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Sample records for activated bleaching agent

  1. In vitro antimicrobial activity of peroxide-based bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; de Oliveira, Rogério; Reis, André Figueiredo; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-06-01

    Antibacterial activity of 4 commercial bleaching agents (Day White, Colgate Platinum, Whiteness 10% and 16%) on 6 oral pathogens (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. A chlorhexidine solution was used as a positive control, while distilled water was the negative control. Bleaching agents and control materials were inserted in sterilized stainless-steel cylinders that were positioned under inoculated agar plate (n = 4). After incubation according to the appropriate period of time for each microorganism, the inhibition zones were measured. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (a = 0.05). All bleaching agents and the chlorhexidine solution produced antibacterial inhibition zones. Antimicrobial activity was dependent on peroxide-based bleaching agents. For most microorganisms evaluated, bleaching agents produced inhibition zones similar to or larger than that observed for chlorhexidine. C albicans, L casei, and L acidophilus were the most resistant microorganisms.

  2. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel.

  3. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  4. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  5. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  6. Effects of bleaching agents on surface roughness of filling materials.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Ljubisa; Jordan, Rainer Andreas; Glasser, Marie-Claire; Arnold, Wolfgang Hermann; Nebel, Jan; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Thomas; Zimmer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a non-tactile optical measurement system to assess the effects of three bleaching agents' concentrations on the surface roughness of dental restoration materials. Two composites (Grandio, Venus) and one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil Plus) were used in this in vitro study. Specimens were treated with three different bleaching agents (16% and 22% carbamide peroxide (Polanight) and 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost)). Surface roughness was measured with an optical profilometer (Infinite Focus G3) before and after the bleaching treatment. Surface roughness increased in all tested specimens after bleaching treatment (p<0.05). Our in vitro study showed that dental bleaching agents influenced the surface roughness of different restoration materials, and the restoration material itself was shown to have an impact on alteration susceptibility. There seemed to be no clinical relevance in case of an optimal finish.

  7. [A review of the effect of tooth bleaching agents on oral microbes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Huo, Sibei; Liu, Shiyu; Li, Mingyun

    2016-02-01

    Tooth bleaching agents contain powerful oxidizing agents, which serve as the main part of bleaching agents because of its release of effective bleaching component. It has been a hot topic whether tooth bleaching agents exert negative influence on oral health. In order to provide train of thoughts and reference for further clinical researches and treatments, this review paper focuses on bleaching agents' effects on the growth of oral microbes and the formation of biofilms.

  8. Effectiveness of dental bleaching in depth after using different bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Débora A N L.; Aguiar, Flávio H B.; Bertoldo, Carlos E S.; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B.; Lovadino, José R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of low- and high-concentration bleaching agents on enamel and deep dentin. Study design: Stained bovine incisors fragments were randomized placed into 10 groups (n=5), according to the sample thicknesses (2.0 mm or 3.5 mm) and bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (4 h a day/21 days); 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with calcium (1:30 h a day/21 days); HP 20% with calcium (50 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% (3 x 15 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval); HP 35% with calcium (40 min a day/3 sessions with a 7-day interval). The samples were stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. The color change was evaluated using a spectrophotometer at the initial analysis, after artificially staining with black tea and after each of the bleaching weeks, and data was expressed in CIE Lab System values. The L* coordinate data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test and the ?E values data was submitted for analysis of variance in a split-plot ANOVA and Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: None of the bleaching agents tested differed from the reflectance values on the enamel surface. For deep dentin HP 20% and HP 35%, both with calcium, showed the lowest reflectance values, which differed from CP 10%. Conclusion: It is concluded that high concentration hydrogen peroxide with calcium was less effective in deep dentin than 10% carbamide peroxide. Key words:Dental bleaching; hydrogen peroxide; carbamide peroxide; dental staining. PMID:24455056

  9. Permeability of enamel following light-activated power bleaching.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Schiavoni, Renato J; Serra, Monica C; Froner, Izabel C

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain whether in-office photocured bleaching techniques would increase permeability to enamel. A 7.1 mm2 circular area located in the middle third of the coronal portion of 90 human canines was isolated by applying an acid-resistant varnish to the remaining surfaces of the tooth. According to a randomized complete block design (n = 15), specimens were treated using a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product activated by an integrated LED/diode laser (LED/laser) source or a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light. Bleaching was accomplished by applying the 35% hydrogen peroxide agent to the enamel surface in three 10-minute sessions, conducted at one-week intervals over a period of three weeks. For the photocured bleached groups, a bleaching agent was applied to the specimen and irradiated with the LED/laser device or the QTH light for 30 seconds. Negative control groups were exposed to artificial saliva or irradiated by the LED/laser device or the QTH light. Specimens were subjected to a histochemical coloring method that employed copper sulfate and dithio-oxamide solutions. Three 300-microm thick sections taken from the exposed area were imaged in an optical microscope. Permeability was measured in the digitized images as the percentage of copper ions penetration over the total enamel thickness. Friedman's test (alpha = 0.05) showed significant difference among groups. Least significant difference test revealed that in comparison with the group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide only, there was no significant increase in enamel permeability when bleaching was activated by either the LED/laser or QTH light devices but all bleached groups showed higher permeability than the unbleached/nonirradiated group.

  10. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  11. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  12. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  13. Effect of bleaching agent on dental ceramics roughness.

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, Aleska D; Passos, Sheila P; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Pereira, Sarina Mb; Vásquez, Vanessa Zc; Bottino, Marco A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) on the roughness of two dental ceramics in vitro, and to analyze the surface by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Two bleaching agents (10% and 16%/Whiteness, FGM Gel) and two microparticle feldspathic ceramics (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were used. Forty disks of Vita VM7 and Vita VM13 ceramic were manufactured, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm high, in accordance with the manufacturers' recommendations, and were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): (1) VM7 + Whiteness 10%; (2) VM7 + Whiteness 16%; (3) VM13 + Whiteness 10%; (4) VM13 + Whiteness 16%. The bleaching agent was applied for 8 hours a day for 15 days and during the intervals the test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The roughness (Ra) of the test specimens was evaluated before and after exposure to the bleaching agents using a laser roughness meter and the topographic description was analyzed by SEM. The statistical analysis of roughness data showed significant differences in the VM7 groups, using paired t-test, p = 0.05 (VM7 + Whiteness 10%: p = 0.002; VM7 + Whiteness 16%: p = 0.001) and two-sample t-test (VM7 p = 0.047), and no significant difference was found among VM13 groups. The qualitative SEM analysis showed different degrees of surface changes. The results suggest that the roughness of the tested ceramic surfaces increased after exposure to the bleaching agents.

  14. Effect of chlorine-containing bleaching agents on diffuse reflection of light by cellulose pulp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. P.; Pokoptseva, O. K.; Sherstobitova, A. S.; Yas'kov, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We have studied diffuse reflectance in the spectral range λ = 380-760 nm of sulfate cellulose pulp with initial hardness G = 30-70 after it was treated with a chlorine-containing bleaching agent with active chlorine concentration C = 0%-10% for different time intervals. We determined the general behavior and basic features of the concentration and time dependences of the brightness B and the diffuse reflectance spectral ratio ( R 437/ R 650)ṡ100% at λ = 457 nm and 650 nm. Based on the data obtained, we propose an optimal algorithm for using optical spectral technologies for metered addition of chlorine-containing bleaching agents.

