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Sample records for activated bleaching agent

  1. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms. PMID:17625621

  2. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  3. The effect of two bleaching agents on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy: An ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Ramachandran, Anil Kumar; Indira, Rajamani

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of in-office bleaching agents,–35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agents, on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Forty noncarious, craze-free human maxillary incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used in this study. Baseline Raman spectra from each specimen were obtained before the application of the bleaching agent to assess the phosphate content present in the teeth. The teeth were divided into two groups: Group A – bleached with pola office bleach (35% hydrogen peroxide, potassium nitrate) (light activated). Group B – bleached with opalescence Xtra bleach (38% hydrogen peroxide potassium nitrate and fluoride) (chemical activated). After the bleaching procedure, the treated specimens were taken to obtain Raman spectra to assess the phosphate loss after bleaching treatment. Results: The results showed that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed less phosphate loss when compared with the light activated bleaching agent. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed minimal phosphate loss when compared to light activated bleaching agent. The chemically activated bleaching agent was better than the light activated bleaching agent when values were evaluated statistically. PMID:23230356

  4. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  5. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  6. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  7. INTRAPULPAL TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING BLEACHING WITH VARIOUS ACTIVATION MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Michida, Sílvia Masae de Araujo; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Marimoto, Ângela Regina Kimie; Garakis, Márcia Carneiro Valera; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. Material and Methods: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12): (G1) Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2) Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3) Bleaching gel + LED, (G4) Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (°C) in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV) values were: 1.5°C (G1), 2.9°C (G2), 1.7°C (G3) and 6.9°C (G4). When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05), but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05) intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05) from each other. Conclusions: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group. PMID:19936522

  8. Effectiveness of dental bleaching in depth after using different bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Débora A N L.; Aguiar, Flávio H B.; Bertoldo, Carlos E S.; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B.; Lovadino, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of low- and high-concentration bleaching agents on enamel and deep dentin. Study design: Stained bovine incisors fragments were randomized placed into 10 groups (n=5), according to the sample thicknesses (2.0 mm or 3.5 mm) and bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (4 h a day/21 days); 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with calcium (1:30 h a day/21 days); HP 20% with calcium (50 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% (3 x 15 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% with calcium (40 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval). The samples were stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. The color change was evaluated using a spectrophotometer at the initial analysis, after artificially staining with black tea and after each of the bleaching weeks, and data was expressed in CIE Lab System values. The L* coordinate data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test and the ?E values data was submitted for analysis of variance in a split-plot ANOVA and Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: None of the bleaching agents tested differed from the reflectance values on the enamel surface. For deep dentin HP 20% and HP 35%, both with calcium, showed the lowest reflectance values, which differed from CP 10%. Conclusion: It is concluded that high concentration hydrogen peroxide with calcium was less effective in deep dentin than 10% carbamide peroxide. Key words:Dental bleaching; hydrogen peroxide; carbamide peroxide; dental staining. PMID:24455056

  9. Effect of bleaching agent on dental ceramics roughness.

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, Aleska D; Passos, Sheila P; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Pereira, Sarina Mb; Vásquez, Vanessa Zc; Bottino, Marco A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) on the roughness of two dental ceramics in vitro, and to analyze the surface by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Two bleaching agents (10% and 16%/Whiteness, FGM Gel) and two microparticle feldspathic ceramics (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were used. Forty disks of Vita VM7 and Vita VM13 ceramic were manufactured, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm high, in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations, and were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): (1) VM7 + Whiteness 10%; (2) VM7 + Whiteness 16%; (3) VM13 + Whiteness 10%; (4) VM13 + Whiteness 16%. The bleaching agent was applied for 8 hours a day for 15 days and during the intervals the test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The roughness (Ra) of the test specimens was evaluated before and after exposure to the bleaching agents using a laser roughness meter and the topographic description was analyzed by SEM. The statistical analysis of roughness data showed significant differences in the VM7 groups, using paired t-test, p = 0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p = 0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p = 0.001) and two-sample t-test (VM7 p = 0.047), and no significant difference was found among VM13 groups. The qualitative SEM analysis showed different degrees of surface changes. The results suggest that the roughness of the tested ceramic surfaces increased after exposure to the bleaching agents.

  10. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  11. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  12. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  13. The influence of bleaching agent and temperature on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of fluid whey and whey retentate.

    PubMed

    Fox, A J; Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2013-10-01

    Fluid whey or retentate are often bleached to remove residual annatto Cheddar cheese colorant, and this process causes off-flavors in dried whey proteins. This study determined the impact of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components in fluid whey and fluid whey retentate. Freshly manufactured liquid whey (6.7% solids) or concentrated whey protein (retentate) (12% solids, 80% protein) were bleached using benzoyl peroxide (BP) at 100 mg/kg (w/w) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 250 mg/kg (w/w) at 5 °C for 16 h or 50 °CC for 1 h. Unbleached controls were subjected to a similar temperature profile. The experiment was replicated three times. Annatto destruction (bleaching efficacy) among treatments was compared, and volatile compounds were extracted and separated using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). Bleaching efficacy of BP was higher than HP (P < 0.05) for fluid whey at both 5 and 50 °C. HP bleaching efficacy was increased in retentate compared to liquid whey (P < 0.05). In whey retentate, there was no difference between bleaching with HP or BP at 50 or 5 °C (P > 0.05). Retentate bleached with HP at either temperature had higher relative abundances of pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, and octanal than BP bleached retentate (P < 0.05). Liquid wheys generally had lower concentrations of selected volatiles compared to retentates. These results suggest that the highest bleaching efficacy (within the parameters evaluated) in liquid whey is achieved using BP at 5 or 50 °C and at 50 °C with HP or BP in whey protein retentate. PMID:24102418

  14. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts. PMID:16130860

  15. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  16. Susceptibility of Enamel Treated with Bleaching Agents to Mineral Loss after Cariogenic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tezel, Hüseyin; Atalayin, Cigdem; Erturk, Ozlem; Karasulu, Ercument

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Controversial reports exist whether bleaching agents cause a susceptibility to demineralization. The aim of this study was to compare the calcium loss of enamel treated with different bleaching agents and activation methods. Method and Materials. The specimens obtained from human premolars were treated in accordance with manufacturer protocols; 10% carbamide peroxide, 38% hydrogen peroxide light-activated, 38% hydrogen peroxide laser-activated, and no treatment (control). After cariogenic challenge calcium concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results. No differences were found between the calcium loss of the laser-activated group and 10% carbamide peroxide group (p > 0.05). However, the differences between laser-activated and control groups were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The differences between 10% carbamide peroxide and the control group were not significant (p > 0.05). On the other hand, the light-activated group showed a significantly higher calcium loss compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions. The results show that bleaching agents may cause calcium loss but it seems to be a negligible quantity for clinical aspects. PMID:23008715

  17. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  18. Regeneration of bleaching clay waste by chemical activation with chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chen, H P; Hsieh, M F; Sun, H F; Lai, C W

    2003-04-01

    Spent bleaching earth (SBE) was regenerated by chemical activation with low cost and low pollution chlorides as activating agents. Under the conditions of activation temperature of 600d egrees C and holding time of 1 h investigated, results show that fresh bleaching earth and regenerated bleaching earth are type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous structure. It is also found that the effect of the regeneration treatment studied in the present work on the pore structures and chemical properties of the resulting solids is negligible compared to the fresh bleaching earth. On the other hand, the pore properties of these chemically activated solids are higher than those of the sample regenerated from heat regeneration, but only approximate 45% of surface area are reclaimed. It implies that the carbon residues could be retained within pores and/or clogs the entrance of pores, resulting in a decrease in pore properties.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  20. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2). PMID:21946494

  1. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  2. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  3. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment.

  4. Temperature rise during experimental light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface and intrapulpal temperatures after treatments with different bleaching gels subjected to different types of light activation. A K-type thermocouple and infrared thermometer were used to measure the temperature increase during the 15- or 30-min treatment period. Light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 405 nm (LED405), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and femtosecond laser were tested and compared to ZOOM2. The tooth surface was treated with five bleaching agents and Vaseline which served as a control.The generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was applied for testing the differences in temperature increase. The ZOOM2 light source led to the largest increase in mean pulpal and tooth surface temperatures of 21.1 and 22.8 °C, followed by focused femtosecond laser which increased the pulpal and surface temperatures by up to 15.7 and 16.8 °C. Treatments with unfocused femtosecond laser, LED405, and OLED induced significantly lower mean temperature increases (p < 0.001 for each comparison with ZOOM2 and focused femtosecond laser), both in the pulp chamber (up to 2.7, 2.5, and 1.4 °C) and at the tooth surface (up to 3.2, 3.4, and 1.8 °C). Significant differences between pulp chamber and tooth surface measurements were obtained for all types of bleaching gel, during treatments with ZOOM2 (p < 0.001), LED405 (p < 0.001), and unfocused (p < 0.001) and focused femtosecond laser (p ≤ 0.002). Different bleaching agents or Vaseline can serve as an isolating layer. Focused femtosecond laser and ZOOM2 produced large temperature increases in the pulp chamber and at the tooth surface. Caution is advised when using these types of light activation, while LED405, OLED, and unfocused femtosecond laser could be safely used.

  5. IN VITRO STUDY OF THE PULP CHAMBER TEMPERATURE RISE DURING LIGHT-ACTIVATED BLEACHING

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)-laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38±0.66°C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29±0.13°C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35±0.15°C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64°C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12°C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11°C). LED and LED-laser system did not differ

  6. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rokaya, Mohammad E.; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26257782

  7. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  8. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Lousada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents. PMID:27008262

  9. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  10. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    CINTRA, Luciano Tavares Angelo; BENETTI, Francine; FERREIRA, Luciana Louzada; RAHAL, Vanessa; ERVOLINO, Edilson; JACINTO, Rogério de Castilho; GOMES, João Eduardo; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  11. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  12. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  13. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Influence of bleaching agents and desensitizing varnishes on the water content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Betke, Herbert; Kahler, Elke; Reitz, Angelika; Hartmann, Gerald; Lennon, Aine; Attin, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the possible dehydration of dentin caused by bleaching agents. Furthermore, it tested whether protective dentin varnishes can maintain the physiological moisture of dentin during bleaching treatment. Fifty-five standardized dentin cylinders were prepared from freshly extracted bovine incisors under constant water irrigation. Prior to bleaching, the treatment specimens were conditioned at room temperature in a hygrophor for 14 days. The samples were divided into 11 groups. The Group A specimens, which were completely dehydrated, and Group B, which was stored for 2 weeks in a hygrophor, served as controls (A, B n=5). The other samples (n=10 each group) were coated with Vivasens [VS] (C), Bilfuorid [BF] (D) and Seal&Protect [SP] (E). Five specimens from each group (C-E) were subsequently treated with an experimental bleaching gel (Exp BG) (20% carbamide peroxide [CP], glycerine-based gel): Cb, Db, Eb. The remaining specimens were bleached with Exp BG (F) only, Vivastyle (G: 16% CP, glycerine-based gel) or Vivastyle Paint On (H: 6% CP-varnish) for 7 days (n=5 each group) with bleaching time for gels: 2 hours/day, paint on: 20 minutes/day. After the respective treatments, the overall water content of each specimen was determined using the analytical method of Karl-Fischer-titration. The water content of bovine dentin (Group B, mean%+/-SD) obtained in this study amounted to 15.24+/-0.4. All bleaching products significantly reduced the water content compared to the controls (exp BG: 13.32+/-0.47, Vivastyle 13.2+/-0.27, paint on 13.72+/-0.54; p<0.05). Also, application of SP before bleaching resulted in reduced water content (14.06+/-0.12; p=0.0005). However, bleaching with exp BG following use of VS (14.99+/-0.42) or SP (13.85+/-0.26) did not result in a reduction of water content in dentin. Pretreatment with BF did not protect dentin from water loss during bleaching (12.44+/-0.38; bi p=0.0009). All glycerine-based bleaching products used

  15. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components. PMID:25841347

  16. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components.

  17. Comparative clinical and psychosocial benefits of tooth bleaching: different light activation of a 38% peroxide gel in a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Calderini, Angelo; Sciara, Simona; Semeria, Chiara; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Polizzi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Tooth bleaching is a widespread dental treatment with important psychosocial antecedents and outcomes involved. In the activation of in-office bleaching agents, a selective light radiation, that is, a diode laser seems to be a positive choice to decrease the time of bleaching without surface modification and with no residual tooth sensitivity for maximum effect and minimal clinical and psychological side effects. PMID:27525071

  18. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  19. The effect of two remineralizing agents and natural saliva on bleached enamel hardness

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Miri, Yasaman; Fard, Mohamad Javad Kharrazi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to compensate the adverse consequences of bleaching agents, the use of fluoride-containing remineralizing agents has been suggested by many researchers. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of applying two remineralizing materials on bleached enamel hardness and in comparison to natural saliva. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. Microhardness (MH) of all specimens was measured and 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied 3 times to the specimens. After completion of the bleaching process, MH of samples was measured and then enamel specimens were divided into three groups each of 10, specimens of groups 1 and 2 were subjected to daily application of hydroxyl apatite (Remin Pro) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) (MI Paste Plus) pastes, respectively, for 15 days. In group 3, the specimens were stored in the operators' natural saliva at room temperature in this period of time. Final MH of all groups was measured. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: The hardness significantly decreased in all groups following bleaching. Application of either Remin Pro, CPP-ACPF or natural saliva increased the hardness significantly. The hardness of the three test groups after 15 days were statistically similar to each other. Conclusion: The hardness of enamel increases eventually after exposure to either MI Paste Plus, Remin Pro or natural saliva. PMID:26962316

  20. Evaluation of dentin permeability after light activated internal dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Zanello Guerisoli, Danilo M; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively the dentin permeability of human teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LEDs, halogen lamp or using the walking bleach technique. Forty human maxillary central incisors had standard access cavities performed and the cervical thirds of the canals were prepared with Gates-Glidden drills up to a size 130. Roots were resected between the coronal and middle thirds and the apical portions were discarded. A glass ionomer, 2 mm thick cervical plug was placed inside the canal, at the cement-enamel junction level. Group I received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by LEDs. Group II was submitted to 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by halogen lamp. Group III received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel and the walking bleach technique was followed. Group IV (control) received a dry cotton pellet inside the pulp chamber with temporary restoration. Dentinal permeability was quantified by copper ion penetration. Linear measurements were obtained by analysis of digital images under x 5 magnification. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I, 7.1% (+/-3.2%); II, 8.4% (+/-3.0%); III, 9.1% (+/-3.0%); IV, 1.3% (+/-2.8%). One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results. Results showed an increase of permeability values for groups I, II and III when compared to group IV (control); however, no statistical differences were found between the three tested bleaching techniques. It can be concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED, halogen lamp or used following the walking bleach technique produced similar increase in dentinal permeability. PMID:17227378

  1. The effect of power bleaching actived by several light sources on enamel microhardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light sources for in-office bleaching on surface microhardness of human enamel. One hundred and five blocks of third molars were distributed among seven groups. The facial enamel surface of each block was polished and baseline Knoop microhardness of enamel was assessed with a load of 25 g for 5 s. Subsequently, the enamel was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent and photo-activated with halogen light (group A) during 38 s, LED (group B) during 360 s, and high intensity diode laser (group C) during 4 s. The groups D (38 s), E (360 s), and F (4 s) were treated with the bleaching agent without photo-activated. The control (group G) was only kept in saliva without any treatment. Microhardness was reassessed after 1 day of the bleaching treatment, and after 7 and 21 days storage in artificial saliva. The mean percentage and standard deviation of microhardness in Knoop Hardness Number were: A 97.8 ± 13.1 KHN; B 95.5 ± 12.7 KHN; C 84.2 ± 13.6 KHN; D 128.6 ± 20.5 KHN; E 133.9 ± 14.2 KHN; F 123.9 ± 14.2 KHN; G 129.8 ± 18.8 KHN. Statistical analysis ( p < 0.05; Tukey test) showed that microhardness percentage values were significantly lower in the groups irradiated with light when compared with the non-irradiated groups. Furthermore, the non-irradiated groups showed that saliva was able to enhance the microhardness during the measurement times. The enamel microhardness was decreased when light sources were used during the bleaching process and the artificial saliva was able to increase microhardness when no light was used.

  2. The walking bleach procedure: an in vitro study to measure microleakage of five temporary sealing agents.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Cox, C F; Arai, T; Nakamura, J

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro sealing capacity of five materials, each used as a temporary sealing agent for the walking bleach technique. All teeth received traditional biomechanical root canal instrumentation, after which the walking bleach agent was placed in the pulp chamber space. The occlusal access was sealed with one of five temporary materials: two hydraulic filling materials, a photoactivated resin composite, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement, and a zinc oxide phosphate cement with/without the placement of a piece of rubber sheet that was placed as a barrier to isolate filling material from the bleaching agent. All teeth were stored in a 1% solution of Alcian blue with thermal cycling stress. After 1 wk, they were sectioned longitudinally, and ranked by graded scores of 0 to 3, according to the degree of the dye penetration. Significantly less dye microleakage was observed in the two hydraulic materials than in the photoactivated resin. Both zinc oxide-eugenol and zinc phosphate cements showed a considerable amount of microleakage. There were no significant differences between the groups with and without a rubber sheet. Our data demonstrate that hydraulic filling materials provide the most favorable cavosurface seal when they are firmly packed into the cavity space to prevent microleakage.

  3. LED and low level laser therapy association in tooth bleaching using a novel low concentration H2O2/N-doped TiO2 bleaching agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra Dias, Hércules; Teixeira Carrera, Emanuelle; Freitas Bortolatto, Janaína; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo; Nara de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Since low concentration bleaching agents containing N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced as an alternative to conventional agents, it is important to verify their efficacy and the hypersensitivity effect in clinical practice. Six volunteer patients were evaluated for color change and hypersensitivity after bleaching using 35% H2O2 (one session of two 12 min applications) and 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 (one session of three 12 min applications) and after low level laser therapy application (LLLT) (780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J.cm-2, 10 s). Based on this case study, the nanobleaching agent provided better or similar aesthetic results than the conventional agent under high concentration, and its association with LLLT satisfactorily decreased the hypersensitivity. The 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 agent could be used instead of conventional in-office bleaching agents under high concentrations to fulfill the rising patient demand for aesthetics.

  4. The effect of carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila P; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Azevedo, Sarina M B; Vasquez, Vanessa Z C; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface microhardness of micro-particulate feldspathic ceramics (VM7 and VM13, Vita Zahnfabrik). Forty specimens (8-mm diameter, 2-mm thickness) were divided into four groups (n=10): GI-VM7 + 10% Whiteness, G2-VM7 + 16% Whiteness, G3-VM13 + 10% and G4-VM13 + 16% Whiteness. The home-use bleaching agents were applied for 8 hours on 15 days, and the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The Vickers hardness number (HV) was determined for each specimen. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05). The microhardness values before exposure were: g1-433 (57); g2-486 (22); g3-509 (28); g4-518 (24), and after exposure: G1-349 (32); G2-496 (95); G3-519 (38); G4-502 (81). G2 exhibited a higher and significant difference than GI in VM7 groups, and the effect of bleaching concentration was shown to be significant by the Mann-Whitney test. And for VM13, both the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests showed no significant differences. When using 10% carbamide peroxide, the microhardness of VM7 ceramic was affected, and there were no effect on the microhardness between VM7 and VM13 ceramics when 16% carbamide peroxide was used.

  5. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  6. Penetration of the pulp chamber by bleaching agents in teeth restored with various restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gökay, O; Yilmaz, F; Akin, S; Tunçbìlek, M; Ertan, R

    2000-02-01

    It is thought that externally applied bleaching agents may penetrate into the pulp chamber. This study was conducted to evaluate the diffusion of peroxide bleaching agents into the pulp chamber of teeth restored with various restorative materials. Sixty-five human extracted anterior maxillary teeth were separated into the 13 groups containing 5 teeth. Five teeth (control group) were not subjected to any cavity preparation and restoration. Standardized class V cavities were prepared in the other 60 teeth and restored using composite resin (Charisma), polyacid modified composite resin (Dyract), or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). All teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction to remove the intracoronal pulp tissue, and the pulp chamber was filled with acetate buffer to absorb and stabilize any peroxide that might penetrate. Vestibular crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to four different bleaching agents for 30 min at 37 degrees C, whereas the teeth in the control groups were exposed only to distilled water. Then the acetate buffer solution in the pulp chamber of each tooth was removed, and the pulp chamber of each tooth was rinsed with 100 ml of distilled water twice. Leukocrystal violet and enzyme horseradish peroxidase were added to the mixture of the acetate buffer and rinse water. The optical density of the resulting blue solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations resulted in a higher pulpal peroxide penetration. The highest pulpal peroxide penetration was found in resin-modified glass ionomer cement groups, whereas composite resin groups showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration. PMID:11194380

  7. Bleaching non vital primary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Roth, Faynna; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Fernandes, Kristiane Porta; Domingues, Manoela Martins; Wanderley, Márcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Trauma and pulpal infections in primary dentition are part of the routine of the pediatric dentist. Common consequences in these cases are alterations in dental color, compromising patient's esthetics and his interaction in social environment. Bleaching intends to preserve dental structure already weakened and to show immediate esthetic results. This clinical case shows a bleaching technique in devitalized primary teeth using bleaching agent with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by photo polymerizer. This technique is simple and shows immediate satisfactory results.

  8. In vitro activity of readily available household materials against HIV-1: is bleach enough?

    PubMed

    Flynn, N; Jain, S; Keddie, E M; Carlson, J R; Jennings, M B; Haverkos, H W; Nassar, N; Anderson, R; Cohen, S; Goldberg, D

    1994-07-01

    This report describes experiments assessing the effectiveness against HIV of potential disinfecting agents that are commonly available to IDU when they are sharing syringes. We exposed cell-free HIV, HIV-infected cells, and HIV-infected blood containing known quantities of HIV to household cleaning agents, alcohols, peroxide, and highly acidic materials for 1 min, in order to examine the effects of these materials on the infectivity of the HIV. Undiluted liquid laundry bleach and dilute liquid dish detergent reduced the number of culturable HIV to an undetectable level under the experimental conditions used. Diluted bleach was not completely effective. Other potential disinfecting agents, including ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, and hydrogen peroxide, were unable to disinfect high numbers of HIV-infected cells or infected blood. Liquid dish detergent warrants further study as a possible acceptable alternative to bleach. Our data provide support for recommendations to IDU that they disinfect shared syringes every time between users with full-strength liquid laundry bleach to reduce their risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV. When bleach is not available, liquid dish detergent or other available disinfecting agents such as rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or high alcohol content beverages are more effective than water at disinfecting HIV, recognizing that these materials are less effective than bleach. Although these materials are effective, they should not be viewed as a substitute for decreased sharing of injection equipment by IDU, or increased availability of sterile needles and syringes.

  9. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

  10. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel. PMID:27148658

  11. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  12. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  13. Efficacy of desensitizing agents on postoperative sensitivity following an in-office vital tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundasetty, Jyothi Kashi; Ashrafulla, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess and compare the incidence and intensity of experienced after an in-office vital tooth bleaching in case of dental fluorosis using two different types of desensitizing agents, at different time periods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine subjects with mild-to-moderate fluorosis were randomly divided into three groups of 23 each. Group I — control group (placebo), group II—potassium nitrate 5% and sodium monofluorophosphate 0.7% (Sensodent KF), and group III—Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) (Tooth Mousse). In-office vital tooth bleaching was done using 35% hydrogen peroxide liquid (Pola office) in two sessions. Desensitizing agent was applied for 10 min after each session. Postoperative sensitivity was recorded after 24 h and 7 days. The statistical analysis was done using chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: The experimental groups showed significantly less incidence and intensity of sensitivity compared to control group, whereas there was no difference between them. Conclusion: The desensitizing agents used in the study show effective reduction after an in-office vital tooth bleaching. PMID:27217631

  14. Effect of Bleaching Agents on the Nanohardness of Tooth Enamel, Composite Resin, and the Tooth-Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Abe, A T; Youssef, M N; Turbino, M L

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the nanohardness of tooth enamel, composite resin, dental adhesive, and enamel hybrid layer exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agents and analyze the tooth-restoration interface using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study used 40 crowns of bovine incisors, which were embedded in epoxy resin. A 2 × 2 × 2-mm cavity was prepared in the medial third of the flattened buccal surface of each tooth and restored (two-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 + nanocomposite resin Filtek Z350 XT). The specimens were polished and divided into four groups (n=10), corresponding to each bleaching agent used (TB: Total Blanc Office, pH=7.22-6.33; HPB: Whiteness HP Blue, pH=8.89-8.85; HP: Whiteness HP, pH=6.65-6.04; PO: Pola Office, pH=3.56-3.8), applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The nanohardness of the substrates was measured before and immediately after the bleaching procedure and after 7-day storage in artificial saliva with an Ultra-Microhardness Tester (DUH-211S, Shimadzu). Loads used were 100 mN for tooth enamel and composite resin and 10 mN for adhesive and enamel hybrid layer. For SEM analysis, epoxy replicas were prepared through high-precision impressions of the specimens. For nanohardness, the statistical tests two-way analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05) revealed that the agent with the lowest pH value (PO) was the only one to decrease the nanohardness of enamel and the enamel hybrid layer immediately after its application; however, after 7-day storage in artificial saliva, the nanohardness levels of these substrates returned to their original values. SEM analysis revealed small gaps between tooth enamel and adhesive after the exposure to all bleaching agents; however, the most evident gap in the tooth-restoration interface was observed immediately after application of agent PO. No bleaching agent used changed the nanohardness of the composite resin and adhesive layer.

  15. Effect of Bleaching Agents on the Nanohardness of Tooth Enamel, Composite Resin, and the Tooth-Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Abe, A T; Youssef, M N; Turbino, M L

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the nanohardness of tooth enamel, composite resin, dental adhesive, and enamel hybrid layer exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agents and analyze the tooth-restoration interface using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study used 40 crowns of bovine incisors, which were embedded in epoxy resin. A 2 × 2 × 2-mm cavity was prepared in the medial third of the flattened buccal surface of each tooth and restored (two-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 + nanocomposite resin Filtek Z350 XT). The specimens were polished and divided into four groups (n=10), corresponding to each bleaching agent used (TB: Total Blanc Office, pH=7.22-6.33; HPB: Whiteness HP Blue, pH=8.89-8.85; HP: Whiteness HP, pH=6.65-6.04; PO: Pola Office, pH=3.56-3.8), applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The nanohardness of the substrates was measured before and immediately after the bleaching procedure and after 7-day storage in artificial saliva with an Ultra-Microhardness Tester (DUH-211S, Shimadzu). Loads used were 100 mN for tooth enamel and composite resin and 10 mN for adhesive and enamel hybrid layer. For SEM analysis, epoxy replicas were prepared through high-precision impressions of the specimens. For nanohardness, the statistical tests two-way analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05) revealed that the agent with the lowest pH value (PO) was the only one to decrease the nanohardness of enamel and the enamel hybrid layer immediately after its application; however, after 7-day storage in artificial saliva, the nanohardness levels of these substrates returned to their original values. SEM analysis revealed small gaps between tooth enamel and adhesive after the exposure to all bleaching agents; however, the most evident gap in the tooth-restoration interface was observed immediately after application of agent PO. No bleaching agent used changed the nanohardness of the composite resin and adhesive layer. PMID:26266649

  16. Characterizing endogenous and exogenous peroxidase activity for bleaching of fluid whey and retentate.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2014-03-01

    The lactoperoxidase (LP) system may be used to achieve the desired bleaching of fluid whey with the addition of low concentrations (<50mg/kg) of hydrogen peroxide. The addition of an exogenous peroxidase (EP) to whey may also be used to aid in whey bleaching when the LP system is not fully active. The objectives of this study were to monitor LP activity in previously refrigerated or frozen milk, fluid whey, and whey retentate (10% solids) and to evaluate peroxidase activity in fluid whey and whey retentate (10% solids), with and without additional EP (2, 1, or 0.5 dairy bleaching units), over a range of pH (5.5-6.5) and temperatures (4-60°C). Subsequent experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between enzyme activity and bleaching efficacy. Raw and pasteurized milk, fat-separated pasteurized whey, and whey retentate (10% solids) were evaluated for LP activity following storage at 4 or -20°C, using an established colorimetric method. A response surface model was applied to evaluate both endogenous and EP activity at various temperatures and pH in freshly manufactured whey and retentate. Refrigerated or frozen storage at the parameters evaluated did not affect LP activity in milk, whey, or retentate. In fluid whey, with and without added EP, as pH decreased (to 5.5) and temperature increased (to 60°C), peroxidase activity increased. Retentate with EP exhibited behavior similar to that of fluid whey: as pH decreased and temperature increased, activity increased. However, in retentate without EP, as pH increased and temperature increased, activity increased. Enzyme activity was negatively correlated to bleaching time (time for >80% norbixin destruction) in fluid whey but a linear relationship was not evident in retentate. When fluid whey is bleached enzymatically, if pH is decreased and temperature is increased, the rate of reaction increases (e.g., bleaching occurs in less time). When bleaching in retentate, a higher pH (pH 6.5 vs. pH 5.5) is

  17. EFFECT OF CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE-BASED BLEACHING AGENTS CONTAINING FLUORIDE OR CALCIUM ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Marcelo; Silva, Alessandra Peres; Cavalli, Vanessa; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents (CPG) containing fluoride (CF) or calcium (CCa) on the ultimate tensile strength of enamel (UTS). Method: A "cube-like" resin composite structure was built-up on the occlusal surface of twenty-two sound third molars to facilitate specimen preparation for the micro-tensile test. The restored teeth were serially sectioned in buccal-lingual direction in slices with approximate 0.7 mm thickness. Each slice was trimmed with a fine diamond bur to reduce the buccal, internal slope enamel of the cusps to a dumb-bell shape with a cross-sectional area at the "neck" of less than 0.5 mm2. The samples were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=11). The control groups were not submitted to the bleaching regimen. Specimens were treated with 10% CPG gel or with 10% CPG formulations containing CF (0.2% and 0.5%) or CCa (0.05% and 0.2%). Bleached groups received the application of the 10% CPGs for 6 hours/day at 37° C, during 14 consecutive days and were stored in artificial saliva (AS) or 100% relative humidity (RH) among each application. After bleaching, specimens were tested with the microtensile method at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (5%). Results: No significant difference was observed between groups stored in AS or RH. Specimens treated with CF or CCa presented similar UTS as unbleached control groups. Conclusion: Either 10% CPG formulations containing CF or CCa can preserve the UTS after bleaching regimen. PMID:19089036

  18. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching.

  19. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  20. MICROMORPHOLOGY AND MICROHARDNESS OF ENAMEL AFTER TREATMENT WITH HOME-USE BLEACHING AGENTS CONTAINING 10% CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE AND 7.5% HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Arcanjo, Alex José; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness and surface micromorphology. Material and Methods: Enamel slabs (n=10) received the bleaching agents for 1 h/day and remained in artificial saliva solution for 23 h/day, during a total period of 21 days. Control group was composed of enamel slabs that were not subjected to treatment with the agents and were maintained in artificial saliva solution. Microhardness tests were performed before treatment application, 21 days of treatment and 14 days after the end of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed after 14 days after the end of bleaching treatment by 3 calibrated observers who attributed scores. Results: The Tukey's test (α=0.05) showed no significant differences in microhardness values among bleaching agents, at 21 days of treatment and a significant increase in microhardness for different agents after 14 days from the end of treatment. Fisher's exact test showed differences in micromorphology of enamel between control and experimental groups (p=0.0342). Conclusions: Bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide may change surface micromorphology of enamel, although no changes in microhardness were observed. PMID:20027436

  1. The effect of home bleaching agents on the surface roughness of five different composite resins: A SEM evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Ulusoy, Nuran; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Yuksel-Devrim, Ece

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) on the surface roughness of five different composite resins using profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty-six specimens (1 mm thick, 10 mm in diameter) of five composite resins were fabricated. Each composite group was equally divided into three subgroups as control, CP and HP. In control group, specimens were stored in daily refreshed distilled water during the 14-day testing period. In other groups, 10% HP (Opalescence Treswhite) and 10% CP (Opalescence PF) were applied and surface roughness values (Ra) of each specimen were measured with a profilometer at the end of 14 days. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to evaluate the surface deformations of composite resins. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Ra values of composite groups exposed to bleaching agents were statistically higher than control group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between Ra values after HP and CP application within each composite group while SEM micrographs showed higher surface alterations at HP group compared to CP. Among the composite resins tested, Ceram-X Mono revealed the lowest Ra values after CP and HP applications as seen at SEM images. Home bleaching agents increased the surface roughness of all composites. Except CP applied Ceram-X mono specimens, Ra values of all composite resins evaluated in this study exceeded the critical limit of 0.2 μm. Ceram-X mono was the least affected composite material after bleaching application. SCANNING 38:277-283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Establishment of an activated peroxide system for low-temperature cotton bleaching using N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Hinks, David; Sun, Chang; Wei, Qufu

    2015-03-30

    Cotton bleaching is traditionally carried out in strongly alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at temperatures close to the boil. Such harsh processing conditions can result in extensive water and energy consumptions as well as severe chemical damage to textiles. In this study, an activated peroxide system was established for low-temperature cotton bleaching by incorporating a bleach activator, namely N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride (TBBC) into an aqueous H2O2 solution. Experimental results showed that the TBBC-activated peroxide system exhibited the most effective bleaching performance in a pH range of 6-8 which could be approximated by adding sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system led to rapid bleaching of cotton at a temperature as low as 50°C. In comparison with the hot alkaline peroxide bleaching system, the TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system provided cotton fabric with an equivalent degree of whiteness, higher degree of polymerization, and slightly lower water absorbency. The new activated peroxide system may provide a more environmentally benign approach to cotton bleaching.

  3. Establishment of an activated peroxide system for low-temperature cotton bleaching using N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Hinks, David; Sun, Chang; Wei, Qufu

    2015-03-30

    Cotton bleaching is traditionally carried out in strongly alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at temperatures close to the boil. Such harsh processing conditions can result in extensive water and energy consumptions as well as severe chemical damage to textiles. In this study, an activated peroxide system was established for low-temperature cotton bleaching by incorporating a bleach activator, namely N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride (TBBC) into an aqueous H2O2 solution. Experimental results showed that the TBBC-activated peroxide system exhibited the most effective bleaching performance in a pH range of 6-8 which could be approximated by adding sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system led to rapid bleaching of cotton at a temperature as low as 50°C. In comparison with the hot alkaline peroxide bleaching system, the TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system provided cotton fabric with an equivalent degree of whiteness, higher degree of polymerization, and slightly lower water absorbency. The new activated peroxide system may provide a more environmentally benign approach to cotton bleaching. PMID:25563946

  4. Oxidative degradation of chemical warfare agents in water by bleaching powder.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lihong; Zuo, Guomin; Cheng, Zhenxing; Zhu, Haiyan; Li, Shanmao

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of sulfur mustard (HD), S-2-(di-isopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) and Soman (GD) in water by bleaching powder was investigated. The degradation products were comprehensively analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and ion chromatography. Degradation pathways were deduced based on the identified products. The product analysis results indicated that HD could be degraded through oxidation and chlorination reactions, and a small portion of sulfur atoms could be mineralized into SO(4)(2-) ion. Oxidative degradation of VX could finally generate O-ethyl methylphosphonate acid (EMPA), sulfonic acids, SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions. GD would be converted into non-toxic pinacolyl methylphosphonate via nucleophilic substitution. PMID:22864420

  5. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  6. A skin sensitization safety assessment of a new bleach activator technology in detergent applications.

    PubMed

    Roggeband, R; Helmlinger, G; Smith, I; Wilhelm, K-P; Ryan, C A; Gerberick, G F

    2002-04-01

    A new chemical called nonanoyl amido caproylacid oxybenzenesulphonate (NACAOBS) is being developed for use as a bleach activator in laundry detergents. Bleach activators, like NACAOBS, are typically used at levels between 2% and 6% in laundry detergents. NACAOBS is stable in aqueous solutions, but undergoes rapid perhydrolysis when combined with water and peroxygen bleach in laundry detergents. Animal testing demonstrated that NACAOBS, as a raw material, is a weak skin sensitizer. Clinical testing, including extended simulated laundry pretreatment, human repeat insult patch testing and home use testing was then undertaken, following sufficient reassurance of 1) the weak sensitization potential of the substance, 2) its rapid degradation in laundry wash solutions and, consequently, 3) low-to-negligible consumer dermal exposures to the native substance. Results confirmed the skin sensitization safety profile of laundry detergents containing NACAOBS, namely the absence of any reaction suggestive of contact sensitization (even under exaggerated dermal exposure conditions in a detergent matrix), and a skin compatibility profile comparable to that of current detergents. Further confirmation of the skin safety profile was obtained from a successful 12-month market test of a granular detergent containing 3.6% of the new substance, during which not a single adverse skin reaction was reported. In addition, NOBS (an oxybenzenesulphonate structural analogue to NACAOBS) has similar toxicological properties and has been safely marketed in detergents at similar levels for many years. It can be concluded that the likelihood of NACAOBS to induce skin sensitization or even elicit allergic reactions in consumer detergent use scenarios is negligible.

