state school generalist teachers' perceptions regarding the barriers and enablers associated with the implementation of the Smart Moves (compulsory physical activity) policy in the primary classroom setting. This study sought to primarily add to the literature on, and…

  8. The APPLE Project: An Investigation of the Barriers and Promoters of Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in New Zealand Children Aged 5-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williden, Micalla; Taylor, Rachael W; McAuley, Kirsten A; Simpson, Jean C; Oakley, Maggie; Mann, Jim I

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To use the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO) framework to determine the barriers and promoters of healthy eating and physical activity in children aged 5-12 years, as a basis for the development of a pilot community-based programme for preventing obesity in children (APPLE project: A Pilot Programme for Lifestyle…

  9. Corrigendum to "PAHs in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon reach potentially toxic levels from coal port activities" [Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci. 144, 39-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Kathryn A.

    2014-08-01

    Erratum with respect to the paper: Burns, K A, 2014 PAHs in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon reach potentially toxic levels from coal port activities. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science 144, 39-45. DOI 10.1016/j.ecss.2014.04.001.

  10. Mediating Effects of Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers on the Association between Peer and Parental Factors and Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls with a Lower Educational Level

    PubMed Central

    Cardon, Greet; De Craemer, Marieke; D’Haese, Sara; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls is low, suggesting it is important to have insights into the complex processes that may underlie their physical activity levels. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the mediating effects of self-efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers on the associations between peer and parental variables and physical activity among lower educated adolescent girls. Methods In total, 226 girls (mean age 16.0±1.0 years; 53% technical education; 47% vocational education) from a convenience sample of 6 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium, completed a questionnaire on their total physical activity level and related peer and parental variables (i.e. modeling of physical activity, co-participation in physical activities and encouragement to be active) and personal variables (i.e. self-efficacy to be active, and specific perceived benefits of physical activity and specific barriers to be active). Mediating effects were tested using MacKinnon’s product-of-coefficients test based on multilevel linear regression analyses. Results Higher peer and parental modeling, co-participation and encouragement were significantly related to a higher physical activity level among adolescent girls (p<0.05). Self-efficacy, the perceived benefits of having fun, being around friends or meeting new people, and not being bored and the perceived barrier of not liking physical activity mediated several associations between peer and parental variables and girls’ physical activity, with some of the mediated proportions exceeding 60%. Conclusions This study contributed to a better understanding of the complexity of how parental and peer factors work together with personal factors to influence the physical activity levels of adolescent girls with a lower educational level. Interventions should involve both peers and parents, as they may influence girls’ physical activity both directly and indirectly through the

  11. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  12. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  13. From "They" Science to "Our" Science: Hip Hop Epistemology in STEAM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolberry, Maurice E.

    Hip hop has moved from being considered a type of music into being understood as a culture in which a prominent type of music originates. Hip hop culture has a philosophy and epistemological constructs as well. This study analyzed those constructs to determine how conceptions of science factor in hip hop worldviews. Pedagogical models in culturally responsive teaching and Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) education were also examined to discern their philosophical connections with hip hop culture. These connections were used to create two theoretical models. The first one, Hip Hop Science, described how scientific thought functions in hip hop culture. The second model, Hip Hop STEAM Pedagogy, proposes how hip hop culture can inform STEAM teaching practices. The study began by using Critical Race Theory to create a theoretical framework proposing how the two theoretical models could be derived from the philosophical and pedagogical concepts. Content analysis and narrative inquiry were used to analyze data collected from scholarly texts, hip hop songs, and interviews with hip hop-responsive educators. The data from these sources were used initially to assess the adequacy of the proposed theoretical framework, and subsequently to improve its viability. Four overlapping themes emerged from the data analyses, including hip hop-resistance to formal education; how hip hop culture informs pedagogical practice in hip hop-responsive classrooms; conceptions of knowledge and reality that shape how hip hoppers conduct scientific inquiry; and hip hop-based philosophies of effective teaching for hip hoppers as a marginalized cultural group. The findings indicate that there are unique connections between hip hop epistemology, sciencemindedness, and pedagogical practices in STEAM education. The revised theoretical framework clarified the nature of these connections, and supported claims from prior research that hip hop culture provides viable sites of