  15. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  16. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  17. Effect of bleaching agents on enamel surface of bovine teeth: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta-Dutra, Ana-Cristina; Albuquerque, Rodrigo-de Castro; Morgan, Luís-Fernando-dos Santos-Alves; Pereira, Geraldo-Magela; Nunes, Eduardo; Horta, Martinho-Campolina-Rebello

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate changes in the enamel surface of bovine teeth after whitening with exogenous bleaching agents: 10% carbamide peroxide (group 1), 16% carbamide peroxide (group 2) and 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by a light-emitting diode (LED) (group 3). The evaluations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Material and Methods Ninety bovine teeth were divided into five groups (n = 18). The bleaching agents 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide were applied for eight hours a day for 14 consecutive days. The third agent, LED-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide, was used four times at seven-day intervals. Each of the four time points consisted of three applications of 10 minutes each. A 37% phosphoric acid solution and artificial saliva were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Results The evaluations by SEM showed changes in the enamel surfaces of the specimens. Based on the Mann-Whitney statistical test, the data showed significant differences (p<0.05) between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 2 and 3. However, no significant difference (p>0.05) was observed between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions Based on these results, it can be concluded that bleaching agents can cause changes in the structure of tooth enamel and that these changes are related to the concentration and the duration of contact with the tooth surface. Key words:Bovine teeth, carbamide peroxide, enamel, hydrogen peroxide, scanning electronic microscopy. PMID:28149462

  18. Multi stage peroxide and activated peroxide bleaching of kenaf bast pulp.

    PubMed

    Zeinaly, Farhad; Shakhes, Jalal; Zeinali, Nooshin

    2013-02-15

    Soda-anthraquinone kenaf bast pulp (12.5 kappa number and 32% ISO brightness) has been bleached with multi stage peroxide bleaching process. Bleaching process was carried out in different sequences of peroxide stage without and with activator (tetraacetylethylenediamine, TAED) to about 80% ISO brightness. Full bleached pulp production with high brightness and viscosity and also, low chemical oxygen demand (COD) and no adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in effluent are the aims of this study. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charges, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximize the brightness gain at the lowest viscosity loss. H(2)O(2) was activated as bleaching agent under milder conditions, such as low alkalinity or low temperature, by TAED activator. Therefore, TAED charge caused to an improvement in viscosity, pulp yield and effluent COD load. Pre-treatment with EDTA for 30 min and in acidic condition gave 2-4% gain in ISO brightness.

  19. Comparative clinical and psychosocial benefits of tooth bleaching: different light activation of a 38% peroxide gel in a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Calderini, Angelo; Sciara, Simona; Semeria, Chiara; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Polizzi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Tooth bleaching is a widespread dental treatment with important psychosocial antecedents and outcomes involved. In the activation of in-office bleaching agents, a selective light radiation, that is, a diode laser seems to be a positive choice to decrease the time of bleaching without surface modification and with no residual tooth sensitivity for maximum effect and minimal clinical and psychological side effects.

  20. The influence of chemical activation on tooth bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Torres, Carlos R G; Goto, Edson Hidenobu; Pucci, Cesar Rogério; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of manganese gluconate, a chemical activator of bleaching agents, at a concentration of 0.01% on the efficiency of a 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agent. Forty bovine incisors were immersed in a 25% instant coffee solution for seven days and randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was the control group and consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel only. Group 2 consisted of 10% carbamide peroxide-based bleaching gel and 0.01% manganese gluconate. Three readings of color were taken using the Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer: the initial reading, a reading at seven days, and a reading at 14 days. Total color variation was calculated by ΔE*Lab. Data were submitted to the statistical t-test (5%), which showed that after seven days group 2 had a significant increase in the degree of tooth bleaching compared with group 1. The mean values (±SD) were 16.33 (±3.95) for group 1 and 19.29 (±4.97) for group 2. However, the results for group 1 and group 2 were similar after 14 days. Adding 0.01% manganese gluconate to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel increased the degree of tooth bleaching after a seven-day treatment and did not influence the resulting shade after 14 days.

  1. Effect of light units on tooth bleaching with visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Ayaka; Otsuki, Masayuki; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different light sources on the efficiency of an office bleaching agent containing visible-light activating titanium dioxide photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)) using an artificial discoloration tooth model. Extracted bovine teeth were stained by black tea. The CIE L*a*b* values were measured before and after nine consecutive treatments by the VL-TiO(2)-containing bleaching agent (TiON in Office, GC, Tokyo, Japan). A halogen light unit (CB; CoBee, GC) or an LED unit (G-light, GC) with two modes (blue and violet: GL-BV, blue: GL-B) were used to activate the bleaching agent in three groups (n=8). Brightness (ΔL) and color difference (ΔE) increased as bleaching repeated in all groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that both number of treatments and light sources significantly affected ΔE (p<0.05). GL-BV showed better bleaching effect than GL-B. In measurement of irradiation spectra, CB showed a wide spectrum (380-530 nm), GL-B had a sharp peak at 470 nm and GL-BV showed an additional peak at 405 nm. It was concluded that the light source influenced the efficiency of the tooth bleaching with VL-TiO(2).

  2. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  3. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  4. [Benefits of antioxidant agents' use for dental filling consequent to the endo-bleaching].

    PubMed

    Kobakhidze, G D; Vadachkoriia, N R; Tkhilava, N G

    2006-08-01

    Efficacy of antioxidant agents' use after dental endo bleaching was studied in clinical trial. The study enrolled 169 patients, ranging age 16 to 60 years in age. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: control (63) and trial (106). In patients of the control group tooth cavity was left open after endo bleaching, and was filled only after 7 days. In patients of the trial group antioxidant agent was administered into the dental tissues consequently to the endo bleaching, and the cavity was filled immediately. Assessment of the immediate and distant effects revealed unwanted results of postponed dental filling (control group) in terms of tooth color stability and forming micro cracks. Results of antioxidant use and immediate dental filling after endo bleaching have proven our earlier experimental studies on benefits of antioxidant use to be right. Based on the results of our clinical study we can recommend use of antioxidant after endo bleaching to achieve successful dental fillings in clinical practice.

  5. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  6. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment.

  7. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Thaise Graciele; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39) was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39) not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13) were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach) according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LED)laser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the groups. When the bleaching agent was not applied, the halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (2.38+/-0.66 degrees C). The LED unit produced the lowest temperature increase (0.29+/-0.13 degrees C); but there was no significant difference between LED unit and LED-laser system (0.35+/-0.15 degrees C) (p>0.01). When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01): halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41+/-0.64 degrees C), and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33+/-0.12 degrees C); however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44+/-0.11 degrees C

  8. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Rokaya, Mohammad E; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rokaya, Mohammad E.; Beshr, Khaled; Hashem Mahram, Abeer; Samir Pedir, Samah; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n = 27) according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n = 9) according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide), group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide), group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture), and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture). Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26257782

  10. [The effect of 2 bleaching agents on the enamel surface. An in-vitro study].

    PubMed

    Llena Puy, M C; Forner Navarro, L; Ferrandez, A; Faus Llacer, J V

    1992-01-01

    We present a study "in vitro" of the effect of bleaching agents on dental surfaces using the "Walking bleaching technique". We found that hydrogen peroxide bleached more quickly than carbamide although, after a period of six weeks, the results were the same as far as whitening was concerned. In the scanning electron microscope we observed significantly different changes in each case. Carbamide caused a regular and uniform opening of the enamel prisms of the surface while hydrogen peroxide produced more severe superficial destruction with the appearance of patterning similar to the acid etching, and the presence of some crystalline areas emerging from the body of the prisms.

  11. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  12. Effects of hydrogen peroxide-containing bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Ernst, C P; Marroquín, B B; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B

    1996-01-01

    The effects of four bleaching agents (Opalescence, HiLite, 30% hydrogen peroxide, and 30% hydrogen peroxide mixed with sodium perborate) and 37% phosphoric acid on the external surface of human enamel were examined with the scanning electron microscope. The materials were applied to the enamel surfaces of 60 specimens obtained from 10 teeth. Each test agent was applied to one specimen from each tooth. One specimen of each tooth was left untreated. Comparison to the untreated control surfaces revealed that enamel exposed to the bleaching agents underwent slight morphologic surface alterations. The enamel surfaces treated with phosphoric acid, in contrast, showed severe morphologic alterations.

  13. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  14. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  15. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    CINTRA, Luciano Tavares Angelo; BENETTI, Francine; FERREIRA, Luciana Louzada; RAHAL, Vanessa; ERVOLINO, Edilson; JACINTO, Rogério de Castilho; GOMES, João Eduardo; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  16. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Lousada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals (control) were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents. PMID:27008262

  17. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents.