  7. [Conservative treatment improved corrosive esophagitis and pneumomediastinum in a patient who ingested bleaching agent containing sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Iseki, Ken; Ozawa, Akiko; Tominaga, Aya; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Otani, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department 3 hours after ingestion of a bleaching agent containing hypochlorous acid and sodium hydroxide in a suicide attempt. Enhanced chest computed tomography scans taken on admission indicated an edematous esophagus and air bubbles in the mediastinum. He underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation until day 9 because of laryngeal edema. On day 10, his endoscopy indicated diffuse reddish mucosal hyperemia, erosions, and lacerated mucosal lesions in the esophagus that were indicative of grade 2b corrosive esophagitis. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor was initiated, with which the condition of the esophagus improved, and on day 44, a slight stricture of the upper part of the esophagus was observed. He was discharged on day 64 without any complaints. The ingestion of sodium hypochlorite induces corrosive esophagitis and acute phase of gastritis. Ingestion of any corrosive agent is known as a risk factor for esophagus cancer in the long-term. In such cases with esophageal stricture, esophagectomy is recommended for preventing esophagus cancer. Considering the age of the patient, however, he did not undergo esophagectomy.

  8. Biodegradation of novel amino acid derivatives suitable for complexing agents in pulp bleaching applications.

    PubMed

    Metsärinne, Sirpa; Ronkainen, Erja; Tuhkanen, Tuula; Aksela, Reijo; Sillanpää, Mika

    2007-05-01

    The biodegradability of four novel diethanolamine derivative complexing agents was examined by using two biodegradation tests standardised by OECD (301B and 301F). Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) were employed as reference substances. Biodegradation of the new complexing agents was studied both with unacclimated and acclimated inocula as well as by simulating wastewater treatment in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). These new complexing agents were of technical grade, and therefore, the results are only indicative but these new compounds hold promise for use as complexing agents in the pulp and paper industry. The novel complexing agents were not readily biodegradable but they showed slight biodegradation. Around 10-30% degradation was found in the SBR where degradation was followed by measurement of concentration. Moreover the novel complexing agents did not have any negative impact on reactor performance as measured by chemical oxygen demand reduction. In the standardised biodegradation tests at best around 50% degradation was observed with the acclimated inoculum and in the prolonged test whereas EDTA and DTPA exhibited no biodegradation. The elevated degradation in acclimated sludge indicates that the water treatment plant microbes are capable of decomposing these molecules under favourable conditions. The total concentration of novel complexing agents decreased slightly during biodegradation tests, while the EDTA and DTPA concentrations remained stable. PMID:17346781

  9. Clinical comparative study of the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide home-use and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching materials containing desensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; França, F M G; Flório, F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide (CP) home-use bleaching agents and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) in-office bleaching agents, all of which contain desensitizing agents, in a clinical trial. Four agents were evaluated: 10% CP and 20% CP (Opalescence PF 10% and Opalescence PF 20%, Ultradent, both with 0.5% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride ions), 38% HP (Opalescence Boost PF, Ultradent, with 3% potassium nitrate and 1.1% fluoride ions), and 35% HP (Pola Office, SDI, with potassium nitrate). The initial screening procedure included 100 volunteers, aged 18 to 42, with no previous sensitivity or bleaching treatment and with any tooth shade. Volunteers were randomly assigned among the technique/bleaching agent groups. A run-in period was performed 1 week before the beginning of the bleaching treatment. For the home-use bleaching technique, each volunteer was instructed to dispense gel (10% CP or 20% CP) into the trays and then insert them into his or her mouth for at least two hours per night for three weeks. For the in-office bleaching technique, the bleaching agents (38% HP or 35% HP) were prepared and used following the manufacturer's instructions, with three applications performed in each session. Three sessions were carried out with an interval of seven days between each session. The participants were evaluated before, at one week, two weeks, and three weeks after the beginning of the bleaching treatment, and again one and two weeks after the bleaching treatment ended. A shade guide (Vita Classical, Vita) was used by a blinded examiner to perform shade evaluations before bleaching and two weeks after the end of bleaching. At the time of the shade evaluations, tooth sensitivity was also recorded by asking the volunteers to classify the sensitivity during bleaching treatment as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. The present study found that 13.8% of the volunteers withdrew from

  10. Adsorption of paraquat on the physically activated bleaching earth waste from soybean oil processing plant.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chen, C H; Yang, J M

    2002-09-01

    A series of regeneration experiments with physical activation were carried out on bleaching earth waste from the soybean refining process in a rotary reactor. The influence of activation parameters on the spent clay by varying the holding time of 1 to approximately 4 hours and temperature of 700 to approximately 900 degrees C was determined. The variations of pore properties as well as the change of chemical characteristics in the resulting solids were also studied. Results showed that the resulting samples were type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous characteristics. However, the regenerated clays had smaller surface areas (70 to approximately 117 m2/g) than that (245 m2/g) of fresh bleaching earth. Under the physical activation conditions investigated, the holding time of 1 hour and temperature of 700 degrees C were found to be optimal conditions for producing mesoporous clay with physical activation. The adsorption of paraquat on regenerated sample was also evaluated. The isotherm showed that the regenerated sample still had a high affinity for this herbicide. Thus, the regeneration of this agro-industrial waste is one option for utilizing the clay resource, and it may be used for water treatment applications to remove organic contaminants.

  11. Beta-ionone activates and bleaches visual pigment in salamander photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Tomoki; McCabe England, S L; Crouch, R K; Zimmerman, A L; Makino, C L

    2009-01-01

    Vision begins with photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal to the all-trans conformation within the chromophore-binding pocket of opsin, leading to activation of a biochemical cascade. Release of all-trans retinal from the binding pocket curtails but does not fully quench the ability of opsin to activate transducin. All-trans retinal and some other analogs, such as beta-ionone, enhance opsin's activity, presumably on binding the empty chromophore-binding pocket. By recording from isolated salamander photoreceptors and from patches of rod outer segment membrane, we now show that high concentrations of beta-ionone suppressed circulating current in dark-adapted green-sensitive rods by inhibiting the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. There were also decreases in circulating current and flash sensitivity, and accelerated flash response kinetics in dark-adapted blue-sensitive (BS) rods and cones, and in ultraviolet-sensitive cones, at concentrations too low to inhibit the channels. These effects persisted in BS rods even after incubation with 9-cis retinal to ensure complete regeneration of their visual pigment. After long exposures to high concentrations of beta-ionone, recovery was incomplete unless 9-cis retinal was given, indicating that visual pigment had been bleached. Therefore, we propose that beta-ionone activates and bleaches some types of visual pigments, mimicking the effects of light.

  12. Differential coral bleaching-Contrasting the activity and response of enzymatic antioxidants in symbiotic partners under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Thomas; Hawkins, Thomas D; Becker, Susanne; Pontasch, Stefanie; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Leggat, William; Fisher, Paul L; Davy, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching due to thermal stress represents a major threat to the integrity and functioning of coral reefs. Thermal thresholds vary, however, between corals, partly as a result of the specific type of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium sp.) they harbour. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in corals under thermal and light stress has been recognised as one mechanism that can lead to cellular damage and the loss of their symbiont population (Oxidative Theory of Coral Bleaching). Here, we compared the response of symbiont and host enzymatic antioxidants in the coral species Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata at 28°C and 33°C. A. millepora at 33°C showed a decrease in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and increase in maximum midday excitation pressure on PSII, with subsequent bleaching (declining photosynthetic pigment and symbiont density). M. digitata exhibited no bleaching response and photochemical changes in its symbionts were minor. The symbiont antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase peroxidase showed no significant upregulation to elevated temperatures in either coral, while only catalase was significantly elevated in both coral hosts at 33°C. Increased host catalase activity in the susceptible coral after 5days at 33°C was independent of antioxidant responses in the symbiont and preceded significant declines in PSII photochemical efficiencies. This finding suggests a potential decoupling of host redox mechanisms from symbiont photophysiology and raises questions about the importance of symbiont-derived ROS in initiating coral bleaching.

  13. Differential coral bleaching-Contrasting the activity and response of enzymatic antioxidants in symbiotic partners under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Thomas; Hawkins, Thomas D; Becker, Susanne; Pontasch, Stefanie; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Leggat, William; Fisher, Paul L; Davy, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching due to thermal stress represents a major threat to the integrity and functioning of coral reefs. Thermal thresholds vary, however, between corals, partly as a result of the specific type of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium sp.) they harbour. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in corals under thermal and light stress has been recognised as one mechanism that can lead to cellular damage and the loss of their symbiont population (Oxidative Theory of Coral Bleaching). Here, we compared the response of symbiont and host enzymatic antioxidants in the coral species Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata at 28°C and 33°C. A. millepora at 33°C showed a decrease in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and increase in maximum midday excitation pressure on PSII, with subsequent bleaching (declining photosynthetic pigment and symbiont density). M. digitata exhibited no bleaching response and photochemical changes in its symbionts were minor. The symbiont antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase peroxidase showed no significant upregulation to elevated temperatures in either coral, while only catalase was significantly elevated in both coral hosts at 33°C. Increased host catalase activity in the susceptible coral after 5days at 33°C was independent of antioxidant responses in the symbiont and preceded significant declines in PSII photochemical efficiencies. This finding suggests a potential decoupling of host redox mechanisms from symbiont photophysiology and raises questions about the importance of symbiont-derived ROS in initiating coral bleaching. PMID:26310104

  14. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  15. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED's for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  16. Adsorption kinetics of herbicide paraquat from aqueous solution onto activated bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Lai, C W; Hsien, K J

    2004-05-01

    In the present study, the activated bleaching earth was used as adsorbent for the herbicide paraquat adsorption in a batch adsorber. The rate of adsorption has been investigated under the controlled process parameters like agitation speed, initial paraquat concentration, adsorbent dosage and temperature. A batch kinetic model, based on the assumption of a pseudo-second order mechanism, has been tested to predict the rate constant of adsorption, equilibrium adsorption capacity, time of half-adsorption, and equilibrium concentration by the fittings of the experimental data. The results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption process can be well described with the pseudo-second order equation. Based on the isotherm data obtained from the fittings of the adsorption kinetics, Freundlich model appears to fit the adsorption better than Langmuir model. In addition, the effective diffusion coefficient has also been estimated based on the restrictive diffusion model.

  17. Recovery in the health of fish populations and communities following remedial activities at a bleached kraft mill facility

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Adams, S.M.; Saylor, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    Fish populations and communities were studied over a seven year period in a river receiving bleached kraft mill effluent (BKME). The period of these investigations preceded and accompanied the extensive modernization of mill facilities and the implementation of design changes to reduce contaminant discharges and minimize impacts on the river ecology. Before modernization, reaches of the river downstream of the discharges were characterized by depauperate fish communities and severely skewed population distributions. The relative condition of both individual fish and fish populations in the river prior to remediation was consistent with effects frequently attributed to exposure to endocrine disrupting agents, including a sex ratio strongly skewed towards male fish, alterations in reproductive hormone levels, pronounced atresia of the developing oocytes in female fish, and a general absence of young fish suggesting near total reproductive failure in a sentinel fish population. Following modernization, sex ratios have trended towards normality, young fish have returned to the mainstream river, and fish communities have become more diverse coincident with corresponding decreases in body burdens of dioxin and other indirect indicators of contaminant exposure, including liver detoxification enzyme activity. The significance of these studies lie in the establishment of distinct links between both: (1) the exposure of individual wild fish to BKME and alterations in fish population and community structure, and (2) the implementation of process changes in a mill producing BKME and noticeable improvements in fish health from the individual to community levels of biological organization.

  18. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p < 0.05. The temperature increase (mean value and standard deviation) inside the pulp chamber for the HL group was 6.8 ± 2.8°C; for the DL group was 15.3 ± 8.8°C; and for the LED group was 1.9 ± 1.0°C for. The temperature variation (mean value and standard deviation) on the tooth surface, for the group irradiated with HL was 9.1 ± 2.2°C; for the group irradiated with DL were 25.7 ± 18.9°C; and for the group irradiated with LED were 2.6 ± 1.4°C. The mean temperature increase values were significantly higher for the group irradiated with DL when compared with groups irradiated with HL and LED ( p < 0.05). When applying the inferior limits of the interval of confidence of 95%, an application time of 38.7 s was found for HL group, and 4.4 s for DL group. The LED group did not achieve the critical temperatures for pulp or the periodontal, even when irradiated for 360 s. The HL and DL light sources may be used for dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  19. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct. PMID:19716523

  20. Active radiation hardening of Tm-doped silica fiber based on pump bleaching.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ying-bin; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Lei; Wang, Yi-bo; Li, Hai-qing; Peng, Jing-gang; Yang, Lv-yun; Dai, Neng-li; Li, Jin-yan

    2015-09-21

    Tm-doped fiber laser or amplifier can be applied in varied adverse environments. In this work, we demonstrate the pump bleaching of Tm-doped silica fiber with 793nm pump source under gamma-ray irradiation in the range 50Gy-675Gy. The recovery time, the fiber slope efficiency and the fiber cladding absorption spectra after irradiation and bleaching have been measured. It is found that the recovery time and radiation induce absorption are positively associated with doses, however, the fiber slope efficiency of irradiated TDF and bleached TDF are both negatively correlated with doses. Based on the simulation of the fiber core temperature, the probable mechanism of pump bleaching is also discussed.

  1. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  2. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive. PMID:15688222

  3. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  4. Characterization of a Family GH5 Xylanase with Activity on Neutral Oligosaccharides and Evaluation as a Pulp Bleaching Aid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Óscar; Fernández-Fernández, María; Valls, Cristina; Valenzuela, Susana Valeria; Roncero, M. Blanca; Vidal, Teresa; Díaz, Pilar; Pastor, F. I. Javier

    2010-01-01

    A new bacterial xylanase belonging to family 5 of glycosyl hydrolases was identified and characterized. The xylanase, Xyn5B from Bacillus sp. strain BP-7, was active on neutral, nonsubstituted xylooligosaccharides, showing a clear difference from other GH5 xylanases characterized to date that show a requirement for methyl-glucuronic acid side chains for catalysis. The enzyme was evaluated on Eucalyptus kraft pulp, showing its effectiveness as a bleaching aid. PMID:20656870

  5. Bleaching in coral reef anthozoans: effects of irradiance, ultraviolet radiation, and temperature on the activities of protective enzymes against active oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.; Stochaj, W. R.; Tapley, D. W.; Shick, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    Recent widespread bleaching of coral reef anthozoans has been observed on the Great Barrier Reef, the Pacific coast of Panama, and in the Caribbean Sea. Bleaching events have been correlated with anomalously high sea surface temperatures which are presumed to cause the expulsion of zooxanthellae from their hosts. Our experimental results show that increases in temperature significantly reduce the total number of zooxanthellae per polyp. At the same time temperature, irradiance (photosynthetically active radiation=PAR), and ultraviolet radiation (UV) independently increase the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase within the zooxanthellae of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum. Enzyme activities within the host are only suggestive of similar changes. These enzymes are responsible for detoxifying active forms of oxygen, and their elevated activities indirectly indicate an increase in the production of active oxygen species by increases in these environmental factors. Historically, bleaching has been attributed to changes in temperature, salinity, and UV. Increases in temperature or highly energetic UV radiation can increase the flux of active forms of oxygen, particularly at the elevated oxygen concentrations that prevail in the tissues during photosynthesis, with oxygen toxicity potentially mediating the bleaching event. Additionally, the concentration of UV absorbing compounds within the symbiosis is inversely related to temperature, potentially increasing exposure of the host and zooxanthellae to the direct effects of UV.

  6. Activity of bleach, ethanol and two commercial disinfectants against spores of Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carly N; Dicristina, Jennifer A; Lindsay, David S

    2006-03-31

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a small protist parasite in the phylum Microspora. Hosts are infected by ingestion or inhalation of spores passed in the urine or feces. Infection with E. cuniculi is usually asymptomatic, except in young or immunocompromised hosts. This study examined the effects of various disinfectants on in vitro infectivity of E. cuniculi spores. Spores of E. cuniculi were exposed to several dilutions of commercial bleach, 70% ethanol and dilutions of commercial disinfectants HiTor and Roccal for 10 min and then loaded onto human fibroblast cells (Hs68 cells). Ten minutes of exposure to these disinfectants was lethal to E. cuniculi spores. Additional exposure time studies were done using dilutions of bleach at 0.1, 1 and 10%, and 70% ethanol. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 1 or 10% bleach for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Growth of E. cuniculi was observed in Hs68 cells inoculated with spores treated with 0.1% bleach for 30s or 1, 3 and 5 min, but not with spores treated for 7 min or longer. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 70% ethanol for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Spores of E. cuniculi are more sensitive to disinfectants than are coccidial oocysts and other parasite cysts. The relatively short contact time needed to kill spores indicates that disinfection of animal housing may be a viable means to reduce exposure of animals to E. cuniculi spores. PMID:16368193

  7. Activity of bleach, ethanol and two commercial disinfectants against spores of Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carly N; Dicristina, Jennifer A; Lindsay, David S

    2006-03-31

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a small protist parasite in the phylum Microspora. Hosts are infected by ingestion or inhalation of spores passed in the urine or feces. Infection with E. cuniculi is usually asymptomatic, except in young or immunocompromised hosts. This study examined the effects of various disinfectants on in vitro infectivity of E. cuniculi spores. Spores of E. cuniculi were exposed to several dilutions of commercial bleach, 70% ethanol and dilutions of commercial disinfectants HiTor and Roccal for 10 min and then loaded onto human fibroblast cells (Hs68 cells). Ten minutes of exposure to these disinfectants was lethal to E. cuniculi spores. Additional exposure time studies were done using dilutions of bleach at 0.1, 1 and 10%, and 70% ethanol. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 1 or 10% bleach for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Growth of E. cuniculi was observed in Hs68 cells inoculated with spores treated with 0.1% bleach for 30s or 1, 3 and 5 min, but not with spores treated for 7 min or longer. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 70% ethanol for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Spores of E. cuniculi are more sensitive to disinfectants than are coccidial oocysts and other parasite cysts. The relatively short contact time needed to kill spores indicates that disinfection of animal housing may be a viable means to reduce exposure of animals to E. cuniculi spores.

  8. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. PMID:27197087

  9. Temperature-regulated bleaching and lysis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis by the novel pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-07-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure culture, characterized microbiologically, and shown to cause bleaching when it was inoculated onto healthy corals at 25 degrees C. The pathogen was reisolated from the diseased tissues of the infected corals. The zooxanthella concentration in the bacterium-bleached corals was less than 12% of the zooxanthella concentration in healthy corals. When P. damicornis was infected with V. coralliilyticus at higher temperatures (27 and 29 degrees C), the corals lysed within 2 weeks, indicating that the seawater temperature is a critical environmental parameter in determining the outcome of infection. A large increase in the level of the extracellular protease activity of V. coralliilyticus occurred at the same temperature range (24 to 28 degrees C) as the transition from bleaching to lysis of the corals. We suggest that bleaching of P. damicornis results from an attack on the algae, whereas bacterium-induced lysis and death are promoted by bacterial extracellular proteases. The data presented here support the bacterial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  10. Hair bleach poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002702.htm Hair bleach poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair bleach poisoning occurs when someone swallows hair bleach or ...

  11. Dental Bleaching Techniques; Hydrogen-carbamide Peroxides and Light Sources for Activation, an Update. Mini Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Féliz-Matos, Leandro; Hernández, Luis Miguel; Abreu, Ninoska

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbamide peroxides have been successfully used for many years; in the past century the dental bleaching technique suffered several changes and almost 10 years before new millennium the technique was finally recognized by the international agencies of regulation. It is important that Dentists handle the peroxides with the essential knowledge, because it is demonstrated that satisfactory final results of this technique depend on the correct diagnosis of stains, management of the substrates (enamel and dentin) and as well sensitivity. Dentists are exposed to several dental bleaching techniques, products and brands, and in the last 2 decades the devices for light activation of the peroxides have become an extensive catalog. Today, the technique is also suffering changes based on the effectiveness of the different light sources for peroxide activation and its relation to satisfactory final results of the technique. The purpose of this literature review is to explain the determinant factors that influence satisfactory final results of the techniques and provide a general overview, in order to achieve a treatment decision based on evidence. PMID:25646134

  12. Enhancement of lipase catalyzed-fatty acid methyl esters production from waste activated bleaching earth by nullification of lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dwiarti, Lies; Ali, Ehsan; Park, Enoch Y

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to identify inhibitory factors of lipase catalyzed-fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) production from waste activated bleaching earth (wABE). During the vegetable oil refinery process, activated bleaching earth (ABE) is used for removing the impure compounds, but adsorbs vegetable oil up to 35-40% as on a weight basis, and then the wABE is discarded as waste material. The impurities were extracted from the wABE with methanol and evaluated by infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, which revealed that some were chlorophyll-plant pigments. The chlorophylls inhibited the lipase during FAME conversion from wABE. The inhibition by a mixture of chlorophyll a and b was found to be competitive. The inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis of waste vegetable oil contained in wABE by chlorophyll a alone was competitive, while the inhibition by chlorophyll b alone was non-competitive. Furthermore, the addition of a small amount of alkali nullified this inhibitory effect and accelerated the FAME production rate. When 0.9% KOH (w/w wABE) was added to the transesterification reaction with only 0.05% lipase (w/w wABE), the maximum FAME production rate improved 120-fold, as compared to that without the addition of KOH. The alkali-combined lipase significantly enhanced the FAME production rate from wABE, in spite of the presence of the plant pigments, and even when a lower amount of lipase was used as a catalyst.

  13. Evaluation of the use of powdered activated carbon in membrane bioreactor for the treatment of bleach pulp mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Lange, Liséte C; Borges, Cristiano P

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the use of powered activated carbon (PAC) in membrane bioreactor (MBR) employed in the treatment of bleach pulp mill effluents was evaluated. The MBR was operated with hydraulic residence time of 9.5 h and PAC concentration of 10 g/L. The addition of PAC to the MBR reduced the average concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the permeate from 215 mg/L (82% removal efficiency) to 135 mg/L (88% removal efficiency), producing an effluent that can be reused on bleaching stage. Moreover, the addition of PAC to the MBR resulted in the reduction in applied pressure and provided a more stable operation during the monitoring period. This occurrence was probably due to the increase of critical flux after the addition of PAC. The fouling mechanism was investigated and the results showed that controlling the concentration of soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) by using PAC and keeping the operational flux below critical flux is of major importance for MBR operational sustainability. PMID:25327019

  14. Inhibition of photosynthetic CO₂ fixation in the coral Pocillopora damicornis and its relationship to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ross; Szabó, Milán; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Vass, Imre; Ralph, Peter J; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2014-06-15

    Two inhibitors of the Calvin-Benson cycle [glycolaldehyde (GA) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] were used in cultured Symbiodinium cells and in nubbins of the coral Pocillopora damicornis to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle triggers coral bleaching. Inhibitor concentration range-finding trials aimed to determine the appropriate concentration to generate inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle, but avoid other metabolic impacts to the symbiont and the animal host. Both 3 mmol l(-1) GA and 20 μmol l(-1) KCN caused minimal inhibition of host respiration, but did induce photosynthetic impairment, measured by a loss of photosystem II function and oxygen production. GA did not affect the severity of bleaching, nor induce bleaching in the absence of thermal stress, suggesting inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle by GA does not initiate bleaching in P. damicornis. In contrast, KCN did activate a bleaching response through symbiont expulsion, which occurred in the presence and absence of thermal stress. While KCN is an inhibitor of the Calvin-Benson cycle, it also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, and it is likely that this was the principal agent in the coral bleaching process. These findings do not support the hypothesis that temperature-induced inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle alone induces coral bleaching.

  15. Evaluation of bleaching efficacy of 37.5% hydrogen peroxide on human teeth using different modes of activations: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Neha; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Patil, Jaya Prakash; Singh, Thakur Veerandar; Jyotsna, Sistla Venkata; Jain, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the role of light and laser sources in the bleaching ability of 37.5% H2 O2 on extracted human teeth. Materials and Methods: About 30 caries-free single-rooted maxillary central incisors were used for the study. Specimens were prepared by sectioning the crown portion of teeth mesiodistally, and labial surface was used for the study. Specimens were then immersed in coffee solution for staining. Color of each tooth was analyzed using Shadestar, a digital shademeter. Specimens were then divided into three groups of 10 each and were subjected to bleaching with 37.5% H2 O2, 37.5% H2 O2 + light activation, and 37.5% H2 O2 + laser activation, respectively. Postbleaching, the color was analyzed for all the specimens immediately and then after 1, 2, and 3 weeks intervals, respectively. Results: All the statistical analyses were done using SPSS version 17. Intra- and inter-group comparisons were done with Friedman test and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA, respectively. Statistical analysis concluded with a significant improvement in their shade values from baseline in all the three groups. Halogen light activation and laser-activated groups showed comparatively enhanced bleaching results over no-activation group, though the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that bleaching assisted with halogen light and laser showed increased lightness than nonlight activated group. Durability of bleaching results obtained postbleaching was maintained throughout the experimental trail period of 3 weeks for both halogen light and laser activation group, whereas no-light activation group presented with shade rebound after 2 weeks postbleaching. PMID:27217641

  16. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries.

  17. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries. PMID:20860738

  18. Removing polysaccharides-and saccharides-related coloring impurities in alkyl polyglycosides by bleaching with the H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system.

    PubMed

    Yanmei, Liu; Jinliang, Tao; Jiao, Sun; Wenyi, Chen

    2014-11-01

    The effect of H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system, namely NaHCO3 as alkaline agent with the (tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED)) TAED-activated peroxide system, bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution was studied by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the optimal bleaching conditions about H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution were as follows: molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 was 0.06, addition of H2O2 was 8.6%, addition of NaHCO3 was 3.2%, bleaching temperature of 50-65 °C, addition of MgO was 0.13%, and bleaching time was 8h. If too much amount of NaHCO3 was added to the system and maintained alkaline pH, the bleaching effect would be greatly reduced. Fixing molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 and increasing the amount of H2O2 were beneficial to improve the whiteness of alkyl polyglycosides, but adding too much amount of H2O2 would reduce the transparency. In the TAED-activated peroxide system, NaHCO3 as alkaline agent and buffer agent, could overcome the disadvantage of producing black precipitates when NaOH as alkaline agent. PMID:25129762

  19. Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production from waste activated bleaching earth as raw material in a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Enoch Y; Sato, Masayasu; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    The production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry using lipase from Candida cylindracea was investigated in a 50-L pilot plant. Diesel oil or kerosene was used as an organic solvent for the transesterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. When 1% (w/w) lipase was added to waste ABE, the FAME content reached 97% (w/w) after reaction for 12 h at 25 degrees C with an agitation rate of 30 rpm. The FAME production rate was strongly dependent upon the amount of enzyme added. Mixtures of FAME and diesel oil at ratios of 45:55 (BDF-45) and 35:65 (BDF-35) were assessed and compared with the European specifications for biodiesel as automotive diesel fuel, as defined by pr EN 14214. The biodiesel quality of BDF-45 met the EN 14214 standard. BDF-45 was used as generator fuel, and the exhaust emissions were compared with those of diesel oil. The CO and SO2 contents were reduced, but nitrogen oxide emission increased by 10%. This is the first report of a pilot plant study of lipase-catalyzed FAME production using waste ABE as a raw material. This result demonstrates a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME from industrial waste resources containing vegetable oils for use as a biodiesel fuel.

  20. Application of waste activated bleaching earth containing rapeseed oil on riboflavin production in the culture of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Ming, H; Lara Pizarro, Ana V; Park, Enoch Y

    2003-01-01

    Waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) that contained 40% rapeseed oil and was discharged by an oil refinery plant, was used for riboflavin production in a culture of Ashbya gossypii. When 125 g/L waste ABE that contained 50 g/L rapeseed oil was added into the culture, the riboflavin concentration was 1.12 g/L, which was almost 1.6-fold as high as that of pure rapeseed oil. However, in waste ABE concentration higher than 125 g/L, the produced riboflavin concentration decreased, which was due to the difficulty in mixing due to the presence of a high amount of solid material in the culture. The surface of the waste ABE was smooth without a hitch, because of being covered with rapeseed oil. However, after the culture, the surface of the waste ABE seemed like that of new one, and the oil content was nearly zero grams per liter. The waste ABE, oily clay, and its black color gradually fade and yellow little by little, and finally the waste ABE changed to yellow powder. Of the riboflavin produced during the culture, 70% was adsorbed in the oil free waste ABE. With diluted alkali solution, extraction only two times yielded 90% recovery of riboflavin adsorbed in the waste ABE. The waste ABE containing waste vegetable oil was suitable for raw material for production of the value-added useful bioproducts, which might be a good model for reuse of the waste resource. PMID:12675581

  1. Oxidation of rapeseed oil in waste activated bleaching earth and its effect on riboflavin production in culture of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Park, Enoch Y; Ming, Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Long-term behavior of rapeseed oil in waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) and the effect of this oil on riboflavin production in the culture of Ashbya gossypii were investigated. Waste ABE with 40% (w/w) rapeseed oil was stored for 80 d, and the extent of oxidation of rapeseed oil was measured by several analytical methods to determine the chemical properties of the oil at different stages of the oil deterioration process:peroxide value, acid value, concentrations of organic acids, acetaldehyde and unsaturated fatty acid, and content of polymerized triglycerides. Peroxide value, acid value, and concentrations of organic acids and acetaldehyde did not affect riboflavin production. However, the content of polymerized triglycerides markedly increased the viscosity of rapeseed oil and was the main reason for the exponential decrease in riboflavin production. A good correlation between the polymerized triglyceride content or viscosity and riboflavin production in the culture of A. gossypii using rapeseed oil as the sole carbon source was found. PMID:16233590

  2. Application of waste activated bleaching earth containing rapeseed oil on riboflavin production in the culture of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Ming, H; Lara Pizarro, Ana V; Park, Enoch Y

    2003-01-01

    Waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) that contained 40% rapeseed oil and was discharged by an oil refinery plant, was used for riboflavin production in a culture of Ashbya gossypii. When 125 g/L waste ABE that contained 50 g/L rapeseed oil was added into the culture, the riboflavin concentration was 1.12 g/L, which was almost 1.6-fold as high as that of pure rapeseed oil. However, in waste ABE concentration higher than 125 g/L, the produced riboflavin concentration decreased, which was due to the difficulty in mixing due to the presence of a high amount of solid material in the culture. The surface of the waste ABE was smooth without a hitch, because of being covered with rapeseed oil. However, after the culture, the surface of the waste ABE seemed like that of new one, and the oil content was nearly zero grams per liter. The waste ABE, oily clay, and its black color gradually fade and yellow little by little, and finally the waste ABE changed to yellow powder. Of the riboflavin produced during the culture, 70% was adsorbed in the oil free waste ABE. With diluted alkali solution, extraction only two times yielded 90% recovery of riboflavin adsorbed in the waste ABE. The waste ABE containing waste vegetable oil was suitable for raw material for production of the value-added useful bioproducts, which might be a good model for reuse of the waste resource.

  3. Efficient production of fatty acid methyl ester from waste activated bleaching earth using diesel oil as organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji; Du, Dongning; Sato, Masayasu; Park, Enoch Y

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry was investigated using fossil fuel as a solvent in the esterification of triglycerides. Lipase from Candida cylindracea showed the highest stability in diesel oil. Using diesel oil as a solvent, 3 h was sufficient to obtain a yield of approximately 100% of FAME in the presence of 10% lipase from waste ABE. Kerosene was also a good solvent in the esterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. Fuel analysis showed that the FAME produced using diesel oil as a solvent complied with the Japanese diesel standard and the 10% residual carbon amount was lower than that of FAME produced using other solvents. Use of diesel oil as solvent in the FAME production from the waste ABE simplified the process, because there was no need to separate the organic solvent from the FAME-solvent mixture. These results demonstrate a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME, for use as a biodiesel, from industrial waste resources containing waste vegetable oils.

  4. Quantum Speedup for Active Learning Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Giuseppe Davide; Dunjko, Vedran; Makmal, Adi; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel; Briegel, Hans J.

    2014-07-01

    Can quantum mechanics help us build intelligent learning agents? A defining signature of intelligent behavior is the capacity to learn from experience. However, a major bottleneck for agents to learn in real-life situations is the size and complexity of the corresponding task environment. Even in a moderately realistic environment, it may simply take too long to rationally respond to a given situation. If the environment is impatient, allowing only a certain time for a response, an agent may then be unable to cope with the situation and to learn at all. Here, we show that quantum physics can help and provide a quadratic speedup for active learning as a genuine problem of artificial intelligence. This result will be particularly relevant for applications involving complex task environments.

  5. Use of 37% carbamide peroxide in the walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-02-01

    Dental bleaching represents an effective, conservative, and relatively low-cost method for improving the appearance of discolored pulpless teeth. Among the bleaching techniques, the walking bleach technique with sodium perborate associated with water or hydrogen peroxide stands out because of its esthetic results and safety. A modified walking bleach technique with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide as the bleaching agent is presented. Additionally, the adverse effects of dental bleaching in the following restorative procedures are discussed, showing the advantages with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide.

  6. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite. PMID:26731309

  7. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite.

  8. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  9. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions.

  10. Socialization agents and activities of young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Sara; Shamai, Shmuel; Ilatov, Zinaida

    2008-01-01

    Research examined the relative importance of peer groups for young adolescents as compared with diverse adult socialization agents--family, school, and community. The factors involved were teenagers' activities, preferences, feelings, and thoughts as to how they spend their leisure time, their preferences for help providers, and their sense of attachment to their community. These comparisons were made with religious and non-religious youngsters, in both rural and urban communities, and in gender subgroups. Questionnaires were administered to teenagers at secondary schools in a northern peripheral region of Israel. Findings showed the primary importance of peer groups and family in leisure activities and support, and the secondary importance of school and community. No evidence was found of a sharp generation gap. Community could also be significant if its organizations accepted youth as a peer group, and not only individually, on an equal and cooperating basis.

  11. Pediatric cutaneous bleach burns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cathleen; Cox, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Bleach is a common household product which can cause caustic injuries. Its effects on mucosal tissues and the eye have been well-described in the literature. However, there is little information published regarding the appearance and effect of bleach on a child's skin. We report three children who sustained chemical burns after contact with bleach. All three children sustained accidental bleach burns while at home, and each child had a distinct brown discoloration to the skin from the injury. All three children had treatment and follow-up for their burns. Two of the children sustained more severe burns, which were extensive and required more time to heal. There was also long-term scarring associated with the severe burns. Like most burns, pain control is required until the injury heals.

  12. Pediatric cutaneous bleach burns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cathleen; Cox, Matthew

    2013-07-01

    Bleach is a common household product which can cause caustic injuries. Its effects on mucosal tissues and the eye have been well-described in the literature. However, there is little information published regarding the appearance and effect of bleach on a child's skin. We report three children who sustained chemical burns after contact with bleach. All three children sustained accidental bleach burns while at home, and each child had a distinct brown discoloration to the skin from the injury. All three children had treatment and follow-up for their burns. Two of the children sustained more severe burns, which were extensive and required more time to heal. There was also long-term scarring associated with the severe burns. Like most burns, pain control is required until the injury heals. PMID:23545350

  13. [Liberation of active agents from coherent emulsions].

    PubMed

    Erós, I; Csóka, I; Csányi, E; Aref, T

    2000-01-01

    Drug release from coherent emulsions containing high water concentration (50-80 w/w%) was studied. Composition of coherent systems was as follows: self-emulsifying wax and preserved water. Griseofulvin was applied as active agent in suspended form. The liberation experiments were carried out with Hanson vertical diffusion cell, acceptor phase was distilled water, membrane was celophane one. It was established that the time course of liberation of griseofulvin from coherent emulsions can be characterized with a multiplicative function and the exponent of this function is about 0.5. The quantity of released drug increased linearly with the water content and it decreased exponentially with the viscosity of coherent emulsions. PMID:11379037

  14. Color of restorative materials after staining and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fay, R M; Servos, T; Powers, J M

    1999-01-01

    This study determined the effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the removal of stain from restorative materials. Color changes (delta E*) of three restorative materials [compomer (Dyract); composite (TPH Spectrum); hybrid ionomer (Fuji II LC)] when exposed to juice/tea, chlorhexidine (CH), and water (control) for 120 hours were studied. Stained specimens were treated for two 2-hour periods with a bleaching agent (Platinum Tooth Whitening System) with and without the active ingredient. Color was measured at baseline, after staining, and after treatment using the CIE L*a*b* color system relative to CIE standard illuminant A (incandescent light) as measured by a reflection spectrophotometer. Means and standard deviations (n = 5) were calculated and data were analyzed by four-way ANOVA. All variables and interactions were statistically significant. Color changes caused by CH and water were not perceptible (delta E* < 3.3). After two 2-hour treatments, the following occurred with specimens stained with cranberry juice/tea: paste with and without active ingredient perceptibly changed color of stained composite. The stained hybrid ionomer perceptibly changed color after treatment with paste containing active ingredient but did not change after exposure to paste without active ingredient. The stained compomer was not perceptibly different with either treatment. Platinum successfully removed stains from the composite and hybrid ionomer tested. PMID:10823076

  15. Neutralization of radical toxicity by temperature-dependent modulation of extracellular SOD activity in coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi and its role as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Murali, Malliga Raman; Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2010-08-01

    Vibrio shiloi is the first and well-documented bacterium which causes coral bleaching, particularly, during summer, when seawater temperature is between 26 and 31 degrees C. Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiotic association between coral hosts and their photosynthetic microalgae zooxanthellae. This is either due to lowered resistance in corals to infection or increased virulence of the bacterium at the higher sea surface temperature. The concentration of the oxygen and resulting oxygen radicals produced by the zooxanthellae during photosynthesis are highly toxic to bacteria, which also assist corals in resisting the infection. Hence, in this study we examined the effect of different temperatures on the activity of a novel extracellular SOD in V. shiloi. We also partially characterized the SOD and clearly confirmed that the extracellular SOD produced by V. shiloi is Mn-SOD type, as it was not inhibited by H2O2 or KCN. Performing chemical susceptibility killing assay, we confirmed that extracellular SOD may act as first line of defense for the bacteria against the reactive oxygen species. Since, increased activity of novel Mn-SOD at higher temperature, leads to the neutralization of radical toxicity and facilitates the survival of V. shiloi. Hence, the extracellular Mn-SOD may be considered as a virulence factor.