  14. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  15. Surface hopping simulation of vibrational predissociation of methanol dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruomu; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2012-06-01

    The mixed quantum-classical surface hopping method is applied to the vibrational predissociation of methanol dimer, and the results are compared to more exact quantum calculations. Utilizing the vibrational SCF basis, the predissociation problem is cast into a curve crossing problem between dissociative and quasibound surfaces with different vibrational character. The varied features of the dissociative surfaces, arising from the large amplitude OH torsion, generate rich predissociation dynamics. The fewest switches surface hopping algorithm of Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990), 10.1063/1.459170] is applied to both diabatic and adiabatic representations. The comparison affords new insight into the criterion for selecting the suitable representation. The adiabatic method's difficulty with low energy trajectories is highlighted. In the normal crossing case, the diabatic calculations yield good results, albeit showing its limitation in situations where tunneling is important. The quadratic scaling of the rates on coupling strength is confirmed. An interesting resonance behavior is identified and is dealt with using a simple decoherence scheme. For low lying dissociative surfaces that do not cross the quasibound surface, the diabatic method tends to overestimate the predissociation rate whereas the adiabatic method is qualitatively correct. Analysis reveals the major culprits involve Rabi-like oscillation, treatment of classically forbidden hops, and overcoherence. Improvements of the surface hopping results are achieved by adopting a few changes to the original surface hopping algorithms.

  16. Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping conductivity without Coulomb gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian

    In doped semiconductors and Coulomb glasses, in the limit of weak coupling, the electron conductivity primarily proceeds by phonon-assisted tunneling or hopping between different sites through the insulating gaps that separate them. Electron conduction can occur both through nearest-neighbor hopping and through cotunneling of electrons between distant sites via a chain of intermediate virtual states. In the presence of some disorder, the latter mechanism dominates at low temperatures, where the length of the hops grows to optimize the conductivity. This transport mechanism was introduced by Mott, and is called variable range hopping. When the Coulomb interaction between localized electrons is taken into account, it can be shown that at a sufficiently low temperature, variable range hopping conductivity obeys the Efros-Shklovskii (ES) law, which has been observed in a number of amorphous semiconductors and granular metal systems at low temperatures. ES conductivity has been long understood as the result of a soft, Coulomb gap at the Fermi level. However, such a theory overlooks the presence of spatial correlations between site energies and their possible effects on electrical conductivity. In this talk, we show both analytically and numerically that in systems where spatial correlations must be taken into account, ES conductivity may persist far outside the Coulomb gap, in contrast to conventional transport theory for doped semiconductors and Coulomb glasses where ES conductivity only occurs within the Coulomb gap.

  17. Alterations in blood-brain barrier ICAM-1 expression and brain microglial activation after λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, J. D.; Campos, C. R.; Mark, K. S.; Davis, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that peripheral inflammatory pain increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and altered tight junction protein expression and the delivery of opioid analgesics to the brain. What remains unknown is which pathways and mediators during peripheral inflammation affect BBB function and structure. The current study investigated effects of λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain (CIP) on BBB expression of ICAM-1. We also examined the systemic contribution of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation in the brain to elucidate pathways involved in BBB disruption during CIP. We investigated ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression levels in isolated rat brain microvessels after CIP using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses, screened inflammatory cytokines during the time course of inflammation, assessed white blood cell counts, and probed for BBB and central nervous system stimulation and leukocyte transmigration using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results showed an early increase in ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression after CIP with no change in circulating levels of several proinflammatory cytokines. Changes in ICAM-1 protein expression were noted at 48 h. Immunohistochemistry showed that the induction of ICAM-1 was region specific with increased expression noted in the thalamus and frontal and parietal cortices, which directly correlated with increased expression of activated microglia. The findings of the present study were that CIP induces increased ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression at the BBB and that systemic proinflammatory mediators play no apparent role in the early response (1–6 h); however, brain region-specific increases in micro-glial activation suggest a potential for a central-mediated response. PMID:16199477