  18. Effects of Tooth Coating Material and Finishing Agent on Bleached Enamel Surfaces by KTP Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Ayumi; Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Teruo, Toko; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth coating material and finishing agent on bleached enamel surfaces after using KTP laser with 27% hydrogen peroxide. Background data: There have been few reports on the effects of tooth coating materials and finishing agents after bleaching. Methods: After 40 crowns of human extracted maxillary incisors were bleached by KTP laser, bleached enamels were finished with fluoride only or both of fluoride and nano-hydroxyapatite as a finishing agent. After application(s) of fluoride and/or finishing agent, the enamel surfaces were divided into 2 groups, which were covered with the coating material or without coating material. After application of coating materials, all specimens were kept for 2 weeks at 37°C of 100% humidity. After removing the coating material, color changing was measured and enamel surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM observation of enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material showed the most flattered surface compared to other groups. By measuring the color changing, few color changing was observed on the enamel surfaces treated the fluoride gel, finishing agents and coating material. Conclusion: These results suggested that applications of fluoride gel, finishing agent and coating material made the enamel-surfaces flattered and kept effects of bleaching, could prevent the re-coloration. After applications of fluoride gel and finishing agent, covering the bleached-enamel surfaces with the coating material enhanced the keeping whiteness. It would give the patients satisfaction of whiteness. PMID:24155557

  19. Effects of a bleaching agent with calcium on bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrino, Larissa; Gomes, Yasmin; Alves, Eliane; Costi, Hilton; Rogez, Hervé; Silva, Cecy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study analyzed the effects of a bleaching treatment containing 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with or without calcium on bovine enamel, using the Knoop hardness number (KHN), tristimulus colorimetry (TC), and scanning electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Forty-five specimens were randomly divided into groups (n = 5), which included artificial saliva (negative control [NC]), 35% HP (positive control [PC]), and 35% HP Blue Calcium (HP Blue). The specimens were subjected to three bleaching sessions. During the sessions, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva at 37°C. Before and after bleaching, KHN tests were conducted using a force of 25 gf for 5 s. TC was performed using the CIE-L*a*b* system and readouts were obtained at the following 4 time points: Before the bleaching treatment; after the first session, the second session, and the third session. The specimens were dehydrated and coated with gold, and the photomicrographs were analyzed in a double-blind manner with a LEO microscope. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P < 0.05), a statistically significant difference was identified between the initial and final mean KHNs of the NC and PC groups, while the initial and final mean KHNs were not significantly different in the HP Blue group. The final mean values of ΔE, ΔL, and Δb of the PC and HP Blue groups were significantly higher than the initial values (P < 0.01 for both). The photomicrographs revealed no differences among the groups. Conclusions: Therefore, treatment with HP Blue prevented changes in the KHN without reducing the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:25202210

  20. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF HOME BLEACHING AGENTS IN DISCOLORED TEETH AND INFLUENCE ON ENAMEL MICROHARDNESS

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Carrasco-Guerisoli, Laíse Daniela; Batista, Andrigo Reis; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of different home bleaching agents on color alteration and their influence on surface and subsurface microhardness of discolored bovine enamel. Material and Methods: Forty-five fragments of bovine incisors were randomly allocated into 3 groups (n=15) according to the bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide gel (CP10), 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16) and 6.5%-hydrogen-peroxide-based strip (HP6.5). Before bleaching treatment, initial values of Knoop surface microhardness and color (CIEL*a*b*) were obtained and the fragments were artificially stained in hemolyzed rat blood. Then, bleaching treatments were performed over a 21-day period. Color changes (ΔE) were assessed at 7, 14 and 21 days, and final surface microhardness reading was done after 21 days. Thereafter, the fragments were bisected to obtain subsurface microhardness. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%). Results: Color changes produced by CP16 were similar to those of CP10, and the color changes produced by these materials were significantly superior to those produced by HP6.5. Color changes at 21 days were superior to 7 days and similar to 14 days. The time did not influence color changes for CP16, which showed similarity between the 14- and 21-day results. No statistically significant differences were found among the home bleaching agents for surface and subsurface microhardness. Conclusions: Microhardness of bovine enamel was not affected by the bleaching agents. The 16% carbamide peroxide gel was the most effective for bleaching the stained substrate. PMID:19668986

  2. The microhardness of bleached dentine and its bond strength to a dentine bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dadoun, M P; Bartlett, D W

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the hardness of a bleached dentine surface and its bond strength to a dentine-bonding agent. Thirty teeth were randomly divided into a test and control group. The teeth were hemi-sectioned, the cut surfaces ground flat and the test surfaces bleached with a 10% aqueous solution of carbamide peroxide continuously for 4 days. Hardness was determined using a Vickers microhardness test. The bond between Coltene 'One Coat Bond' and bleached and unbleached dentine was evaluated by measuring shear bond strength using an Instron machine. The mean hardness of dentine before and after bleaching was 62.5 (10.2) and 53.6 (7.3) and this difference was statistically different (p<0.001). For the controls immersed in water the hardness was before 60.8 (standard deviation: 7.2) and after 59.6 (8.2) respectively. The mean shear bond strength for the unbleached was 5.5MPa (1.6) and for the bleached samples was 3.3MPa (1.8) and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.002). Under these study conditions the Vickers hardness and bond strength to dentine was reduced by bleaching.

  3. The effect of bleaching agent on the flavor of liquid whey and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Croissant, A E; Kang, E J; Campbell, R E; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2009-12-01

    and BPO. These results indicate that the bleaching of liquid whey may affect the flavor of WPC and that the type of bleaching agent used may affect WPC flavor.

  4. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components.

  5. Vibrio shiloi sp. nov., the causative agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica.

    PubMed

    Kushmaro, A; Banin, E; Loya, Y; Stackebrandt, E; Rosenberg, E

    2001-07-01

    The aetiological agent of bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica was characterized as a new Vibrio species on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence, DNA-DNA hybridization data and phenotypic properties, including the cellular fatty acid profile. Based on its 16S rDNA and DNA-DNA hybridization, the new Vibrio species is closely related to Vibrio mediterranei. The name Vibrio shiloi sp. nov. is proposed for the new coral-bleaching species, the type strain being AK1T (= ATCC BAA-91T = DSM 13774T).

  6. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an in-office bleaching system and the effect of potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Palé, Maria; Mayoral, Juan R; Llopis, Jaume; Vallès, Marta; Basilio, Joan; Roig, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate by spectrophotometer the in vivo colour changes resulting from the application of an in-office tooth bleaching system containing 28% H2O2 by light-emitting diode (LED) activation and to determine whether the application of 5% potassium nitrate 30 min before bleaching decreased tooth sensitivity. Thirty-two individuals were assigned randomly to two groups (n = 16). Group A received 5% potassium nitrate as a desensitizing agent 30 min before bleaching with 28% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED. Group B received glycerin as a placebo and the same bleaching protocol was applied. The colour of the right central incisor of each patient was measured visually and by spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately thereafter, 15 days and 3 months later. Differences in L* a* b* values were tested with a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Differences in ΔΕ values were tested with ANOVA statistical analysis at a 0.05 level of significance. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were detected in L*, as well as in b* values, between initial (I) and post bleaching (PB) and between initial (I) and 3 months post-op. In contrast, there was no significant difference between PB and 3 months post-op. The a* values showed no statistically significant differences among the different time points. Tooth sensitivity decreased significantly when potassium nitrate was applied. In-office bleaching system gave quantitatively stable results over a 3-month period. Tooth sensitivity was reduced significantly, when a desensitizing agent was applied 30 min before treatment, but the efficacy of bleaching decreased.