  16. Oxidative stress and seasonal coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; Fauth, John E; Halas, John C; Dustan, Phillip; Bemiss, John; Woodley, Cheryl M

    2002-08-15

    During the past two decades, coral reefs have experienced extensive degradation worldwide. One etiology for this global degradation is a syndrome known as coral bleaching. Mass coral bleaching events are correlated with increased sea-surface temperatures, however, the cellular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is uncertain. To determine if oxidative stress plays a mechanistic role in the process of sea-surface temperature-related coral bleaching, we examined corals along a depth transect in the Florida Keys over a single season that was characterized by unusually high sea-surface temperatures. We observed strong positive correlations between accumulation of oxidative damage products and bleaching in corals over a year of sampling. High levels of antioxidant enzymes and small heat-shock proteins were negatively correlated with levels of oxidative damage products. Corals that experienced oxidative stress had higher chaperonin levels and protein turnover activity. Our results indicate that coral bleaching is tightly coupled to the antioxidant and cellular stress capacity of the symbiotic coral, supporting the mechanistic model that coral bleaching (zooxanthellae loss) may be a final strategy to defend corals from oxidative stress.

  17. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  18. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  19. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  20. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  1. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  2. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative clinical study of the effectiveness of different dental bleaching methods - two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; de AZEVEDO, Juliana Felipi David e Góes; FRANCISCONI, Ana Carolina; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated color change, stability, and tooth sensitivity in patients submitted to different bleaching techniques. Material and methods In this study, 48 patients were divided into five groups. A half-mouth design was conducted to compare two in-office bleaching techniques (with and without light activation): G1: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Lase Peroxide - DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) + hybrid light (HL) (LED/Diode Laser, Whitening Lase II DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil); G2: 35% HP; G3: 38% HP (X-traBoost - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA) + HL; G4: 38% HP; and G5: 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (Opalescence PF - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA). For G1 and G3, HP was applied on the enamel surface for 3 consecutive applications activated by HL. Each application included 3x3' HL activations with 1' between each interval; for G2 and G4, HP was applied 3x15' with 15' between intervals; and for G5, 15% CP was applied for 120'/10 days at home. A spectrophotometer was used to measure color change before the treatment and after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate tooth sensitivity before the treatment, immediately following treatment, 24 h after and finally 1 week after. Results Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between in-office bleaching with or without HL activation related to effectiveness; nevertheless the time required was less with HL. Statistical differences were observed between the results after 24 h, 1 week and 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months (intergroup). Immediately, in-office bleaching increased tooth sensitivity. The groups activated with HL required less application time with gel. Conclusion All techniques and bleaching agents used were effective and demonstrated similar behaviors. PMID:23032205

  4. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  5. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  6. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules. PMID:21882590

  7. Effect of hair dyes and bleach on the hair protein patterns as revealed by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Komoriya, H; Bunai, Y; Yamada, S; Jiang, X Y; Ohya, I

    1991-06-01

    The effect of hair dyes, i.e., temporary, semi-permanent, or permanent hair dyes, or hair bleach on the isoelectric focusing (IEF) hair protein patterns was studied. A permanent hair dye (metallic, alkaline oxidative, or acidic oxidative) and hair bleach induced changes in the IEF hair protein patterns and in the intensity of hair protein bands. The changes in the IEF patterns, caused by the alkaline oxidative dye or the bleach, are considered to result from the combined effect of an alkaline agent and an oxidative agent in the alkaline oxidative dye and in the hair bleach.

  8. Effect of hair dyes and bleach on the hair protein patterns as revealed by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Komoriya, H; Bunai, Y; Yamada, S; Jiang, X Y; Ohya, I

    1991-06-01

    The effect of hair dyes, i.e., temporary, semi-permanent, or permanent hair dyes, or hair bleach on the isoelectric focusing (IEF) hair protein patterns was studied. A permanent hair dye (metallic, alkaline oxidative, or acidic oxidative) and hair bleach induced changes in the IEF hair protein patterns and in the intensity of hair protein bands. The changes in the IEF patterns, caused by the alkaline oxidative dye or the bleach, are considered to result from the combined effect of an alkaline agent and an oxidative agent in the alkaline oxidative dye and in the hair bleach. PMID:1889397

  9. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent. PMID:24828134

  10. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  11. The effects of coral bleaching on settlement preferences and growth of juvenile butterflyfishes.

    PubMed

    Cole, A J; Lawton, R J; Pisapia, C; Pratchett, M S

    2014-07-01

    Coral bleaching and associated mortality is an increasingly prominent threat to coral reef ecosystems. Although the effects of bleaching-induced coral mortality on reef fishes have been well demonstrated, corals can remain bleached for several weeks prior to recovery or death and little is known about how bleaching affects resident fishes during this time period. This study compared growth rates of two species of juvenile butterflyfishes (Chaetodon aureofasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus) that were restricted to feeding upon either bleached or healthy coral tissue of Acropora spathulata or Pocillopora damicornis. Coral condition (bleached vs. unbleached) had no significant effects on changes in total length or weight over a 23-day period. Likewise, in a habitat choice experiment, juvenile butterflyfishes did not discriminate between healthy and bleached corals, but actively avoided using recently dead colonies. These results indicate that juvenile coral-feeding fishes are relatively robust to short term effects of bleaching events, provided that the corals do recover.

  12. Effect of In-Office Bleaching on Color and Surface Roughness of Composite Restoratives

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Randa; Ahmed, Doa; Yousry, Mai; El-Badrawy, Wafa; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine color changes and surface roughness of composites when they were subjected to in-office bleaching. Methods: 12 discs 15 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared from two shades (A2 & A4) of two composites, Durafil VS (DF) and TPH3 (TPH). Specimens were polished and stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before being subjected to bleaching, staining, and re-bleaching. Each of the groups of specimens (DF-A2, DF-A4, TPH-A2 and TPH-A4) were subdivided into three subgroups (n=4) and bleached with Beyond, LumaWhite-Plus, and Opalescence-Boost. Specimens were then stained by immersing them in a coffee solution for 48 hours at 37°C, and then they were re-bleached. Colorimetric measurements were performed at baseline, after bleaching, after staining, and after re-bleaching. Surface roughness was determined with environmental SEM before and after bleaching. Data were statistically-analyzed. Results: None of the bleaching systems notably changed the color of composites (delta-E<2). Coffee staining affected DF specimens more than TPH. Stained specimens showed variable responses to whitening with no significant color change observed with TPH (delta-E<2) and significant changes observed with DF. Surface roughness significantly changed with bleaching, but the degree varied according to composite shade and bleaching agent. Conclusions: Three in-office bleaching agents had no significant color changes on two composites. DF showed more color change than TPH when immersed in coffee. Stained composites showed different degrees of whitening, with DF showing more response. Bleaching may adversely affect the surface texture of composites. Dentists should take into consideration that composite restorations may not respond to bleaching in the same way that natural teeth do. PMID:20396441

  13. Surface active agent for emulsion fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Y.; Furuyama, Y.; Moriyama, N.

    1980-01-08

    A method is claimed for preparing a water-in-oil emulsion fuel which comprises emulsifying water in oil, in the presence of an emulsifying agency. The improvement comprises using as the emulsifying agent, a surfactant. The formula of this surfactant is presented.

  14. Assessment of activity of topical virucidal agents.

    PubMed

    O' Connor, T

    2000-01-01

    There is currently considerable interest in the possibility of developing a potent, nontoxic anti-HIV agent that could be used intravaginally to reduce the risks of transmission of HIV. Worldwide up to 80% of HIV infections have been acquired heterosexually. Projections suggest that by the year 2000 approx 25 million individuals worldwide will have been infected by heterosexual transmission. This spread of infection is particularly rapid in parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. In the absence of a prophylactic vaccine, there is an urgent need to develop safe, effective, female-controlled, topical virucidal preparations to prevent sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Many assays directed against the virus have had problems with removal of the presumptive agents, which in many cases are toxic to the cell culture system. Methods have includes dilution, centrifugation, and erythrocyte ghost preparations, but these have problems with virus dilution and an inability to examine the kinetics of inactivation. PMID:21331911

  15. Chemical analysis of bleach and hydroxide-based solutions after decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, F B; Gravett, M R; Self, A J; Wang, M; Chua, Hoe-Chee; Hoe-Chee, C; Lee, H S Nancy; Sim, N Lee Hoi; Jones, J T A; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    Detailed chemical analysis of solutions used to decontaminate chemical warfare agents can be used to support verification and forensic attribution. Decontamination solutions are amongst the most difficult matrices for chemical analysis because of their corrosive and potentially emulsion-based nature. Consequently, there are relatively few publications that report their detailed chemical analysis. This paper describes the application of modern analytical techniques to the analysis of decontamination solutions following decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). We confirm the formation of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine following decontamination of VX with hypochlorite-based solution, whereas they were not detected in extracts of hydroxide-based decontamination solutions by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We report the electron ionisation and chemical ionisation mass spectroscopic details, retention indices, and NMR spectra of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine, as well as analytical methods suitable for their analysis and identification in solvent extracts and decontamination residues.

  16. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching. PMID:27148662

  17. Nitric oxide mediates coral bleaching through an apoptotic-like cell death pathway: evidence from a model sea anemone-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Thomas D; Bradley, Benjamin J; Davy, Simon K

    2013-12-01

    Coral bleaching (involving the loss of symbiotic algae from the cnidarian host) is a major threat to coral reefs and appears to be mediated at the cellular level by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we examined the specific role of NO in bleaching using the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, a model system for the study of corals. Exposure of A. pulchella to high-temperature shock (26-33°C over <1 h) or an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione) resulted in significant increases in host caspase-like enzyme activity. These responses were reflected in the intensities of bleaching, which were significantly higher in heat- or NO-treated specimens than in controls maintained in seawater at 26°C. Notably, the inhibition of caspase-like activity prevented bleaching even in the presence of an NO donor or at elevated temperature. The additional use of an NO scavenger controlled for effects mediated by agents other than NO. We also exposed A. pulchella to a more ecologically relevant treatment (an increase from 26 to 33°C over 6-7 d). Again, host NO synthesis correlated with the activation of caspase-like enzyme activity. Therefore, we conclude that NO's involvement in cnidarian bleaching arises through the regulation of host apoptotic pathways. PMID:23934282

  18. Nitric oxide mediates coral bleaching through an apoptotic-like cell death pathway: evidence from a model sea anemone-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Thomas D; Bradley, Benjamin J; Davy, Simon K

    2013-12-01

    Coral bleaching (involving the loss of symbiotic algae from the cnidarian host) is a major threat to coral reefs and appears to be mediated at the cellular level by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we examined the specific role of NO in bleaching using the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, a model system for the study of corals. Exposure of A. pulchella to high-temperature shock (26-33°C over <1 h) or an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione) resulted in significant increases in host caspase-like enzyme activity. These responses were reflected in the intensities of bleaching, which were significantly higher in heat- or NO-treated specimens than in controls maintained in seawater at 26°C. Notably, the inhibition of caspase-like activity prevented bleaching even in the presence of an NO donor or at elevated temperature. The additional use of an NO scavenger controlled for effects mediated by agents other than NO. We also exposed A. pulchella to a more ecologically relevant treatment (an increase from 26 to 33°C over 6-7 d). Again, host NO synthesis correlated with the activation of caspase-like enzyme activity. Therefore, we conclude that NO's involvement in cnidarian bleaching arises through the regulation of host apoptotic pathways.

  19. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals

    PubMed Central

    Manzello, Derek P.; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B.; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C.; Nemeth, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community. PMID:17606914

  20. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Manzello, Derek P; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C; Nemeth, Richard S

    2007-07-17

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community.

  1. Treatment of bleached wool with trans-glutaminases to enhance tensile strength, whiteness, and alkali resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Lessan, Fatemeh; Pajootan, Elmira; Dadashian, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Trans-glutaminases is known as a cross-linking enzyme for proteins. Wool is a proteinous fiber conventionally is treated through several processes to obtain the desirable characteristics. Bleaching is also one of the most important processes usually carried out by using an oxidizing agent in a conventional method. The tensile strength of wool yarns was reduced as a consequence of oxidative bleaching. Here, with the help of microbial trans-glutaminases (m-TGases), a novel bleaching process was disclosed in a way to obtain a bleached wool yarn with no significant reduction in the tensile strength. The results confirmed that the bleached wool yarns with H(2)O(2) could be modified by m-TGases post-treatment. The m-TGases treatment on the bleached wool yarns improved the tensile strength and whiteness along with the higher alkali resistance. PMID:21638062

  2. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  3. Color alteration in teeth subjected to different bleaching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briso, A. L. F.; Fonseca, M. S. M.; de Almeida, L. C. A. G.; Mauro, S. J.; Dos Santos, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the color alteration of teeth subjected to the action of different bleaching agents and the influence of light sources commonly used in association with these products, In GI, the specimens remained immersed in artificial saliva. The specimens in GII were bleached with a 10% carbamide peroxide gel 4 hours/day during 3 weeks; the teeth in the other three groups were subjected to three sessions of three 10-min applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel at 7-day intervals. In GIII, no light was used, while in GIV and GV the gel was associated with a quartz-tungsten-halogen light and a LED/laser source, respectively. The teeth color was evaluated before and 7 days after the bleaching sessions by reflectance spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Fisher's test (α = 0.05), and showed that a significant color change was obtained in all treated groups. After the first week of treatment and at the end of it, the bleaching protocols showed similar results. The results of the present study indicate that association of a light source is not necessary to obtain the bleaching effect and that optimal bleaching can be achieved with all techniques tested.

  4. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching. PMID:27508161

  5. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs.

  6. THE INTERPLAY OF LIGHT AND HEAT IN BLEACHING RHODOPSIN

    PubMed Central

    St. George, Robert C. C.

    1952-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the pigment of the retinal rods, can be bleached either by light or by high temperature. Earlier work had shown that when white light is used the bleaching rate does not depend on temperature, and so must be independent of the internal energy of the molecule. On the other hand thermal bleaching in the dark has a high temperature dependence from which one can calculate that the reaction has an apparent activation energy of 44 kg. cal. per mole. It has now been shown that the bleaching rate of rhodopsin becomes temperature-dependent in red light, indicating that light and heat cooperate in activating the molecule. Apparently thermal energy is needed for bleaching at long wave lengths where the quanta are not sufficiently energy-rich to bring about bleaching by themselves. The temperature dependence appears at 590 mµ. This is the longest wave length at which bleaching by light proceeds without thermal activation, and corresponds to a quantum energy of 48.5 kg. cal. per mole. This value of the minimum energy to bleach rhodopsin by light alone is in agreement with the activation energy of thermal bleaching in the dark. At wave lengths between 590 and 750 mµ, the longest wave length at which the bleaching rate was fast enough to study, the sum of the quantum energy and of the activation energy calculated from the temperature coefficients remains between 44 and 48.5 kg. cal. This result shows that in red light the energy deficit of the quanta can be made up by a contribution of thermal energy from the internal degrees of freedom of the rhodopsin molecule. The absorption spectrum of rhodopsin, which is not markedly temperature-dependent at shorter wave lengths, also becomes temperature-dependent in red light of wave lengths longer than about 570 to 590 mµ. The temperature dependence of the bleaching rate is at least partly accounted for by the temperature coefficient of absorption. There is some evidence that the temperature coefficient of bleaching is

  7. Incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric components.

    PubMed

    Iconomopoulou, Sofia M; Kallitsis, Joannis K; Voyiatzis, George A

    2008-01-01

    The incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric matrixes bearing controlled release characteristics represents an interesting strategy with numerous useful applications. Antimicrobials, biocides, fungicides or drugs, encapsulated into erodible or non-erodible polymeric micro-spheres, micro-capsules and micro-shells or/and embedded into continuous polymeric matrixes, are controlled released either by particular degradation routes or/and by specific stimuli. Cross-linking, curing or micro-porosity generating agents acting during polymerization impart additional controlled encapsulation characteristics to the active substances. Release modulating agents, like retardants or carrier materials used as vehicles are often encapsulated into microspheres or dispersed within polymeric compositions for the controlled introduction of an active agent into a liquid-based medium. The aim of this review is to reveal relevant strategies reported in recent patents on the encapsulation or incorporation of low molecular weight active agents into the matrix of polymers bearing controlled release characteristics. The inventions described implicate the formation of both erodible and non erodible polymer microparticles that contain active ingredients. Modification of polymer matrix and inorganic porous carriers represent pertinent major strategies that have been also developed and patented.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue. PMID:27688375

  10. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  11. Intra-pulpal temperature rise of different tooth types during dental bleaching supported by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Strakas, D; Tolidis, K; Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Vanweersch, L; Franzen, R; Gutknecht, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of the teeth, during Er,Cr:YSGG bleaching, as well as to show which teeth are the most susceptible in terms of pulp temperature increase during laser-activated bleaching treatment. Although Er:YAG studies have been published on this subject, it is the first time Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is tested. Fifteen teeth were tested--3 each of the following--(maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, canines, premolars and mandibular incisors). The bleaching procedure comprised an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a yellow-coloured bleaching agent with a concentration of 38 % H2O2 (Power whitening, WHITEsmile GmbH, Germany). The tip used was a 6-mm long Z-type glass tip (MZ8) of a 800 μm diameter. Average output power was set to 1.25 W, pulse duration 700 μs (S-mode), whilst the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The results showed that the most susceptible teeth in terms of pulp temperature increase were the lateral maxillary incisors and the mandibular incisors. The mean temperature increase on these teeth was 1.06 and 1.00 °C, respectively, on 60 s Er,Cr:YSGG-supported bleaching.

  12. Intra-pulpal temperature rise of different tooth types during dental bleaching supported by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Strakas, D; Tolidis, K; Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Vanweersch, L; Franzen, R; Gutknecht, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of the teeth, during Er,Cr:YSGG bleaching, as well as to show which teeth are the most susceptible in terms of pulp temperature increase during laser-activated bleaching treatment. Although Er:YAG studies have been published on this subject, it is the first time Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is tested. Fifteen teeth were tested--3 each of the following--(maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, canines, premolars and mandibular incisors). The bleaching procedure comprised an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a yellow-coloured bleaching agent with a concentration of 38 % H2O2 (Power whitening, WHITEsmile GmbH, Germany). The tip used was a 6-mm long Z-type glass tip (MZ8) of a 800 μm diameter. Average output power was set to 1.25 W, pulse duration 700 μs (S-mode), whilst the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The results showed that the most susceptible teeth in terms of pulp temperature increase were the lateral maxillary incisors and the mandibular incisors. The mean temperature increase on these teeth was 1.06 and 1.00 °C, respectively, on 60 s Er,Cr:YSGG-supported bleaching. PMID:26526961

  13. Effects of LED-laser hybrid light on bleaching effectiveness and tooth sensitivity: a randomized clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolatto, Janaina F.; Pretel, Hermes; Neto, Carolina S.; Andrade, Marcelo F.; Moncada, Gustavo; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B.

    2013-08-01

    The study evaluated the effectiveness and the sensitivity of in-office tooth bleaching with the use of a hybrid photo-activation system composed by LEDs and lasers. 40 patients, both genders, aged 18 through 25 years, were randomly distributed into two treatment groups: group I, 35% hydrogen peroxide, with a total bleaching time of 135 min divided into three sessions, and group II, 35% hydrogen peroxide and photo-thermal catalysis by an LED-laser system (300 mW cm-2), for a total bleaching time of 72 min divided into three sessions. The treatment efficiency was measured by reflectance spectroscopy and sensitivity by a visual analog scale (VAS). The final luminosity value (ΔL), color variation (ΔE) and sensitivity (S) resulting from the treatments were analyzed by the generalized estimating equations method (GEEs), and Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons at 5% significance. The two groups presented similar colors (ΔE) and luminosities (ΔL) after treatment. Group I presented a greater sensitivity index (37.6 ± 5.9%) compared to group II (11.1 ± 3.3%), statistically significant at p < 0.05. The use of LED-laser hybrid light, as a catalyst of the bleaching agents, showed a significant decrease of provoked tooth sensitivity and a treatment time reduced by 53%, with the same aesthetic results as without a light source.

  14. Chalcone derivatives as potential antifungal agents: Synthesis, and antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Much research has been carried out with the aim to discover the therapeutic values of chalcone derivatives. Chalcones possess wide range of pharmacological activity such as antibacterial, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antitubercular, anticancer, and antifungal agents etc. The presence of reactive α,β-unsaturated keto group in chalcones is found to be responsible for their biological activity. The rapid developments of resistance to antifungal agents, led to design, and synthesize the new antifungal agents. The derivatives of chalcones were prepared using Claisen–Schmidt condensation scheme with appropriate tetralone and aldehyde derivatives. Ten derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of chalcone showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum. The results so obtained were superior or comparable to ketoconazole. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans nor against fungi Aspergillus niger. Chalcone derivatives showed inhibitory effect against M. gypseum species of fungus. It was found that among the chalcone derivatives so synthesized, two of them, that is, 4-chloro derivative, and unsubstituted derivative of chalcone showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as antifungal agent. PMID:26317075

  15. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  16. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W. H.; Löbenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-01

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  17. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W.H.; Loebenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-20

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  18. A review of the effect of vital teeth bleaching on the mechanical properties of tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Swain, Michael V

    2013-09-01

    Tooth whitening is considered the easiest and most cost-effective procedure for treating tooth discoloration. Contemporary bleaching agents contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. It is either applied directly or produced from its precursor, carbamide peroxide. A review of the published literature was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of whitening products on dental enamel, with a focus on its mechanical properties and the influence of various parameters on study outcomes. There appear to be considerable differences in opinion as to whether changes in mechanical properties occur as a result of tooth whitening. However, the mechanical property findings of those studies appear to be related to the load applied during the indentation tests. Most studies which used loads higher than 500mN to determine enamel hardness showed no effect of bleaching, whereas those using lower loads were able to detect hardness reduction in the surface layer of enamel. In conclusion, bleaching reduces the hardness of the enamel surface of enamel, and that is more readily detected with instrumented low load testing systems. This hardness reduction may arise due to degradation or denaturation of enamel matrix proteins by the peroxide oxidation.

  19. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  20. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  1. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  2. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  3. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW) or ascorbic acid (AA) 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time. PMID:26877990

  4. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  5. Ultraviolet radiation and coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Daniel F.; Wellington, Gerard M.

    1993-10-01

    EPISODES of coral bleaching resulting from dissociation of endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) from host coral tissues have occurred with increasing frequency over the past decade on reefs throughout the tropics1,2. These episodes have usually been attributed to increases in sea water temperatures3-10, but the mass bleaching events that occurred throughout the Caribbean during 1987 and 1990 were not readily explained by temperature alone11,12. An additional factor that may have contributed to these bleaching episodes is ultraviolet radiation in the 280-400-nm band. At many localities where bleaching occurred in 1987 and 1990, sea conditions were described as extremely calm with exceptionally clear water13. In the absence of suspended organic and inorganic matter in the water column, higher than average intensities of ultraviolet radiation probably reached all depths within the photic zone for several consecutive months. Evidence for a possible link between ultraviolet radiation and coral bleaching has not been forthcoming2. Here we report results of a field experiment showing that, irrespective of high water temperatures, short-term (three weeks) increases in ultraviolet radiation of a magnitude possible under calm, clear water column conditions can readily induce bleaching in reef-building corals.

  6. In-Vitro Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide Amorphous Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Susceptibility to Staining by Tea during Bleaching Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoom; Hashemi Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Zarenegad, Nafiseh; Tabari, Negin; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bleached enamel is more susceptible to staining, and application of remineralizing agents may decrease enamel susceptibility to staining. This study sought to assess the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on enamel susceptibility to staining during bleaching treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty central and lateral incisors and first premolar teeth were evaluated in four groups of 10. Group one specimens were subjected to in-office bleaching. Group two underwent in-office bleaching followed by surface treatment with CPP-ACP. Group three specimens received home bleaching and group four underwent home bleaching followed by CPP-ACP surface treatment. After each course of daily bleaching, specimens were immersed in tea solution. Home bleaching (15% carbamide peroxide) was performed for 14 days and in-office bleaching (40% hydrogen peroxide) was carried out in two sessions with an eight-day interval. The color of specimens was analyzed at baseline and post-intervention using Easy Shade Shade-Selection Device. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of bleaching type and surface treatment on color change. Then, the means were compared by Tukey’s HSD test (P=0.05). Results: The interaction effect of surface treatment and type of bleaching was not significant on any color parameter (P>0.05). Surface treatment had significant effects on ΔL (P=0.004). Type of bleaching had a significant effect on “b” parameter (P=0.00). The effect of bleaching type on ΔE was significant (P=0.00) but the effect of surface treatment was not (P=0.34). Conclusion: CPP-ACP had no significant effect on preventing enamel staining by tea during bleaching treatment. PMID:27123021

  7. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  8. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  9. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  10. Peganine hydrochloride dihydrate an orally active antileishmanial agent.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Tanvir; Misra, Pragya; Gupta, Swati; Reddy, K Papi; Kant, Ruchir; Maulik, P R; Dube, Anuradha; Narender, T

    2009-05-01

    Protozoic infections caused by genus Leishmania pose an enormous public health threat in developing countries, compounded by the toxicity and resistance to current therapies. Under the aegis of our ongoing program on drug discovery and development on antileishmanial agents from plants, we carried out bioassay guided fractionation on Peganum harmala seeds which resulted in the isolation of 1 as an antileishmanial agent. 2D-NMR spectral data and single crystal X-ray crystallography data indicated 1 as peganine hydrochloride in dihydrated form. The compound 1 exhibited in-vitro activity against both extracellular promastigotes as well as intracellular amastigotes residing within murine macrophages in Leishmania donovani. Furthermore, 1 also exhibited in-vivo activity, 79.6 (+/-8.07)% against established VL in hamsters at a dose of 100mg/kgb.wt. PMID:19339182

  11. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp. PMID:15279473

  12. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  13. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used.

  14. Coordinating the activities of a planner and an execution agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, Austin

    1989-01-01

    A research program was defined that will explore the link between planning and execution systems. A simple scenario was defined in which a very capable off-line planning system interacts with the user and a smaller, less capable, on-line real-time system executing plans and reacting to faults. However, the on-line execution system may have a more flexible representation of the plans it is executing. This imbalance in the capabilities of the two agents involved should clarify some of the research objectives and give an experimental framework for the work. The task is to investigate the knowledge representations and communication protocols needed to link a user stating some requirements for a task to be carried out through a planning system to the (remote) execution agent that can carry out the user's wishes. The notion that a single representation can encapsulate the expression of the user's requirements, the capabilities for action, the communication to the execution agent, the successful or faulty response from the execution agent and the means of keeping the user informed, is examined. Methods of creating plan patches to update the plans separately held by each of the parties involved to keep them in step as they each react to changing circumstances in real-time is investigated. This involves the specification of plan patch attachment points that can be understood by the recipient. Transaction based methods are also investigated for coordinating the activities of the planner with those of the execution agent and user. The trial application area for the research is in the command and control of an advanced Earth Observation Space Platform.

  15. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  16. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good manufacturing...

  17. Does a toothpaste containing blue covarine have any effect on bleached teeth? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.

  18. Does a toothpaste containing blue covarine have any effect on bleached teeth? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration. PMID:26981757

  19. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  20. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  1. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  3. Probing protein targeting to plasmodesmata using fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathryn M; MacKenzie, Katrin M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) involves the irreversible bleaching of a fluorescent protein within a specific area of the cell using a high-intensity laser. The recovery of fluorescence represents the movement of new protein into this area and can therefore be used to investigate factors involved in this movement. Here we describe a FRAP method to investigate the effect of a range of pharmacological agents on the targeting of Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein to plasmodesmata. PMID:25287209

  4. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel. PMID:25992987

  5. The Effect of Remin Pro and MI Paste Plus on Bleached Enamel Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Jaberi, Solmaz; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharrazi

    2014-01-01

    Objective The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus) and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus) and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control) were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed. Results: The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P<0.005). The surface roughness after using Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF was statistically similar to each other (P>0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness. PMID:24910687

  6. Structure-activity relationship studies of pyrrolone antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Dinakaran; Kaiser, Marcel; White, Karen L; Norval, Suzanne; Riley, Jennifer; Wyatt, Paul G; Charman, Susan A; Read, Kevin D; Yeates, Clive; Gilbert, Ian H

    2013-09-01

    Previously reported pyrrolones, such as TDR32570, exhibited potential as antimalarial agents; however, while these compounds have potent antimalarial activity, they suffer from poor aqueous solubility and metabolic instability. Here, further structure-activity relationship studies are described that aimed to solve the developability issues associated with this series of compounds. In particular, further modifications to the lead pyrrolone, involving replacement of a phenyl ring with a piperidine and removal of a potentially metabolically labile ester by a scaffold hop, gave rise to derivatives with improved in vitro antimalarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum K1, a chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant parasite strain, with some derivatives exhibiting good selectivity for parasite over mammalian (L6) cells. Three representative compounds were selected for evaluation in a rodent model of malaria infection, and the best compound showed improved ability to decrease parasitaemia and a slight increase in survival.

  7. Perspective of surface active agents in baking industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asif; Arshad, Nazish; Ahmed, Zaheer; Bhatti, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Nomana; Ahmad, Hajra; Afreen, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Different researchers have previously used surfactants for improving bread qualities and revealed that these compounds result in improving the quality of dough and bread by influencing dough strength, tolerance, uniform crumb cell size, and improve slicing characteristics and gas retention. The objective of this review is to highlight the areas where surfactants are most widely used particularly in the bread industries, their role and mechanism of interaction and their contribution to the quality characteristics of the dough and bread. This review reveals some aspects of surface-active agents regarding its role physiochemical properties of dough that in turn affect the bread characteristics by improving its sensory quality and storage stability.

  8. Vital bleach of hemorrhagic discoloration.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Schmidt, J C

    1991-05-01

    An unusual case is presented of a maxillary central incisor with hemorrhagic discoloration that was successfully treated with the thermocatalytic vital bleach technique. This case emphasizes the need for a thorough radiographic and clinical examination to include vitality tests when a patient presents with a discolored tooth.

  9. Wet deposition of the seeding agent after weather modification activities.

    PubMed

    Curić, Mladjen; Janc, Dejan

    2013-09-01

    Weather modification activities are performed mostly by cloud seeding. Some operational projects have been conducted for more than a half century and cover planetary scales. These activities have led to large amounts of seeding agents being deposited on the ground in precipitation. The main intent of this paper is to identify the spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits after hail suppression. The spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits is determined using the weather modification project measurements from seeding agent reports, two weather radars and 316 launching sites during a 5-year period. The estimated spatial distribution of the deposits is not uniform, with the maximum silver iodide amount located in the southern part of the study area (up to 140 μg m(-2)). Our results are comparable with the measurements performed by chemical analyses during other cloud seeding experiments. The maximum location coincides well with that of the maximum seeded hailstorm precipitation frequency. A new method for identifying the spatial pattern of wet-deposited material has been established. The location with the maximum amount is found. This method would be important as a means of placing samplers and monitoring at the representative sites because those are where most weather modification projects would be performed in the future.

  10. Biological activities of phosphocitrate: a potential meniscal protective agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubo; Roberts, Andrea; Mauerhan, David R; Sun, Andrew R; Norton, H James; Hanley, Edward N

    2013-01-01

    Phosphocitrate (PC) inhibited meniscal calcification and the development of calcium crystal-associated osteoarthritis (OA) in Hartley guinea pigs. However, the mechanisms remain elusive. This study sought to examine the biological activities of PC in the absence of calcium crystals and test the hypothesis that PC is potentially a meniscal protective agent. We found that PC downregulated the expression of many genes classified in cell proliferation, ossification, prostaglandin metabolic process, and wound healing, including bloom syndrome RecQ helicase-like, cell division cycle 7 homolog, cell division cycle 25 homolog C, ankylosis progressive homolog, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthases-1/cyclooxygenase-1, and plasminogen activator urokinase receptor. In contrast, PC stimulated the expression of many genes classified in fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling pathway, collagen fibril organization, and extracellular structure organization, including fibroblast growth factor 7, collagen type I, alpha 1, and collagen type XI, alpha 1. Consistent with its effect on the expression of genes classified in cell proliferation, collagen fibril organization, and ossification, PC inhibited the proliferation of OA meniscal cells and meniscal cell-mediated calcification while stimulating the production of collagens. These findings indicate that PC is potentially a meniscal-protective agent and a disease-modifying drug for arthritis associated with severe meniscal degeneration. PMID:23936839

  11. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  12. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  13. Learning Activity Models for Multiple Agents in a Smart Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Aaron; Cook, Diane J.

    With the introduction of more complex intelligent environment systems, the possibilities for customizing system behavior have increased dramatically. Significant headway has been made in tracking individuals through spaces using wireless devices [1, 18, 26] and in recognizing activities within the space based on video data (see chapter by Brubaker et al. and [6, 8, 23]), motion sensor data [9, 25], wearable sensors [13] or other sources of information [14, 15, 22]. However, much of the theory and most of the algorithms are designed to handle one individual in the space at a time. Resident tracking, activity recognition, event prediction, and behavior automation becomes significantly more difficult for multi-agent situations, when there are multiple residents in the environment.

  14. Modified Technique for Nonvital Tooth Bleaching: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Naglaa Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of a nonvital, discolored, maxillary central incisor bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with the use of glass ionomer cement as a mechanical barrier in an attempt to minimize the undesirable side effects of intracoronal bleaching. The patient was a 13-year-old boy complaining of a discolored nonvital upper-right central incisor and was selected for this study from the pedodontic clinic in the Shibin Elkom teaching hospital in June 2013. After successful endodontic treatment, the tooth was bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Xtra), activated by a standard curing light unit, and evaluated for any periapical changes by a periapical radiograph for a nine-months follow-up period. Radiographically, there was no evidence of cervical or apical resorption during the study period. PMID:26516453

  15. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  16. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  17. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Doustfateme, Samaneh; Kaveh, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6): Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique. PMID:26681849

  18. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several benzoic acid analogs showed antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis. Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids increased by addition of a methyl, methoxyl...

  19. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  20. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  1. Spring ``bleaching'' among Pocillopora in the Sea of Cortez, Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, T. C.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Warner, M. E.

    2007-06-01

    A mild bleaching event was observed among Pocillopora spp. in the southern Gulf of California in the spring of 2006. Uniform bleaching occurred in numerous colonies on the upper portions of their branches. Most (˜90%) colonies that exhibited bleaching contained a species of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium C1b-c, which differed from the Symbiodinium D1 found inhabiting most unbleached colonies. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence, indicated a decline in photosystem II photochemical activity, especially among colonies populated with C1b-c. By early August, most affected colonies had recovered their normal pigmentation and fluorescence values were once again high for all colonies. No mortality was observed among tagged bleached colonies nor did symbiont species composition change during recovery. This unusual episode of bleaching did not appear to be a response to thermal stress, but may have been triggered by high levels of solar radiation during a period of unseasonally high water clarity in the early spring.

  2. Activated metallic gold as an agent for direct methoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-12-21

    We have discovered that metallic gold is a highly effective vehicle for the low-temperature vapor-phase carbonylation of methanol by insertion of CO into the O-H bond to form methoxycarbonyl. This reaction contrasts sharply to the carbonylation pathway well known for homogeneously catalyzed carbonylation reactions, such as the synthesis of acetic acid. The methoxycarbonyl intermediate can be further employed in a variety of methoxycarbonylation reactions, without the use or production of toxic chemicals. More generally we observe facile, selective methoxycarbonylation of alkyl and aryl alcohols and secondary amines on metallic gold well below room temperature. A specific example is the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, which has extensive use in organic synthesis. This work establishes a unique framework for using oxygen-activated metallic gold as a catalyst for energy-efficient, environmentally benign production of key synthetic chemical agents. PMID:22035206

  3. Biological Activity of Coumarin Derivatives as Anti-Leishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Vineetha; Patil, Sohan; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Basu, Sudipta; Singh, Shailza

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects nearly 0.7 to 1.3 million people annually. Treatment of this disease is difficult due to lack of appropriate medication and the growing problem of drug resistance. Natural compounds such as coumarins serve as complementary therapeutic agents in addition to the current treatment modalities. In this study, we have performed an in-silico screening of the coumarin derivatives and their anti-leishmanial properties has been explored both in-vitro and in-vivo. One of the compounds (compound 2) exhibited leishmanicidal activity and to further study its properties, nanoliposomal formulation of the compound was developed. Treatment of cutaneous lesions in BALB/c mice with compound 2 showed significantly reduced lesion size as compared to the untreated mice (p<0.05) suggesting that compound 2 may possess anti-leishmanial properties. PMID:27768694

  4. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  5. Do different bleaching protocols affect the enamel microhardness?