  18. Low-coverage surface diffusion in complex periodic energy landscapes: Analytical solution for systems with symmetric hops and application to intercalation in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, Miguel A.; Otrokov, Mikhail M.; Ferrando, Nestor; Ryabishchenkova, Anastasia G.; Ayuela, Andres; Echenique, Pedro M.; Chulkov, Evgueni V.

    2016-02-01

    This is the first of two papers that introduce a general expression for the tracer diffusivity in complex, periodic energy landscapes with M distinct hop rates in one-, two-, and three-dimensional diluted systems (low-coverage, single-tracer limit). The present report focuses on the analysis of diffusion in systems where the end sites of the hops are located symmetrically with respect to the hop origins (symmetric hops), as encountered in many ideal surfaces and bulk materials. For diffusion in two dimensions, a number of formulas are presented for complex combinations of the different hops in systems with triangular, rectangular, and square symmetry. The formulas provide values in excellent agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, concluding that the diffusion coefficient can be directly determined from the proposed expressions without performing the simulations. Based on the diffusion barriers obtained from first-principles calculations and a physically meaningful estimate of the attempt frequencies, the proposed formulas are used to analyze the diffusion of Cu, Ag, and Rb adatoms on the surface and within the van der Waals (vdW) gap of a model topological insulator, Bi2Se3 . Considering the possibility of adsorbate intercalation from the terraces to the vdW gaps at morphological steps, we infer that, at low coverage and room temperature, (i) a majority of the Rb atoms bounce back at the steps and remain on the terraces, (ii) Cu atoms mostly intercalate into the vdW gap, the remaining fraction staying at the steps, and (iii) Ag atoms essentially accumulate at the steps and gradually intercalate into the vdW gap. These conclusions are in good qualitative agreement with previous experiments. The companion report (M. A. Gosálvez et al., Phys. Rev. B, submitted] extends the present study to the description of systems that contain asymmetric hops.

  19. Cultivated Grapevines Represent a Symptomless Reservoir for the Transmission of Hop Stunt Viroid to Hop Crops: 15 Years of Evolutionary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi-Ito, Yoko; Li, Shi-Fang; Tagawa, Masaya; Araki, Hiroyuki; Goshono, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Shingen; Tanaka, Mayumi; Narita, Masako; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Liu, Sheng-Xue; Shikata, Eishiro; Sano, Teruo

    2009-01-01

    Hop stunt was a mysterious disorder that first emerged in the 1940s in commercial hops in Japan. To investigate the origin of this disorder, we infected hops with natural Hop stunt viroid (HpSVd) isolates derived from four host species (hop, grapevine, plum and citrus), which except for hop represent possible sources of the ancestral viroid. These plants were maintained for 15 years, then analyzed the HpSVd variants present. Here we show that the variant originally found in cultivated grapevines gave rise to various combinations of mutations at positions 25, 26, 54, 193, and 281. However, upon prolonged infection, these variants underwent convergent evolution resulting in a limited number of adapted mutants. Some of them showed nucleotide sequences identical to those currently responsible for hop stunt epidemics in commercial hops in Japan, China, and the United States. Therefore, these results indicate that we have successfully reproduced the original process by which a natural HpSVd variant naturally introduced into cultivated hops was able to mutate into the HpSVd variants that are currently present in commercial hops. Furthermore, and importantly, we have identified cultivated grapevines as a symptomless reservoir in which HSVd can evolve and be transmitted to hop crops to cause epidemics. PMID:20041179

  20. The blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier--first evidence for an active transport of organic mercury compounds out of the brain.