  8. The effect of two remineralizing agents and natural saliva on bleached enamel hardness

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Haleh; Ganjkar, Maryam Hoorizad; Miri, Yasaman; Fard, Mohamad Javad Kharrazi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to compensate the adverse consequences of bleaching agents, the use of fluoride-containing remineralizing agents has been suggested by many researchers. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of applying two remineralizing materials on bleached enamel hardness and in comparison to natural saliva. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. Microhardness (MH) of all specimens was measured and 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied 3 times to the specimens. After completion of the bleaching process, MH of samples was measured and then enamel specimens were divided into three groups each of 10, specimens of groups 1 and 2 were subjected to daily application of hydroxyl apatite (Remin Pro) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) (MI Paste Plus) pastes, respectively, for 15 days. In group 3, the specimens were stored in the operators' natural saliva at room temperature in this period of time. Final MH of all groups was measured. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: The hardness significantly decreased in all groups following bleaching. Application of either Remin Pro, CPP-ACPF or natural saliva increased the hardness significantly. The hardness of the three test groups after 15 days were statistically similar to each other. Conclusion: The hardness of enamel increases eventually after exposure to either MI Paste Plus, Remin Pro or natural saliva. PMID:26962316

  9. Evaluation of dentin permeability after light activated internal dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Zanello Guerisoli, Danilo M; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Fröner, Izabel Cristina

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively the dentin permeability of human teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LEDs, halogen lamp or using the walking bleach technique. Forty human maxillary central incisors had standard access cavities performed and the cervical thirds of the canals were prepared with Gates-Glidden drills up to a size 130. Roots were resected between the coronal and middle thirds and the apical portions were discarded. A glass ionomer, 2 mm thick cervical plug was placed inside the canal, at the cement-enamel junction level. Group I received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by LEDs. Group II was submitted to 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by halogen lamp. Group III received 35% hydrogen peroxide gel and the walking bleach technique was followed. Group IV (control) received a dry cotton pellet inside the pulp chamber with temporary restoration. Dentinal permeability was quantified by copper ion penetration. Linear measurements were obtained by analysis of digital images under x 5 magnification. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I, 7.1% (+/-3.2%); II, 8.4% (+/-3.0%); III, 9.1% (+/-3.0%); IV, 1.3% (+/-2.8%). One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the results. Results showed an increase of permeability values for groups I, II and III when compared to group IV (control); however, no statistical differences were found between the three tested bleaching techniques. It can be concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED, halogen lamp or used following the walking bleach technique produced similar increase in dentinal permeability.

  10. Effect of internal bleaching agents on dentinal permeability of non-vital teeth: quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Laise Daniela; Fröner, Izabel Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess quantitatively dentin permeability of pulpless teeth after intracoronal bleaching therapy with three different agents. Twenty-four maxillary central incisors were randomly assigned to four groups according to the bleaching agent used: I--non-bleached control; II--37% carbamide peroxide; III--sodium perborate/20% hydrogen peroxide paste; IV--27% carbamide peroxide. After standard access and root-canal preparation the access opening, biomechanical preparation and root-canal filling, a cervical glass ionomer plug was prepared and intracoronal bleaching procedures were carried out in a standardized fashion. The access cavities were opened and the teeth were externally sealed and immersed in a 10% copper sulfate aqueous solution for 30 min, in vacuum for the first 5 min. Then, samples were removed, dried with absorbing paper and immersed in a 1% rubianic acid alcohol solution, for the same above-mentioned period in solution and in vacuum. Copper ion penetration was indicated by the rubianic acid staining. Mean values and SD for the experimental groups were: I--7.88% (+/-1.33), II--16.94% (+/-5.72); III--11.45% (+/-3.90) and IV--8.98% (+/-4.19). Data were submitted to one-way anova. The results showed that the 37% carbamide peroxide provided the highest increase in dentin permeability, followed by sodium perborate with 20% hydrogen peroxide. The 27% carbamide peroxide provided the lowest results and showed statistical similarity to the control group. On basis of these findings, it may be concluded that, among the tested intracoronal bleaching agents, 37% carbamide peroxide presented an optimized overall performance in increasing dentinal permeability.

  11. The effect of power bleaching actived by several light sources on enamel microhardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light sources for in-office bleaching on surface microhardness of human enamel. One hundred and five blocks of third molars were distributed among seven groups. The facial enamel surface of each block was polished and baseline Knoop microhardness of enamel was assessed with a load of 25 g for 5 s. Subsequently, the enamel was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent and photo-activated with halogen light (group A) during 38 s, LED (group B) during 360 s, and high intensity diode laser (group C) during 4 s. The groups D (38 s), E (360 s), and F (4 s) were treated with the bleaching agent without photo-activated. The control (group G) was only kept in saliva without any treatment. Microhardness was reassessed after 1 day of the bleaching treatment, and after 7 and 21 days storage in artificial saliva. The mean percentage and standard deviation of microhardness in Knoop Hardness Number were: A 97.8 ± 13.1 KHN; B 95.5 ± 12.7 KHN; C 84.2 ± 13.6 KHN; D 128.6 ± 20.5 KHN; E 133.9 ± 14.2 KHN; F 123.9 ± 14.2 KHN; G 129.8 ± 18.8 KHN. Statistical analysis ( p < 0.05; Tukey test) showed that microhardness percentage values were significantly lower in the groups irradiated with light when compared with the non-irradiated groups. Furthermore, the non-irradiated groups showed that saliva was able to enhance the microhardness during the measurement times. The enamel microhardness was decreased when light sources were used during the bleaching process and the artificial saliva was able to increase microhardness when no light was used.

  12. The walking bleach procedure: an in vitro study to measure microleakage of five temporary sealing agents.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Cox, C F; Arai, T; Nakamura, J

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro sealing capacity of five materials, each used as a temporary sealing agent for the walking bleach technique. All teeth received traditional biomechanical root canal instrumentation, after which the walking bleach agent was placed in the pulp chamber space. The occlusal access was sealed with one of five temporary materials: two hydraulic filling materials, a photoactivated resin composite, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement, and a zinc oxide phosphate cement with/without the placement of a piece of rubber sheet that was placed as a barrier to isolate filling material from the bleaching agent. All teeth were stored in a 1% solution of Alcian blue with thermal cycling stress. After 1 wk, they were sectioned longitudinally, and ranked by graded scores of 0 to 3, according to the degree of the dye penetration. Significantly less dye microleakage was observed in the two hydraulic materials than in the photoactivated resin. Both zinc oxide-eugenol and zinc phosphate cements showed a considerable amount of microleakage. There were no significant differences between the groups with and without a rubber sheet. Our data demonstrate that hydraulic filling materials provide the most favorable cavosurface seal when they are firmly packed into the cavity space to prevent microleakage.

  13. LED and low level laser therapy association in tooth bleaching using a novel low concentration H2O2/N-doped TiO2 bleaching agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra Dias, Hércules; Teixeira Carrera, Emanuelle; Freitas Bortolatto, Janaína; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo; Nara de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Since low concentration bleaching agents containing N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced as an alternative to conventional agents, it is important to verify their efficacy and the hypersensitivity effect in clinical practice. Six volunteer patients were evaluated for color change and hypersensitivity after bleaching using 35% H2O2 (one session of two 12 min applications) and 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 (one session of three 12 min applications) and after low level laser therapy application (LLLT) (780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J.cm-2, 10 s). Based on this case study, the nanobleaching agent provided better or similar aesthetic results than the conventional agent under high concentration, and its association with LLLT satisfactorily decreased the hypersensitivity. The 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 agent could be used instead of conventional in-office bleaching agents under high concentrations to fulfill the rising patient demand for aesthetics.

  14. The effect of carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila P; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Salazar-Marocho, Susana M; Azevedo, Sarina M B; Vasquez, Vanessa Z C; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface microhardness of micro-particulate feldspathic ceramics (VM7 and VM13, Vita Zahnfabrik). Forty specimens (8-mm diameter, 2-mm thickness) were divided into four groups (n=10): GI-VM7 + 10% Whiteness, G2-VM7 + 16% Whiteness, G3-VM13 + 10% and G4-VM13 + 16% Whiteness. The home-use bleaching agents were applied for 8 hours on 15 days, and the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The Vickers hardness number (HV) was determined for each specimen. Data were analyzed by the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05). The microhardness values before exposure were: g1-433 (57); g2-486 (22); g3-509 (28); g4-518 (24), and after exposure: G1-349 (32); G2-496 (95); G3-519 (38); G4-502 (81). G2 exhibited a higher and significant difference than GI in VM7 groups, and the effect of bleaching concentration was shown to be significant by the Mann-Whitney test. And for VM13, both the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests showed no significant differences. When using 10% carbamide peroxide, the microhardness of VM7 ceramic was affected, and there were no effect on the microhardness between VM7 and VM13 ceramics when 16% carbamide peroxide was used.