    PubMed Central

    Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Garrido Gabriel, Taisa R. Conti; Piola Rizzante, Fabio Antonio; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Soares Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tooth bleaching tends to increase enamel roughness and porosity, in addition to reducing surface microhardness. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching treatments using different hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentrations, with and without light activation on bovine enamel microhardness. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of sixty bovine incisors were flattened and polished and the enamel specimens were divided into six groups: G1 : c0 ontrol, exposed to artificial saliva; G2: 35% HP applied in two sessions (45’ each); G3: 35% HP applied in two sessions (3 × 15’ each); G4: 35% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus hybrid light (HL); G5: 25% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL; and G6: 15% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL. After the treatment, the enamel specimens were stored in artificial saliva. The surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at the baseline, 24 h and 7 days after bleaching. The data was analyzed using the ANOVA test, followed by the Tukey–Krummer test (P < 0.05). Results: All bleaching procedures lead to a decrease in surface microhardness when compared with the control group after 24 h. The lowest change in surface microhardness was found in the specimens treated with 15% HP plus HL. However, 35% HP plus HL induced the highest decrease in surface microhardness. After 7 days of remineralization, the surface microhardness returned to normal levels for all bleached specimens. Conclusion: Therefore, it can be concluded that the bleaching protocols caused a slight enamel surface alteration. However, the remineralization process minimized these effects. PMID:25713480

  6. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; de Souza, João Batista; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05. Results: The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels. PMID:27812622

  7. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  8. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids were increased against strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis, by addition of a methyl, methoxyl or a chloro group at position 4 of the aromatic ri...

  9. Adaptive bleaching: A general phenomenon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory and field data bearing on the adaptive bleaching hypothesis (ABH) are largely consistent with it; no data of which we are aware refute it. We generalize the ABH in light of these data and observations. The population of zooxanthellae within an organism is dynamic, the diversity of zooxanthellae is both surprising and difficult to ascertain, and field experiments demonstrate both turn-over in zooxanthella types and habitat-holobiont correlations. Dynamic change in symbiont communities, and the idea of an equilibrium or optimal community that matches the environment at a particular place and time, are concepts that underlie or emerge from much of the recent literature. The mechanism we proposed to explain responses to acute bleaching appears to operate continuously, thereby enabling the host-symbiont holobiont to track even subtle environmental changes and respond promptly to them. These findings enhance the potential importance of the ABH in the outcomes of acute bleaching, which can (1) accelerate this process of holobiont change, and (2) change the set of possible trajectories for how symbiont communities might recover.

  10. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  11. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  12. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  13. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  14. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  15. Occurrence of surface active agents in the environment.

    PubMed

    Olkowska, Ewa; Ruman, Marek; Polkowska, Zaneta

    2014-01-01

    Due to the specific structure of surfactants molecules they are applied in different areas of human activity (industry, household). After using and discharging from wastewater treatment plants as effluent stream, surface active agents (SAAs) are emitted to various elements of the environment (atmosphere, waters, and solid phases), where they can undergo numerous physic-chemical processes (e.g., sorption, degradation) and freely migrate. Additionally, SAAs present in the environment can be accumulated in living organisms (bioaccumulation), what can have a negative effect on biotic elements of ecosystems (e.g., toxicity, disturbance of endocrine equilibrium). They also cause increaseing solubility of organic pollutants in aqueous phase, their migration, and accumulation in different environmental compartments. Moreover, surfactants found in aerosols can affect formation and development of clouds, which is associated with cooling effect in the atmosphere and climate changes. The environmental fate of SAAs is still unknown and recognition of this problem will contribute to protection of living organisms as well as preservation of quality and balance of various ecosystems. This work contains basic information about surfactants and overview of pollution of different ecosystems caused by them (their classification and properties, areas of use, their presence, and behavior in the environment).

  16. Occurrence of Surface Active Agents in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Olkowska, Ewa; Ruman, Marek; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2014-01-01

    Due to the specific structure of surfactants molecules they are applied in different areas of human activity (industry, household). After using and discharging from wastewater treatment plants as effluent stream, surface active agents (SAAs) are emitted to various elements of the environment (atmosphere, waters, and solid phases), where they can undergo numerous physic-chemical processes (e.g., sorption, degradation) and freely migrate. Additionally, SAAs present in the environment can be accumulated in living organisms (bioaccumulation), what can have a negative effect on biotic elements of ecosystems (e.g., toxicity, disturbance of endocrine equilibrium). They also cause increaseing solubility of organic pollutants in aqueous phase, their migration, and accumulation in different environmental compartments. Moreover, surfactants found in aerosols can affect formation and development of clouds, which is associated with cooling effect in the atmosphere and climate changes. The environmental fate of SAAs is still unknown and recognition of this problem will contribute to protection of living organisms as well as preservation of quality and balance of various ecosystems. This work contains basic information about surfactants and overview of pollution of different ecosystems caused by them (their classification and properties, areas of use, their presence, and behavior in the environment). PMID:24527257

  17. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  18. Pretty painful: why does tooth bleaching hurt?

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Kenneth

    2010-05-01

    Vital bleaching procedures are a popular means of improving the appearance of discolored teeth. There is a wide array of whitening products for home and dental office use; all involves placing peroxide containing gels or solutions in contact with the teeth. In order to whiten teeth peroxide has to be able to penetrate tooth structure and oxidize colored compounds in the dentin. Unfortunately beauty comes with a price; many patients undergoing peroxide based whitening procedures complain of bleaching sensitivity (BS) arising in the treated teeth. In BS, pain can occur in healthy intact teeth without any provoking stimulus. Currently the mechanism of nociceptors activation in BS is unknown. A more common form of dental pain-dentin sensitivity (DS) occurs when stimuli such as cold or tactile stimulation contact areas of exposed dentin in otherwise healthy teeth. In DS, stimulation of the dentin results in fluid shifts in the dentinal tubules, these fluid shifts activate mechanosensitive nerve endings in the deep dentin and pulp. Since many aspects of BS and DS symptoms differ, it is hypothesized that that the mechanism of pain generation differs for these two conditions. Recently the functional properties of a chemosensitive ion channel-TRPA1 have been described. This channel is activated by a variety of oxidizer compounds including hydrogen peroxide. Pulpal sensory afferents express TRPA1. It is hypothesized that direct activation of intradental nerve activity via TRPA1 is the mechanism of BS pain. If this theory were correct, tooth sensitivity treatments that reduce the excitability of the intradental nerves such as potassium salts, would be the treatment of choice for BS. PMID:20045265

  19. Cellulose oxidation and bleaching processes based on recombinant Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Flitsch, Annemarie; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-01-10

    Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase (MtCDH) was expressed in Pichia pastoris using the pPICZαA expression vector under the control of methanol inducible AOX promoter. The purified recombinant MtCDH with a specific activity of 3.1 Umg(-1) was characterized to obtain kinetic constants for various carbohydrate substrates. Additionally, the C1 oxidation of the reducing ends of cellobiose, cellotetraose and maltotriose by MtCDH was verified by HPLC-MS. MtCDH was employed to oxidize several different cellulose-based materials by production of hydrogen peroxide. Based on the obtained results a one-pot enzymatic scouring/bleaching process for cotton fabrics was developed using pectinases as scouring agent and MtCDH to produce H(2)O(2) for bleaching. An average increase in whiteness (Berger) ΔE of 26 and an average 95% increase in wettability were observed in all MtCDH treated fabrics. In addition, MtCDH oxidized typical colored cotton flavonoids (morin, rutin, isoquercitrin). PMID:23199740

  20. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  1. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  2. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  3. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  4. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses. PMID:24909009

  5. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses.

  6. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Igarashi, A.; Hirai, Y.; Kumagai, Y.; Kurata, H.

    2008-05-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2), or an LED (835 mW/cm2) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L* a* b* color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained.

  7. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity.

  8. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation.

  9. pH-Sensitive Microparticles with Matrix-Dispersed Active Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Calle, Luz M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods to produce pH-sensitive microparticles that have an active agent dispersed in a polymer matrix have certain advantages over microcapsules with an active agent encapsulated in an interior compartment/core inside of a polymer wall. The current invention relates to pH-sensitive microparticles that have a corrosion-detecting or corrosion-inhibiting active agent or active agents dispersed within a polymer matrix of the microparticles. The pH-sensitive microparticles can be used in various coating compositions on metal objects for corrosion detecting and/or inhibiting.

  10. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel surface morphology after tooth bleaching followed by the application of protective pastes.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Grasso, Nicolò; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the morphology of bleached enamel surface followed by the application of different protective pastes. Specimens were prepared from 50 human incisors free of caries and defects. The bleaching procedure was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Perfect Bleach Office+). For the remineralization treatment, different protective pastes (Tooth Mousse, MI Paste Plus, Remin Pro, and Profluorid Varnish) were evaluated. Specimens were randomly assigned to 10 groups of 5 specimens each. The specimens were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The superficial morphology of enamel was examined and scored as follows: 0, enamel with smooth surface morphology; 1, enamel with slight irregularities; 2, enamel with moderate irregularities; 3, enamel with accentuated irregularities. The photomicrographs were evaluated in a double-blind manner by three examiners, previously calibrated. Results were analyzed by a Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, at the significance level of 0.05. Dunn method posttest was applied for multiple comparisons. A different superficial morphology was observed among control group specimens and specimens treated with bleaching agent and protective pastes (p < 0.05). Enamel bleached showed pronounced surface changes and irregularities, significantly different from other groups except for groups 8 (enamel + Perfect Bleach Office+ + Remin Pro) and 10 (enamel + Perfect Bleach Office+ + Profluorid Varnish) (p > 0.05). The application of the tested pastes after bleaching is effective on repairing enamel surface morphology, demonstrating a higher efficacy for the CPP-ACP products compared to fluoridated ones. SCANNING 38:221-226, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  12. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  13. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  14. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Material and Methods Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Results Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in hardness values among the two groups either before (p=0.131) or after (p=0.182) the bleaching procedures. Conclusions Tooth whitening through home bleaching or laser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching. PMID:26330939

  15. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  16. Bleaching gels containing calcium and fluoride: effect on enamel erosion susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra B; Torres, Carlos R G; de Souza, Paulo A B; Caneppele, Taciana M F; Santos, Luciana F T F; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gel modified or not by the addition of calcium and fluoride on enamel susceptibility to erosion. Bovine enamel samples (3 mm in diameter) were divided into four groups (n = 15) according to the bleaching agent: control-without bleaching (C); 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); 35% HP with the addition of 2% calcium gluconate (HP + Ca); 35% HP with the addition of 0.6% sodium fluoride (HP + F). The bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface for 40 min, and the specimens were subjected to erosive challenge with Sprite Zero and remineralization with artificial saliva for 5 days. Enamel wear was assessed using profilometry. The data were analyzed by ANOVA/ Tukey's test (P < 0.05). There were significant differences among the groups (P = 0.009). The most enamel wear was seen for C (3.37 ± 0.80 μm), followed by HP (2.89 ± 0.98 μm) and HP + F (2.72 ± 0.64 μm). HP + Ca (2.31 ± 0.92 μm) was the only group able to significantly reduce enamel erosion compared to C. The application of HP bleaching agent did not increase the enamel susceptibility to erosion. However, the addition of calcium gluconate to the HP gel resulted in reduced susceptibility of the enamel to erosion. PMID:23193404

  17. Effect of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength of hybrid composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Samanian, Noushmehr; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The entire effects of different bleaching regimens on the mechanical properties of composite resins have remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength (FS) of hybrid composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 80 bar-shaped specimens of hybrid composite resins were fabricated and randomly divided into four groups, 20 specimens in each group. First group (C) was considered as control. The other groups were treated by home bleaching (HB) agent, in-office bleaching (IB) agent, and the combination regimens (HIB), respectively. The FS was evaluated by three-point bending test by using a Universal Testing Machine. All data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 18, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Turkey's post hoc statistical tests (α = 0.05). Results: The maximum mean value of FS was seen in HB group with significant differences to other groups (P < 0.05). Also, the minimum FS was observed in group HIB. Conclusion: Application of different bleaching regimens does not have any adverse effect on the FS of hybrid composite resins. However, the administration of HB regimens seemed to have lesser negative impact on the FS. PMID:27099423

  18. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  19. Morphology and optical properties of aluminum oxide formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarkin, B.; Stsiapanau, A.; Zhilinski, V.; Chernik, A.; Bezborodov, V.; Kozak, G.; Danilovich, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the results of investigations of porous films of alumina, formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents, in particular, ordering structure, roughness of a surface, the optical transparency of the electrolyte concentration and surface active agents. Also discusses the features of the formation of porous films of temperature and IR radiation.

  20. The Activation of Free Dipeptides Promoted by Strong Activating Agents in Water Does not Yield Diketopiperazines.

    PubMed

    Beaufils, Damien; Jepaul, Sandra; Liu, Ziwei; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The activation of dipeptides was studied in the perspective of the abiotic formation of oligopeptides of significant length as a requirement for secondary structure formation. The formation of piperazin-2,5-diones (DKP), previously considered as a dead end when activating free dipeptides, was shown in this work to be efficiently suppressed when using strong activating agents (e.g., carbodiimides). This behaviour was explained by the fast formation of a 5(4H)-oxazolone intermediate at a rate that exceeds the time scale of the rotation of the peptide bond from the predominant trans-conformation into the cis-isomer required for DKP formation. No DKP was observed when using strong activating agents whereas phosphate mixed anhydrides or moderately activated esters were observed to predominantly yield DKP. The DKP side-reaction no longer constitutes a drawback for the C-terminus elongation of peptides. These results are considered as additional evidence that pathways involving strong activation are required to drive the emergence of living entities rather than close to equilibrium processes.

  1. The Activation of Free Dipeptides Promoted by Strong Activating Agents in Water Does not Yield Diketopiperazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufils, Damien; Jepaul, Sandra; Liu, Ziwei; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The activation of dipeptides was studied in the perspective of the abiotic formation of oligopeptides of significant length as a requirement for secondary structure formation. The formation of piperazin-2,5-diones (DKP), previously considered as a dead end when activating free dipeptides, was shown in this work to be efficiently suppressed when using strong activating agents (e.g., carbodiimides). This behaviour was explained by the fast formation of a 5(4 H)-oxazolone intermediate at a rate that exceeds the time scale of the rotation of the peptide bond from the predominant trans-conformation into the cis-isomer required for DKP formation. No DKP was observed when using strong activating agents whereas phosphate mixed anhydrides or moderately activated esters were observed to predominantly yield DKP. The DKP side-reaction no longer constitutes a drawback for the C-terminus elongation of peptides. These results are considered as additional evidence that pathways involving strong activation are required to drive the emergence of living entities rather than close to equilibrium processes.

  2. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems and... bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.44 through 430.47; or (iv) Paper-grade sulfite bleaching systems...

  3. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems and... bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.44 through 430.47; or (iv) Paper-grade sulfite bleaching systems...

  4. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  5. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster). PMID:26647056

  6. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  7. Coral bleaching: the role of the host.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew H; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Ralph, Peter J; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Very recently, research has focused on the possibility of corals switching symbionts as a means of adjusting to accelerating increases in sea surface temperature. Although symbionts are clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be readily explained by differences in symbionts among coral species. Here we outline several potential mechanisms by which the host might influence the bleaching response, and conclude that predicting the fate of corals in response to climate change requires both members of the symbiosis to be considered equally.

  8. The role of microorganisms in coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kushmaro, Ariel; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Banin, Ehud; Yossi, Loya

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiosis between the coral host and its endosymbiotic algae. The prevalence and severity of the disease have been correlated with high seawater temperature. During the last decade, the major hypothesis to explain coral bleaching is that high water temperatures cause irreversible damage to the symbiotic algae resulting in loss of pigment and/or algae from the holobiont. Here, we discuss the evidence for an alternative but not mutually exclusive concept, the microbial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  9. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1995-10-10

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode. 5 figs.

  10. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode.

  11. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  12. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  13. Methods for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    2008-03-18

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method comprises the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention also provides a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  14. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  15. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon. PMID:25881437

  16. The attenuation of rod signals by bleachings

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Rushton, W. A. H.; Torii, S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Contrast flash technique allows the rod threshold to be measured even when it lies far above the cone threshold. In this way the rod dark adaptation curve after rhodopsin bleaching can be measured over 6 log units. 2. By retinal densitometry the regeneration of rhodopsin can be measured in the same subject. It is found that the log threshold is raised 1·2 units for each 10% of rhodopsin in the bleached state. 3. We have tried to discover whether bleaching raises the threshold by desensitizing the rods, or (like backgrounds) by attenuating their signals. Neither suggestion satisfies all conditions. 4. All are satisfied by [Formula: see text], where N is the size of rod signal, constant for threshold; θ, θD are steady backgrounds of light and receptor noise; ϕ is the threshold flash with σ a constant of about 2·5 log td sec; B the fraction of pigment in the bleached state. PMID:5499030

  17. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P < 0.05). In groups 3 and 4 at start and group 2 at start and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  18. Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-28

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

  19. In Vitro Activities of 35 Double Combinations of Antifungal Agents against Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Bernal-Martinez, Leticia; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Buitrago, Maria J.; Mellado, Emilia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Activities of 35 combinations of antifungal agents against Scedosporium spp. were analyzed by a checkerboard microdilution design and the summation of fractional concentration index. An average indifferent effect was detected apart from combinations of azole agents and echinocandins against Scedosporium apiospermum. Antagonism was absent for all antifungal combinations against both species. PMID:18195067

  20. 78 FR 70576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Special Agent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Special Agent Medical Pre- placement. (3) Agency form number... of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; Special Agent Medical Pre-placement ACTION: 30-Day notice. The Department...

  1. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice.

  2. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice. PMID:23928450

  3. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue by treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue.

  4. A Strategic Framework for Responding to Coral Bleaching Events in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, J. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Marshall, P. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Goby, G.; Schuttenberg, H.; Spillman, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The framework presented has two main inter-related components: an early warning system and assessment and monitoring. Both include the need to proactively and consistently communicate information on environmental conditions and the level of bleaching severity to senior decision-makers, stakeholders, and the public. Managers, being the most timely and credible source of information on bleaching events, can facilitate the implementation of strategies that can give reefs the best chance to recover from bleaching and to withstand future disturbances. The proposed framework is readily transferable to other coral reef regions, and can easily be adapted by managers to local financial, technical, and human resources.

  5. A strategic framework for responding to coral bleaching events in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Maynard, J A; Johnson, J E; Marshall, P A; Eakin, C M; Goby, G; Schuttenberg, H; Spillman, C M

    2009-07-01

    The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The framework presented has two main inter-related components: an early warning system and assessment and monitoring. Both include the need to proactively and consistently communicate information on environmental conditions and the level of bleaching severity to senior decision-makers, stakeholders, and the public. Managers, being the most timely and credible source of information on bleaching events, can facilitate the implementation of strategies that can give reefs the best chance to recover from bleaching and to withstand future disturbances. The proposed framework is readily transferable to other coral reef regions, and can easily be adapted by managers to local financial, technical, and human resources.

  6. Personality Style in Patients Looking for Tooth Bleaching and Its Correlation with Treatment Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Javier; Rivas, Vanessa; Vildósola, Patricio; Moncada, Laura; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B; Saad, José Roberto C; Fernandez, Eduardo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the focus in dentistry has shifted to an "esthetic dentistry" approach, where patients are concerned about reaching a better look of their teeth. Vital tooth bleaching is a technique with immediate results, which improves the appearance and patient's self-esteem. The aim of this study was to recognize personality characteristics determined by the Millon Index of Personality Styles of participants looking for tooth bleaching and to correlate them to satisfaction with the treatment. Forty participants were included and filled out the Millon Index of Personality Styles form before treatment. Expectation about tooth bleaching was quantified from 1 to 5. Patients were treated with bleaching agent according to manufacturer's directions. One week after treatment, the patient's satisfaction was quantified from 1 to 5. Prevailing personality characteristics were determined. Expectations and satisfaction values of all patients were correlated with each of the presented personality scales by Spearman Rho test. Ten scales prevailed over their counterpart. Median of patient's expectation was 2 and satisfaction 4. Only the score of a single characteristic (extraversing) showed statistically significant correlation with patient satisfaction. Patients looking for tooth bleaching treatment seem to have common personality characteristics. Almost all of them wanted to achieve a moderate change in teeth color and the result of the treatment was usually satisfactory.

  7. Effect of Nano-Tricalcium Phosphate and Nanohydroxyapatite on the Staining Susceptibility of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Malekhoseini, Kosar; Rezai, Hamideh; Hamze, Faeze

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of nano-tricalcium phosphate (n-TCP) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HAP) on prevention of restaining of enamel after dental bleaching. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide for two weeks. Afterward, they were divided into five groups based on remineralization solution: no treatment (control), 10% n-TCP, 5% n-TCP, 10% n-HAP, and 5% n-HAP. Each group was daily immersed for 10 minutes in the restaining solution (tea) and for 3 minutes in the remineralization agent, respectively. This protocol was repeated for five days. Subsequently, three digital photographs (baseline, after bleaching, and after restaining) were analyzed by Adobe Photoshop software. The obtained L∗, a∗, b∗, and ΔE parameters were compared using ANOVA and Wilcoxon and Bonferroni tests. Results. After bleaching, there were significant changes in tooth colors (P < 0.001) while, after restaining and immersion in remineralization solutions, there were no significant differences in L∗, a∗, and b∗ values of different groups (P > 0.05). However, ΔE of 10% TCP was significantly lower than the control (P = 0.02) while there were no significant differences between the other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. 10% n-TCP could significantly maintain the resultant color and reconstruct the enamel structure after bleaching. PMID:27347555

  8. Personality Style in Patients Looking for Tooth Bleaching and Its Correlation with Treatment Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Javier; Rivas, Vanessa; Vildósola, Patricio; Moncada, Laura; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B; Saad, José Roberto C; Fernandez, Eduardo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the focus in dentistry has shifted to an "esthetic dentistry" approach, where patients are concerned about reaching a better look of their teeth. Vital tooth bleaching is a technique with immediate results, which improves the appearance and patient's self-esteem. The aim of this study was to recognize personality characteristics determined by the Millon Index of Personality Styles of participants looking for tooth bleaching and to correlate them to satisfaction with the treatment. Forty participants were included and filled out the Millon Index of Personality Styles form before treatment. Expectation about tooth bleaching was quantified from 1 to 5. Patients were treated with bleaching agent according to manufacturer's directions. One week after treatment, the patient's satisfaction was quantified from 1 to 5. Prevailing personality characteristics were determined. Expectations and satisfaction values of all patients were correlated with each of the presented personality scales by Spearman Rho test. Ten scales prevailed over their counterpart. Median of patient's expectation was 2 and satisfaction 4. Only the score of a single characteristic (extraversing) showed statistically significant correlation with patient satisfaction. Patients looking for tooth bleaching treatment seem to have common personality characteristics. Almost all of them wanted to achieve a moderate change in teeth color and the result of the treatment was usually satisfactory. PMID:27007348

  9. Effect of Nano-Tricalcium Phosphate and Nanohydroxyapatite on the Staining Susceptibility of Bleached Enamel.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Malekhoseini, Kosar; Rezai, Hamideh; Hamze, Faeze

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of nano-tricalcium phosphate (n-TCP) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HAP) on prevention of restaining of enamel after dental bleaching. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide for two weeks. Afterward, they were divided into five groups based on remineralization solution: no treatment (control), 10% n-TCP, 5% n-TCP, 10% n-HAP, and 5% n-HAP. Each group was daily immersed for 10 minutes in the restaining solution (tea) and for 3 minutes in the remineralization agent, respectively. This protocol was repeated for five days. Subsequently, three digital photographs (baseline, after bleaching, and after restaining) were analyzed by Adobe Photoshop software. The obtained L (∗) , a (∗) , b (∗) , and ΔE parameters were compared using ANOVA and Wilcoxon and Bonferroni tests. Results. After bleaching, there were significant changes in tooth colors (P < 0.001) while, after restaining and immersion in remineralization solutions, there were no significant differences in L (∗) , a (∗) , and b (∗) values of different groups (P > 0.05). However, ΔE of 10% TCP was significantly lower than the control (P = 0.02) while there were no significant differences between the other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. 10% n-TCP could significantly maintain the resultant color and reconstruct the enamel structure after bleaching. PMID:27347555

  10. Heterotrophic plasticity and resilience in bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Rodrigues, Lisa J; Palardy, James E

    2006-04-27

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures have resulted in extensive coral mortality throughout the tropics over the past few decades. With continued global warming, bleaching events are predicted to increase in frequency and severity, causing up to 60% coral mortality globally within the next few decades. Although some corals are able to recover and to survive bleaching, the mechanisms underlying such resilience are poorly understood. Here we show that the coral host has a significant role in recovery and resilience. Bleached and recovering Montipora capitata (branching) corals met more than 100% of their daily metabolic energy requirements by markedly increasing their feeding rates and CHAR (per cent contribution of heterotrophically acquired carbon to daily animal respiration), whereas Porites compressa (branching) and Porites lobata (mounding) corals did not. These findings suggest that coral species with high-CHAR capability during bleaching and recovery, irrespective of morphology, will be more resilient to bleaching events over the long term, could become the dominant coral species on reefs, and may help to safeguard affected reefs from potential local and global extinction.

  11. Low Concentration H2O2/TiO_N in Office Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, J.F.; Pretel, H.; Floros, M.C.; Luizzi, A.C.C.; Dantas, A.A.R.; Fernandez, E.; Moncada, G.; de Oliveira, O.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this randomized double-blinded clinical trial was to test the efficacy and tooth sensitivity promoted by the use of an in-office 15% H2O2 bleaching agent containing nanoparticles of TiO_N photocatalyzed with LED/laser light (HP15) and a control of 35% H2O2 (HP35). Methods: Forty healthy volunteers, both sexes, aged 18 to 25 yr, were randomly distributed in 2 groups: HP15 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 48 min each, and HP35 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 45 min each. The efficacy (E) was evaluated by ΔE values measured via reflectance spectroscopy. The tooth sensitivity (S) was analyzed by visual analog scale (low, average, high, very high). The absolute risk reduction and the number needed to treat index were calculated. The data were analyzed by mixed repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni-correction t test (α = 0.05). Results: For the efficacy, significant differences were found for number of bleaching sessions (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.73 and π = 1.000) and for the interaction of number of sessions and bleaching protocols (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.319 and π = 1.000. The tooth sensitivity level showed significant differences only between the bleaching protocols. Absolute risk reduction calculated was 52% and number needed to treat, 1.92. Conclusions: The bleaching agent with the lower concentration (HP15) promoted lower levels of tooth sensitivity and presented greater efficacy compared to the control (HP35) in patients between 18 and 25 yr old. The limitation of short-term evaluation did not provide information about the longevity of the tooth bleaching (Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Re Bec no. U1111-1150-4466). PMID:24868014

  12. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of imidazolium oximes as nerve agent antidotes

    SciTech Connect

    Musallam, H.A.; Foye, W.O.; Hansch, C.; Harris, R.N.; Engle, R.R.

    1993-05-13

    Organophosphorus-containing pesticides and chemical warfare agents are potent inhibitors of synaptic acetylcholinesterase, a key regulator of cholinergic neurotransmission. These nerve agents have for many years constituted a serious threat to military personnel. These threats stimulated considerable efforts to develop effective medical countermeasures. Several potential drugs have been found recently which are capable of protecting animals from lethal levels of nerve agents. A recent U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command drug development project synthesized a large number of imidazolium oximes. These compounds were found to possess strong antidotal activity against one of the most lethal nerve agents, soman. The Army's approach, like most conventional drug discovery approaches, depended primarily on the trial and error method. This research was carried out to determine if these potential nerve agent antidotes could have been discovered through the use of Quantitative Structure Activity-Relationships (QSAR) technique.

  14. Symbiophagy as a cellular mechanism for coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Martinez, Jon; Kushmaro, Ariel; Woodley, Cheryl M; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is a major contributor to the global declines of coral reefs. This phenomenon is characterized by the loss of symbiotic algae, their pigments or both. Despite wide scientific interest, the mechanisms by which bleaching occurs are still poorly understood. Here we report that the removal of the symbiont during light and temperature stress is achieved using the host's cellular autophagic-associated machinery. Host cellular and subcellular morphologies showed increased vacuolization and appearance of autophagic membranes surrounding a variety of organelles and surrounding the symbiotic algae. Markers of autophagy (Rab 7 and LAS) corroborate these observations. Results showed that during stress the symbiont vacuolar membrane is transformed from a conduit of nutrient exchange to a digestive organelle resulting in the consumption of the symbiont, a process we term symbiophagy. We posit that during a stress event, the mechanism maintaining symbiosis is destabilized and symbiophagy is activated, ultimately resulting in the phenomenon of bleaching. Symbiophagy may have evolved from a more general primordial innate intracellular protective pathway termed xenophagy.

  15. Synthesis and Biological Activities of Organotin(IV) Complexes as Antitumoral and Antimicrobial Agents. A Review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Shoaib Ahmad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Ahmed, M Mehboob; Najam, Tayyaba; Shaheen, Salma; Rivera, Gildardo

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the use of organotin(IV) compounds have gained relevant interest in both the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Tin(IV) form stable complexes with a unique structure and physicochemical properties that are used in organic synthesis as heat stabilizers and catalysts, in drug development as biologically active agents, and in other areas. This review focuses on recent progress in the classical and convenient synthesis procedure, on their mechanism of action, and biological activities as antitumoral and antimicrobial agents.

  16. A color test for the convenient identification of an ingested surface activating agent.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Jamal, Mostofa; Takakura, Ayaka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tobiume, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Color tests are easy, simple and inexpensive methods for the qualitative identification of chemicals. A color test was applied to the stomach contents of a forensic autopsy case. The result of the test, using bromophenol blue reagent, indicated the ingestion of a commercial cleaning product containing a cationic surface activating agent. Our findings suggest that forensic investigators should consider the additives used in commercial chemical products, such as surface activating agents, when determining the cause of death. PMID:26419519

  17. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  18. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability. PMID:27450259

  19. IsoCombretaQuinazolines: Potent Cytotoxic Agents with Antitubulin Activity.

    PubMed

    Soussi, Mohamed Ali; Provot, Olivier; Bernadat, Guillaume; Bignon, Jérome; Desravines, Déborah; Dubois, Joëlle; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Messaoudi, Samir; Alami, Mouad

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel isocombretaquinazolines (isoCoQ) 4 were quickly prepared by coupling N-toluenesulfonylhydrazones with 4-chloroquinazolines under palladium catalysis. These compounds, which can be regarded as isocombretastatin A-4 (isoCA-4) analogues that lack the 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl ring, displayed nanomolar-level cytotoxicity against various human cancer cell lines and were observed to effectively inhibit tubulin polymerization. The isoCoQ compounds 2-methoxy-5-(1-(2-methylquinazolin-4-yl)vinyl)phenol (4 b), 4-[1-(3-fluoro-4-methoxyphenyl)vinyl]-2-methylquinazoline (4 c), and 2-methoxy-5-(1-(2-methylquinazolin-4-yl)vinyl)aniline (4 d), which respectively bear the greatest resemblance to isoCA-4, isoFCA-4, and isoNH2 CA-4, are able to arrest HCT116 cancer cells in the G2 /M cell-cycle phase at very low concentrations. Preliminary in vitro antivascular assay results show that 4 d is able to disrupt a network of capillary-like structures formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells on Matrigel. All these results clearly demonstrate that replacement of the 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl ring of isoCA-4 with a quinazoline nucleus is a feasible approach toward new and highly promising derivatives with the potential for further development as antitubulin agents. PMID:26076053

  20. [Immunotropic activity of a potential antiparkinson agent himantane].

    PubMed

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Val'dman, E A; Nazarov, P G; Voronina, T A

    2001-01-01

    N-(Adamant-2-yl) hexamethyleneimine hydrochloride (A-7, himantane), a new potential antiparkinsonian drug belonging to the class of aminoadamantyl derivatives, exhibits pronounced immunomodulant activity in a therapeutic dose of 10 mg/kg. A single intraperitoneal injection of himantane stimulated a high B-lymphocyte activity in mice over a period of 21 days. The drug inhibited the reaction of delayed hypersensitivity with respect to the Freund adjuvant, while enhancing the immediate reaction with respect to horse serum in guinea pigs. Himantane increased the functional (absorption) activity of macrophages in the peritoneal exudate, while not affecting superoxide anion production by the macrophages. These results suggest that the immunomodulant activity of himantane may produce a positive neuroprotective and symptomatic effects in the course of parkinsonism. PMID:11548451

  1. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  2. Evaluation of antiseptic antiviral activity of chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Geller, Chloé; Finance, Chantal; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Antiviral antisepsis and disinfection are crucial for preventing the environmental spread of viral infections. Emerging viruses and associated diseases, as well as nosocomial viral infections, have become a real issue in medical fields, and there are very few efficient and specific treatments available to fight most of these infections. Another issue is the potential environmental resistance and spread of viral particles. Therefore, it is essential to properly evaluate the efficacy of antiseptics-disinfectants (ATS-D) on viruses. ATS-D antiviral activity is evaluated by (1) combining viruses and test product for an appropriately defined and precise contact time, (2) neutralizing product activity, and (3) estimating the loss of viral infectivity. A germicide can be considered to have an efficient ATS-D antiviral activity if it induces a >3 or >4 log(10) reduction (American and European regulatory agency requirements, respectively) in viral titers in a defined contact time. This unit describes a global methodology for evaluating chemical ATS-D antiviral activity.

  3. Preparation of activated carbons from coffee husks utilizing FeCl3 and ZnCl2 as activating agents.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz C A; Pereira, Elaine; Guimaraes, Iara R; Vallone, Andrea; Pereira, Márcio; Mesquita, João P; Sapag, Karim

    2009-06-15

    Ferric chloride was used as a new activating agent, to obtain activated carbons (AC) from agro industrial waste (coffee husks). This material was compared with two samples from the same raw material: one of them activated by using the classical activating agent, zinc chloride, and the other, activated with a mixture of the two mentioned activating agents in the same mass proportion. The carbonaceous materials obtained after the activation process showed high specific surface areas (BET), with values higher than 900 m(2)g(-1). It is interesting to observe that the activation with FeCl(3) produces smaller pores compared to the activation with ZnCl(2). An important fact to emphasize in the use of FeCl(3) as activating agent is the activation temperature at 280 degrees C, which is clearly below to the temperature commonly employed for chemical or physical activation, as described in the bibliography. All the studied materials showed different behaviors in the adsorption of methylene blue dye and phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:18996644

  4. The human host as active agent in malaria epidemiology.

    PubMed

    MacCormack, C P

    1987-09-01

    The literature on malaria epidemiology tends to view the human host as a passive or constant factor. However, for at least 2000 years people have been an active factor, causing vast changes in epidemiological patterns. They have cut forest and increased the breeding area of An. gambiae, or changed salinity in rice swamps causing a different change in the dominant vector. Human activity not only increases risk, but influences control by killing mosquito larvae, killing adult mosquitos or preventing mosquitos from feeding. For example, people prefer chloroquine or other anti-malarials to traditional herbal remedies that do not kill parasites, and in some areas introduce larvivorous fish into swamp rice fields and cattle ponds. Bed nets impregnated with residual insecticide simultaneously prevent mosquitos from feeding on people and kill adult mosquitos. Preferences and practices in bed net use in the Gambia are described. PMID:3432961

  5. Biological activity assessment of a novel contraceptive antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Garg, A; Anderson, R A; Zaneveld, L J D; Garg, S

    2005-01-01

    Microbicides are a new category of compounds being developed as a prophylactic approach for the prevention of transmission of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These are primarily being developed as women-controlled methods, with the target of designing new compounds or formulations that can be used without the knowledge of a male partner. Microbicide screening can be initially based on their hyaluronidase-inhibiting (HI) activity, as this enzyme plays a major role in the sperm and microbe penetration into the substrate. Derivatives of hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid glycoside, have been reported in the literature for their HI effects. Hesperidin was thereby sulphonated under strictly controlled conditions and the active fraction isolated and characterized, based on its HI activity. This derivative was screened for antimicrobial and enzyme-inhibitory activities, specifically for the reproductive tract. Sulphonated hesperidin (SH) was found to completely inhibit the sperm enzymes hyaluronidase, giving an indication toward its contraceptive effects. It was also been found to inhibit various sexually transmitted pathogens, including Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, HIV, and Herpes Simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Its safety assessment was based on its noninterference in sperm motility and its penetration through the cervical mucus, and no effect on the growth of lactobacilli, the normal vaginal flora. It was also found to be nontoxic to the HIV substrate cells (MT2 cells). The study concludes that sulphonated hesperidin can be developed as a potential microbicide for a dual prophylaxis of contraception and transmission of STDs and AIDS. PMID:15867010

  6. NRF2 activation by antioxidant antidiabetic agents accelerates tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiufei; Long, Min; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Liao, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yuren; Liao, Qian; Li, Wenjie; Tang, Zili; Tong, Qiang; Wang, Xiaocui; Fang, Fang; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Ouyang, Qin; Zhang, Donna D; Yu, Shicang; Zheng, Hongting

    2016-04-13

    Cancer is a common comorbidity of diabetic patients; however, little is known about the effects that antidiabetic drugs have on tumors. We discovered that common classes of drugs used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the hypoglycemic dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) saxagliptin and sitagliptin, as well as the antineuropathic α-lipoic acid (ALA), do not increase tumor incidence but increase the risk of metastasis of existing tumors. Specifically, these drugs induce prolonged activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated antioxidant response through inhibition of KEAP1-C151-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NRF2, resulting in up-regulated expression of metastasis-associated proteins, increased cancer cell migration, and promotion of metastasis in xenograft mouse models. Accordingly, knockdown of NRF2 attenuated naturally occurring and DPP-4i-induced tumor metastasis, whereas NRF2 activation accelerated metastasis. Furthermore, in human liver cancer tissue samples, increased NRF2 expression correlated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that antioxidants that activate NRF2 signaling may need to be administered with caution in cancer patients, such as diabetic patients with cancer. Moreover, NRF2 may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for tumor metastasis. PMID:27075625

  7. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer, Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0-4) during bleaching and up to 48 h after each session. The primary outcome of absolute risk of tooth sensitivity was compared using the Fisher's exact test (α = 0.05). The intensity of tooth sensitivity and the efficacy of in-office bleaching were also statistically evaluated. No significant differences in absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were detected between the groups (p = 1.0 and p = 0.53, respectively). BE was also found to be similar between the groups (p = 0.67). Although the use of a nano-calcium phosphate paste associated with fluoride and potassium nitrate did not influence the whitening outcome, but it also did not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. PMID:26313348

  8. Unprecedented Mass Bleaching and Loss of Coral across 12° of Latitude in Western Australia in 2010–11

    PubMed Central

    Moore, James A. Y.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Depczynski, Martial R.; Evans, Richard D.; Evans, Scott N.; Field, Stuart N.; Friedman, Kim J.; Gilmour, James P.; Holmes, Thomas H.; Middlebrook, Rachael; Radford, Ben T.; Ridgway, Tyrone; Shedrawi, George; Taylor, Heather; Thomson, Damian P.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, coral bleaching has been responsible for a significant decline in both coral cover and diversity over the past two decades. During the summer of 2010–11, anomalous large-scale ocean warming induced unprecedented levels of coral bleaching accompanied by substantial storminess across more than 12° of latitude and 1200 kilometers of coastline in Western Australia (WA). Methodology/Principal Findings Extreme La-Niña conditions caused extensive warming of waters and drove considerable storminess and cyclonic activity across WA from October 2010 to May 2011. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature measurements recorded anomalies of up to 5°C above long-term averages. Benthic surveys quantified the extent of bleaching at 10 locations across four regions from tropical to temperate waters. Bleaching was recorded in all locations across regions and ranged between 17% (±5.5) in the temperate Perth region, to 95% (±3.5) in the Exmouth Gulf of the tropical Ningaloo region. Coincident with high levels of bleaching, three cyclones passed in close proximity to study locations around the time of peak temperatures. Follow-up surveys revealed spatial heterogeneity in coral cover change with four of ten locations recording significant loss of coral cover. Relative decreases ranged between 22%–83.9% of total coral cover, with the greatest losses in the Exmouth Gulf. Conclusions/Significance The anomalous thermal stress of 2010–11 induced mass bleaching of corals along central and southern WA coral reefs. Significant coral bleaching was observed at multiple locations across the tropical-temperate divide spanning more than 1200 km of coastline. Resultant spatially patchy loss of coral cover under widespread and high levels of bleaching and cyclonic activity, suggests a degree of resilience for WA coral communities. However, the spatial extent of bleaching casts some doubt over hypotheses suggesting that future impacts to coral reefs under forecast

  9. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    1999-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  10. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  11. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-03

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material. 23 figs.