    PubMed

    Lohren, Hanna; Bornhorst, Julia; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to organic mercury compounds promotes primarily neurological effects. Although methylmercury is recognized as a potent neurotoxicant, its transfer into the central nervous system (CNS) is not fully evaluated. While methylmercury and thiomersal pass the blood-brain barrier, limited data are available regarding the second brain regulating interface, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier. This novel study was designed to investigate the effects of organic as well as inorganic mercury compounds on, and their transfer across, a porcine in vitro model of the blood-CSF barrier for the first time. The barrier system is significantly more sensitive towards organic Hg compounds as compared to inorganic compounds regarding the endpoints cytotoxicity and barrier integrity. Whereas there are low transfer rates from the blood side to the CSF side, our results strongly indicate an active transfer of the organic mercury compounds out of the CSF. These results are the first to demonstrate an efflux of organic mercury compounds regarding the CNS and provide a completely new approach in the understanding of mercury compounds specific transport. PMID:26267314

  1. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR + PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions. PMID:26486449

  2. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR + PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions.

  3. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR + PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions. PMID:26486449

  4. Repetitive Hops Induce Postactivation Potentiation in Triceps Surae as well as an Increase in the Jump Height of Subsequent Maximal Drop Jumps

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Julian; Kramer, Andreas; Gruber, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) has been defined as the increase in twitch torque after a conditioning contraction. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hops as conditioning contractions to induce PAP and increase performance in subsequent maximal drop jumps. In addition, we wanted to test if and how PAP can contribute to increases in drop jump rebound height. Twelve participants performed 10 maximal two-legged hops as conditioning contractions. Twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were recorded before and after the conditioning hops. Then, subjects performed drop jumps with and without 10 conditioning hops before each drop jump. Recordings included ground reaction forces, ankle and knee angles and electromyographic activity in five leg muscles. In addition, efferent motoneuronal output during ground contact was estimated with V-wave stimulation. The analyses showed that after the conditioning hops, twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were 32% higher compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). Drop jumps performed after conditioning hops were significantly higher (12%, P < 0.05), but V-waves and EMG activity remained unchanged. The amount of PAP and the change in drop jump rebound height were positively correlated (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.05). These results provide evidence for PAP in triceps surae muscles induced by a bout of hops and indicate that PAP can contribute to the observed performance enhancements in subsequent drop jumps. The lack of change in EMG activity and V-wave amplitude suggests that the underlying mechanisms are more likely intramuscular than neural in origin. PMID:24147061

  5. Platelet activating factor-induced ceramide micro-domains drive endothelial NOS activation and contribute to barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  6. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  7. Carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles: fluctuation in hopping rate and variable-range hopping with respect to annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, Vali; Elahi, Smohammad; Solaymani, Shahram; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Elahi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the electrical properties of carbon-nickel films annealed at different temperatures (573, 773, 1073 and 1273 K) in the temperature range 15-300 K were investigated. The films were grown by radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering on quartz substrates at room temperature. The multiphonon hopping conduction mechanism is found to dominate the electrical transport in the temperature range 150-300 K. It can be seen that the room-temperature hopping rate (ΓRT) at 773 K has maximum value of 56.8 × 105 s-1. Our results of conductivity measurements at high temperature are in good agreement with strong carrier-lattice coupling model; on the other hand, the conductivity in the range 15-50 K is well described in terms of variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism. The localized state density around Fermi level N( E F) and the average hopping energy W hop at low temperature for the films annealed at 773 K have maximum value of 2.23 × 1023 (cm-3 eV-1) and minimum value of 9.74 × 10-4 eV, respectively.