  15. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  16. Agent neutralization study. II: Detoxification of HD with aqueous bleach. Final report, May-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.B.; Beaudry, W.T.; Rohrbaugh, D.K.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Butrow, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A series of neutralization studies was conducted by reacting varying amounts of HD with aqueous hydrochlorite (OCL-) solution to evaluate the use of bleach as an alternate means of destroying stockpiles of HD. A small vacuum jacketed glass reactor was used to react CASARM grade HD and one ton container HD sample. One mid-scale reaction with ton container HD was also conducted. Exotherms were observed in each reaction, and the heat of reaction was estimated. Analyses of selected products by NMR and GC/MS are reported. Sodium hydroxide as a stabilizer for the bleach was studied. Reaction products were titrated for active chlorine. Thiodiglycol was reacted with OCL- for comparison. The stability versus time for bleach solutions at 75 C is reported. A large variety of compounds are formed during the oxidation of HD, which proceeds by a complex and inexact stoichiometry. At least 5 moles of OCL- are required to destroy all of the HD, and significant heat is produced during the reaction. however, the reaction is more controlled and more efficient when caustic is used as a bleach stabilizer. Ton container HD required more OCL- due to the oxidation of the extra sulfides.

  17. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  18. Penetration of the pulp chamber by bleaching agents in teeth restored with various restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Gökay, O; Yilmaz, F; Akin, S; Tunçbìlek, M; Ertan, R

    2000-02-01

    It is thought that externally applied bleaching agents may penetrate into the pulp chamber. This study was conducted to evaluate the diffusion of peroxide bleaching agents into the pulp chamber of teeth restored with various restorative materials. Sixty-five human extracted anterior maxillary teeth were separated into the 13 groups containing 5 teeth. Five teeth (control group) were not subjected to any cavity preparation and restoration. Standardized class V cavities were prepared in the other 60 teeth and restored using composite resin (Charisma), polyacid modified composite resin (Dyract), or resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). All teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction to remove the intracoronal pulp tissue, and the pulp chamber was filled with acetate buffer to absorb and stabilize any peroxide that might penetrate. Vestibular crown surfaces of teeth in the experimental groups were subjected to four different bleaching agents for 30 min at 37 degrees C, whereas the teeth in the control groups were exposed only to distilled water. Then the acetate buffer solution in the pulp chamber of each tooth was removed, and the pulp chamber of each tooth was rinsed with 100 ml of distilled water twice. Leukocrystal violet and enzyme horseradish peroxidase were added to the mixture of the acetate buffer and rinse water. The optical density of the resulting blue solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations resulted in a higher pulpal peroxide penetration. The highest pulpal peroxide penetration was found in resin-modified glass ionomer cement groups, whereas composite resin groups showed the lowest pulpal peroxide penetration.

  19. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  20. Assessment of the release of mercury from silver amalgam alloys exposed to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Paloma; Bueno, Renata Pla Rizzolo; Trinidade, Rodrigo Farcili; Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Tezezinha

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the amount of mercury (Hg) released from a silver amalgam alloy following the application of different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents. A total of 30 specimens (2 mm thick x 4 mm in diameter) were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Next, the control group (n = 10) remained in the deionized water for 15 days, while the remaining samples were exposed to 1 of 2 bleaching agents (n = 10) for 8 hours daily (total exposure = 120 hours); for the remaining 16 hours, specimens in the test groups were stored in deionized water at 37°C under relative humidity. After this period, the quantity of Hg in the deionized water was assessed (using atomic absorption spectrophotometry) and compared to the amount of Hg at baseline. The results indicate that exposing amalgam alloys to bleaching agents released greater amounts of Hg compared to exposing samples to deionized [corrected] water.

  1. Effects of three different bleaching agents on microhardness and roughness of composite sample surfaces finished with different polishing techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yikilgan, İhsan; Akgul, Sinem; Ozcan, Suat; Bala, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of different polishing methods and whitening agents on surface hardness and roughness of nano-hybrid composite resin. Material and Methods In total, one hundred twenty disc-shaped specimens were prepared to nano-hybrid composite (Charisma Diamond). 60 samples were used for microhardness measurements and the others were used for the evaluation of surface roughness. Samples were divided randomly into two subgroups (n = 30 each). In first group a low-viscosity liquid polishing agent (Biscover LV) was applied. In the second group, nothing was applied. All the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. After initial measurements were completed, samples were divided randomly into three subgroups for bleaching application. 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF), 45% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF Quick), 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost) was applied. Then microhardness and surface roughness measurements of samples were repeated and data were recorded as final values for each sample. Results When the polishing techniques were compared, no signicant difference was observed in surface hardness and roughness. When the bleaching agents were compared, the 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agent groups showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-procedure hardness values (p<0.05). Conclusions Office-type bleaching agent containing CP was observed to be more secure for composite resins than other bleaching agents. No negative effect of glaze materials on the protection of surface roughness and hardness of composite resin was observed. Key words:Composite resin, bleaching, surface hardness, surface roughness. PMID:28298992

  2. Effect of a Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites, Using Short Rod Design

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R.; Fani, M.; Barfi Ghasrodashti, AR.; Nouri Yadkouri, N.; Mousavi, SM.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. Purpose: To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Materials and Method: Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M 0.5) was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (p< 0.05).Tukey’s test showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent. PMID:24883344

  3. Bleaching non vital primary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Roth, Faynna; Guedes, Carolina Cardoso; Fernandes, Kristiane Porta; Domingues, Manoela Martins; Wanderley, Márcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Trauma and pulpal infections in primary dentition are part of the routine of the pediatric dentist. Common consequences in these cases are alterations in dental color, compromising patient's esthetics and his interaction in social environment. Bleaching intends to preserve dental structure already weakened and to show immediate esthetic results. This clinical case shows a bleaching technique in devitalized primary teeth using bleaching agent with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by photo polymerizer. This technique is simple and shows immediate satisfactory results.

  4. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

  5. Carbamide peroxide bleaching agents: effects on surface roughness of enamel, composite and porcelain.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Marimon, J L M; Schneider, L F J; Correr Sobrinho, L; Camacho, G B; Bueno, M

    2006-03-01

    This study examined the effect of 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on the surface roughness of enamel, feldspathic porcelain, and microfilled and microhybrid composite resins. Standardized cylindrical specimens were prepared for restorative materials. Enamel samples were obtained from buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. Samples from each substrate were divided in three subgroups (n=10), according to surface treatment: distilled water (control), and 10 and 35% carbamide peroxide. The 10% agent was applied 3 h daily and the 35% agent was applied for 30 min/week, at 37 degrees C, during 21 days. Control samples remained stored in distilled water, at 37 degrees C. Roughness measurements (Ra, microm) were made at 24 h and repeated after 7, 14 and 21 days of exposure. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (split-plot design) and Tukey's test (5% significance level). Samples from control groups showed no significant alteration during all test periods, while for exposure to 10% agent, only the porcelain presented a rougher surface after 21 days (p<0.05). For the 35% product, roughness means significantly increased during the first and second weeks for enamel (p<0.05), and after 21 days for porcelain (p<0.05) and for the microhybrid composite (p<0.05). Microfilled samples showed no significant alteration throughout the 21-day period, regardless of the surface treatment.

  6. The effect of cold-light-activated bleaching treatment on enamel surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin-Chang; Ma, He; Zhou, Jing-Lin; Li, Wei

    2012-12-01

    This in vitro study aims to evaluate the crystal and surface microstructure of dental enamel after cold-light bleaching treatment. Twelve sound human premolars were cross-split into four specimens, namely, mesio-buccal (Group LP), disto-buccal (Group P), mesio-lingual (Group NP) and disto-lingual (Group L) specimens. These four groups were treated using the standard cold-light bleaching procedure, a bleaching agent, a peroxide-free bleaching agent and cold-light, respectively. Before and after treatment, all specimens were analyzed by high-resolution, micro-area X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using a spectrometer, tooth color of all specimens was measured before and after treatment. The phase of the enamel crystals was identified as hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite. After treatment, specimens in Groups LP and P showed significantly weaker X-ray diffraction peaks, significant reduction in crystal size and crystallinity, significant increase in L* but decrease in a* and b*, and obvious alterations in the surface morphology. However, specimens in Groups NP and L did not show any significant changes. The cold-light bleaching treatment leads to demineralization in the enamel surface. The acidic peroxide-containing bleaching agent was the major cause of demineralization, whereas cold-light did not exhibit significant increase or decrease effect on this demineralization.