  12. The influence of desensitizing dentifrices on pain induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Carlos Henrique; Rodrigues Filho, Rubens; Prates, Luiz Henrique Maykot; Sartori, Neimar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of desensitizing dentifrices used 15 days prior to and after in-office tooth bleaching could eliminate or reduce tooth sensitivity. After institutional review board approval and informed consent, 45 subjects were selected and divided into 3 groups according to the dentifrice selected: Colgate Total (CT), Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (CS) or Sensodyne ProNamel (SP). The subjects used toothpaste and a toothbrush provided to them for 15 days prior to bleaching. They were then submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium). Their tooth sensitivity was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for a week after each session. Their tooth shade alteration was measured with a Vitapan Classical shade guide to determine if the dentifrices could influence the effectiveness of the bleaching agent. The data were submitted to Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). The use of desensitizing dentifrices did not affect the bleaching efficacy. In regard to tooth sensitivity, there was a statistically significant difference between the results of the Control Group and Group T2 after the first session (p = 0.048). There was no statistically significant difference in the results for the other groups after the first session. In regard to the second session, there was no statistically significant difference in the results for all the groups. The use of a desensitizing dentifrice containing nitrate potassium reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching regimen. Dentifrices containing arginine and calcium carbonate did not reduce tooth sensitivity. Color change was not influenced by the dentifrices used.

  13. Continuation of sexual reproduction in Montipora capitata following bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, E. F.

    2007-09-01

    Bleaching is generally expected to produce detrimental impacts on coral reproduction. This study compared the fecundity of bleached and unbleached colonies of the Hawaiian coral Montipora capitata. It was hypothesized that bleaching would have no effect on reproduction because previous studies have shown that Montipora capitata can increase heterotrophic feeding following bleaching. Reproductive parameters, total reproductive output (bundles released ml-1 coral colony), number of eggs bundle-1, and egg size, measured in the summer of 2005 did not differ between colonies that bleached or did not bleach during 2004. These data were collected following a single bleaching event and cannot be used to predict the outcome should bleaching episodes become more frequent or severe.

  14. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-12-18

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones.

  15. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones. PMID:26680690

  16. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones. PMID:26680690

  17. Local Stressors Reduce Coral Resilience to Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Carilli, Jessica E.; Norris, Richard D.; Black, Bryan A.; Walsh, Sheila M.; McField, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2–3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change. PMID:19623250

  18. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  19. Novel oxidatively activated agents modify DNA and are enhanced by ercc1 silencing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Amy R; Bell-Horwath, Tiffany R; Li, Guorui; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Merino, Edward J

    2012-11-19

    Agents that chemically modify DNA form a backbone of many cancer treatments. A key problem for DNA-modifying agents is lack of specificity. To address this issue, we designed novel molecular scaffolds, termed An-Hq and An-Hq(2), which are activated by a hallmark of some cancers: elevated concentrations of reactive oxygen species. Elevated reactive oxygen species are linked to oncogenesis and are found to increase in several aggressive cancers. The agents are quinones that, upon oxidation, form highly electrophilic species. In vitro studies identified the mode of addition to DNA. The aniline portion of An-Hq serves to enhance nucleophilic addition to the ethyl phenyl ether instead of forming common Michael additions. Structural characterization showed that the agents add to 2'-deoxyguanosine at the N2,N3-positions. The product formed is a bulky hydroxy-N2,3-benzetheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct. In addition, the oxidatively activated agents added to 2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxycytidine but not thymidine or 2'-deoxyinosine. These findings are confirmed by primer extension analysis of a 392 base pair DNA. The full-length primer extension product was reduced by 69.0 ± 0.6% upon oxidative activation of An-Hq(2) as compared to controls. Little sequence dependence was observed with 76% of guanine, adenine, and cytosine residues showing an increase in extension stops between 2- and 4-fold above controls. Benzetheno-nucleobase addition to double-stranded DNA was confirmed by LC/MS of a self-complementary oligonucletide. Experiments were carried out to confirm in vivo DNA damage. Because of the lesion identified in vitro, we reasoned that nucleotide excision repair should be involved in reversing the effects of these oxidatively activated agents and enhance toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. Using an RNAi-based approach, Ercc1 was silenced, and survival was monitored after injection of an agent. As expected, bulky cross-linking DNA-modifying agents, cisplatin and

  20. The mutagenic activity of razoxane (ICRF 159): an anticancer agent.

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, R.; Watkins, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The mutagenic activity of razoxane (ICRF 159) was studied using the Salmonella/microsome assay and rodent bone-marrow micronucleus and metaphase assays. Razoxane (up to 5000 micrograms/plate) did not cause an increase in the mutation frequency in the Salmonella/microsome assay. In the mouse micronucleus assay razoxane (200 and 400 mg kg-1 i.p.) was cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells (which limited the analysis) but an increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes was observed in razoxane dosed animals (5-fold compared to control value). In the Chinese hamster metaphase assay razoxane (up to 500 mg kg-1 orally) induced abnormal chromosome condensation and an increase in structural chromosome aberrations (7 fold compared to control value) as well as an increase in the number of polypoid cells (8-fold compared to control value). The mutagenic effect of razoxane was restricted to eukaryotic organisms and was associated with specific chromosomal changes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3904803

  1. Study of in vitro antibacterial activity of 19 antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Sun, X D; Cai, Q M

    1989-04-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of 19 antimicrobial agents against 40 strains of P aeruginosa was studied. The 19 antimicrobial agents included 7 semisynthetic penicillins, 6 third generation cephalosporins, 5 aminoglycosides and 1 quinolone agent. The minimal inhibition concentrations (MIGs) were measured by the serial dilution on solid agar. Ceftazidime was the most active in 19 antimicrobial agents again P aeruginosa (MIC50: 1 microgram/ml, MIC90: 2 micrograms/ml) Amikacin and ofloxaxin followed it in activity. Acylureido-penicillins, such as azlocillin, furbenicillin and piperacillin were highly active against P aeruginosa, which could inhibit, 92.5%, 90% and 85% of these strains at a concentration of 8 micrograms/ml. Cefsulodine and cefoperazone were also active against the same strains, inhibiting 92.5% and 99% of the strains at a concentration of 8 micrograms/ml. The potency of the agents mentioned above against P. aeruginosa was similar to that of aminoglycosides. The drug susceptibility of 10 strains isolated in our hospital was compared with that of 29 strains of other hospitals in Beijing. The MICS of 5 penicillins and 3 cephalosporins against the isolates of our hospital was higher than that of other hospitals, suggesting that the susceptibility of beta-lactam antibiotics against isolates of our hospital was lower. The effects of combined use of azlocillin with oxacillin and piperacillin with ofloxacin against 4 strains of carbenicillin-resistant P aeruginosa was studied using check-board testing. The synergy and partial synergy were observed in both combinations.

  2. Pharmacological activity and toxicity of some neurotropic agents under conditions of experimental hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichek, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    The indices of pharmacological range, risk coefficients, ED50, LD50, the size of the area of toxic activity, and maximal tolerated and absolute lethal doses were compared in hypodynamic mice. The pharmacological activity of the test neurotropic agents exhibiting a central action underwent change, but their toxicity remained unchanged.

  3. Bleaching of fluorosis stains using sodium hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Sharanesha, Rajashekhara Bhari

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis staining is commonly considered an esthetic problem because of the psychological impact of unesthetic maxillary anterior teeth. Numerous treatment approaches have been proposed, ranging from bleaching to enamel reduction to restorative techniques. Bleaching of hypomineralized enamel lesions, using 5% sodium hypochlorite, has been useful clinically. The technique described, in this case, appears to have advantages over other methods for improving the appearance of fluorotic lesions. It is simple, low cost, noninvasive, so the enamel keeps its structure, relatively rapid, and safe; it requires no special materials, and it can be used with safety on young permanent teeth. PMID:26538964

  4. Bleaching of fluorosis stains using sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Sharanesha, Rajashekhara Bhari

    2015-08-01

    Fluorosis staining is commonly considered an esthetic problem because of the psychological impact of unesthetic maxillary anterior teeth. Numerous treatment approaches have been proposed, ranging from bleaching to enamel reduction to restorative techniques. Bleaching of hypomineralized enamel lesions, using 5% sodium hypochlorite, has been useful clinically. The technique described, in this case, appears to have advantages over other methods for improving the appearance of fluorotic lesions. It is simple, low cost, noninvasive, so the enamel keeps its structure, relatively rapid, and safe; it requires no special materials, and it can be used with safety on young permanent teeth. PMID:26538964

  5. Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Jones, G. P.; Thorrold, S. R.; Planes, S.

    2011-06-01

    Coral bleaching and related reef degradation have caused significant declines in the abundance of reef-associated fishes. Most attention on the effects of bleaching has focused on corals, but bleaching is also prevalent in other cnidarians, including sea anemones. The consequences of anemone bleaching are unknown, and the demographic effects of bleaching on associated fish recruitment, survival, and reproduction are poorly understood. We examined the effect of habitat degradation including host anemone bleaching on fish abundance, egg production, and recruitment of the panda anemonefish ( Amphiprion polymnus) near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Following a high-temperature anomaly in shallow waters of the region, most shallow anemones to a depth of 6 m (approximately 35% of all the anemones in this area) were severely bleached. Anemone mortality was low but bleached anemones underwent a ~34% reduction in body size. Total numbers of A. polymnus were not affected by bleaching and reduction in shelter area. While egg production of females living in bleached anemones was reduced by ~38% in 2009 compared to 2008, egg production of females on unbleached anemones did not differ significantly between years. Total recruitment in 2009 was much lower than in 2008. However, we found no evidence of recruiting larvae avoiding bleached anemones at settlement suggesting that other factors or different chemical cues were more important in determining recruitment than habitat quality. These results provide the first field evidence of detrimental effects of climate-induced bleaching and habitat degradation on reproduction and recruitment of anemonefish.

  6. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  11. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  12. The influence of active vision on the exoskeleton of intelligent agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Patrice; Terry, Theodore B.

    2016-04-01

    Chameleonization occurs when a self-learning autonomous mobile system's (SLAMR) active vision scans the surface of which it is perched causing the exoskeleton to changes colors exhibiting a chameleon effect. Intelligent agents having the ability to adapt to their environment and exhibit key survivability characteristics of its environments would largely be due in part to the use of active vision. Active vision would allow the intelligent agent to scan its environment and adapt as needed in order to avoid detection. The SLAMR system would have an exoskeleton, which would change, based on the surface it was perched on; this is known as the "chameleon effect." Not in the common sense of the term, but from the techno-bio inspired meaning as addressed in our previous paper. Active vision, utilizing stereoscopic color sensing functionality would enable the intelligent agent to scan an object within its close proximity, determine the color scheme, and match it; allowing the agent to blend with its environment. Through the use of its' optical capabilities, the SLAMR system would be able to further determine its position, taking into account spatial and temporal correlation and spatial frequency content of neighboring structures further ensuring successful background blending. The complex visual tasks of identifying objects, using edge detection, image filtering, and feature extraction are essential for an intelligent agent to gain additional knowledge about its environmental surroundings.

  13. Effect of an Ice-Nucleating Activity Agent on Subzero Survival of Nematode Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Wergin, William P.; Yaklich, Robert W.; Carta, Lynn K.; Erbe, Eric F.; Murphy, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Juveniles of five species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans, Panagrellus redivivus, Pratylenchus agilis, Pristionchus pacificus, and Distolabrellus veechi, were added to solutions with (treatment) and without (control) a commercial ice-nucleating activity (INA) agent. Ten-microliter droplets of the solutions containing the juveniles were placed on glass microscope slides and transferred to a temperaturecontrolled freeze plate where the temperature was reduced to -6 to -8 °C. At this temperature, the droplets containing the INA agent froze while those without the agent remained liquid. After 2 minutes, the temperature of the plate was raised to 24 °C, and the slides were examined with a light microscope to determine the viability of the juveniles. The results showed that usually most juveniles (43% to 88%, depending on species) in solutions that did not contain the INA agent (controls) were active, indicating that the juveniles were capable of supercooling and were thereby protected from the subzero temperatures. Alternatively, less than 10% of the juveniles that had frozen for 2 minutes in solutions containing the INA agent remained viable, indicating that inoculative freezing of the solution was lethal to the supercooled juveniles. Our results suggest that, in geographical areas where winter temperatures may not be sufficiently low or sustained to freeze soil, the addition of an INA agent may help induce ice nucleation and thereby reduce the populations of nematode species that are unable to survive when the soil solution is frozen. PMID:19270966

  14. Effect of an ice-nucleating activity agent on subzero survival of nematode juveniles.

    PubMed

    Wergin, W P; Yaklich, R W; Carta, L K; Erbe, E F; Murphy, C A

    2000-06-01

    Juveniles of five species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans, Panagrellus redivivus, Pratylenchus agilis, Pristionchus pacificus, and Distolabrellus veechi, were added to solutions with (treatment) and without (control) a commercial ice-nucleating activity (INA) agent. Ten-microliter droplets of the solutions containing the juveniles were placed on glass microscope slides and transferred to a temperaturecontrolled freeze plate where the temperature was reduced to -6 to -8 degrees C. At this temperature, the droplets containing the INA agent froze while those without the agent remained liquid. After 2 minutes, the temperature of the plate was raised to 24 degrees C, and the slides were examined with a light microscope to determine the viability of the juveniles. The results showed that usually most juveniles (43% to 88%, depending on species) in solutions that did not contain the INA agent (controls) were active, indicating that the juveniles were capable of supercooling and were thereby protected from the subzero temperatures. Alternatively, less than 10% of the juveniles that had frozen for 2 minutes in solutions containing the INA agent remained viable, indicating that inoculative freezing of the solution was lethal to the supercooled juveniles. Our results suggest that, in geographical areas where winter temperatures may not be sufficiently low or sustained to freeze soil, the addition of an INA agent may help induce ice nucleation and thereby reduce the populations of nematode species that are unable to survive when the soil solution is frozen. PMID:19270966

  15. Activation of Aluminum as an Effective Reducing Agent by Pitting Corrosion for Wet-chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F−, Cl−, and Br− in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu2Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  16. Activation of aluminum as an effective reducing agent by pitting corrosion for wet-chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F⁻, Cl⁻, and Br⁻ in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu₂Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent.

  17. Variables and potential models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating of fluvial sediments rests on the assumption that sufficient sunlight is available to remove a previously obtained signal in a process deemed bleaching. However, luminescence signals obtained from sediment in the active channels of rivers often contain residual signals. This paper explores and attempts to build theoretical models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial settings. We present two models, one for sediment transported in an episodic manner, such as flood-driven washes in arid environments, and one for sediment transported in a continuous manner, such as in large continental scale rivers. The episodic flow model assumes that the majority of sediment is bleached while exposed to sunlight at the near surface between flood events and predicts a power-law decay in luminescence signal with downstream transport distance. The continuous flow model is developed by combining the Beer–Lambert law for the attenuation of light through a water column with a general-order kinetics equation to produce an equation with the form of a double negative exponential. The inflection point of this equation is compared with the sediment concentration from a Rouse profile to derive a non-dimensional number capable of assessing the likely extent of bleaching for a given set of luminescence and fluvial parameters. Although these models are theoretically based and not yet necessarily applicable to real-world fluvial systems, we introduce these ideas to stimulate discussion and encourage the development of comprehensive bleaching models with predictive power.

  18. Antifungal agents, Part 11. Biphenyl analogues of naftifine: synthesis and antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Porretta, G C; Fioravanti, R; Biava, M; Artico, M; Villa, A; Simonetti, N

    1995-09-01

    A series of naftifine analogues having the biphenyl instead of the naphthyl moiety have been synthesized in a search devoted to study bioanalogues of clinically efficacious antifungal agents. The new derivatives were tested against Candida albicans by the direct contact method. They were also assayed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and against some isolates of plant pathogenic fungi. Derivatives 8a, 8c, and 9a were found to be active against Candida albicans, derivative 5a was active against E. coli, a very resistant species to antimycotic agents, and derivatives 8a and 8b inhibited the plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia solani.

  19. Analysis of structural changes in bleached keratin fibers (black and white human hair) using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2006-04-15

    To investigate the influence of bleaching treatments on keratin fibers, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of bleached human hair (black and white human hair) was directly analyzed without isolating the cuticle and cortex, using Raman spectroscopy. The S-S band intensity existing from the cuticle region to the center of cortex region of virgin white human hair decreased, while the S-O band intensity at 1040 cm(-1), assigned to cysteic acid, increased by performing the bleaching treatment. Especially, the S-O band intensity of the cuticle region increased remarkably compared with that of the cortex region. Also, the amide III (unordered) band intensity in the cortex region increased, indicating that some of the proteins existing throughout the cortex region changed to the random coil form. Moreover, it has been found that the S-S band intensity existing from the cuticle region to the center of the cortex region of the virgin black human hair decreased remarkably, while the S-O band intensity increased significantly compared with that of the virgin white human hair by performing the bleaching treatment. From these experiments, we concluded that the melanin granules including metal ions act as a decomposition accelerator for the oxidizing agent, thereby leading to a higher level of disulfide (-SS-) group cleavage in the black human hair compared with that of the white human hair. PMID:16425172

  20. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  1. Effect of fluoride gels on microhardness and surface roughness of bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    China, Ana L P; Souza, Nayara M; Gomes, Yasmin do S B de L; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Silva, Cecy M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bleaching treatments containing added calcium and combined with neutral or acidic fluoride gels on tooth enamel was investigated in vitro through Knoop microhardness (KHN) and surface roughness (SR) measurements. A total of 60 bovine incisors were tested, including 30 for SR measurements and 30 for KHN measurements. The specimens were divided into 12 groups and subjected to a bleaching agent with hydrogen peroxide 35% (Whiteness HP 35% Maxx, FGM) or hydrogen peroxide 35% with calcium (Whiteness HP 35% Blue Calcium, FGM) and a fluoride treatment flugel acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) or flugel neutral fluoride (NF). Control specimens were submitted to bleaching treatments without fluoride. Microhardness tests were performed using a Knoop indentor. Roughness measurements were obtained using a roughness analyzer. Measurements were obtained before and after treatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C between treatments. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Treatments using APF combined with 35% HP caused a decrease in microhardness, while NF combined with HP 35% Ca increased the enamel hardness. Fluoride gels did not alter the SR of the bleached enamel. PMID:25419249

  2. Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.

    2002-03-04

    Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of

  3. Multi-Agent System for Managing Human Activities in Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenkenghost, Debra; Bonasso, R. Peter

    2006-01-01

    In manned space operations today, the astronauts' activity schedules are preplanned and adjusted daily on Earth. We have developed the Distributed Collaboration and Interaction (DCI) multi-agent system to investigate automating aspects of human activity management. The DCI System assists (1) plan generation, (2) human activity tracking, (3) plan revision, and (4) mixed initiative interaction with the plan. We have deployed and evaluated the DCI system at JSC to assist control engineers in managing anomaly handling activities for automated life support systems. DCI operated round the clock for 20 months in the Water Research Facility at JSC. Using this software, we reduced anomaly response time by engineers from up to 10 hours in previous tests to under an hour. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that agent assistance for schedule management has potential to improve astronaut activity awareness and reduce response time in situations where crew are interrupted to handle anomalies.

  4. Chronic parrotfish grazing impedes coral recovery after bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotjan, Randi D.; Dimond, James L.; Thornhill, Daniel J.; Leichter, James J.; Helmuth, Brian; Kemp, Dustin W.; Lewis, Sara M.

    2006-08-01

    Coral bleaching, in which corals become visibly pale and typically lose their endosymbiotic zooxanthellae ( Symbiodinium spp.), increasingly threatens coral reefs worldwide. While the proximal environmental triggers of bleaching are reasonably well understood, considerably less is known concerning physiological and ecological factors that might exacerbate coral bleaching or delay recovery. We report a bleaching event in Belize during September 2004 in which Montastraea spp. corals that had been previously grazed by corallivorous parrotfishes showed a persistent reduction in symbiont density compared to intact colonies. Additionally, grazed corals exhibited greater diversity in the genetic composition of their symbiont communities, changing from uniform ITS2 type C7 Symbiodinium prior to bleaching to mixed assemblages of Symbiodinium types post-bleaching. These results suggest that chronic predation may exacerbate the influence of environmental stressors and, by altering the coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis, such abiotic-biotic interactions may contribute to spatial variation in bleaching processes.

  5. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions.

  6. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions. PMID:16683620

  7. Comparative evaluation of superoxide dismutase, alpha-tocopherol, and 10% sodium ascorbate on reversal of shear bond strength of bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Mahendran; Selvaraj, Sharmila; Khetarpal, Ambica; Raj, Aruna; Pasupathy, Shakunthala; Shekar, Shobana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the neutralizer effect of antioxidant agents on the bond strength of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty enamel slabs were prepared from 60 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors and were divided into six groups. The negative control group received no bleaching treatment and the other groups were bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence Quick; Ultradent, South Jordan, USA). In Group II, composite was built immediately after bleaching and cured without any antioxidants. In Group III, bleached specimens received composite build ups delayed by 1 week. In Groups IV, V, and VI bleached specimens received applications of superoxide dismutase (SOD), sodium ascorbate (SA), and tocopherol solutions, respectively, for 10 min. Following composite bonding, the micro shear bond strength (μSBS) was measured at a speed of 1 mm/min in universal testing machine. Statistical Analysis Used: The μSBS values of all the groups were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significant difference post-hoc test. Results: Bonding of composites to unbleached group (Group I) exhibited the highest mean SBS values and among the antioxidant-treated groups, the highest SBS values were seen with SOD (Group IV) treated samples (23.0040 ± 4.30565 MPa). Conclusions: Application of SA, alpha-tocopherol, and SOD can effectively reverse the bond strength with bleached enamel. SOD gave a comparatively more promising reversal of bond strength than SA and alpha-tocopherol, and deserves further studies. PMID:27011749

  8. Kraft Pulp Bleaching and Delignification by Dikaryons and Monokaryons of Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Addleman, Katherine; Archibald, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    The ability of 10 dikaryotic and 20 monokaryotic strains of Trametes (Coriolus) versicolor to bleach and delignify hardwood and softwood kraft pulps was assessed. A dikaryon (52P) and two of its mating-compatible monokaryons (52J and 52D) derived via protoplasting were compared. All three regularly bleached hardwood kraft pulp more than 20 brightness points (International Standards Organization) in 5 days and softwood kraft pulp the same amount in 12 days. Delignification (kappa number reduction) by the dikaryon and the monokaryons was similar, but the growth of the monokaryons was slower. Insoluble dark pigments were commonly found in the mycelium, medium, and pulp of the dikaryon only. Laccase and manganese peroxidase (MnP) but not lignin peroxidase activities were secreted during bleaching by all three strains. Their laccase and MnP isozyme patterns were compared on native gels. No segregation of isozyme bands between the monokaryons was found. Hardwood kraft pulp appeared to adsorb several laccase isozyme bands. One MnP isozyme (pI, 3.2) was secreted in the presence of pulp by all three strains, but a second (pI, 4.9) was produced only by 52P. A lower level of soluble MnP activity in one monokaryon (52D) was associated with reduced bleaching ability and a lower level of methanol production. Since monokaryon 52J bleached pulp better than its parent dikaryon 52P, especially per unit of biomass, this genetically simpler monokaryon will be the preferred subject for further genetic manipulation and improvement of fungal pulp biological bleaching. Images PMID:16348851

  9. Redox-activated MRI contrast agents based on lanthanide and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tsitovich, Pavel B; Burns, Patrick J; McKay, Adam M; Morrow, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) potential of tissue is tightly regulated in order to maintain normal physiological processes, but is disrupted in disease states. Thus, the development of new tools to map tissue redox potential may be clinically important for the diagnosis of diseases that lead to redox imbalances. One promising area of chemical research is the development of redox-activated probes for mapping tissue through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we summarize several strategies for the design of redox-responsive MRI contrast agents. Our emphasis is on both lanthanide(III) and transition metal(II/III) ion complexes that provide contrast either as T1 relaxivity MRI contrast agents or as paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents. These agents are redox-triggered by a variety of chemical reactions or switches including redox-activated thiol groups, and heterocyclic groups that interact with the metal ion or influence properties of other ancillary ligands. Metal ion centered redox is an approach which is ripe for development by coordination chemists. Redox-triggered metal ion approaches have great potential for creating large differences in magnetic properties that lead to changes in contrast. An attractive feature of these agents is the ease of fine-tuning the metal ion redox potential over a biologically relevant range.

  10. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  11. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  12. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  13. Bleach boosting effect of xylanase A from Bacillus halodurans C-125 in ECF bleaching of wheat straw pulp.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-qiong; Han, Shuang-yan; Zhang, Na; Hu, Hui; Zheng, Sui-ping; Ye, Yan-rui; Lin, Ying

    2013-02-01

    Past studies have revealed major difficulties in applications of xylanase in the pulp and paper industry as enzymes isolated from many different species could not tolerate high temperatures or highly alkaline conditions. The thermostable xylanase A from Bacillus halodurans C-125 (C-125 xylanase A) was successfully cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris with a yield as high as 3361 U/mL in a 2 L reactor. Its thermophilic and basophilic properties (optimal activity at 70 °C and pH 9.0), together with the fact it is cellulase-free, render this enzyme attractive for compatible applications in the pulp and paper industry. The pretreatment of wheat straw pulp with C-125 xylanase A at pH 9.0 and 70 °C for 90 min induced the release of both chromophores (Ab(237), Ab(254), Ab(280)) and hydrophobic compounds (Ab(465)) into the filtrate as well as sugar degradation. Moreover, the addition of 10 U xylanase to 1 g wheat straw pulp (dry weight) as pretreatment improved brightness by 5.2% ISO and decreased the kappa number by 5.0% when followed by hydrogen peroxide bleaching. In addition, compared with two commercial enzymes, Pulpzyme HC and AU-PE89, which are normally incorporated in ECF bleaching of wheat straw pulp, C-125 xylanase A proved to be more effective in enhancing brightness as well as preserving paper strength properties. When evaluating the physical properties of pulp samples, such as tensile index, tearing index, bursting index, and post-color (PC) number, the enzymes involved in pretreating pulps exhibited better or the same performances as chemical treatment. Compared with chemical bleaching, chlorine consumption can be significantly reduced by 10% for xylanase-pretreated wheat straw pulp while maintaining the brightness together with the kappa number at the same level. Scanning electron microscopy revealed significant surface modification of enzyme-pretreated pulp fibers with no marked fiber disruptions.

  14. SHEDDING LIGHT ON CORALS HEALTH: INTERACTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SOLAR RADIATION WITH BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral bleaching and declines in coral reef health in recent years have been attributed in part to processes driven by UV and/or visible light. For coral assemblages, exposure to UV light is often an unavoidable consequence of having access to visible (photosynthetically active) ...

  15. Effect of Activating Agent on the Preparation of Bamboo-Based High Surface Area Activated Carbon by Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hongying; Wu, Jian; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo

    2016-06-01

    The present work attempts to convert bamboo into a high surface area activated carbon via microwave heating. Different chemical activating agents such as KOH, NaOH, K2CO3 and Na2CO3 were utilized to identify a most suitable activating agent. Among the activating agents tested KOH was found to generate carbon with the highest porosity and surface area. The effect of KOH/C ratio on the porous nature of the activated carbon has been assessed. An optimal KOH/C ratio of 4 was identified, beyond which the surface area as well as the pore volume were found to decrease. At the optimized KOH/C ratio the surface area and the pore volume were estimated to be 3,441 m2/g and 2.093 ml/g, respectively, with the significant proportion of which being microporous (62.3%). Activated carbon prepared under the optimum conditions was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Activated carbons with so high surface area and pore volume are very rarely reported, which could be owed to the nature of the precursor and the optimal conditions of mixture ratio adopted in the present work.

  16. Differential nitric oxide synthesis and host apoptotic events correlate with bleaching susceptibility in reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, T. D.; Krueger, T.; Becker, S.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Coral bleaching poses a threat to coral reefs worldwide. As a consequence of the temperature-induced breakdown in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, bleaching can have extensive effects on reef communities. However, our understanding of bleaching at a cellular level is limited, and this is particularly true regarding differential susceptibility among coral species. Recent work suggests that bleaching may represent a host innate immune-like response to symbiont dysfunction that involves synthesis of the signalling compound nitric oxide (NO) and the induction of host apoptotic-like cell death. In this study, we examined the activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes alongside oxidised NO accumulation (a proxy for NO synthesis) in the reef corals Acropora millepora, Montipora digitata, and Pocillopora damicornis during experimental thermal stress. P. damicornis was the most sensitive species, suffering mortality (tissue sloughing) after 5 days at 33 °C but non-lethal bleaching after 9 days at 31.5 °C. A. millepora bleached at 33 °C but remained structurally intact, while M. digitata showed little evidence of bleaching. P. damicornis and A. millepora both exhibited evidence of temperature-induced NO synthesis and, after 5 days of heating, levels of oxidised NO in both species were fivefold higher than in controls maintained at 28.5 °C. These responses preceded bleaching by a number of days and may have occurred before symbiont dysfunction (measured as chlorophyll a degradation and oxidised NO accumulation). In A. millepora, apparent NO synthesis correlated with the induction of host apoptotic-like pathways, while in P. damicornis, the upregulation of apoptotic pathways occurred later. No evidence of elevated NO production or apoptosis was observed in M. digitata at 33 °C and baseline activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes was negligible in this species. These findings provide important physiological data in the context of the responses of corals to global change and

  17. [Prevalence of the use of skin bleaching cosmetics in two areas in Dakar (Sénégal)].

    PubMed

    Wone, I; Tal-Dia, A; Diallo, O F; Badiane, M; Touré, K; Diallo, I

    2000-01-01

    The use of skin bleaching cosmetics is an increasingly widespread phenomenon in Africa. If the negative sanitary effects of this practice are today well known, reliable statistics on the importance of the problem within the global population are rare. Our study, conducted in two popular areas in Dakar, Usine bene taly and Usine Niary Taly, had 2 objectives: to determine the prevalence of the use of skin bleaching cosmetics in the studied zones, to describe the prevalence according to the following variables: age, matrimonial situation, level and/or type of instruction, job, type of agents used. For that purpose, we conducted a transverse study on a representative sample of 600 women from 15 to 55 years old. This study reveals a prevalence of the use of skin bleaching cosmetics of 67.2%. The agents found are hydroquinone derivatives (61%), topical corticosteroids (37%) and agents from unknown origin (2%). The use of skin bleaching cosmetics is more important among young women between 30 to 44 years (72.5%), married (72.2%), analphabets (75%), working (77.6%). Studies conducted in Mali and Togo gave comparable results, which give perspectives for a prevention based on education an awareness.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the effect of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of composite resins submitted to at-home and in-office bleaching procedures

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Lima, Michele; Catelan, Anderson; Hernandes, Natália Maria Pinto; Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may affect the properties of dental materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of composite resins submitted to the at-home and in-office bleaching treatment. Materials and Methods: Disc-shaped specimens were carried out of nanofilled and microhybrid composites (n = 10). Finishing step was performed after light curing (L1) and polishing after 24 h with two systems (L2). Then, specimens were submitted to the home or in-office bleaching procedures, and roughness was re-evaluated (L3). The surface roughness (Ra) readings were measured at L1, L2, and L3 times using a profilometer. Data were statistically analyzed by multiple-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = 0.05). Results: The polishing procedures decreased Ra for both composites compared to baseline values (L1). The roughness of specimens polished with jiffy did not present significant difference after polishing step (L2) and bleaching treatment (L3). However, the groups polished with Sof-Lex discs had increase on the Ra values after bleaching. Conclusion: The polishing is an important procedure to reduce the roughness of dental restorations and composite surface polished with jiffy system improved the degradation resistance to the bleaching agents compared to Sof-Lex discs. PMID:26752845

  19. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  20. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders.

    PubMed

    Anthony, K R N; Kline, D I; Diaz-Pulido, G; Dove, S; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-11-11

    Ocean acidification represents a key threat to coral reefs by reducing the calcification rate of framework builders. In addition, acidification is likely to affect the relationship between corals and their symbiotic dinoflagellates and the productivity of this association. However, little is known about how acidification impacts on the physiology of reef builders and how acidification interacts with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcification responses of crustose coralline algae (CCA) and branching (Acropora) and massive (Porites) coral species in response to acidification and warming. Using a 30-tank experimental system, we manipulated CO(2) levels to simulate doubling and three- to fourfold increases [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projection categories IV and VI] relative to present-day levels under cool and warm scenarios. Results indicated that high CO(2) is a bleaching agent for corals and CCA under high irradiance, acting synergistically with warming to lower thermal bleaching thresholds. We propose that CO(2) induces bleaching via its impact on photoprotective mechanisms of the photosystems. Overall, acidification impacted more strongly on bleaching and productivity than on calcification. Interestingly, the intermediate, warm CO(2) scenario led to a 30% increase in productivity in Acropora, whereas high CO(2) lead to zero productivity in both corals. CCA were most sensitive to acidification, with high CO(2) leading to negative productivity and high rates of net dissolution. Our findings suggest that sensitive reef-building species such as CCA may be pushed beyond their thresholds for growth and survival within the next few decades whereas corals will show delayed and mixed responses.

  1. Synthesis and alkylation activity of a nitrogen mustard agent to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard agents are widely used for the clinical treatment of cancers. A nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agent was synthesized utilizing nicotinic acid as the carrier of the alkylating substituent (-OCH2CH2N(CH2CH2Cl)2) that forms an ester group (R-C(O)-OR) on a heterocyclic ring. The N-mustard agent is a solid at room temperature and is stable for more than 6 weeks when stored at -10 degrees C. To determine the kinetics of alkylation activity a nucleophilic primary amine compound (4-chloroaniline) was placed in aqueous solution with the mustard agent at physiological pH 7.4 (pH of blood) and 37 degrees C. The alkylation reaction was found to be second-order with rate equation: rate = k2[N-mustard][Nu], where Nu = nucleophile and k2 = 0.0415 L/(mol x min). Pharmacological descriptors calculated showed values indicating a strong potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. The partition coefficient (Log P) of the mustard agent is 1.95 compared with 0.58 for nicotinic acid. Values of descriptors such as dipole, polar surface area, Log BB, molar refractivity, parachor, and violations of Rule of 5 were found to be 5.057 Debye, 42.44 A2, 0.662, 72.7 cm3, 607.7 cm3, and 0.0 for the N-mustard agent. Value of polar surface area for the mustard agent (42.44 A2) predicts that >90% of any amount present in the intestinal tract will be absorbed.