  8. Scaffold hopping using clique detection applied to reduced graphs.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward J; Buttar, David; Cosgrove, David A; Gardiner, Eleanor J; Kitts, Paula; Willett, Peter; Gillet, Valerie J

    2006-01-01

    Similarity-based methods for virtual screening are widely used. However, conventional searching using 2D chemical fingerprints or 2D graphs may retrieve only compounds which are structurally very similar to the original target molecule. Of particular current interest then is scaffold hopping, that is, the ability to identify molecules that belong to different chemical series but which could form the same interactions with a receptor. Reduced graphs provide summary representations of chemical structures and, therefore, offer the potential to retrieve compounds that are similar in terms of their gross features rather than at the atom-bond level. Using only a fingerprint representation of such graphs, we have previously shown that actives retrieved were more diverse than those found using Daylight fingerprints. Maximum common substructures give an intuitively reasonable view of the similarity between two molecules. However, their calculation using graph-matching techniques is too time-consuming for use in practical similarity searching in larger data sets. In this work, we exploit the low cardinality of the reduced graph in graph-based similarity searching. We reinterpret the reduced graph as a fully connected graph using the bond-distance information of the original graph. We describe searches, using both the maximum common induced subgraph and maximum common edge subgraph formulations, on the fully connected reduced graphs and compare the results with those obtained using both conventional chemical and reduced graph fingerprints. We show that graph matching using fully connected reduced graphs is an effective retrieval method and that the actives retrieved are likely to be topologically different from those retrieved using conventional 2D methods. PMID:16562978

  9. Investigation of CdSe quantum dots in MgS barriers as active region in light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gust, A.; Kruse, C.; Hommel, D.

    2007-04-01

    On the way towards a quantum dot (QD) based single photon emitting device operating at room temperature (RT) we investigated the electrical and optical properties of light emitting diodes (LEDs) containing single CdSe quantum dot sheets surrounded by different types of barriers. The barriers consist either of MgS layers or a combination of MgS and ZnSSe layers in order to improve the luminescence stability of the QDs at elevated temperatures. The turn-on voltages of the LEDs at RT are in the range of 4-7 V while electro-luminescence (EL) spectra show distinct QD-related emission in the green spectral region. The LEDs containing the barriers show a factor of five lower intensity compared to the reference sample without barriers due to the tunneling process of the carriers through the barriers. However, the sample with the MgS/ZnSSe barrier has a significantly higher device lifetime under constant current driving conditions compared to the samples without the ZnSSe layer.

  10. Starting with Style: Toward a Second Wave of Hip-Hop Education Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchauer, Emery

    2015-01-01

    One fundamental breakthrough in the field of hip-hop education in recent years is the shift from understanding hip-hop solely as content to understanding hip-hop also as aesthetic form. In this article, I chart the roots of this shift across disciplines and focus on what it might mean for the future of hip-hop education, pedagogy, and research in…

  11. Effect of light on hopping conduction in kesterite CZTS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghediya, Prashant R.; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.; Ray, Jaymin R.

    2016-05-01

    Mott variable range hopping conduction in dip-coated CZTS thin films has been studied in the temperature range of 77 to 150 K in dark and under different light intensities. The films were basically p-type and photoconducting. Various hopping parameters such as, Mott characteristic temperature, density of states at Fermi level, hopping distance and hopping energy of the CZTS films were investigated for different light intensities.

  12. Dietary choline regulates antibacterial activity, inflammatory response and barrier function in the gills of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua-Fu; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-05-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of graded levels of choline (197-1795 mg/kg) on antibacterial properties, inflammatory status and barrier function in the gills of grass carp. The results showed that optimal dietary choline supplementation significantly improved lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, complement component 3 (C3) content, and the liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and Hepcidin mRNA levels in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). In addition, appropriate dietary choline significantly decreased the oxidative damage, which might be partly due to increase copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities and increased glutathione content in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Moreover, appropriate dietary choline significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1, Zonula occludens 1, Occludin, Claudin-b, c, 3 and 12, inhibitor of κBα, target of rapamycin, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, GR, GPx, GST and NF-E2-related factor 2 in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). Conversely, appropriate dietary choline significantly down-regulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ, interleukin 1β, and related signaling factors, nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ, myosin light chain kinase and Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a) in the gills of fish (P < 0.05). However, choline did not have a significant effect on the mRNA levels of IκB kinase α, Claudin-15 and Keap1b in the gills of fish. Collectively, appropriate dietary choline levels improved gill antibacterial properties and relative gene expression levels of tight junction proteins, and decreased inflammatory status, as well as up-regulated the mRNA levels of related signaling molecules in the gills of fish. Based on gill C3 content and AHR