  7. Effect of light activation on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Kossatz, S; Dalanhol, A P; Cunha, T; Loguercio, A; Reis, A

    2011-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED)/laser activation on bleaching effectiveness (BE) and tooth sensitivity (TS) during in-office bleaching. Thirty caries-free patients were divided into two groups: light-activated (LA) and non-activated (NA) groups. A 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville SC, Brazil) was used in three 15-minute applications for both groups. For the LA group, LED/laser energy (Whitening Lase Light Plus, DMC Odontológica, São Carlos SP, Brazil) was used, in accordance with the manufacturer's directions. Two sessions of bleaching were performed at one-week intervals. Color was registered at baseline and after the first and second bleaching sessions using a Vita shade guide. Patients recorded TS on a 0 to 4 scale during bleaching and within the next 24 and 48 hours of each session. BE at recall each week and intensity of TS were evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Tooth sensitivity was compared using the Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and the Wilcoxon sign-ranked test. Faster bleaching was observed for the LA group than for the NA group after the first session (4.8 and 3.8 shade guide units [SGUs]; p=0.0001). However, both techniques were capable of bleaching the same number of SGUs after the second bleaching session (p=0.52). Most of the LA group (53.3%) had sensitivity even 24 hours after each bleaching session, but only 26.6% from the NA group reported TS. The intensity of TS was similar for both groups immediately after bleaching but significantly higher for the LA group 24 hours after each bleaching session (p=0.001). After two bleaching sessions, the use of LED/laser light activation did not improve bleaching speed. Persistent tooth sensitivity and higher tooth sensitivity after 24 hours of bleaching were observed when light activation was used.

  8. A critical reinvestigation of the TAED-activated peroxide system for low-temperature bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Long, Xiaoxia; Du, Jinmei; Fu, Shaohai

    2013-01-30

    There exists a misunderstanding on the TAED-activated peroxide system in the textile industry that H(2)O(2) used in excess of the stoichiometric amount could produce an addition effect on bleaching of cotton under alkaline conditions. In this study, a critical reinvestigation was carried out on the TAED-activated peroxide system for bleaching of cotton. It was found that the TAED-activated peroxide system achieved its best performance under near-neutral pH conditions. No addition effect was observed when an excessive amount of H(2)O(2) was used under alkaline conditions, which is probably due to the base-catalyzed bimolecular decomposition of peracetic acid and the nucleophilic attack by H(2)O(2) on peracetic acid. NaHCO(3) was shown to be a desired alkaline agent for maintaining near-neutral pH for the TAED-activated peroxide system. This study provides new insight into the application of the TAED-activated peroxide system for low-temperature bleaching of cotton under more environmentally benign conditions.

  9. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  10. Efficacy of desensitizing agents on postoperative sensitivity following an in-office vital tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundasetty, Jyothi Kashi; Ashrafulla, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess and compare the incidence and intensity of experienced after an in-office vital tooth bleaching in case of dental fluorosis using two different types of desensitizing agents, at different time periods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine subjects with mild-to-moderate fluorosis were randomly divided into three groups of 23 each. Group I — control group (placebo), group II—potassium nitrate 5% and sodium monofluorophosphate 0.7% (Sensodent KF), and group III—Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) (Tooth Mousse). In-office vital tooth bleaching was done using 35% hydrogen peroxide liquid (Pola office) in two sessions. Desensitizing agent was applied for 10 min after each session. Postoperative sensitivity was recorded after 24 h and 7 days. The statistical analysis was done using chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and post hoc Tukey's test. Results: The experimental groups showed significantly less incidence and intensity of sensitivity compared to control group, whereas there was no difference between them. Conclusion: The desensitizing agents used in the study show effective reduction after an in-office vital tooth bleaching. PMID:27217631

  11. The effect of home-use and in-office bleaching treatments combined with experimental desensitizing agents on enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Pintado-Palomino, Karen; Tirapelli, Camila

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate in vitro the effect of formulations containing Biosilicate to treat enamel and dentin bovine samples exposed to dental bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: On enamel and dentin bleached with commercial gels containing 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) (14 days/4 h) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (single session/45 min), desensitizing dentifrices (Sensodyne®; experimental dentifrice of Biosilicate®; Odontis RX®; Sorriso®) were applied along 14 days and desensitizing pastes (Biosilicate®/water 1:1; Dessensebilize NanoP®; Bioglass type 45S5/water 1:1) were applied on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14. Distilled water was the control. Microhardness (MH) and roughness measurements were the variables measured on the samples before and after the treatments. Student's t-test analyzed differences before and after the treatments. Two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey test analyzed differences among the factors desensitizing, bleaching agents and substrate. Results: Tukey test showed no differences in roughness for both bleaching treatments and among the desensitizing agents (P > 0.05). Differences in MH appeared on enamel treated with in-home bleaching when control group (lower values) was compared with Sensodyne, Biosilicate dentifrice, Biosilicate paste, and Bioglass paste (higher values). Comparisons between desensitizing agents on dentin treated with both bleaching gels showed no statistical differences. Conclusions: The effect of formulations containing Biosilicate (Biosilicate dentifrice and paste) was significant in the MH of enamel bleached with 16% CP. PMID:25713487

  12. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  13. The effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the phosphate concentration of tooth enamel assessed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santini, Ario; Pulham, Colin R; Rajab, Ahmed; Ibbetson, Richard

    2008-04-01

    The study assessed changes in phosphate concentrations of surface enamel treated with a proprietary bleaching agent ('PEROXIDE') containing 10% carbamide peroxide over a 28-day period using Raman spectroscopy. Six non-carious human molar teeth (age range 12-21 years), extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used. From the enamel face of each half tooth, a near flat enamel section, approximately 2 x 2 mm, was cut, providing 12 specimens. Each specimen was treated with 10% carbamide peroxide for 8 h day(-1) for 28 consecutive days, with Raman spectra being obtained prior to bleaching and after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Raman spectra were acquired on a confocal LabRam 300 spectrometer fitted with an Olympus B microscope (Olympus, Middlesex, UK). The difference in the maximum peak values for phosphate group concentrations were tested using the Friedman test (non-parametric anova) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. An intense broad band at 980 cm(-1), characteristic of phosphate groupings, was always observed. At 7 and 14 days, and again at 28 days, there was a significant decrease in the phosphate group concentration compared with base-line measurements (P < 0.05) but not at 21 days (P > 0.05). Ideally, bleaching should not be continued to a point where surface enamel is lost, and the present study suggests that a regime using 10% carbamide peroxide should not extend to 7 days.

  14. Effect of bleaching agent and topical fluoride application on color and gloss of dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Vicente, Sergio Augusto de Freitas; Tonani, Rafaella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride application and their association with a change in color (ΔE*) and brightness of dental ceramic submitted to different finishing procedures. A total of 120 test specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 40) according to the type of finishing: glazing; polishing; or polishing and glazing. Initial color and brightness readouts were taken, and the finished specimens were divided into groups (n = 10) according to the treatment to which they were submitted: fluoride; bleaching; bleaching and fluoride; or control. After this, final color and brightness readouts were taken. The type of polishing had no influence on ΔE* or brightness (P > 0.05). Regardless of which solution was used, a decrease in brightness occurred only for the group treated with bleach and fluoride (P < 0.05). The results showed the use of fluoride after bleaching may interfere with the esthetics of a restoration.

  15. Two-state model of light induced activation and thermal bleaching of photochromic glasses: theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Jose A.; Perciante, Cesar D

    2008-07-10

    The behavior of photochromic glasses during activation and bleaching is investigated. A two-state phenomenological model describing light-induced activation (darkening) and thermal bleaching is presented. The proposed model is based on first-order kinetics. We demonstrate that the time behavior in the activation process (acting simultaneously with the thermal fading) can be characterized by two relaxation times that depend on the intensity of the activating light. These characteristic times are lower than the decay times of the pure thermal bleaching process. We study the temporal evolution of the glass optical density and its dependence on the activating intensity. We also present a series of activation and bleaching experiments that validate the proposed model. Our approach may be used to gain more insight into the transmittance behavior of photosensitive glasses, which could be potentially relevant in a broad range of applications, e.g., real-time holography and reconfigurable optical memories.