  2. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  3. Evaluation of the efficacy of bleach routinely used in health facilities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Daniel; Admassu, Aschalew; Wassie, Belaynew; Biadglegne, Fantahun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Ethiopia, the most widely used disinfectant is 5% Hypochlorites. However, Ethiopian national health safety and infection prevention guideline recommendation on the use of bleach is not consistent and varying from 0.1%-4%. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the effective time-concentration relationship of sodium hypochlorite against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the absence of any organic load. Methods This experimental study was conducted in Bahir Dar Regional laboratory from February-June 2013. Test suspensions of 1.5 X 108 CFU/ml prepared using normal saline containing 0.5% tween 80. From 5% stock, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% bleach was prepared. A 1ml of test strain suspension and 1ml of bleach mixed and allowed to stand until the specified time achieved, neutralized by 48 ml phosphate buffer. 100µl from the diluted sediment were spread on two L-J mediums and incubated at 37°C for 8 weeks. Results When 0. 1% bleach was used for 10 min, majority 11/20 of isolates showed 3 x 103 CFU/ml growth (ME = 4.4) which was inefficient. However, when the time increased, the log10 reduction was acceptable, ME >5 and it was effective. The bleach solution containing 0.5% and above was effective in all respective times. In this study, there is no difference observed in the tuberculocidal activity of bleach against resistant and sensitive strains. Conclusion Our study showed that in the absence of any organic load, 0.1% bleaches over 15 min and 0.5% bleaches over 10 min was found to be tuberculocidal. PMID:26668688

  4. Effect of tooth bleaching on orthodontic stainless steel bracket bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Deepti; Golchha, Vineet; Paul, Rahul; Sharma, Pooja; Wadhwa, Jitesh; Taneja, Sidhant

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to assess the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resins on stainless steel brackets immediately bonded to previously bleached teeth with 35% hydrogen peroxide and to compare the neutralization effect of various antioxidant agents on the bond strength after bleaching. Materials and Methods: One hundred sound human maxillary premolars were used for the study. Teeth were divided into 5 groups (n = 20); Group 1 (control), Group 2 (bleach treatment), Group 3 (sodium ascorbate treatment), Group 4 (tocopherol acetate treatment), and Group 5 (retinol acetate treatment). Teeth in Group 3, 4, and 5 were treated as in Group 2, but after that and before bleaching received treatment with sodium ascorbate, tocopherol acetate, and retinol acetate, respectively. Subsequently, teeth were bonded with stainless steel brackets (Ormco) using 3M Transbond XT. After 24 h, each specimen was loaded into a universal testing machine to determine the SBS at debonding. The data were exposed to the analysis of variance, Bonferroni, and Weibull Analysis. Result: There significant SBS difference (P = 0.000, F = 32.125) between various groups. Group 1 had the highest SBS (12.182 ± 1.41 MPa) and Group 2 the least SBS (6.182 ± 1.49 MPa). Significant SBS differences observed between Group 1 and 2; Group 2 and 3; Group 2 and 4; and Group 2 and 5 (P = 0.000). There was no significant SBS difference between Group 1 and 3; Group 1 and 4; and Group 3 and 4 (P = 1.000). Bonferroni results also indicated that there was a significant difference between Group 1 and 5 (P = 0.002); Group 3 and 5 (P = 0.144); and between Group 4 and 5 (P = 0.008). Weibull analysis indicated that bond strength for a 90% probability of failure, which was highest for Group 1 (13.99 MPa) and lowest for Group 2 (8.49 MPa). Conclusion: The in-vitro study showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide reduced the SBS significantly and this could be effectively reversed by the application of 10

  5. Agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    The active hybridization technique provides an effective approach to combining the best properties of a heterogeneous set of power sources to achieve higher energy density, power density and fuel efficiency. Active hybrid power sources can be used to power hybrid electric vehicles with selected combinations of internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, and/or supercapacitors. They can be deployed in all-electric ships to build a distributed electric power system. They can also be used in a bulk power system to construct an autonomous distributed energy system. An important aspect in designing an active hybrid power source is to find a suitable control strategy that can manage the active power sharing and take advantage of the inherent scalability and robustness benefits of the hybrid system. This paper presents an agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed agent-based power sharing scheme, simulation studies are performed for a hybrid power source that can be used in a solar car as the main propulsion power module. Simulation results clearly indicate that the agent-based control framework is effective to coordinate the various energy sources and manage the power/voltage profiles.

  6. Reef fishes can recognize bleached habitat during settlement: sea anemone bleaching alters anemonefish host selection.

    PubMed

    Scott, Anna; Dixson, Danielle L

    2016-05-25

    Understanding how bleaching impacts the settlement of symbiotic habitat specialists and whether there is flexibility in settlement choices with regard to habitat quality is essential given our changing climate. We used five anemonefishes (Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion latezonatus, Amphiprion ocellaris, Amphiprion percula and Premnas biaculeatus) and three host sea anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis crispa and Heteractis magnifica) in paired-choice flume experiments to determine whether habitat naive juveniles have the olfactory capabilities to distinguish between unbleached and bleached hosts, and how this may affect settlement decisions. All anemonefishes were able to distinguish between bleached and unbleached hosts, and responded only to chemical cues from species-specific host anemones irrespective of health status, indicating a lack of flexibility in host use. While bleached hosts were selected as habitat, this occurred only when unbleached options were unavailable, with the exception of A. latezonatus, which showed strong preferences for H. crispa regardless of health. This study highlights the potential deleterious indirect impacts of declining habitat quality during larval settlement in habitat specialists, which could be important in the field, given that bleaching events are becoming increasingly common. PMID:27226472

  7. Penetration of 38% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine and human teeth submitted to office bleach technique.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Gasparoto Mancini, Maria Nadir; Menezes, Marcia Maciel

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulp chamber penetration of peroxide bleaching agent in human and bovine teeth after office bleach technique. All the teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical of the cement-enamel junction and were divided into 2 groups, A (70 third human molars) and B (70 bovine lateral incisors), that were subdivided into A1 and B1 restored by using composite resin, A2 and B2 by using glass ionomer cement, and A3 and B3 by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement; A4, A5, B4, and B5 were not restored. Acetate buffer was placed in the pulp chamber, and the bleaching agent was applied for 40 minutes as follows: A1-A4 and B1-B4, 38% hydrogen peroxide exposure and A5 and B5, immersion into distilled water. The buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco crystal violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Dunnett, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey tests (5%). A higher level of hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp chamber in resin-modified glass ionomer cements in bovine (0.79 +/- 0.61 microg) and human (2.27 +/- 0.41 microg) groups. The bleaching agent penetration into the pulp chamber was higher in human teeth for any experimental situation. The penetration of the hydrogen peroxide depends on restorative materials, and under the conditions of this study human teeth are more susceptible to penetration of bleaching agent into the pulp chamber than bovine teeth.

  8. Wound-healing evaluation of entrapped active agents into protein microspheres over cellulosic gauzes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raquel; Ferreira, Helena; Matamá, Teresa; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-11-01

    The use of active ingredients in wound management have evolved alongside the pharmaceutical agents and dressings used to deliver them. However, the development of gauzes, dressings with specific properties, still remains a challenge for several medical applications. A new methodology for the controlled release of active components for the healing of burn wounds is proposed herein. Cotton and non-woven bandages have been cationised to promote the attachment of protein microspheres. The active agents, piroxicam and vegetable oil, were entrapped into the microspheres using ultrasound energy. Active agents were released from the microspheres by a change in pH. Wound healing was assessed through the use of standardised burn wounds induced by a cautery in human full-thickness skin equivalents (EpidermFT). The best re-epithelialisation and fastest wound closure was observed in wounds treated with proteinaceous microspheres attached to gauzes, after six days of healing, in comparison with commercial collagen dressing and other controls. Furthermore, the ability of these materials to reduce the inflammation process, together with healing improvement, makes these biomaterials suitable for wound-dressing applications.

  9. Combined bleaching and hydrolysis for isolation of cellulose nanofibrils from waste sackcloth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Jiang, Yaoquan; Song, Yuanyuan; Cao, Shaomei; Miao, Miao; Feng, Xin; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-10-20

    A convenient and low cost process to prepare cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) from waste sackcloth by using H2O2/HNO3 solution as both bleaching agent and hydrolysis medium was recommended. The resultant CNF with high crystallinity was initially synthesized by the chemical disintegration process for the removal of non-cellulosic components and the crystallinity of CNF was 68.11% compared with that of sackcloth fibers (48.28%). The decomposition temperature of CNF was about 340°C, which indicated that the thermal stability of the fibers was increased after the combined bleaching and hydrolysis. Subsequently, the homogenous CNF colloidal suspensions in water, ethanol and acetone were obtained after sonication treatment. The CNF in water suspensions with 20-50nm in width and hundreds of nanometers in length was ultimately prepared under the conditions of different ultrasonic time. PMID:26256171

  10. Effect of various capping agents on photocatalytic, antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Akhil, K; Jayakumar, J; Gayathri, G; Khan, S Sudheer

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are extensively used in a wide variety of commercial products including sunscreens, textiles and paints It is a known fact that ZnO NPs are not stable when dispersed in water, therefore manufacturers use several surface modifying agents to increase the stability of ZnO NPs. In the present study, ZnO NPs were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation with and without the use of surface modifying agents including ethylene glycol (EG), gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Preliminary characterization was done by UV-Visible spectroscopy. Electron microscopic analysis showed that the particles were hexagonal in shape. The hydrodynamic size distribution was analyzed by using dynamic light scattering method and crystalline nature was determined by X-ray diffraction method. The study evaluated the photocatalytic, antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of the particles with and without the addition of surface modifying agents. The capping of the particle was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was checked against methylene blue. Capping of the particles reduced the photocatalytic activity of the particles. The antibacterial and antibiofilm activities were checked against Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 3160) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 1688). Antibacterial activity was analyzed by simple plate count method both under dark as well as light condition. Antibiofilm activity was checked in both pre- and post-biofilm formation period under both dark as well as light condition. The activity was evaluated via crystal violet staining method. All the particles showed good antibacterial and antibiofilm activities. PMID:27088507

  11. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  12. Levels of immunity parameters underpin bleaching and disease susceptibility of reef corals.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline V; Bythell, John C; Willis, Bette L

    2010-06-01

    Immunity is a key life history trait that may explain hierarchies in the susceptibility of corals to disease and thermal bleaching, two of the greatest current threats to coral health and the persistence of tropical reefs. Despite their ongoing and rapid global decline, there have been few investigations into the immunity mechanisms of reef-building corals. Variables commonly associated with invertebrate immunity, including the presence of melanin, size of melanin-containing granular cells, and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, as well as concentrations of fluorescent proteins (FPs), were investigated in hard (Scleractinia) and soft (Alcyonacea) corals spanning 10 families from the Great Barrier Reef. Detectable levels of these indicators were present in all corals investigated, although relative investment differed among coral taxa. Overall levels of investment were inversely correlated to thermal bleaching and disease susceptibility. In addition, PO activity, melanin-containing granular cell size, and FP concentration were each found to be significant predictors of susceptibility and thus may play key roles in coral immunity. Correlative evidence that taxonomic (family-level) variation in the levels of these constituent immunity parameters underpins susceptibility to both thermal bleaching and disease indicates that baseline immunity underlies the vulnerability of corals to these two threats. This reinforces the necessity of a holistic approach to understanding bleaching and disease in order to accurately determine the resilience of coral reefs.

  13. From docking false-positive to active anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Gabriela; Kim, Joseph T; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Bailey, Christopher M; Domaoal, Robert A; Wang, Ligong; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2007-11-01

    Virtual screening of the Maybridge library of ca. 70 000 compounds was performed using a similarity filter, docking, and molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area postprocessing to seek potential non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). Although known NNRTIs were retrieved well, purchase and assaying of representative, top-scoring compounds from the library failed to yield any active anti-HIV agents. However, the highest-ranked library compound, oxadiazole 1, was pursued as a potential "near-miss" with the BOMB program to seek constructive modifications. Subsequent synthesis and assaying of several polychloro-analogs did yield anti-HIV agents with EC50 values as low as 310 nM. The study demonstrates that it is possible to learn from a formally unsuccessful virtual-screening exercise and, with the aid of computational analyses, to efficiently evolve a false positive into a true active. PMID:17918923

  14. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  15. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators. PMID:25133545

  16. A comparison of the sensitivity of four Staphylococcus aureus isolates to two chlorine-based disinfectants and an eco-friendly commercially available cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Adukwu, Emmanuel C; Allen, Stuart C; Phillips, Carol Ann

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of household bleach, a sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC)-based disinfectant and an eco-friendly cleaning agent (EFCA) on four Staphylococcus aureus strains, including two isolated from community infections. The products were assessed using the suspension (EN 1276) and surface (EN 13697) tests, while biofilm activity was determined using the 96-well plate method. Bleach and NaDCC caused > 5 log reduction in viable counts within 5 min in suspension, whilst on surfaces the reduction was < 3 log. Bleach at 5000 ppm free available chlorine completely eradicated MSSA NCTC 13297 and PVL CA MSSA biofilms within 10 min, but not at 500 and 50 ppm, NaDCC was less effective against biofilms. The EFCA demonstrated no antimicrobial activity. It is of concern that at the recommended "use" dilution, bleach did not eradicate biofilms. Although increasing contact time and/or concentration should improve the activity, this may not be acceptable to the user.

  17. A comparison of the sensitivity of four Staphylococcus aureus isolates to two chlorine-based disinfectants and an eco-friendly commercially available cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Adukwu, Emmanuel C; Allen, Stuart C; Phillips, Carol Ann

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of household bleach, a sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC)-based disinfectant and an eco-friendly cleaning agent (EFCA) on four Staphylococcus aureus strains, including two isolated from community infections. The products were assessed using the suspension (EN 1276) and surface (EN 13697) tests, while biofilm activity was determined using the 96-well plate method. Bleach and NaDCC caused > 5 log reduction in viable counts within 5 min in suspension, whilst on surfaces the reduction was < 3 log. Bleach at 5000 ppm free available chlorine completely eradicated MSSA NCTC 13297 and PVL CA MSSA biofilms within 10 min, but not at 500 and 50 ppm, NaDCC was less effective against biofilms. The EFCA demonstrated no antimicrobial activity. It is of concern that at the recommended "use" dilution, bleach did not eradicate biofilms. Although increasing contact time and/or concentration should improve the activity, this may not be acceptable to the user. PMID:24725246

  18. Network Interventions on Physical Activity in an Afterschool Program: An Agent-Based Social Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Shoham, David A.; Tesdahl, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We studied simulated interventions that leveraged social networks to increase physical activity in children. Methods. We studied a real-world social network of 81 children (average age = 7.96 years) who lived in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, and attended public schools and 1 of 2 structured afterschool programs. The sample was ethnically diverse, and 44% were overweight or obese. We used social network analysis and agent-based modeling simulations to test whether implementing a network intervention would increase children’s physical activity. We tested 3 intervention strategies. Results. The intervention that targeted opinion leaders was effective in increasing the average level of physical activity across the entire network. However, the intervention that targeted the most sedentary children was the best at increasing their physical activity levels. Conclusions. Which network intervention to implement depends on whether the goal is to shift the entire distribution of physical activity or to influence those most adversely affected by low physical activity. Agent-based modeling could be an important complement to traditional project planning tools, analogous to sample size and power analyses, to help researchers design more effective interventions for increasing children’s physical activity. PMID:25689202

  19. Garlic-derived anticancer agents: structure and biological activity of ajoene.

    PubMed

    Kaschula, Catherine H; Hunter, Roger; Parker, M Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Garlic has been used throughout the centuries to treat infections, heart disease, and cancer. Ajoene is one of the main compounds formed from heating crushed garlic as a mixture of E- and Z-isomers (E- and Z-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide). Ajoene possesses a broad spectrum of biological activities that include anticancer activity. It's cytotoxicity towards cancer cells is postulated to occur via an apoptotic mechanism involving activation of the mitochondrial-dependent caspase cascade. Structure-activity studies on ajoene and ajoene analogues have revealed that the Z-isomer is moderately more active than the E-isomer at inhibiting in vitro tumor cell growth, suggesting that specific protein interactions may be important. Substitution of the terminal end allyl groups in ajoene for alkyl, aromatic, or heteroaromatic groups produces some analogs with superior in vitro anticancer activity to ajoene, opening up the way to developing ajoene-based anticancer agents.

  20. Synthesis and activities of naphthalimide azoles as a new type of antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Yi; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2011-07-15

    Naphthalimide-derived azoles as a new type of antimicrobial agents were synthesized and evaluated for their efficiency in vitro against eight bacteria and two fungi by two fold serial dilution technique. Most title compounds exhibited good antimicrobial potency with low MIC values ranging from 1 to 16μg/mL. Notably, some synthesized compounds displayed comparable or even better antibacterial and antifungal activities against some tested strains than the reference drugs Orbifloxacin, Chloromycin and Fluconazole, respectively.

  1. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    PubMed Central

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  2. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  3. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  4. Internal bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vachon, C; Vanek, P; Friedman, S

    1998-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide to internally bleach discolored teeth. Following pulp removal, 38 tooth crowns were stained with erythrocytes and bleached 3 times over 14 days using either 10% carbamide peroxide or 30% H2O2 and sodium perborate. The pulp chambers were subsequently filled, and the tooth crowns stored for 3 months. The shades of the crowns were measured using reflectance spectroscopy prior to and at several time points following bleaching. Using statistical analysis, the authors determined that both materials significantly improved the shade of the crowns, and that 10% carbamide peroxide could be utilized clinically to internally bleach nonvital discolored teeth.

  5. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Heiden, Anke; Blunck, Uwe; Zimmer, Stefan; Seemann, Rainer; Roulet, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    This clinical study compared the effectiveness of bleaching non-vital teeth with an open pulp chamber during bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide compared to the modified walking bleach technique and extracoronal bleaching. Sixty discolored, non-vital teeth were treated. They were divided into three groups. Each group was treated with one of the bleaching materials and methods: extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks as negative control (Group A), intracoronally using sodium perborate mixed with 3% hydrogen peroxide (modified walking bleach technique) (Rotstein, Mor & Friedman, 1993) for four weeks (Group B) and intracoronally and extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks (Group C) (Liebenberg, 1997). Tooth color was measured at baseline, (BL), immediately post-bleaching (IP) and six months post-bleaching (SP) with a colorimeter (Castor, Sigma, Germany) using a tooth-positioning jig. The color was determined according to the CIELAB system, which records lightness as L* and chromaticity coordinates as a* and b*. The difference in L* and b* among the three groups was significant between BL and IP examination. The post-bleaching, whitening effect in Group C was significantly better, but after six months, in Group C, it was as effective as in Group B.

  6. Coral bleaching at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooidonk, Ruben J.; Manzello, Derek P.; Moye, Jessica; Brandt, Marilyn E.; Hendee, James C.; McCoy, Croy; Manfrino, Carrie

    2012-06-01

    The global rise in sea temperature through anthropogenic climate change is affecting coral reef ecosystems through a phenomenon known as coral bleaching; that is, the whitening of corals due to the loss of the symbiotic zooxanthellae which impart corals with their characteristic vivid coloration. We describe aspects of the most prevalent episode of coral bleaching ever recorded at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, during the fall of 2009. The most susceptible corals were found to be, in order, Siderastrea siderea, Montastraea annularis, and Montastraea faveolata, while Diplora strigosa and Agaricia spp. were less so, yet still showed considerable bleaching prevalence and severity. Those found to be least susceptible were Porites porites, Porites astreoides, and Montastraea cavernosa. These observations and other reported observations of coral bleaching, together with 29 years (1982-2010) of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, were used to optimize bleaching predictions at this location. To do this a Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) and Peirce Skill Score (PSS) analysis was employed to calculate a local bleaching threshold above which bleaching was expected to occur. A threshold of 4.2 DHW had the highest skill, with a PSS of 0.70. The method outlined here could be applied to other regions to find the optimal bleaching threshold and improve bleaching predictions.

  7. Mass Coral Bleaching in 2010 in the Southern Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching. PMID:24400078

  8. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  9. Role of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae and coral mucus in the adhesion of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi to its host.

    PubMed

    Banin, E; Israely, T; Fine, M; Loya, Y; Rosenberg, E

    2001-05-15

    Vibrio shiloi, the causative agent of bleaching the coral Oculina patagonica in the Mediterranean Sea, adheres to its coral host by a beta-D-galactopyranoside-containing receptor on the coral surface. The receptor is present in the coral mucus, since V. shiloi adhered avidly to mucus-coated ELISA plates. Adhesion was inhibited by methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside. Removal of the mucus from O. patagonica resulted in a delay in adhesion of V. shiloi to the coral, corresponding to regeneration of the mucus. DCMU inhibited the recovery of adhesion of the bacteria to the mucus-depleted corals, indicating that active photosynthesis by the endosymbiotic zooxanthellae was necessary for the synthesis or secretion of the receptor. Further evidence of the role of the zooxanthellae in producing the receptor came from a study of adhesion of V. shiloi to different species of corals. The bacteria failed to adhere to bleached corals and white (azooxanthellate) O. patagonica cave corals, both of which lacked the algae. In addition, V. shiloi adhered to two Mediterranean corals (Madracis and Cladocora) that contained zooxanthellae and did not adhere to two azooxanthellate Mediterranean corals (Phyllangia and Polycyathus). V. shiloi demonstrated positive chemotaxis towards the mucus of O. patagonica. The data demonstrate that endosymbiotic zooxanthellae contribute to the production of coral mucus and that V. shiloi infects only mucus-containing, zooxanthellate corals.

  10. New investigational drugs with single-agent activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) is rapidly evolving. In the United States, four drugs (panobinostat, ixazomib, daratumumab and elotuzumab) were approved for the treatment of MM in 2015. As a result of improved diagnosis and therapy, there has been a dramatic improvement in the outcome of MM in the last decade, probably more than any other malignancy. Numerous agents continue to be studied in preclinical models and in clinical trials, with many demonstrating clinical efficacy that appears promising enough to have a trajectory for regulatory approval. The purpose of this article is to summarize the current data and provide perspective on new investigational agents with promising single-agent activity in MM. The agents reviewed include Isatuximab, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody; marizomib, a new proteasome inhibitor; oprozomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor; filanesib (ARRY-520), a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor; dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; venetoclax (ABT-199), a selective BCL-2 inhibitor; and LGH-447, pan PIM kinase inhibitor. PMID:27471867

  11. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  12. A contrast agent recognizing activated platelets reveals murine cerebral malaria pathology undetectable by conventional MRI

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Peter, Karlheinz; Campbell, Sandra J.; Wilainam, Panop; Grau, Georges E.; Bode, Christoph; Choudhury, Robin P.; Anthony, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Human and murine cerebral malaria are associated with elevated levels of cytokines in the brain and adherence of platelets to the microvasculature. Here we demonstrated that the accumulation of platelets in the brain microvasculature can be detected with MRI, using what we believe to be a novel contrast agent, at a time when the pathology is undetectable by conventional MRI. Ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on activated platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors were detected in the brains of malaria-infected mice 6 days after inoculation with Plasmodium berghei using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs) conjugated to a single-chain antibody specific for the LIBS (LIBS-MPIO). No binding of the LIBS-MPIO contrast agent was detected in uninfected animals. A combination of LIBS-MPIO MRI, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, but not IL-1β or lymphotoxin-α (LT-α), induced adherence of platelets to cerebrovascular endothelium. Peak platelet adhesion was found 12 h after TNF-α injection and was readily detected with LIBS-MPIO contrast-enhanced MRI. Temporal studies revealed that the level of MPIO-induced contrast was proportional to the number of platelets bound. Thus, the LIBS-MPIO contrast agent enabled noninvasive detection of otherwise undetectable cerebral pathology by in vivo MRI before the appearance of clinical disease, highlighting the potential of targeted contrast agents for diagnostic, mechanistic, and therapeutic studies. PMID:18274670

  13. Cilofungin (LY121019), an antifungal agent with specific activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G S; Myles, C; Pratt, K J; Washington, J A

    1988-01-01

    Cilofungin (LY121019) is an antifungal agent that interferes with beta-glucan synthesis in the cells walls of fungi. The activity of this agent against 256 clinical isolates of yeasts was determined. It was found to be very active in vitro against Candida albicans (MIC for 90% of isolates [MIC90], less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; minimal fungicidal concentration for 90% of isolates [MFC90], less than or equal to 0.31 micrograms/ml) and C. tropicalis (MIC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; MFC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml) and moderately active against Torulopsis glabrata (MIC90 and MFC90, less than or equal to 20 micrograms/ml). All C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were resistant. The activity of cilofungin was affected by medium and inoculum size. Antibiotic medium no. 3 was used as the standard medium. Isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis demonstrated a paradoxical effect in Sabouraud dextrose broth and yeast nitrogen base broth in that growth was partially inhibited at MICs equivalent to those in antibiotic medium no. 3, but growth continued, in many instances, throughout all concentrations tested. There was decreased activity of cilofungin with inocula greater than 10(5) CFU/ml. The temperature and duration of incubation did not affect its activity. Images PMID:3058017

  14. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer. PMID:26421434

  15. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  16. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of omeprazole-like agents with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    El-Nezhawy, Ahmed O H; Biuomy, Ayman R; Hassan, Fatma S; Ismaiel, Ayman K; Omar, Hany A

    2013-04-01

    A new series of novel benzimidazole derivatives containing substituted pyrid-2-yl moiety and polyhydroxy sugar conjugated to the N-benzimidazole moiety has been synthesized and evaluated as orally bioavailable anti-inflammatory agents with anti-ulcerogenic activity. The anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcerogenic activities of these compounds were compared to diclofenac and omeprazole, respectively. In carrageenan-induced paw oedema assay, 2-methyl-N-((3,4-dimethoxypyridin-2-yl)methyl)-1H-benzimidazol-5-amine (12d) and 1-(1,2,3,5-tetrahydroxy-α-D-mannofuranose)-5-(((3,4-dimethoxypyridin-2yl)methyl)amino)-2-methyl-1H-benzimidazole (15d) displayed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activities by decreasing the inflammation by 62% and 72%, respectively which is comparable to that of diclofenac (73%). In contrast to diclofenac, the anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds was not only free from any side effects on the gastric mucosa but also showed significant anti-ulcerogenic activity in rat pyloric ligation and ethanol-induced gastric ulcer models similar to that of omeprazole. Together, these findings suggest that 12d and 15d are potent anti-inflammatory agents with concurrent anti-ulcerogenic activity and support its clinical promise as a component of therapeutic strategies for inflammation, for which the gastric side effects are always a major limitation.

  17. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  18. The incorporation of activities to control dengue by community health agents

    PubMed Central

    Cazola, Luiza Helena de Oliveira; Tamaki, Edson Mamoru; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; de Andrade, Sonia Maria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the performance of Community Health Agents when dengue control activities were added to their tasks. METHODS Performance was measured comparing the evolution of selected indicators from the Brazilian National Dengue Control Program and the Family Health Strategy for 2002 to 2008 in the municipality of Sao Gabriel do Oeste, MS, Central Western Brazil, with those of Rio Verde de Mato Grosso, neighboring municipality with demographic, socioeconomic and health services similarities. Data were collected from municipal databases of the Information System for Yellow Fever and Dengue and the Information System for Primary Healthcare of the Mato Grosso do Sul State Health Office. The variables selected for the family health strategy activities were: monthly home visits, pregnant women whose antenatal care began in the first trimester, children under one with up-to-date vaccinations and hypertensive patients. Those selected for the Brazilian National Dengue Control Program were: properties inspected with Aedes aegypti and properties not inspected. RESULTS The two municipalities maintained a similar trend in dengue control indicators in the period studied. With regard to the Family Health Strategy, in 2002 Sao Gabriel do Oeste was better off in three of the four indicators studied, however, this situation was reversed at the end of the period when the county was overtaken by Rio Verde de Mato Grosso in three of the four indicators analyzed, including, the monthly average community health worker visits per registered family, the main activity of a Family Health Strategy agent. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the National Dengue Control Program into the Family Health Strategy is viable and developed without prejudice to dengue control activities, however, the same did not occur with the activities of family health in Sao Gabriel do Oeste. The additional workload of the community health workers is the most likely hypothesis for the declining performance of these

  19. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  20. Inhibition and stimulation of activity of purified recombinant CYP11A1 by therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Linger, Marlin; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2013-05-22

    In vertebrates, the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is initiated by cytochrome P450 CYP11A1 which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone. We investigated whether some of the experimental and FDA-approved therapeutic agents alter the activity of CYP11A1 in the reconstituted system in vitro. We found that under the experimental conditions used and when phospholipids are included, ketoconazole, posaconazole, carbenoxolone, and selegiline inhibit CYP11A1-mediated production of pregnenolone by at least 67%. Conversely, pemirolast, clobenpropit, desogestrel, dexmedetomidine, and tizanidine stimulate the enzyme activity by up to 70%. We then evaluated the identified inhibitors and activators for spectral binding to CYP11A1 and their effect on enzyme activity in the absence of phospholipids. The data obtained provide insight into how different drugs interact with CYP11A1 and demonstrate that P450 association with the lipid bilayer determines, in many cases, a drug's effect on enzyme activity.

  1. Inhibition and stimulation of activity of purified recombinant CYP11A1 by therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Linger, Marlin; Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, the biosynthesis of steroid hormones is initiated by cytochrome P450 CYP11A1 which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone. We investigated whether some of the experimental and FDA-approved therapeutic agents alter the activity of CYP11A1 in the reconstituted system in vitro. We found that under the experimental conditions used and when phospholipids are included, ketoconazole, posaconazole, carbenoxolone, and selegiline inhibit CYP11A1-mediated production of pregnenolone by at least 67%. Conversely, pemirolast, clobenpropit, desogestrel, dexmedetomidine, and tizanidine stimulate the enzyme activity by up to 70%. We then evaluated the identified inhibitors and activators for spectral binding to CYP11A1 and their effect on enzyme activity in the absence of phospholipids. The data obtained provide insight into how different drugs interact with CYP11A1 and demonstrate that P450 association with the lipid bilayer determines, in many cases, a drug’s effect on enzyme activity. PMID:23089212

  2. Decontamination of chemical agents in Freon-113. Final report, February 1984-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.C.; Collins, K.R.; Ward, J.R.; Richmond, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    Freon solubilizes hydrophobic chemical warfare agents, such as soman, without damaging sensitive electronic equipment, such as night-vision goggles or communication equipment. Freon is used in this manner in the Nonaqueous Equipment Decontamination System (NAEDS) under development at CRDEC. The contaminated Freon is returned to a still, after which it is distilled through an aqueous layer containing bleach to decontaminate the residual agent. This report describes the results of experiments to measure how effectively agent is destroyed in the NAEDS. These results show that residual agent is still left in the redistilled Freon, and there is little difference whether the active decontaminant is removed from the aqueous layer. A mixture was prepared consisting of a 1:1:1 mixture of ethanol, 8 m sodium hydroxide, and Freon. It was demonstrated that the use of this mixture in the NAEDS would destroy all agent and that the redistilled Freon was free of soman. Freon-113, Bleach, Decontamination, Distillation, Non-Aqueous equipment decontamination system, Ethanol blend.

  3. Macrolide-Based Microtubule-Stabilizing Agents - Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, B.; Kuzniewski, C. N.; Wullschleger, C.; Altmann, K.-H.

    This article provides an overview on the chemistry and structure-activity relationships of macrolide-based microtubule-stabilizing agents. The primary focus will be on the total synthesis or examples thereof, but a brief summary of the current state of knowledge on the structure-activity relationships of epothilones, laulimalide, dictyostatin, and peloruside A will also be given. This macrolide class of compounds, over the last decade, has become the subject of growing interest due to their ability to inhibit human cancer cell proliferation through a taxol-like mechanism of action.

  4. Design, diversity-oriented synthesis and structure activity relationship studies of quinolinyl heterocycles as antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Venkatesham; Alla, Manjula; Kotipalli, Sudha Sravanti; Ummani, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    The current study reports design and diversity oriented synthesis of novel bis heterocycles with a common 2-methyl, C-4 unsubstituted quinoline moiety as the central key heterocycle. Employing reagent based skeletal diversity approach; a facile synthesis of bis heterocycles with different heterocyclic rings at C-3 position of the quinoline moiety has been accomplished. A broad range of heterocyclic frameworks thus obtained were evaluated for their antimycobacterial activity. The active scaffolds were further explored by a parallel library generation in order to establish SAR. Further, low cytotoxicity against A549 cell line enhances the potential of the synthesized molecules as promising antimycobacterial agents. PMID:24189497

  5. Effect of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without addition of calcium on the enamel surface.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Izadora Quintela Souza; Silva, Lucas Nunes de Brito; Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; de Lima Neto, Cantídio Francisco; Dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa; Fragoso, Larissa Silveira de Mendonça

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effectiveness and effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without calcium on color, micromorphology, and the replacement of calcium and phosphate on the enamel surface. Thirty bovine enamel blocks (5.0 × 5.0 mm) were placed into the following groups: G1: artificial saliva (control); G2: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel without calcium (Whiteness HP Maxx-FGM); and G3: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with calcium (Whiteness HP Blue-FGM). Three color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer: untreated (baseline), after performing staining, and after application of bleaching agents. Calcium deposition on the enamel was evaluated before and after the application of bleaching agents using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The enamel surface micromorphology was observed under scanning electron microscopy. The pH of each product was measured. The data were subjected to one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and any differences were analyzed using Tukey's test (P < 0.05). G3 showed greater variation in total color after the experiment than G2 and G1; there was no significant difference in calcium or phosphorus concentration before and after the experimental procedures; morphological changes were observed only in G2 and G3; and the pH values of the Whiteness HP Maxx and Whiteness HP Blue bleaching agents were 5.77 and 7.79, respectively. The 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium showed greater bleaching potential, but the addition of calcium had no effect in terms of reducing morphological changes or increasing the calcium concentration on the enamel surface. PMID:26279091

  6. Effect of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without addition of calcium on the enamel surface.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Izadora Quintela Souza; Silva, Lucas Nunes de Brito; Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; de Lima Neto, Cantídio Francisco; Dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa; Fragoso, Larissa Silveira de Mendonça

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effectiveness and effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without calcium on color, micromorphology, and the replacement of calcium and phosphate on the enamel surface. Thirty bovine enamel blocks (5.0 × 5.0 mm) were placed into the following groups: G1: artificial saliva (control); G2: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel without calcium (Whiteness HP Maxx-FGM); and G3: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with calcium (Whiteness HP Blue-FGM). Three color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer: untreated (baseline), after performing staining, and after application of bleaching agents. Calcium deposition on the enamel was evaluated before and after the application of bleaching agents using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The enamel surface micromorphology was observed under scanning electron microscopy. The pH of each product was measured. The data were subjected to one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and any differences were analyzed using Tukey's test (P < 0.05). G3 showed greater variation in total color after the experiment than G2 and G1; there was no significant difference in calcium or phosphorus concentration before and after the experimental procedures; morphological changes were observed only in G2 and G3; and the pH values of the Whiteness HP Maxx and Whiteness HP Blue bleaching agents were 5.77 and 7.79, respectively. The 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium showed greater bleaching potential, but the addition of calcium had no effect in terms of reducing morphological changes or increasing the calcium concentration on the enamel surface.

  7. Nutrient enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Smith, Edward G.; Hunt, Alan N.; Legiret, François-Eric; Postle, Anthony D.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching, resulting from the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis has been identified as the most severe threat to coral reef survival on a global scale. Regionally, nutrient enrichment of reef waters is often associated with a significant loss of coral cover and diversity. Recently, increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have been linked to a reduction of the temperature threshold of coral bleaching, a phenomenon for which no mechanistic explanation is available. Here we show that increased levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in combination with limited phosphate concentrations result in an increased susceptibility of corals to temperature- and light-induced bleaching. Mass spectrometric analyses of the algal lipidome revealed a marked accumulation of sulpholipids under these conditions. Together with increased phosphatase activities, this change indicates that the imbalanced supply of dissolved inorganic nitrogen results in phosphate starvation of the symbiotic algae. Based on these findings we introduce a conceptual model that links unfavourable ratios of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the water column with established mechanisms of coral bleaching. Notably, this model improves the understanding of the detrimental effects of coastal nutrient enrichment on coral reefs, which is urgently required to support knowledge-based management strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

  8. A structure-activity analysis of the variation in oxime efficacy against nerve agents

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Donald M. Koplovitz, Irwin; Worek, Franz; Sweeney, Richard E.

    2008-09-01

    A structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the variation in oxime efficacy of 2-PAM, obidoxime, HI-6 and ICD585 against nerve agents. In vivo oxime protection and in vitro oxime reactivation were used as indicators of oxime efficacy against VX, sarin, VR and cyclosarin. Analysis of in vivo oxime protection was conducted with oxime protective ratios (PR) from guinea pigs receiving oxime and atropine therapy after sc administration of nerve agent. Analysis of in vitro reactivation was conducted with second-order rate contants (k{sub r2}) for oxime reactivation of agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from guinea pig erythrocytes. In vivo oxime PR and in vitro k{sub r2} decreased as the volume of the alkylmethylphosphonate moiety of nerve agents increased from VX to cyclosarin. This effect was greater with 2-PAM and obidoxime (> 14-fold decrease in PR) than with HI-6 and ICD585 (< 3.7-fold decrease in PR). The decrease in oxime PR and k{sub r2} as the volume of the agent moiety conjugated to AChE increased was consistent with a steric hindrance mechanism. Linear regression of log (PR-1) against log (k{sub r2} {center_dot} [oxime dose]) produced two offset parallel regression lines that delineated a significant difference between the coupling of oxime reactivation and oxime protection for HI-6 and ICD585 compared to 2-PAM and obidoxime. HI-6 and ICD585 appeared to be 6.8-fold more effective than 2-PAM and obidoxime at coupling oxime reactivation to oxime protection, which suggested that the isonicotinamide group that is common to both of these oximes, but absent from 2-PAM and obidoxime, is important for oxime efficacy.