  13. Coadministration of branched-chain amino acids and lipopolysaccharide causes matrix metalloproteinase activation and blood-brain barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Galant, Leticia S; Vuolo, Francieli; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Ramos, Vitor M; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, Jose Claudio F; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Soriano, Francisco G; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a severe deficiency in the activity of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Infections have a significant role in precipitating acute metabolic decompensation in patients with MSUD; however, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity in this disorder are poorly understood. In this study, we subjected rats to the coadministration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a major component of gram-negative bacteria cell walls, and high concentrations of BCAA (H-BCAA) to determine their effects on the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and on the levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Our results demonstrated that the coadministration of H-BCAA and LPS causes breakdown of the BBB and increases the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the hippocampus of these rats. On the other hand, examination of the cerebral cortex of the 10- and 30-day-old rats revealed a significant difference in Evan's Blue content after coadministration of H-BCAA and LPS, as MMP-9 levels only increased in the cerebral cortex of the 10-day-old rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the inflammatory process associated with high levels of BCAA causes BBB breakdown. Thus, we suggest that BBB breakdown is relevant to the perpetuation of brain inflammation and may be related to the brain dysfunction observed in MSUD patients. PMID:24390570

  14. Targeted Drug Delivery with Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Using Acoustically-Activated Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cherry C.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. More homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  15. "Deeper than Rap": Gifted Males and Their Relationship with Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, J. Sean; Grantham, Tarek C.

    2012-01-01

    One would be hard-pressed to deny the impact that hip hop is having on gifted students. More specifically, because hip hop is a creative and exciting male-dominated culture, gifted males gravitate to hip hop culture. From the perspective of two Black men from two different generations, this article was inspired by discussions about the role of hip…

  16. Behind Beats and Rhymes: Working Class from a Hampton Roads Hip Hop Homeplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Aisha S.

    2009-01-01

    The film documentary titled "Hip Hop: beyond beats and rhymes" captures ongoing conversations among scholars, cultural critics, and hip hop insiders about the state of African Americans by interrogating distinct expressive forms associated with hip hop culture. Durham draws from two scenes to describe her memories as the researched underclass and…

  17. Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Marc Lamont

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, educators have looked to capitalize on the appeal of hip-hop culture, sampling its language, techniques, and styles as a way of reaching out to students. But beyond a fashionable hipness, what does hip-hop have to offer our schools? In this revelatory new book, Marc Lamont Hill shows how a serious engagement with hip-hop culture…

  18. Wish to Live: The Hip-Hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader. Educational Psychology. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ruth Nicole, Ed.; Kwakye, Chamara Jewel, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Wish To Live: The Hip-hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader" moves beyond the traditional understanding of the four elements of hip-hop culture--rapping, breakdancing, graffiti art, and deejaying--to articulate how hip-hop feminist scholarship can inform educational practices and spark, transform, encourage, and sustain local and global youth community…

  19. Sequential sampling for estimation and classification of the incidence of hop powdery mildew I: Leaf sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop powdery mildew (caused by Podosphaera macularis) is an important disease of hops (Humulus lupulus) in the Pacific Northwest. Sequential sampling models for estimation and classification of the incidence of powdery mildew on leaves of hop were developed based on the beta-binomial distribution, u...

  20. Precision QTL mapping of downy mildew resistance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop Downy mildew (DM) is an obligate parasite causing severe losses in hop if not controlled. Resistance to this pathogen is a primary goal for hop breeding programs. The objective of this study was to identify QTLs linked to DM resistance. Next-generation-sequencing was performed on a mapping po...