  16. Establishment of an activated peroxide system for low-temperature cotton bleaching using N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Hinks, David; Sun, Chang; Wei, Qufu

    2015-03-30

    Cotton bleaching is traditionally carried out in strongly alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at temperatures close to the boil. Such harsh processing conditions can result in extensive water and energy consumptions as well as severe chemical damage to textiles. In this study, an activated peroxide system was established for low-temperature cotton bleaching by incorporating a bleach activator, namely N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride (TBBC) into an aqueous H2O2 solution. Experimental results showed that the TBBC-activated peroxide system exhibited the most effective bleaching performance in a pH range of 6-8 which could be approximated by adding sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system led to rapid bleaching of cotton at a temperature as low as 50°C. In comparison with the hot alkaline peroxide bleaching system, the TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system provided cotton fabric with an equivalent degree of whiteness, higher degree of polymerization, and slightly lower water absorbency. The new activated peroxide system may provide a more environmentally benign approach to cotton bleaching.

  17. Efficacy of Home-use Bleaching Agents Delivered in Customized or Prefilled Disposable Trays: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carlos, N R; Bridi, E C; Amaral, Flb; França, Fmg; Turssi, C P; Basting, R T

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bleaching methods containing hydrogen peroxide (HP) or carbamide peroxide (CP), dispensed in customized or prefilled trays, in terms of color change, tooth sensitivity, gingival irritation, acceptance, and comfort. Seventy-five volunteers were randomly selected and distributed according to the whitening agent (n=25): 10% HP dispensed in prefilled trays (Opalescence Go 10%) and 9.5% HP (Pola Day) and 10% CP both delivered in customized trays (Opalescence PF 10%). HP was applied for 30 min/d for 14 days (d), and CP for 8 h/d for 14 days. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at 7 days and 14 days of treatment. Color change was measured with Commission internationale de l'éclairage color coordinates (L*, a*, b*), Vita Classical, and 3D Master scales. A visual analog scale was used to assess tooth sensitivity, acceptance of the method and degree of comfort of the tray. Gingival irritation was evaluated as present or absent and localized or generalized. Regarding gingival irritation, tray acceptance, and tooth sensitivity, no differences were observed among the groups at any time (p>0.05). As for degree of comfort, 10% HP showed lower scores (comfortable) than 10% CP, with significant differences (p<0.05) from the other groups (comfortable to very comfortable). In terms of ΔL, Δa, and ΔE, no difference was observed among the groups or between the time periods (p>0.05). The Δb average was higher at 14 days (p<0.05), and there was no difference among the groups (p>0.05). Localized gingival irritation was observed in both tray methods. Mild tooth sensitivity was observed with time, regardless of the bleaching agent concentration or the application time. Color change was similar for all the groups at 7 days and 14 days, but there was a greater reduction in the yellow hue at 14 days. All the bleaching methods were highly accepted and effective in promoting whitening. Although prefilled trays are generally comfortable, they

  18. Oxidative degradation of chemical warfare agents in water by bleaching powder.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lihong; Zuo, Guomin; Cheng, Zhenxing; Zhu, Haiyan; Li, Shanmao

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of sulfur mustard (HD), S-2-(di-isopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) and Soman (GD) in water by bleaching powder was investigated. The degradation products were comprehensively analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and ion chromatography. Degradation pathways were deduced based on the identified products. The product analysis results indicated that HD could be degraded through oxidation and chlorination reactions, and a small portion of sulfur atoms could be mineralized into SO(4)(2-) ion. Oxidative degradation of VX could finally generate O-ethyl methylphosphonate acid (EMPA), sulfonic acids, SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions. GD would be converted into non-toxic pinacolyl methylphosphonate via nucleophilic substitution.

  19. Effects of bleach activator, sodium alkyl acyloxybenzene sulfonate, on house dust mites (Dermatophagoides farinae).

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Kamezaki, Hiroki; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Takaoka, Hiromitsu; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    House dust mites (Dermatophagoides farinae) in bedding and clothes are a major allergen. However, house dust mites cannot be killed by general washing conditions under 50 degrees C. Therefore, low-temperature washing conditions must be improved to eliminate house dust mites. Sodium alkyl acyloxybenzene sulfonate (OBS) is a bleach activator that is used to intensify the bleaching effects of some laundry products. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of OBS on the elimination of house dust mites in low-temperature washing conditions. D. farinae was soaked in solutions containing different types of OBS for various durations and at various temperatures. The miticidal effects of the various washing conditions were also evaluated for D. farinae. Then sodium lauroyloxybenzene sulfonate (OBS-12) produced the highest D. farinae mortality rate among the OBS solutions that were examined and had a stronger miticidal effect than available chlorine under general washing conditions. OBS exhibited miticidal effects under general washing conditions at low temperatures. Since OBS is already used as an additive in some laundry products to increase the bleaching activity, OBS can be easily used to kill house dust mites under general washing conditions.

  20. Effects of light sources and visible light-activated titanium dioxide photocatalyst on bleaching.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; Otsuki, Masayuki; Ogisu, Shinichiro; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Tagami, Junji; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurata, Hiroshi; Cho, Takahiro

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, using methylene blue (MB), the effects of various light sources on the bleaching action of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with two titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalysts - an ultraviolet light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (UVTiO(2)) versus a visible light-activated TiO(2) photocatalyst (VL-TiO(2)). Five experimental solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), H(2)O(2), VL-TiO(2), UV-TiO(2)) were prepared by mixing varying concentrations of H(2)O(2 )and/or TiO(2 )photocatalyst with MB solution. For H(2)O(2)-containing solutions (VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), UV-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2), and H(2)O(2)), the concentration of H(2)O(2) was adjusted to 3.5%. For the four different light sources, low- and high-intensity halogen lamps and blue LED LCUs were used. All the experimental solutions were irradiated by each of the light sources for 7 minutes, and the absorbance at 660 nm was measured every 30 seconds to determine the concentration of MB as an indicator of the bleaching effect. On the interaction between the effects of light source and bleaching treatment, the high-intensity halogen with VL-TiO(2)+H(2)O(2) caused the most significant reduction in MB concentration. On the effect of light sources, the halogen lamps resulted in a greater bleaching effect than the blue LED LCUs.

  1. [Conservative treatment improved corrosive esophagitis and pneumomediastinum in a patient who ingested bleaching agent containing sodium hypochlorite and sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Iseki, Ken; Ozawa, Akiko; Tominaga, Aya; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Otani, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department 3 hours after ingestion of a bleaching agent containing hypochlorous acid and sodium hydroxide in a suicide attempt. Enhanced chest computed tomography scans taken on admission indicated an edematous esophagus and air bubbles in the mediastinum. He underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation until day 9 because of laryngeal edema. On day 10, his endoscopy indicated diffuse reddish mucosal hyperemia, erosions, and lacerated mucosal lesions in the esophagus that were indicative of grade 2b corrosive esophagitis. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor was initiated, with which the condition of the esophagus improved, and on day 44, a slight stricture of the upper part of the esophagus was observed. He was discharged on day 64 without any complaints. The ingestion of sodium hypochlorite induces corrosive esophagitis and acute phase of gastritis. Ingestion of any corrosive agent is known as a risk factor for esophagus cancer in the long-term. In such cases with esophageal stricture, esophagectomy is recommended for preventing esophagus cancer. Considering the age of the patient, however, he did not undergo esophagectomy.