  9. Amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides: membrane active peptidomimetics and their potential as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Simone; Keller, Janos; Azzouz, Nahid; Wagner, Stefanie; Titz, Alexander; Seeberger, Peter H; Brezesinski, Gerald; Hartmann, Laura

    2014-05-12

    We introduce a novel class of membrane active peptidomimetics, the amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides, and evaluate their potential as antimicrobial agents. The design criteria, the building block and oligomer synthesis as well as a detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) study are reported. Specifically, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) was employed to investigate structural features of amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptide sequences at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic air/liquid interface. Furthermore, Langmuir monolayers of anionic and zwitterionic phospholipids have been used to model the interactions of amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides with prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular membranes in order to predict their membrane selectivity and elucidate their mechanism of action. Lastly, antimicrobial activity was tested against Gram-positive M. luteus and S. aureus as well as against Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa bacteria along with testing hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. We found that amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptide sequences combine high and selective antimicrobial activity with exceptionally low cytotoxicity in comparison to values reported in the literature. Overall, this study provides further insights into the SAR of antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics and indicates that amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides are strong candidates for further development as antimicrobial agents with high therapeutic index.

  10. Chicken cathelicidin-2-derived peptides with enhanced immunomodulatory and antibacterial activities against biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Molhoek, E Margo; van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Dijk-Knijnenburg, Helma; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H; Boele, Linda C L; Kaman-van Zanten, Wendy E; Haagsman, Henk P; Bikker, Floris J

    2010-09-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are considered to be excellent candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Recently, it was demonstrated that the peptide C1-15, an N-terminal segment of chicken HDP cathelicidin-2, exhibits potent antibacterial activity while lacking cytotoxicity towards eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we report that C1-15 is active against bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis that may potentially be used by bioterrorists. Substitution of single and multiple phenylalanine (Phe) residues to tryptophan (Trp) in C1-15 resulted in variants with improved antibacterial activity against B. anthracis and Y. pestis as well as decreased salt sensitivity. In addition, these peptides exhibited enhanced neutralisation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities of these C1-15-derived peptides are exerted at concentrations far below the concentrations that are toxic to human PBMCs. Taken together, we show that Phe-->Trp substitutions in C1-15 variants enhances the antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities against pathogenic bacteria, including those that may potentially be used as biological warfare agents.

  11. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  12. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  13. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  14. The in vitro activity of 15 antimicrobial agents against bacterial isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Awji, Elias Gebru; Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joong-Su; Kim, Young-Hoan; Park, Seung-Chun

    2012-08-01

    The in vitro activity of 15 antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp. and Streptococcus canis from dogs was investigated. For Staphylococcus spp., the highest frequency of resistance was observed for penicillin, followed by ampicillin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The highest frequency of resistance in E. coli isolates was recorded for tetracycline and streptomycin. Pasteurella spp. and S. canis had the highest resistance rate for tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Most isolates showed full susceptibility to low-level resistance to colistin, florfenicol and fluoroquinolones. Further studies using larger number of isolates from both healthy and diseased dogs would provide a broader picture of antimicrobial resistance at a national level and promote prudent use of antimicrobial agents in companion animals. PMID:22516694

  15. HURON (HUman and Robotic Optimization Network) Multi-Agent Temporal Activity Planner/Scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Hook; Mrozinski, Joseph J.; Elfes, Alberto; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Shelton, Kacie E.; Smith, Jeffrey H.; Lincoln, William P.; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    HURON solves the problem of how to optimize a plan and schedule for assigning multiple agents to a temporal sequence of actions (e.g., science tasks). Developed as a generic planning and scheduling tool, HURON has been used to optimize space mission surface operations. The tool has also been used to analyze lunar architectures for a variety of surface operational scenarios in order to maximize return on investment and productivity. These scenarios include numerous science activities performed by a diverse set of agents: humans, teleoperated rovers, and autonomous rovers. Once given a set of agents, activities, resources, resource constraints, temporal constraints, and de pendencies, HURON computes an optimal schedule that meets a specified goal (e.g., maximum productivity or minimum time), subject to the constraints. HURON performs planning and scheduling optimization as a graph search in state-space with forward progression. Each node in the graph contains a state instance. Starting with the initial node, a graph is automatically constructed with new successive nodes of each new state to explore. The optimization uses a set of pre-conditions and post-conditions to create the children states. The Python language was adopted to not only enable more agile development, but to also allow the domain experts to easily define their optimization models. A graphical user interface was also developed to facilitate real-time search information feedback and interaction by the operator in the search optimization process. The HURON package has many potential uses in the fields of Operations Research and Management Science where this technology applies to many commercial domains requiring optimization to reduce costs. For example, optimizing a fleet of transportation truck routes, aircraft flight scheduling, and other route-planning scenarios involving multiple agent task optimization would all benefit by using HURON.

  16. Clonidine as a sensitizing agent in the forced swimming test for revealing antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Colombel, M C; Malinge, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-11-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice has failed to predict antidepressant activity for drugs having beta adrenoreceptor agonist activity and for serotonin uptake inhibitors. We investigated the potential for clonidine to render the FST sensitive to antidepressants by using a behaviorally inactive dose of this agent (0.1 mg/kg). All antidepressants studied (tricyclics, 5-HT uptake inhibitors, iprindole, mianserin, viloxazine, trazodone) showed either activity at lower doses or activity at previously inactive doses. The effect appeared specific because it did not appear with drugs other than antidepressants (diazepam, chlorpromazine, sulpiride, atropine), except for amphetamine and apomorphine which have a strong effect on the dopaminergic system. The use of behaviorally subactive doses of clonidine may thus provide an important means of increasing the sensitivity of the forced swimming test.

  17. Effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on color stability of giomer and microfilled composite resin: An in vitro comparison

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Abed-Kahnamoii, Mehdi; Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Sadr, Alireza; Daneshi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on color stability and surface topography of a giomer and a microfilled composite resin was evaluated in the present in vitro study. Study design: Forty discs measuring 10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness were prepared from a giomer and a microfilled composite resin. Each material yielded 20 discs with completely smooth surfaces. Then a spectrophotometer was used to measure L* (lightness), a* (redness, greenness) and b* (blueness, yellowness) color coordinates of all the discs. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel. After measuring the color coordinates once again, color changes (ΔE*) were calculated by the CIELAB system. Six specimens from each material (three specimens before bleaching agent application and three specimens thereafter) were viewed under an atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface topography evaluation. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests at α=0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in color changes (ΔE*) between the two materials (P>0.05). In addition, no significant differences were detected in surface roughness between composite resin and giomer discs before and after bleaching (P>0.05 for both). However, in both materials the differences in surface roughness were significant before and after bleaching procedures (P<0.001). Conclusions: Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that 15% carbamide peroxide does not induce clinically detectable color changes in composite resin and giomer despite an increase in surface roughness. Key words:Bleaching, color stability, giomer, microfilled composite. PMID:22926466

  18. Does coral bleaching mean global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    This article discusses the implications of global warming on the marine ecosystems. In recent hearings of the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, plans were made to introduce legislation for control of greenhouse-gas emissions, conservation of biological diversity, forest conservation, world population planning, sustainable economic development , increased fuel efficiency, and increased research into Earth-system processes. Research is required to ascertain the meaning of coral bleaching, which is the mass expulsion of symbiotic algae, called zooxanthellae, which gives the coral its color. Many scientists think that the death of the algae is an early indicator for massive destruction of the marine ecosystem.

  19. Laser teeth bleaching: evaluation of eventual side effects on enamel and the pulp and the efficiency in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Verheyen, Peter; Diachuk, Andrii; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; De Bruyne, Mieke; Keulemans, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Light and heat increase the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide. There is no evidence that light activation (power bleaching with high-intensity light) results in a more effective bleaching with a longer lasting effect with high concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. Laser light differs from conventional light as it requires a laser-target interaction. The interaction takes place in the first instance in the bleaching gel. The second interaction has to be induced in the tooth, more specifically in the dentine. There is evidence that interaction exists with the bleaching gel: photothermal, photocatalytical, and photochemical interactions are described. The reactivity of the gel is increased by adding photocatalyst of photosensitizers. Direct and effective photobleaching, that is, a direct interaction with the colour molecules in the dentine, however, is only possible with the argon (488 and 415 nm) and KTP laser (532 nm). A number of risks have been described such as heat generation. Nd:YAG and especially high power diode lasers present a risk with intrapulpal temperature elevation up to 22°C. Hypersensitivity is regularly encountered, being it of temporary occurrence except for a number of diode wavelengths and the Nd:YAG. The tooth surface remains intact after laser bleaching. At present, KTP laser is the most efficient dental bleaching wavelength.

  20. Laser Teeth Bleaching: Evaluation of Eventual Side Effects on Enamel and the Pulp and the Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Light and heat increase the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide. There is no evidence that light activation (power bleaching with high-intensity light) results in a more effective bleaching with a longer lasting effect with high concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. Laser light differs from conventional light as it requires a laser-target interaction. The interaction takes place in the first instance in the bleaching gel. The second interaction has to be induced in the tooth, more specifically in the dentine. There is evidence that interaction exists with the bleaching gel: photothermal, photocatalytical, and photochemical interactions are described. The reactivity of the gel is increased by adding photocatalyst of photosensitizers. Direct and effective photobleaching, that is, a direct interaction with the colour molecules in the dentine, however, is only possible with the argon (488 and 415 nm) and KTP laser (532 nm). A number of risks have been described such as heat generation. Nd:YAG and especially high power diode lasers present a risk with intrapulpal temperature elevation up to 22°C. Hypersensitivity is regularly encountered, being it of temporary occurrence except for a number of diode wavelengths and the Nd:YAG. The tooth surface remains intact after laser bleaching. At present, KTP laser is the most efficient dental bleaching wavelength. PMID:25874258

  1. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    SciTech Connect

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  2. Ginsenosides as Anticancer Agents: In vitro and in vivo Activities, Structure–Activity Relationships, and Molecular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Subhasree Ashok; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2012-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutic agents are often toxic not only to tumor cells but also to normal cells, limiting their therapeutic use in the clinic. Novel natural product anticancer compounds present an attractive alternative to synthetic compounds, based on their favorable safety and efficacy profiles. Several pre-clinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the anticancer potential of Panax ginseng, a widely used traditional Chinese medicine. The anti-tumor efficacy of ginseng is attributed mainly to the presence of saponins, known as ginsenosides. In this review, we focus on how ginsenosides exert their anticancer effects by modulation of diverse signaling pathways, including regulation of cell proliferation mediators (CDKs and cyclins), growth factors (c-myc, EGFR, and vascular endothelial growth factor), tumor suppressors (p53 and p21), oncogenes (MDM2), cell death mediators (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, XIAP, caspases, and death receptors), inflammatory response molecules (NF-κB and COX-2), and protein kinases (JNK, Akt, and AMP-activated protein kinase). We also discuss the structure–activity relationship of various ginsenosides and their potentials in the treatment of various human cancers. In summary, recent advances in the discovery and evaluation of ginsenosides as cancer therapeutic agents support further pre-clinical and clinical development of these agents for the treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. PMID:22403544

  3. Hypoxia-directed and activated theranostic agent: Imaging and treatment of solid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kim, Eun-Joong; Han, Jiyou; Lee, Hyunseung; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Hyun Min; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, a distinguished feature of various solid tumors, has been considered as a key marker for tumor progression. Inadequate vasculature and high interstitial pressures result in relatively poor drug delivery to these tumors. Herein, we developed an antitumor theranostic agent, 4, which is activated in hypoxic conditions and can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. Compound 4, bearing biotin, a tumor-targeting unit, and SN38, an anticancer drug, proved to be an effective theranostic agent for solid tumors. SN38 plays a dual role: as an anticancer drug for therapy and as a fluorophore for diagnosis, thus avoids an extra fluorophore and limits cytotoxicity. Compound 4, activated in the hypoxic environment, showed high therapeutic activity in A549 and HeLa cells and spheroids. In vivo imaging of solid tumors confirmed the tumor-specific localization, deep tissue penetration and activation of compound 4, as well as the production of a strong anticancer effect through the inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model validating it as a promising strategy for the treatment of solid tumors.

  4. Inactivation of staphylococcal virulence factors using a light-activated antimicrobial agent

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the limitations of antibiotic therapy is that even after successful killing of the infecting microorganism, virulence factors may still be present and cause significant damage to the host. Light-activated antimicrobials show potential for the treatment of topical infections; therefore if these agents can also inactivate microbial virulence factors, this would represent an advantage over conventional antibiotic therapy. Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide range of virulence factors that contribute to its success as a pathogen by facilitating colonisation and destruction of host tissues. Results In this study, the ability of the light-activated antimicrobial agent methylene blue in combination with laser light of 665 nm to inactivate staphylococcal virulence factors was assessed. A number of proteinaceous virulence factors were exposed to laser light in the presence of methylene blue and their biological activities re-determined. The activities of V8 protease, α-haemolysin and sphingomyelinase were shown to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by exposure to laser light in the presence of methylene blue. Conclusion These results suggest that photodynamic therapy could reduce the harmful impact of preformed virulence factors on the host. PMID:19804627

  5. Bleaching kraft pulps with white-rot fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, I.D.; Paice, M.G.; Bourbonnais, R.

    1996-10-01

    Certain white-rot fungi, notably Trametes versicolor, Phanerochaete sordida, and isolate IZU-154 can lower the residual lignin content and increase the brightness of kraft pulps without damaging the pulps` strength or yield. This biological delignification effect can be used in Elemental Chlorine Free and Totally Chlorine Free bleaching sequences. Physical contact between the fungal hyphae and the pulp fibers is not required, but the presence of the living fungus is necessary for continued delignification. In many but not a systems, delignification is correlated with manganese peroxidase activity. Experiments with pulps containing {sup 14}C-labelled lignin indicate that the residual lignin is solubilized, but not extensively mineralized, by T. versicolor. The solubilized lignin has the same molecular size as the residual lignin originally present in the pulp. Demethylation of the phenolic rings in the pulp is an early effect of incubation with the fungus.

  6. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  7. Formation of organochlorine by-products in bleached laundry.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Anthony, Laura N

    2013-02-01

    Laundering fabrics with chlorine bleach plays a role in health and hygiene as well as aesthetics. However, laundry bleaching may create chlorinated by-products with potentially adverse human health effects. Studies have shown that toxic chlorinated gases are produced in the headspace of washing machines when hypochlorite-containing bleach is used. Laundry bleaching has also been implicated in contributing dissolved organochlorine to municipal wastewater. However, there have been no reports of organochlorines produced and retained in fabric as a result of laundry bleaching. We have used a chlorine-specific X-ray spectroscopic analysis to demonstrate the formation of organochlorine by-products in cotton fabrics laundered with chlorine bleach under typical household conditions. Organochlorine formation increases at higher wash temperature. At least two pools of organochlorine are produced in bleached fabric: a labile fraction that diminishes over several months of storage time as well as a more stable fraction that persists after more than 1 year. Our results also suggest that residual hypochlorite remains in fabric after laundering with bleach, presenting the possibility of direct and sustained dermal contact with reactive chlorine. This study provides a first step toward identifying a new risk factor for elevated organochlorine body burdens in humans.

  8. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  9. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  10. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lines, 40 CFR 430.54(a) and (c), and 430.56(a) and (c). (2) Use no hypochlorite or chlorine for... limitation guidelines and standards specified in 40 CFR part 430: (i) Dissolving-grade kraft bleaching systems and lines, 40 CFR 430.14 through 430.17; (ii) Paper-grade kraft and soda bleaching systems...

  11. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  12. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  13. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates of Flavimonas oryzihabitans obtained from patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rolston, K V; Ho, D H; LeBlanc, B; Bodey, G P

    1993-11-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activities of 21 different antimicrobial agents against nine clinical isolates of Flavimonas oryzihabitans obtained from patients with cancer. The organisms were susceptible to most agents commonly used for the empiric therapy (aminoglycosides, ureidopenicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems) and prevention of infections (quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) in this patient population.

  14. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates of Flavimonas oryzihabitans obtained from patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rolston, K V; Ho, D H; LeBlanc, B; Bodey, G P

    1993-11-01

    We evaluated the in vitro activities of 21 different antimicrobial agents against nine clinical isolates of Flavimonas oryzihabitans obtained from patients with cancer. The organisms were susceptible to most agents commonly used for the empiric therapy (aminoglycosides, ureidopenicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems) and prevention of infections (quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) in this patient population. PMID:8285645

  15. Climate change and coral reef bleaching: An ecological assessment of long-term impacts, recovery trends and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew C.; Glynn, Peter W.; Riegl, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    regenerating and recovering coral reefs have originated from broadcast spawning taxa with a potential for asexual growth, relatively long distance dispersal, successful settlement, rapid growth and a capacity for framework construction. Whether or not affected reefs can continue to function as before will depend on: (1) how much coral cover is lost, and which species are locally extirpated; (2) the ability of remnant and recovering coral communities to adapt or acclimatize to higher temperatures and other climatic factors such as reductions in aragonite saturation state; (3) the changing balance between reef accumulation and bioerosion; and (4) our ability to maintain ecosystem resilience by restoring healthy levels of herbivory, macroalgal cover, and coral recruitment. Bleaching disturbances are likely to become a chronic stress in many reef areas in the coming decades, and coral communities, if they cannot recover quickly enough, are likely to be reduced to their most hardy or adaptable constituents. Some degraded reefs may already be approaching this ecological asymptote, although to date there have not been any global extinctions of individual coral species as a result of bleaching events. Since human populations inhabiting tropical coastal areas derive great value from coral reefs, the degradation of these ecosystems as a result of coral bleaching and its associated impacts is of considerable societal, as well as biological concern. Coral reef conservation strategies now recognize climate change as a principal threat, and are engaged in efforts to allocate conservation activity according to geographic-, taxonomic-, and habitat-specific priorities to maximize coral reef survival. Efforts to forecast and monitor bleaching, involving both remote sensed observations and coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models, are also underway. In addition to these efforts, attempts to minimize and mitigate bleaching impacts on reefs are immediately required. If significant reductions in

  16. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time. PMID:27178918

  17. Coral reef bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep atolls, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth, Ramar; Gopi, Mohan; Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith; Thangaradjou, Thirunavukarassu; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2012-03-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010. Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon, which triggered widespread bleaching of corals. The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%). The SST increased up to 34 °C with an average maximum SST of 32.5 during the study °C period between May and June 2010. Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side. This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST. Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010, at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  18. Monitoring coral bleaching using a colour reference card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebeck, U. E.; Marshall, N. J.; Klüter, A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2006-08-01

    Assessment of the extent of coral bleaching has become an important part of studies that aim to understand the condition of coral reefs. In this study a reference card that uses differences in coral colour was developed as an inexpensive, rapid and non-invasive method for the assessment of bleaching. The card uses a 6 point brightness/saturation scale within four colour hues to record changes in bleaching state. Changes on the scale of 2 units or more reflect a change in symbiont density and chlorophyll a content, and therefore the bleaching state of the coral. When used by non-specialist observers in the field (here on an intertidal reef flat), there was an inter-observer error of ± 1 colour score. This technique improves on existing subjective assessment of bleaching state by visual observation and offers the potential for rapid, wide-area assessment of changing coral condition.

  19. In Brief: Coral bleaching likely in Caribbean and other regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    Conditions are favorable for significant coral bleaching and infectious coral disease outbreaks in the Caribbean, especially in the Lesser Antilles, scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Coral Reef Watch Program indicated in a 22 July announcement. Scientists are concerned that bleaching could reach or exceed the levels recorded in 2005, when up to 90% of corals there were bleached and more than half of those died. The forecast is based on the agency's July Coral Reef Watch outlook, which expects continued high water temperatures through October 2009. Other areas of concern are the central Pacific region including the equatorial Line Islands and Kiribati, according to NOAA. Coral bleaching is associated with increased ocean temperatures, among other factors, which causes the coral to expel symbiotic microalgae and causes coral tissue to appear to be bleached. For more information, visit http://coralreefwatch.noaa.gov.

  20. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Ameri, Hamideh; Eslami, Samaneh; Mirzaeepoor, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05). The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required. PMID:23349570

  1. An In vitro Study on Post Bleaching Pigmentation Susceptibility of Teeth and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Latha, S Pushpa; Hegde, Vani; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the susceptibility of teeth for repigmentation after bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were assigned to three groups (n = 12). Group 1 was bleached using 30% w/v hydrogen peroxide 15 min 3 times a day every other day for 4 days. In Group 2 was bleached using 16% carbamide peroxide (Polanight), 90 min a day for 15 days. 2 days later, the shades of the bleached teeth were recorded. Remaining 4 teeth were bleached according to Group 1 and 2 and were subjected to atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy analysis. Results: Specimens of athome bleaching were lighter than the specimens of inoffice bleaching. Conclusion: The susceptibility of enamel to pigmentation can be increased after bleaching, and pigmentation is greater if bleaching is performed with H2O2. The percentage change (lighter) was more for athome bleaching specimens as compared to inoffice bleaching specimens. PMID:25395800

  2. Alkylating agents and immunotoxins exert synergistic cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells. Mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, Y J; O'Briant, K C; Xu, F J; Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Bast, R C

    1993-01-01

    Alkylating agents can be administered in high dosage to patients with ovarian cancer using autologous bone marrow support, but drug-resistant tumor cells can still persist. Immunotoxins provide reagents that might eliminate drug resistant cells. In the present study, concurrent treatment with alkylators and immunotoxins proved superior to treatment with each agent alone. Toxin immunoconjugates prepared from different monoclonal antibodies and recombinant ricin A chain (rRTA) inhibited clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in limiting dilution assays. When alkylating agents and toxin conjugates were used in combination, the addition of the immunotoxins to cisplatin, or to cisplatin and thiotepa, produced synergistic cytotoxic activity against the OVCA 432 and OVCAR III cell lines. Studies performed to clarify the mechanism of action showed that cisplatin and thiotepa had no influence on internalization and binding of the 317G5-rRTA immunotoxin. Intracellular uptake of [195m]Pt-cisplatin was not affected by the immunoconjugate and thiotepa. The combination of the 317G5-rRTA and thiotepa, as well as 317G5-rRTA alone, increased [195m]Pt cisplatin-DNA adduct levels. The immunotoxin alone and in combination with the alkylators decreased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced glutathione-S-transferase activity. Repair of DNA damage induced by the combination of alkylators and 317G5-rRTA was significantly reduced when compared to repair after damage with alkylators alone. These findings suggest that immunotoxins affect levels and activity of enzymes required for the prevention and repair of alkylator damage. Images PMID:8227359

  3. Effect of a Combined Bleaching Regimen on the Microhardness of a Sealed Methacrylate-based and a Silorane-based Composite

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, F; Doustfatemeh, S

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The use of tooth bleaching agents has been very popular treatment in dentistry. The bleaching agents have an inherent potential to impair surface properties of existing composite resin restorations. Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of a combined bleaching regimen on the surface microhardness of a Silorane-based and a sealed methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Method: Forty-five specimens of methacrylate-based composite (Ice) and 18 specimens of Silorane composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; USA) were prepared and randomly divided into 5 (1-5) and 2 (6-7) groups (n=9), respectively. After 8-week aging, groups 1 and 6 were remained with no treatment. In groups 2, 4 and 5, the specimens were covered by a surface sealant and light cured. In groups 3, 4, 5 and 7, the specimens were bleached with hydrogen peroxide 40% and then carbamide peroxide 20% for seven days. In group 5, after bleaching, the sealant was removed by polishing. Surface microhardness was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results: The microhardness values of groups 2 to 4 were significantly lower than that of group1 (p <0.05). There was no significant difference among groups 1, 5, 6 and 7 (p> 0.05). Conclusion: The combined bleaching regimen used in this study had a substantial negative effect on methacrylate and sealed methacrylate composites but not on Silorane composite. Polishing following the bleaching on the sealed composite yielded a hardness value similar to that of unsealed methacrylate composite (control). PMID:24724132

  4. Physiological and Biogeochemical Traits of Bleaching and Recovery in the Mounding Species of Coral Porites lobata: Implications for Resilience in Mounding Corals

    PubMed Central

    Levas, Stephen J.; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Hughes, Adam; Osburn, Christopher L.; Matsui, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ13C of the skeletal, δ13C, and δ15N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions). Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via 13C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic sources of fixed carbon

  5. Physiological and biogeochemical traits of bleaching and recovery in the mounding species of coral Porites lobata: implications for resilience in mounding corals.

    PubMed

    Levas, Stephen J; Grottoli, Andréa G; Hughes, Adam; Osburn, Christopher L; Matsui, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ(13)C of the skeletal, δ(13)C, and δ(15)N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions). Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via (13)C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic sources of

  6. Activated charcoal-carboxymethylcellulose gel formulation as an antidotal agent for orally ingested aspirin.

    PubMed

    Mathur, L K; Jaffe, J M; Colaizzi, J L; Moriarty, R W

    1976-07-01

    The in vivo effect on aspirin absorption of a potentially more palatable form of activated charcoal was compared to that of a simple aqueous slurry of activated charcoal. The experimental formulation consisted of 20.0 g of activated charcoal, 2.25 g of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and 42.8 ml of water; it was tested with and without chocolate syrup as a flavoring agent added just prior to administration. Six subjects were treated in crossover fashion following an aspirin dose of 972 mg. Total urinary excretion of salicylate was measured over 48 hours. Although all three treatments appeared to be effective in reducing the rate and extent of aspirin absorption, the slurry was significantly more effective in reducing the total amount absorbed than the charcoal-CMC gel with chocolate syrup. The slight difference in effectiveness between the gel formulation with and without the chocolate syrup was not significant. PMID:941924

  7. Isothiazolopyridones: synthesis, structure, and biological activity of a new class of antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Jason A; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Thanassi, Jane A; Cheng, Jijun; Incarvito, Christopher D; Deshpande, Milind; Pucci, Michael J; Bradbury, Barton J

    2006-01-12

    We report the syntheses of first-generation derivatives of isothiazolopyridones and their in vitro evaluation as antibacterial agents. These compounds, containing a novel heterocyclic nucleus composed of an isothiazolone fused to a quinolizin-4-one (at C-2 and C-3 of the quinolizin-4-one), were prepared using a sequence of seven synthetic transformations. The solid-state structure of 7-chloro-9-ethyl-1-thia-2,4a-diazacyclopenta[b]naphthalene-3,4-dione was determined by X-ray diffraction. The prepared derivatives of desfluoroisothiazolopyridones exhibited (a) antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms, (b) inhibitory activities against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, and (c) no inhibitory activity against human topoisomerase II.

  8. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human tumor cells with acquired resistance to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Dai, F; Spitz, M; Peters, G J; Fiebig, H H; Hussain, A; Burger, A M

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres and telomerase are targets for anticancer drug development and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. However, it has been reported that standard cytotoxic agents can affect telomere length and telomerase activity suggesting that they also have of a role in drug resistance. in this study, telomere lengths and telomerase activity as well as drug efflux pump expression, glutathione (GSH) levels and polyadenosine-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were assessed in a panel of human tumor cell lines made resistant to vindesine, gemcitabine and cisplatin. these included two lung cancer cell lines resistant to vindesine (LXFL 529L/Vind, LXFA 526L/Vind), a renal cancer cell line (RXF944L/Gem) and an ovarian cancer cell line (AG6000) resistant to gemcitabine, and one resistant to cisplatin (ADDP). The resistant clones were compared to their parental lines and evaluated for cross resistance to other cytotoxic agents. Several drug specific resistance patterns were found, and various complex patterns of cross resistance emerged from some cell lines, but these mechanisms of resistance could not be related to drug efflux pump expression, GSH levels or pARp cleavage. However, all displayed changes in telomerase activity and/or telomere length. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics.

  9. Irradiation system for two-photon induced activation of agents in novel intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klämpfl, Florian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents a newly designed irradiation system for the photochemically triggered two-photon activation of an agent loaded in novel intraocular lenses. After activation, this agent suppresses the formation of after-cataract, a very common disease after the treatment of an eye cataract by implanting an intraocular lens. For this application, intrinsic safety is also important: the laser radiation is applied to one of the most light-sensitive organs: the eye. This has to be taken into account during development of the system. Moreover, the activation uses a two-photon process so a relatively small laser focus is required. To address these issues in combination with economic requirements, a mirror based objective was designed and built, specifically tailored to these needs. Besides the laser beam guidance elements, the irradiation system consists of a camera based monitoring module and an illumination unit. While the first part of the paper shows the design of the system, the second part presents the results of the characterization of the system. The paper closes with a conclusion and an outlook discussing what further development is needed to prepare the system for treatments of human eyes.

  10. ESR studies on bleached sedimentary quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, R.; Zilles, D.

    Some ESR signals in quartz are reported to be bleachable by sunlight and so they promise to be useful for dating sediments (Grün, 1989). The Ge signal in quartz is the only one that shows bleaching effects with UV light in short time scales (hours). Therefore we used quartz samples from the sites of Mauer ( 'Homo erectus heidelbergensis'), samples from a borehole in the Neckar valley ('Entensee', Ladenburg near Heidelberg) and samples from a pegmatite for basic studies on the Ge signal. The results show that with our standard sample preparation procedure for quartz separation (using red light as for TL samples), the natural Ge signal is not detectable, but rises clearly with gamma irradiation. Several experiments for examination of the stability and sensitivity of the Ge centre in quartz were carried out. For comparison with the behaviour of the Ge signal we measured the Al signal as well. Our experiments show that the Al signal is bleachable in long time scales (weeks). The behaviour on bleaching, irradiation and thermal annealing is very complicated, as the Al centre is a hole centre (it possibly interacts with several electron centres in the quartz and so the processes are of higher order).

  11. Bleaching process preferred to decontaminate odorants

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The problem of decontaminating and disposing of out-of-service gas odorizers has long faced both gas transmission and distribution companies since the early 1980s. Finding a methodology to safely and effectively decontaminate odorant-contaminated equipment has caused many companies to simply cap the equipment and put it in storage. The recommended process of decontamination by odorant manufacturers is currently a bleaching-type process. A sodium hypochlorite solution is added to water and either circulated or left standing in the contaminated equipment. The sodium hypochlorite effectively neutralizes the smell of the odorant and slightly corrodes the inside of the equipment to neutralize any odorant which has permeated the metal. The waste sodium hypochlorite and water is then shipped as hazardous waste (pH of 12.5) or non-hazardous waste after the pH has been adjusted. The bleaching process has proven cost-effective and less time-consuming than most other methods including bioremediation. To effectively use it, there are several problems to overcome--most importantly the removal of residual product and the release of vapors into the atmosphere. River Valley Technologies, a contractor located in Cincinnati, OH, specializing in odorant-equipment decontamination, has developed several methods and engineering controls to eliminate most of the problems associated with decontaminating odorant equipment. The paper describes these methods.

  12. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  13. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  14. Potential antitumor agents. 36. Quantitative relationships between experimental antitumor activity, toxicity, and structure for the general class of 9-anilinoacridine antitumor agents

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, W.A.; Cain, B.F.; Atwell, G.J.; Hansch, C.; Panthananickal, A.; Leo, A.

    1982-03-01

    Quantitative relationships (QSAR) have been derived between antileukemic (L1210) activity and agent physicochemical properties for 509 tumor-active members of the general class of 9-anilinoacridines. One member of this class is the clinical agent m-AMSA (NSC 249992). Agent hydrophobicity proved a significant but not a dominant influence on in vivo potency. The electronic properties of substituent groups proved important, but the most significant effects on drug potency were shown by the steric influence of groups placed at various positions on the 9-anilinoacridine skeleton. The results are entirely consistent with the physiologically important step in the action of these compounds being their binding to double-stranded DNA by intercalation of the acridine chromophore between the base pairs and positioning of the anilino group in the minor groove, as previously suggested. An equation was also derived for the acute toxicities of 643 derivatives of 9-anilinoacridine. This equation took a somewhat similar form to the one modeling antileukemia potency, emphasizing the usual fairly close relationship between potency and acute toxicity for antitumor agents in general. This study demonstrated the power of QSAR techniques to structure very large amounts of biological data and to allow the extraction of useful information from them bearing on the possible site of action of the compounds concerned.

  15. Synthesis and biological activity of trans-tiliroside derivatives as potent anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yujin; Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Yi; Chu, Hongwan; Duan, Hongquan

    2010-12-10

    A set of novel trans-tiliroside derivatives were synthesized. The structures of the derivatives were identified by their IR, 1H-NMR, and MS spectra analysis. Their anti-diabetic activities were evaluated on the insulin resistant (IR) HepG2 cell model. As a result, compounds 7a, 7c, 7h, and trans-tiliroside exhibited significant glucose consumption-enhancing effects in IR-HepG2 cells compared with the positive control (metformin). This research provides useful clues for further design and discovery of anti-diabetic agents.

  16. The efficacy of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home bleaching on sound and demineralized enamel

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Mohammadpour, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the effectiveness of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home-bleaching in sound and demineralized enamel. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 120 freshly-extracted bovine incisors. Half of the specimens were stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Following exposure to a tea solution for 7.5 days, the specimens were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 30 according to the type of enamel and the bleaching procedure employed. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of demineralized teeth subjected to in-office bleaching and home bleaching, whereas in groups 3 and 4, sound teeth were subjected to in-office and home bleaching, respectively. A diode laser (810 nm, 2 W, continuous wave, four times for 15 seconds each) was employed for assisting the in-office process. The color of the specimens was measured before (T1) and after (T2) staining and during (T3) and after (T4) the bleaching procedures using a spectrophotometer. The color change (ΔE) between different treatments stages was compared among the groups. Results: There were significant differences in the color change between T2 and T3 (ΔE T2–T3) and T2 and T4 (ΔE T2–T4) stages among the study groups (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison by Duncan test revealed that both ΔET2–T3 and ΔET2–T4 were significantly greater in demineralized teeth submitted to laser-assisted in-office bleaching (group 1) as compared to the other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Laser-assisted in-office bleaching could provide faster and greater whitening effect than home bleaching on stained demineralized enamel, but both procedures produced comparable results on sound teeth. PMID:26877590

  17. Effect of polyester blends in hydroentangled raw and bleached cotton nonwoven fabrics on the adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics (applicable for wipes) including raw cotton, bleached cotton, and their blends with polyester (PES) were stu...

  18. Ciprofloxacin-Induced Antibacterial Activity Is Atteneuated by Pretreatment with Antioxidant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Al-azzam, Sayer I.; Khabour, Omar F.; Al-buhairan, Ahlam M.

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin works through interfering with replication and transcription of bacterial DNA, which leads to increased oxidative stress, and death of bacterial cells. Drugs with strong antioxidant such as tempol, melatonin and pentoxifylline might interfere with the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin. In the current study, the effect of these drugs on the cytotoxicity of ciprofloxacin was investigated against several reference bacteria. Standard bacterial strains included Escherichia coli ATCC 35218, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 12459, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (ATCC 43300), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 25923). The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin with or without treatment of bacterial cells by tempol, melatonin or pentoxifylline was assessed using the disc diffusion method and by measuring the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and zones of inhibition of bacterial growth. All of the tested bacterial strains were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. When treated with tempol, melatonin or pentoxifylline, all bacterial strains showed significantly smaller zones of inhibition and larger MIC values compared ciprofloxacin alone. In correlation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation induced by ciprofloxacin antibacterial action was diminished by treatment of bacterial cells with tempol, melatonin or pentoxifylline. In conclusion, results indicate the possible antagonistic properties for agents with antioxidant properties such as tempol, melatonin and pentoxifylline when they are used concurrently with flouroquinolones. This could be related to the ability of these agents to inhibit oxidative stress in bacterial cells. PMID:27005666

  19. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  20. Isolation, screening, and characterization of surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria of Mumbai Harbor.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Rajamani; Jagtap, Chandrakant; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-15

    Diverse marine bacterial species predominantly found in oil-polluted seawater produce diverse surface-active agents. Surface-active agents produced by bacteria are classified into two groups based on their molecular weights, namely biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers. In this study, surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria were isolated using a modified Bushnell-Haas medium with high-speed diesel as a carbon source from three oil-polluted sites of Mumbai Harbor. Surface-active agent-producing bacterial strains were screened using nine widely used methods. The nineteen bacterial strains showed positive results for more than four surface-active agent screening methods; further, these strains were characterized using biochemical and nucleic acid sequencing methods. Based on the results, the organisms belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Bacillus, Comamonas, Chryseomicrobium, Halomonas, Marinobacter, Nesterenkonia, Pseudomonas, and Serratia. The present study confirmed the prevalence of surface-active agent-producing bacteria in the oil-polluted waters of Mumbai Harbor.

  1. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of substituted quinazoline and quinoxaline derivatives: search for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Patel, Harun M; Bhardwaj, Varun; Chauhan, Ankit

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of some 2-furano-4(3H)-quinazolinones, diamides (open ring quinazolines), quinoxalines and their biological evaluation as antitumor agents using National Cancer Institute (NCI) disease oriented antitumor screen protocol are investigated. Among the synthesize compounds, seventeen compounds were granted NSC code and screened at National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA for anticancer activity at a single high dose (10(-5) M) in full NCI 60 cell panel. Among the selected compounds, 3-(2-chloro benzylideneamine)-2-(furan-2-yl) quinazoline-4(3h)-one 21 was found to be the most active candidate of the series at five dose level screening against Ovarian OVCAR-4 and Non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H522 with GI50 1.82 & 2.14 μM respectively. Rational approach and QSAR techniques enabled the understanding of the pharmacophoric requirement for quinazoline, diamides and quinoxaline derivatives. PMID:21458891

  2. Quaternized Chitosan as an Antimicrobial Agent: Antimicrobial Activity, Mechanism of Action and Biomedical Applications in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Ma, Rui; Lin, Chucheng; Liu, Ziwei; Tang, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a linear polysaccharide with good biodegradability, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, which makes it potentially useful for biomedical applications, including an antimicrobial agent either alone or blended with other polymers. However, the poor solubility of CS in most solvents at neutral or high pH substantially limits its use. Quaternary ammonium CS, which was prepared by introducing a quaternary ammonium group on a dissociative hydroxyl group or amino group of the CS, exhibited improved water solubility and stronger antibacterial activity relative to CS over an entire range of pH values; thus, this quaternary modification increases the potential biomedical applications of CS in the field of anti-infection. This review discusses the current findings on the antimicrobial properties of quaternized CS synthesized using different methods and the mechanisms of its antimicrobial actions. The potential antimicrobial applications in the orthopedic field and perspectives regarding future studies in this field are also considered. PMID:23325051

  3. Synthesis of fibrinolytic active silver nanoparticle using wheat bran xylan as a reducing and stabilizing agent.

    PubMed

    Harish, B S; Uppuluri, Kiran Babu; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-11-01

    A facile synthesis of highly stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was reported using a biopolymer, xylan as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. Xylan was isolated from waste biomass, wheat bran (WB) by alkaline treatment and was characterized by Fehling's test, dinitrosalicylic acid assay, FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were polydispersed with the size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. The synthesized WB-xylan AgNPs showed excellent free radical scavenging activity. In addition, WB-xylan AgNPs showed fibrinolytic activity as evidenced by the zone of clearance in fibrin plate assay. The biomedical potential of the WB-xylan AgNPs was demonstrated by dissolution of preformed blood clots. These results suggest that the development of xylan-metal nanoparticle composite would be feasible to treat thrombus related diseases. PMID:26256330

  4. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of substituted quinazoline and quinoxaline derivatives: search for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Patel, Harun M; Bhardwaj, Varun; Chauhan, Ankit

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of some 2-furano-4(3H)-quinazolinones, diamides (open ring quinazolines), quinoxalines and their biological evaluation as antitumor agents using National Cancer Institute (NCI) disease oriented antitumor screen protocol are investigated. Among the synthesize compounds, seventeen compounds were granted NSC code and screened at National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA for anticancer activity at a single high dose (10(-5) M) in full NCI 60 cell panel. Among the selected compounds, 3-(2-chloro benzylideneamine)-2-(furan-2-yl) quinazoline-4(3h)-one 21 was found to be the most active candidate of the series at five dose level screening against Ovarian OVCAR-4 and Non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H522 with GI50 1.82 & 2.14 μM respectively. Rational approach and QSAR techniques enabled the understanding of the pharmacophoric requirement for quinazoline, diamides and quinoxaline derivatives.

  5. Clinical study of the safety and effectiveness of a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system.

    PubMed

    Ghalili, K Michael; Khawaled, Kamal; Rozen, Doran; Afsahi, Veda

    2014-01-01

    We investigated color change, gingival irritation, and tooth sensitivity in patients undergoing at-home vital tooth bleaching with a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system. Tooth color shade in anterior teeth, supragingival plaque and gingivitis in Ramfjord teeth, as well as visual assessment of teeth gingival tissues and mucosa were evaluated in-office prior to treatment, after two consecutive applications of the 9% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product, after eight applications (10 minutes/day for 3 days at home), and after ten applications (50 minutes exposure over 5 days). Color stability was evaluated at 3 months after completing the treatment regimen. Over-the-counter bleaching products can be used by the patient at home without dentist supervision, but are frequently associated with gingival irritation and tooth sensitivity despite low concentrations of peroxide agents. Our investigations showed that the treatment is tolerable and safe with a low incidence of adverse effects. Any adverse effects associated with use of the whitening gel and tray are temporary, easily controlled, and often disappear within minutes of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvement in teeth whitening following treatment (mean color change of seven shades) and at three months after treatment. PMID:24591847

  6. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent.

  7. Interfacial Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with a Polymeric Patchy Shell and the Role of Spreading Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold patchy nanoparticles (PPs) were prepared under surfactant-free conditions by functionalization with a binary ligand mixture of polystyrene and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, respectively. The interfacial activity of PPs was compared to that of homogeneous hydrophilic nanoparticles (HPs), fully functionalized with PEG, by means of pendant drop tensiometry at water/air and water/decane interfaces. We compared interfacial activities in three different spreading agents: water, water/chloroform, and pure chloroform. We found that the interfacial activity of PPs was close to zero (∼2 mN/m) when the spreading agent was water and increased to ∼14 mN/m when the spreading agent was water/chloroform. When the nanoparticles were deposited with pure chloroform, the interfacial activity reached up to 60 mN/m by compression. In all cases, PPs exhibited higher interfacial activity than HPs, which were not interfacially active, regardless of the spreading agent. The interfacial activity at the water/decane interface was found to be significantly lower than that at the water/air interface because PPs aggregate in decane. Interfacial dilatational rheology showed that PPs form a stronger elastic shell at the pendant drop interface, compared to HPs. The significantly high interfacial activity obtained with PPs in this study highlights the importance of the polymeric patchy shell and the spreading agent. PMID:27656691

  8. Nrf2 activity as a potential biomarker for the pan-epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shoucheng; Sekar, Thillai Veerapazham; Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Peehl, Donna M; Knox, Susan J; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-08-28

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulatory transcription factor that plays an important role in the antioxidant response pathway against anticancer drug-induced cytotoxic effects. RRx-001 is a new anticancer agent that generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. Here we report the RRx-001 mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the activation of expression of its downstream enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 in tumor cells. Inhibition of intrinsic Nrf2 expression by Nrf2-specific siRNA increased cell sensitivity to RRx-001. Molecular imaging of tumor cells co-expressing pARE-Firefly luciferase and pCMV-Renilla luciferase-mRFP in vitro and in vivo in mice revealed that RRx-001 significantly increased ARE-FLUC signal in cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that RRx-001 is an effective activator of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. The pre-treatment level of ARE-FLUC signal in cells, reflecting basal activity of Nrf2, negatively correlated with the tumor response to RRx-001. The results support the concept that RRx-001 activates Nrf2-ARE antioxidant signaling pathways in tumor cells. Hence measurement of Nrf2-mediated activation of downstream target genes through ARE signaling may constitute a useful molecular biomarker for the early prediction of response to RRx-001 treatment, and thereby guide therapeutic decision-making.

  9. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials :

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  10. Antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against Nidovirales in cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, F J U M; de Haan, C A M; Schuurman, N M P; Haijema, B J; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J M; Delputte, P L; Balzarini, J; Egberink, H F

    2007-10-01

    Coronaviruses are important human and animal pathogens, the relevance of which increased due to the emergence of new human coronaviruses like SARS-CoV, HKU1 and NL63. Together with toroviruses, arteriviruses, and roniviruses the coronaviruses belong to the order Nidovirales. So far antivirals are hardly available to combat infections with viruses of this order. Therefore, various antiviral strategies to counter nidoviral infections are under evaluation. Lectins, which bind to N-linked oligosaccharide elements of enveloped viruses, can be considered as a conceptionally new class of virus inhibitors. These agents were recently evaluated for their antiviral activity towards a variety of enveloped viruses and were shown in most cases to inhibit virus infection at low concentrations. However, limited knowledge is available for their efficacy towards nidoviruses. In this article the application of the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cymbidium sp. agglutinin (CA) and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) as well as non-plant derived pradimicin-A (PRM-A) and cyanovirin-N (CV-N) as potential antiviral agents was evaluated. Three antiviral tests were compared based on different evaluation principles: cell viability (MTT-based colorimetric assay), number of infected cells (immunoperoxidase assay) and amount of viral protein expression (luciferase-based assay). The presence of carbohydrate-binding agents strongly inhibited coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus, infectious bronchitis virus, feline coronaviruses serotypes I and II, mouse hepatitis virus), arteriviruses (equine arteritis virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus) and torovirus (equine Berne virus). Remarkably, serotype II feline coronaviruses and arteriviruses were not inhibited by PRM-A, in contrast to the other viruses tested.

  11. Bleaching of Serratia marcescens by some coumarins: a spectrophotometric study.

    PubMed

    Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Mirjani, Rooholla; Amin, Gholamreza; Shafiee, Abbas; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we reported that umbelliprenin inhibits the red pigment production in Serratia marcescens . In this current investigation the bleaching effect of the umbelliprenin was further studied using the spectrophotometric method, and its IC 50 was calculated. Also in this study the effect of the other coumarins extracted from Ferula persica roots were evaluated for depigmentation of Serratia marcescens . None of these compounds appeared to have a bleaching effect against a test strain at certain concentrations. Comparing the structures of the different coumarins showed that the linear sesquiterpene part of the umbelliprenin structure may be essential for the bleaching effect of S. marcescens .

  12. Preclinical Activity of the Vascular Disrupting Agent OXi4503 against Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bothwell, Katelyn D.; Folaron, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a relatively distinct class of agents that target established blood vessels in tumors. In this study, we examined the preclinical activity of the second-generation VDA OXi4503 against human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Studies were performed in subcutaneous and orthotopic FaDu-luc HNSCC xenografts established in immunodeficient mice. In the subcutaneous model, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) along with tumor growth measurements was performed to assess tumor response to therapy. In mice bearing orthotopic tumors, a dual modality imaging approach based on BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized. Correlative histologic assessment of tumors was performed to validate imaging data. Dynamic BLI revealed a marked reduction in radiance within a few hours of OXi4503 administration compared to baseline levels. However, this reduction was transient with vascular recovery observed at 24 h post treatment. A single injection of OXi4503 (40 mg/kg) resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) tumor growth inhibition of subcutaneous FaDu-luc xenografts. MRI revealed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in volume of orthotopic tumors at 10 days post two doses of OXi4503 treatment. Corresponding histologic (H&E) sections of Oxi4503 treated tumors showed extensive areas of necrosis and hemorrhaging compared to untreated controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report, on the activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC. These results demonstrate the potential of tumor-VDAs in head and neck cancer. Further examination of the antivascular and antitumor activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC alone and in combination with chemotherapy and radiation is warranted. PMID:26751478

  13. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  14. Effect of low-concentration bleaching products on enamel bond strength at different elapsed times after bleaching treatment.

    PubMed

    Cura, María; Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of several low-concentration bleaching products on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to enamel at different elapsed times after the bleaching treatment. One hundred and fifty bovine incisors were divided into five groups: No treatment, 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence), 10% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Treswhite Supreme), 3% carbamide peroxide plus lactoperoxidase (WhiteKin), or 3% carbamide peroxide plus 2.7% carbamide peroxide (Clysiden Kit Express). All treatments lasted 4 weeks. After bleaching treatment or non-treatment, teeth were restored immediately, at 1, 3, 7, or 14 days after bleaching and submitted to µTBS test. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). For WhiteKin and Clysiden, µTBS to enamel was significantly reduced immediately, at 1, 3 and 7 days after bleaching. At 14 days after bleaching, similar µTBS values were obtained regardless of bleaching product. Therefore, while over-the-counter (OTC) products might affect bond strength to enamel, this effect was no longer observed after 14 days.

  15. Changes of acetylcholinesterase activity in different rat brain areas following intoxication with nerve agents: biochemical and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Fusek, Josef; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Bartosova, Lucie; Blaha, Vaclav

    2007-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity in defined brain regions was determined using biochemical and histochemical methods 30 min after treating rats with sarin, soman or VX (0.5 x LD(50)). Enzyme inhibition was high in the pontomedullar area and frontal cortex, but was low in the basal ganglia. Histochemical and biochemical results correlated well. Determination of the activity in defined brain structures was a more sensitive parameter than determination in whole brain homogenate where the activity was a "mean" of the activities in different structures. The pontomedullar area controls respiration, so that the special sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to inhibition by nerve agents in this area is important for understanding the mechanism of death caused by nerve agents. Thus, acetylcholinesterase activity is the main parameter investigated in studies searching for target sites following nerve agent poisoning.

  16. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

  17. Highly effective bacterial agents against Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae): isolation of bacteria and their insecticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Cakici, Filiz Ozkan; Ozgen, İnanc; Bolu, Halil; Erbas, Zeynep; Demirbağ, Zihni; Demir, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Cimbex quadrimaculatus (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) is one of the serious pests of almonds in Turkey and worldwide. Since there is no effective control application against this pest, it has been a serious problem up to now. Therefore, we aimed to find an effective bacterium that can be utilized as a biocontrol agent against C. quadrimaculatus in pest management. We isolated seven bacteria from dead and live C. quadrimaculatus larvae, and evaluated the larvicidal potency of all isolates on the respective pest. Based on the morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular properties (partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene), the isolates were identified to be Bacillus safensis (CQ1), Bacillus subtilis (CQ2), Bacillus tequilensis (CQ3), Enterobacter sp. (CQ4), Kurthia gibsonii (CQ5), Staphylococcus sp. (CQ6) and Staphylococcus sciuri (CQ7). The results of the larvicidal activities of these isolates indicated that the mortality value obtained from all treatments changed from 58 to 100 %, and reached 100 % with B. safensis (CQ1) and B. subtilis (CQ2) on the 3rd instar larvae within 10 days of application of 1.89 × 10(9) cfu/mL bacterial concentration at 25 °C under laboratory conditions. Findings from this study indicate that these isolates appear to be a promising biocontrol agent for C. quadrimaculatus.

  18. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae) to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Kvitt, Hagit; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Zandbank, Keren; Tchernov, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like) cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C), caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h) and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i) the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii) acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  19. A robust screening method for dietary agents that activate tumour-suppressor microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Keitaro; Gailhouste, Luc; Yasukawa, Ken; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Certain dietary agents, such as natural products, have been reported to show anti-cancer effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of these substances in human cancer remain unclear. We recently found that resveratrol exerts an anti-cancer effect by upregulating tumour-suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs). In the current study, we aimed to identify new dietary products that have the ability to activate tumour-suppressor miRNAs and that therefore may serve as novel tools for the prevention and treatment of human cancers. We describe the generation and use of an original screening system based on a luciferase-based reporter vector for monitoring miR-200c tumour-suppressor activity. By screening a library containing 139 natural substances, three natural compounds — enoxolone, magnolol and palmatine chloride — were identified as being capable of inducing miR-200c expression in breast cancer cells at 10 μM. Moreover, these molecules suppressed the invasiveness of breast cancer cells in vitro. Next, we identified a molecular pathway by which the increased expression of miR-200c induced by natural substances led to ZEB1 inhibition and E-cadherin induction. These results indicate that our method is a valuable tool for a fast identification of natural molecules that exhibit tumour-suppressor activity in human cancer through miRNA activation. PMID:26423775

  20. Human recombinant truncated RNASET2, devoid of RNase activity; A potential cancer therapeutic agent

    PubMed Central

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Human RNASET2 has been implicated in antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities, independent of its ribonuclease capacities. We constructed a truncated version of human RNASET2, starting at E50 (trT2-50) and devoid of ribonuclease activity. trT2-50 maintained its ability to bind actin and to inhibit angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. trT2-50 binds to cell surface actin and formed a complex with actin in vitro. The antiangiogenic effect of this protein was demonstrated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by its ability to arrest tube formation on Matrigel, induced by angiogenic factors. Immunofluorescence staining of HUVECs showed nuclear and cytosolic RNASET2 protein that was no longer detectable inside the cell following trT2-50 treatment. This effect was associated with disruption of the intracellular actin network. trT2-50 co-localized with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind (or compete) for similar cellular epitopes. Moreover, trT2-50 led to a significant inhibition of tumor development. Histological analysis demonstrated abundant necrotic tissue and a substantial loss of endothelial structure in trT2-50-treated tumors. Collectively, the present results indicate that trT2-50, a molecule engineered to be deficient of its catalytic activity, still maintained its actin binding and anticancer-related biological activities. We therefore suggest that trT2-50 may serve as a potential cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:25426551

  1. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1–10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1–100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  2. Role of human hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in activation of the antiviral agent T-705 (favipiravir).

    PubMed

    Naesens, Lieve; Guddat, Luke W; Keough, Dianne T; van Kuilenburg, André B P; Meijer, Judith; Vande Voorde, Johan; Balzarini, Jan

    2013-10-01

    6-Fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide (T-705) is a novel antiviral compound with broad activity against influenza virus and diverse RNA viruses. Its active metabolite, T-705-ribose-5'-triphosphate (T-705-RTP), is recognized by influenza virus RNA polymerase as a substrate competing with GTP, giving inhibition of viral RNA synthesis and lethal virus mutagenesis. Which enzymes perform the activation of T-705 is unknown. We here demonstrate that human hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) converts T-705 into its ribose-5'-monophosphate (RMP) prior to formation of T-705-RTP. The anti-influenza virus activity of T-705 and T-1105 (3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide; the analog lacking the 6-fluoro atom) was lost in HGPRT-deficient Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This HGPRT dependency was confirmed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells undergoing HGPRT-specific gene knockdown followed by influenza virus ribonucleoprotein reconstitution. Knockdown for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase did not change the antiviral activity of T-705 and T-1105. Enzymatic assays showed that T-705 and T-1105 are poor substrates for human HGPRT having Km(app) values of 6.4 and 4.1 mM, respectively. Formation of the RMP metabolites by APRT was negligible, and so was the formation of the ribosylated metabolites by human purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Phosphoribosylation and antiviral activity of the 2-pyrazinecarboxamide derivatives was shown to require the presence of the 3-hydroxyl but not the 6-fluoro substituent. The crystal structure of T-705-RMP in complex with human HGPRT showed how this compound binds in the active site. Since conversion of T-705 by HGPRT appears to be inefficient, T-705-RMP prodrugs may be designed to increase the antiviral potency of this new antiviral agent.

  3. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC.

  4. Antiviral agents: characteristic activity spectrum depending on the molecular target with which they interact.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    1993-01-01

    The target protein (enzyme) with which antiviral agents interact determines their antiviral activity spectrum. Based on their activity spectrum, antiviral compounds could be divided into the following classes: (1) sulfated polysaccharides (i.e., dextran sulfate), which interact with the viral envelope glycoproteins and are inhibitory to a broad variety of enveloped viruses (i.e., retro-, herpes-, rhabdo-, and arenaviruses): (2) SAH hydrolase inhibitors (i.e., neplanocin A derivatives), which are particularly effective against poxvirus, (-)RNA viruses (paramyxovirus, rhabdovirus), and (+/-)RNA virus (reovirus); (3) OMP decarboxylase inhibitors (i.e., pyrazofurin) and CTP synthetase inhibitors (i.e., cyclopentenylcytosine), which are active against a broad range of DNA, (+)RNA, (-)RNA, and (+/-)RNA viruses; (4) IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors (i.e., ribavirin), which are also active against various (+)RNA and (-)RNA viruses and, in particular, ortho- and paramyxoviruses; (5) acyclic guanosine analogs (i.e., ganciclovir) and carbocyclic guanosine analogs (i.e., cyclobut-G), which are particularly active against herpesviruses (i.e., HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, CMV); (6) thymidine analogs (i.e., BVDU, BVaraU), which are specifically active against HSV-1 and VZV because of their preferential phosphorylation by the virus-encoded thymidine kinase; (7) acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (i.e., HPMPA, HPMPC, PMEA, FPMPA), which, depending on the structure of the acyclic side chain, span an activity spectrum from DNA viruses (papova-, adeno-, herpes-, hepadna-, and poxvirus) to retroviruses (HIV); (8) dideoxynucleoside analogs (i.e., AZT, DDC), which act as chain terminators in the reverse transcriptase reaction and thus block the replication of retroviruses as well as hepadnaviruses; and (9) the TIBO, HEPT, and other TIBO-like compounds, which interact specifically with the reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 and thus block the replication of HIV-1, but not of HIV-2 or any other retrovirus

  5. The Secondary Structure of Human Hageman Factor (Factor XII) and its Alteration by Activating Agents

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Carl R.; Saito, Hidehiko; Ratnoff, Oscar D.; Walton, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    Hageman factor (factor XII) is activated by exposure to surfaces such as glass or by solutions of certain compounds, notably ellagic acid. Changes in the structure of Hageman factor accompanying activation have been examined in this study by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The spectrum of unactivated Hageman factor in aqueous solutions suggests that its conformation is mainly aperiodic. Various perturbants altered the conformation of Hageman factor in differing ways, demonstrating the sensitivity of Hageman factor to its environment. After activation of Hageman factor with solutions of ellagic acid, a negative trough appeared in the region of the circular dichroism spectrum commonly assigned to tyrosine residues, along with other minor changes in the peptide spectral region. Some of these changes are similar to changes that occurred upon partial neutralization of the basic residues at alkali pH. Activation of Hageman factor by adsorption to quartz surfaces (in an aqueous environment) also produced changes similar to those in the ellagic acid-activated Hageman factor, including the negative ellipticity in the tyrosine region. These observations suggest that the activation process may be related to a change in status of some of the basic amino acid residues, coupled with a specific change in the environment of some tyrosine residues. The importance of these changes during the activation process remains to be determined. The sensitivity of Hageman factor to its environment is consistent with the view that the initiation of clotting by exposure of plasma to appropriate agents is brought about by alterations in the conformation of Hageman factor that occur in the apparent absence of Fletcher factor or other recognized clotting factors. Images PMID:4373492

  6. Surface pH and bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system to intracoronal dentin after application of hydrogen peroxide bleach with sodium perborate.

    PubMed

    Elkhatib, Hanadi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hiraishi, Noriko; Kitasako, Yuichi; Tagami, Junji; Nomura, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a self-etching primer/adhesive system with dentin surface pH with or without bleaching and observed the morphological changes in bleached dentin treated with a self-etching primer. Dentin disks were prepared from the coronal-labial region of 32 human anterior teeth. The pulpal surfaces of the dentin disks were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. The dentin surfaces on all specimens were bleached with a mixture of 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for one week. The bleaching agent was then rinsed off with water for 5, 15 or 30 seconds. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C. Half of the five-second rinsing specimens were stored in water for an additional week. Dentin surface pH with or without bleaching was examined using a pH-imaging microscope (SCHEM-100). A self-etching primer/adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) was applied to bleached or unbleached dentin according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24-hour water storage, the bonded specimens were prepared for microtensile testing. Microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin was measured using a universal-testing machine (EZ test, Shimadzu, Japan) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's test (alpha=0.05). The pH values of the dentin surfaces of the 5 and 15 second rinsing groups were significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), while the 30-second rinsing and one-week water storage groups had similar surface pH values to the control group (p<0.05). The microTBS of 5, 15 and 30 second rinsing specimens after bleaching were significantly lower than the control specimens (p<0.05). However, after one-week of water storage, the microTBS returned to the control group. The application of a bleaching agent increased the pH value of the dentin surface and decreased the bond strength of the self-etching primer/adhesive system. One

  7. Determination of anionic surface active agents using silica coated magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Duarte, Regina M B O; Trindade, Tito; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-07-19

    The development of a novel methodology for extraction and preconcentration of the most commonly used anionic surface active agents (SAAs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), is presented herein. The present method, based on the use of silica-magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates, was developed for determination of C10-C13 LAS homologues. The proposed methodology allowed quantitative recoveries of C10-C13 LAS homologues by using a reduced amount of magnetic nanoparticles. Limits of detection were in the range 0.8-1.9μgL(-1) for C10-C13 LAS homologues, while the repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 2.0 to 3.9% (N=6). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of a variety of natural water samples.

  8. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents: risk assessment and biosafety recommendations in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed.

  9. Matricellular proteins in drug delivery: Therapeutic targets, active agents, and therapeutic localization.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Andrew J; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix is composed of a complex array of molecules that together provide structural and functional support to cells. These properties are mainly mediated by the activity of collagenous and elastic fibers, proteoglycans, and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. ECM composition is tissue-specific and could include matricellular proteins whose primary role is to modulate cell-matrix interactions. In adults, matricellular proteins are primarily expressed during injury, inflammation and disease. Particularly, they are closely associated with the progression and prognosis of cardiovascular and fibrotic diseases, and cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the potential use of matricellular proteins in drug delivery including the generation of therapeutic agents based on the properties and structures of these proteins as well as their utility as biomarkers for specific diseases.

  10. Thermal bleaching of photodarkening-induced loss in ytterbium-doped fibers.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Mikko J; Montiel i Ponsoda, Joan J; Koplow, Jeffrey P; Honkanen, Seppo

    2009-09-01

    We study the thermal bleaching process of photodarkening-induced loss in ytterbium-doped fibers. The observed power-law time dependence of the normalized absorption coefficient is well represented by the thermal decay model of Erdogan et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 76, 73 (1994)]. Using this model, we derive the activation energy associated with thermal recovery of the induced loss to prephotodarkened state. For the studied commercial 20 microm core diameter large-mode-area fiber, the energy distribution consists of a single peak, located at 1.32 eV with a FWHM of approximately 0.31 eV. The results presented are of particular importance to understanding photodarkening and bleaching processes in high-power fiber lasers. PMID:19724516

  11. Bleaching of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics without scouring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work investigated whether a hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabric made at a relatively high hydroentangling water pressure, say, 135-bar, could be successfully bleached to attain the desired whiteness, absorbency and other properties without traditional scouring. Accordingly, the scoured...

  12. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    PubMed

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet. PMID:26228070

  13. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  14. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    PubMed

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet.

  15. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2). PMID:27375906

  16. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2). PMID:27375906

  17. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity. PMID:17189829

  18. "Super-quenching" state protects Symbiodinium from thermal stress - Implications for coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Chavdar; Schrameyer, Verena; Reus, Michael; Ralph, Peter J; Hill, Ross; Büchel, Claudia; Larkum, Anthony W D; Holzwarth, Alfred R

    2016-06-01

    The global rise in sea surface temperatures causes regular exposure of corals to high temperature and high light stress, leading to worldwide disastrous coral bleaching events (loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from reef-building corals). Our picosecond chlorophyll fluorescence experiments on cultured Symbiodinium clade C cells exposed to coral bleaching conditions uncovered the transformations of the alga's photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) that activate an extremely efficient non-photochemical "super-quenching" mechanism. The mechanism is associated with a transition from an initially heterogeneous photosystem II (PSII) pool to a homogeneous "spillover" pool, where nearly all excitation energy is transferred to photosystem I (PSI). There, the inherently higher stability of PSI and high quenching efficiency of P(700)(+) allow dumping of PSII excess excitation energy into heat, resulting in almost complete cessation of photosynthetic electron transport (PET). This potentially reversible "super-quenching" mechanism protects the PSA against destruction at the cost of a loss of photosynthetic activity. We suggest that the inhibition of PET and the consequent inhibition of organic carbon production (e.g. sugars) in the symbiotic Symbiodinium provide a trigger for the symbiont expulsion, i.e. bleaching.

  19. "Super-quenching" state protects Symbiodinium from thermal stress - Implications for coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Chavdar; Schrameyer, Verena; Reus, Michael; Ralph, Peter J; Hill, Ross; Büchel, Claudia; Larkum, Anthony W D; Holzwarth, Alfred R

    2016-06-01

    The global rise in sea surface temperatures causes regular exposure of corals to high temperature and high light stress, leading to worldwide disastrous coral bleaching events (loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from reef-building corals). Our picosecond chlorophyll fluorescence experiments on cultured Symbiodinium clade C cells exposed to coral bleaching conditions uncovered the transformations of the alga's photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) that activate an extremely efficient non-photochemical "super-quenching" mechanism. The mechanism is associated with a transition from an initially heterogeneous photosystem II (PSII) pool to a homogeneous "spillover" pool, where nearly all excitation energy is transferred to photosystem I (PSI). There, the inherently higher stability of PSI and high quenching efficiency of P(700)(+) allow dumping of PSII excess excitation energy into heat, resulting in almost complete cessation of photosynthetic electron transport (PET). This potentially reversible "super-quenching" mechanism protects the PSA against destruction at the cost of a loss of photosynthetic activity. We suggest that the inhibition of PET and the consequent inhibition of organic carbon production (e.g. sugars) in the symbiotic Symbiodinium provide a trigger for the symbiont expulsion, i.e. bleaching. PMID:26869375

  20. Towards Pro-active Embodied Agents: On the Importance of Neural Mechanisms Suitable to Process Time Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Croon, G.; Nolfi, S.; Postma, E. O.

    In Embodied Cognitive Science, many studies have focused on reactive agents, i.e. agents that have no internal state and always respond in the same way to the same stimulus. However, this particular focus is not due to a rejection of the importance of internal states. Rather, it is due to the difficulty of developing pro-active embodied and situated agents, that is agents able to: (a) extract internal states by integrating sensorymotor information through time and, (b) later use these internal states to modulate their motor behaviour according to the current environmental circumstances. In this chapter we will focus on how pro-active agents can be developed and, more specifically, on which are the neural mechanisms that might favour the development of pro-active agents. By comparing the results of five sets of evolutionary experiments in which simulated robots are provided with different types of recurrent neural networks, we gain insight into the relation between the robots` capabilities and the characteristics of their neural controllers. We show how special mechanisms for processing information in time facilitate the exploitation of internal states.

  1. Broad-spectrum in vivo antiviral activity of 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine, a novel immunopotentiating agent.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Cottam, H B; Sharma, B S; Jolley, W B; Robins, R K

    1989-01-01

    A novel immunopotentiating agent, 5-amino-3-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazolo [4,5-d]pyrimidine-2,7(3H,6H)-dione (7-thia-8-oxoguanosine), lacks virus-inhibitory properties in vitro but induces interferon and potentiates immune functions, such as natural killer cell activity. It was evaluated in rodent models to determine the spectrum of antiviral activity and effective treatment regimens. At 50 to 200 mg/kg given as single or divided intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses 1 day before virus inoculation, significant protection was afforded to mice infected i.p. with Semliki Forest, San Angelo, banzi, and encephalomyocarditis viruses. Similarly, suckling rats were protected from an intranasal challenge with rat coronavirus. Against San Angelo virus, treatments could be delayed to 1 day post-virus inoculation and still show a beneficial effect. The compound was moderately effective in mice infected i.p. with herpes simplex virus type 2 or intranasally with vesicular stomatitis virus. No activity was seen against influenza B virus in mice when the analog was administered one time pre-virus inoculation or in multiple doses given before and after the virus inoculation. Nor was there a prophylactic effect against herpetic skin lesions on mice. This immune modulator may have promise for the treatment of a variety of virus infections. PMID:2817849

  2. Bitter melon extracts enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through the modulation of multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Venugopal, Anand; Standing, David; Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Dhar, Animesh; Mitra, Ashim; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that extracts of bitter melon (BME) can be used as a preventive/therapeutic agent in colon cancers. Here, we determined BME effects on anticancer activity and bioavailability of doxorubicin (DOX) in colon cancer cells. BME enhanced the effect of DOX on cell proliferation and sensitized the cells toward DOX upon pretreatment. Furthermore, there was both increased drug uptake and reduced drug efflux. We also observed a reduction in the expression of multidrug resistance conferring proteins (MDRCP) P-glycoprotein, MRP-2, and BCRP. Further BME suppressed DOX efflux in MDCK cells overexpressing the three efflux proteins individually, suggesting that BME is a potent inhibitor of MDR function. Next, we determined the effect of BME on PXR, a xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptor and a transcription factor that controls the expression of the three MDR genes. BME suppressed PXR promoter activity thereby suppressing its expression. Finally, we determined the effect of AMPK pathway on drug efflux because we have previously demonstrated that BME affects the pathway. However, inhibiting AMPK did not affect drug resistance, suggesting that BME may use different pathways for the anticancer and MDR modulating activities. Together, these results suggest that BME can enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy.

  3. Coral bleaching: thermal adaptation in reef coral symbionts.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Rob

    2004-08-12

    Many corals bleach as a result of increased seawater temperature, which causes them to lose their vital symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium spp.) - unless these symbioses are able to adapt to global warming, bleaching threatens coral reefs worldwide. Here I show that some corals have adapted to higher temperatures, at least in part, by hosting specifically adapted Symbiodinium. If other coral species can host these or similar Symbiodinium taxa, they might adapt to warmer habitats relatively easily.

  4. A new non-vital tooth bleaching method using titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with a 405-nm diode laser or a halogen lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    To establish a safer and more effective bleaching method for discolored pulpless teeth, we examined bleaching from the pulpal dentin side using a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide. The twenty bovine blood-stained discolored enamel-dentin plates of 1.0 mm enamel thickness and 2.0 mm dentin thickness were used. The bleaching agent was applied to the dentin side that was then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2) or a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2) for 15 minutes. The bleaching effect was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of the color of the specimens from the dentin and enamel side for every 5 minutes, and then dentin or enamel surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide proved to have a strong bleaching effect. The color difference after laser irradiation was higher than that after halogen lamp irradiation, however, there was no significant difference between them. No changes in the enamel surface morphology were found and open dentinal tubules with no smear layer were clearly observed at the pulpal dentin surface in both groups.

  5. Maintenance of whitening with a power toothbrush after bleaching treatment.

    PubMed

    Kugel, Gerard; Aboushala, Ayman; Sharma, Shradha; Ferreira, Susana; Anderson, Chad

    2004-02-01

    A randomized, parallel, examiner-blind clinical study was conducted to examine the ability of 2 toothbrushes to maintain teeth whitening after at-home bleaching. Forty subjects used a 15% carbamide peroxide tray bleaching system at home for 2 weeks per the manufacturer's instructions and then were randomly assigned to use either the Sonicare Advance power toothbrush or a manual toothbrush as part of their home oral hygiene routine for 6 months. The color of the labial surfaces of the subjects' maxillary anterior dentition was assessed before bleaching and immediately, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months after bleaching. Color was assessed by comparison with Vita Classical shade tabs and by digital image analysis in the CIE L*a*b* color space. Both groups demonstrated a rebound effect at the 2-month visit and beyond, with mean Vita shade scores significantly higher than immediately after bleaching. At the 6-month evaluation, a significant difference in the amount of rebound in each group was observed. Specifically, the rebound of the Sonicare brush group was on average 1.12 Vita shades less than that of the manual brush group. The 6-month difference was confirmed through digital image analysis, with the Sonicare brush group 4.8 L* units lighter, corresponding to 2 Vita shades, and 2.1 b* units less yellow than the manual brush group. This clinical trial demonstrates that the Sonicare Advance toothbrush better maintains whitening after bleaching treatment than a manual toothbrush.

  6. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  7. Universal Approach to FRAP Analysis of Arbitrary Bleaching Patterns.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Daniel; Goldstien, Leo; Edidin, Michael; Gheber, Levi A

    2015-01-01

    The original approach to calculating diffusion coefficients of a fluorescent probe from Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) measurements assumes bleaching with a circular laser beam of a Gaussian intensity profile. This method was used without imaging the bleached cell. An empirical equation for calculating diffusion coefficients from a rectangular bleaching geometry, created in a confocal image, was later published, however a single method allowing the calculation of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary geometry does not exist. Our simulation approach allows computation of diffusion coefficients regardless of bleaching geometry used in the FRAP experiment. It accepts a multiple-frame TIFF file, representing the experiment as input, and simulates the (pure) diffusion of the fluorescent probes (2D random walk) starting with the first post-bleach frame of the actual data. It then fits the simulated data to the real data and extracts the diffusion coefficient. We validate our approach using a well characterized diffusing molecule (DiIC18) against well-established analytical procedures. We show that the algorithm is able to calculate the absolute value of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary bleaching geometries, including exaggeratedly large ones. It is provided freely as an ImageJ plugin, and should facilitate quantitative FRAP measurements for users equipped with standard fluorescence microscopy setups. PMID:26108191

  8. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001). However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  9. A quantitative structure activity/dose response relationship for contact allergic potential of alkyl group transfer agents.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Basketter, D A

    1990-11-01

    As part of the investigation of structure activity relationships in contact allergy, it has been shown that methyl transfer agents are capable of acting as skin sensitizers. This work has now been extended to a more general examination of alkyl transfer reactions. The modified single injection adjuvant test has been used to investigate the sensitization potential of C12, C16 and unsaturated C18 alkyl transfer agents. Dose responses to challenge and the patterns of cross-reactivity between these materials and methyl transfer agents have been studied. All alkyl transfer agents examined were potent sensitizers in the guinea pig. There was evidence of mutual cross-reactivity between all alkyl transfer agents examined (including methyl transfer agents). Analysis of the data in terms of a modified relative alkylation index showed evidence of an overload effect. The sensitization data has been accurately modelled using a mathematical equation. These results emphasize the possibilities for relating physicochemical parameters and skin sensitization potential. Further studies with alkyl transfer agents are in progress of amplify the observations and conclusions presented in this report. No in vitro model is available for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Therefore an approach based on a model using physicochemical criteria is the most likely route to a reduced requirement for animal testing. PMID:1965716

  10. Targeted proteomic analyses of nasal lavage fluid in persulfate-challenged hairdressers with bleaching powder-associated rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Mörtstedt, Harriet; Ali, Neserin; Kåredal, Monica; Jacobsson, Helene; Rietz, Emelie; Diab, Kerstin Kronholm; Nielsen, Jörn; Jönsson, Bo A G; Lindh, Christian H

    2015-02-01

    Hairdressers have an increased risk for developing airway symptoms, for example, asthma and rhinitis. Persulfates, which are oxidizing agents in bleaching powder, are considered important causal agents for these symptoms. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim was therefore to measure proteomic changes in nasal lavage fluid from persulfate-challenged subjects to identify proteins potentially involved in the pathogenesis of bleaching powder-associated rhinitis or candidate effect biomarkers for persulfate. Also, oxidized peptides were measured to evaluate their usefulness as biomarkers for persulfate exposure or effect, for example, oxidative stress. Samples from hairdressers with and without bleaching powder-associated rhinitis were analyzed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring to target 246 proteins and five oxidized peptides. Pathway analys