  2. Clinical comparative study of the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide home-use and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching materials containing desensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; França, F M G; Flório, F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide (CP) home-use bleaching agents and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) in-office bleaching agents, all of which contain desensitizing agents, in a clinical trial. Four agents were evaluated: 10% CP and 20% CP (Opalescence PF 10% and Opalescence PF 20%, Ultradent, both with 0.5% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride ions), 38% HP (Opalescence Boost PF, Ultradent, with 3% potassium nitrate and 1.1% fluoride ions), and 35% HP (Pola Office, SDI, with potassium nitrate). The initial screening procedure included 100 volunteers, aged 18 to 42, with no previous sensitivity or bleaching treatment and with any tooth shade. Volunteers were randomly assigned among the technique/bleaching agent groups. A run-in period was performed 1 week before the beginning of the bleaching treatment. For the home-use bleaching technique, each volunteer was instructed to dispense gel (10% CP or 20% CP) into the trays and then insert them into his or her mouth for at least two hours per night for three weeks. For the in-office bleaching technique, the bleaching agents (38% HP or 35% HP) were prepared and used following the manufacturer's instructions, with three applications performed in each session. Three sessions were carried out with an interval of seven days between each session. The participants were evaluated before, at one week, two weeks, and three weeks after the beginning of the bleaching treatment, and again one and two weeks after the bleaching treatment ended. A shade guide (Vita Classical, Vita) was used by a blinded examiner to perform shade evaluations before bleaching and two weeks after the end of bleaching. At the time of the shade evaluations, tooth sensitivity was also recorded by asking the volunteers to classify the sensitivity during bleaching treatment as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. The present study found that 13.8% of the volunteers withdrew from

  3. Beta-ionone activates and bleaches visual pigment in salamander photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Tomoki; McCabe England, S L; Crouch, R K; Zimmerman, A L; Makino, C L

    2009-01-01

    Vision begins with photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal to the all-trans conformation within the chromophore-binding pocket of opsin, leading to activation of a biochemical cascade. Release of all-trans retinal from the binding pocket curtails but does not fully quench the ability of opsin to activate transducin. All-trans retinal and some other analogs, such as beta-ionone, enhance opsin's activity, presumably on binding the empty chromophore-binding pocket. By recording from isolated salamander photoreceptors and from patches of rod outer segment membrane, we now show that high concentrations of beta-ionone suppressed circulating current in dark-adapted green-sensitive rods by inhibiting the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. There were also decreases in circulating current and flash sensitivity, and accelerated flash response kinetics in dark-adapted blue-sensitive (BS) rods and cones, and in ultraviolet-sensitive cones, at concentrations too low to inhibit the channels. These effects persisted in BS rods even after incubation with 9-cis retinal to ensure complete regeneration of their visual pigment. After long exposures to high concentrations of beta-ionone, recovery was incomplete unless 9-cis retinal was given, indicating that visual pigment had been bleached. Therefore, we propose that beta-ionone activates and bleaches some types of visual pigments, mimicking the effects of light.

  4. Adsorption of paraquat on the physically activated bleaching earth waste from soybean oil processing plant.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chen, C H; Yang, J M

    2002-09-01

    A series of regeneration experiments with physical activation were carried out on bleaching earth waste from the soybean refining process in a rotary reactor. The influence of activation parameters on the spent clay by varying the holding time of 1 to approximately 4 hours and temperature of 700 to approximately 900 degrees C was determined. The variations of pore properties as well as the change of chemical characteristics in the resulting solids were also studied. Results showed that the resulting samples were type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous characteristics. However, the regenerated clays had smaller surface areas (70 to approximately 117 m2/g) than that (245 m2/g) of fresh bleaching earth. Under the physical activation conditions investigated, the holding time of 1 hour and temperature of 700 degrees C were found to be optimal conditions for producing mesoporous clay with physical activation. The adsorption of paraquat on regenerated sample was also evaluated. The isotherm showed that the regenerated sample still had a high affinity for this herbicide. Thus, the regeneration of this agro-industrial waste is one option for utilizing the clay resource, and it may be used for water treatment applications to remove organic contaminants.

  5. Comparison of the effects of two bleaching agents on the recording of phase holograms in silver halide emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2006-11-01

    Optical densities before bleaching and final Lin-curves of plane-wave phase holograms recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD emulsions were determined for combinations of the AAC developer with a solvent bleach (R-9) and a (fixation-free) rehalogenating bleach (R-10). To characterize the processing, the square root of the diffraction efficiency of the processed holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. Sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could thereby be compared directly.

  6. Virucidal effects of bleach activators, sodium alkyl acyloxybenzene sulfonate and acyloxybenzoic acid, against Feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Hoshi, Marika; Iizuka, Kinue; Tadenuma, Hirohiko; Takaoka, Hiromitsu; Komoriya, Tomoe; Kohno, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) are major causative pathogens of gastroenteritis. The disinfection of contaminated clothing during common household washing is desirable. The virucidal effects of 2 bleach activators, sodium alkyl acyloxybenzene sulfonate (OBS) and alkyl acyloxybenzoic acid (OBC), were studied using Feline calicivirus (FCV) as a surrogate for NVs. FCV was added to solutions containing either OBS or OBC and sodium percarbonate at various temperatures and for varying lengths of time. OBS and OBC, which generate long carbon chain peroxy acids, enhanced the virucidal effect of sodium percarbonate (PC). In particular, sodium lauroyloxybenzene sulfonate (OBS-12) and decanoyloxybenzoic acid (OBC-10) showed superior virucidal effects. Although the virucidal effect of 38-200 mg/L OBS-12 was maintained with 2-5% (v/v) horse serum, there was less of an effect with the same concentration of available chlorine. OBS and OBC have been used as ingredients in some laundry products to increase bleaching activity. It is expected that the use of OBS and OBC is also effective for the inactivation of NVs under common household washing conditions.

  7. Differential coral bleaching-Contrasting the activity and response of enzymatic antioxidants in symbiotic partners under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Thomas; Hawkins, Thomas D; Becker, Susanne; Pontasch, Stefanie; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Leggat, William; Fisher, Paul L; Davy, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching due to thermal stress represents a major threat to the integrity and functioning of coral reefs. Thermal thresholds vary, however, between corals, partly as a result of the specific type of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium sp.) they harbour. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in corals under thermal and light stress has been recognised as one mechanism that can lead to cellular damage and the loss of their symbiont population (Oxidative Theory of Coral Bleaching). Here, we compared the response of symbiont and host enzymatic antioxidants in the coral species Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata at 28°C and 33°C. A. millepora at 33°C showed a decrease in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and increase in maximum midday excitation pressure on PSII, with subsequent bleaching (declining photosynthetic pigment and symbiont density). M. digitata exhibited no bleaching response and photochemical changes in its symbionts were minor. The symbiont antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase peroxidase showed no significant upregulation to elevated temperatures in either coral, while only catalase was significantly elevated in both coral hosts at 33°C. Increased host catalase activity in the susceptible coral after 5days at 33°C was independent of antioxidant responses in the symbiont and preceded significant declines in PSII photochemical efficiencies. This finding suggests a potential decoupling of host redox mechanisms from symbiont photophysiology and raises questions about the importance of symbiont-derived ROS in initiating coral bleaching.

  8. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED's for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  9. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  10. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  11. Adsorption of acid dyes from aqueous solution on activated bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chang, C Y; Ing, C H; Chang, C F

    2004-07-01

    In the present study, activated bleaching earth was used as clay adsorbent for an investigation of the adsorbability and adsorption kinetics of acid dyes (i.e., acid orange 51, acid blue 9, and acid orange 10) with three different molecular sizes from aqueous solution at 25 degrees C in a batch adsorber. The rate of adsorption has been investigated under the most important process parameters (i.e., initial dye concentration). A simple pseudo-second-order model has been tested to predict the adsorption rate constant, equilibrium adsorbate concentration, and equilibrium adsorption capacity by the fittings of the experimental data. The results showed that the adsorbability of the acid acids by activated bleaching earth follows the order: acid orange 51 > acid blue 9 > acid orange 10, parallel to the molecular weights and molecular sizes of the acid dyes. The adsorption removals (below 3%) of acid blue 9 and acid orange 10 onto the clay adsorbent are far lower than that (approximately 24%) of acid orange 51. Further, the adsorption kinetic of acid orange 51 can be well described by the pseudo-second-order reaction model. Based on the isotherm data obtained from the fittings of the adsorption kinetics, the Langmuir model appears to fit the adsorption better than the Freundlich model. The external coefficients of mass transfer of the acid orange 51 molecule across the boundary layer of adsorbent particle have also been estimated at the order of 10(-4)-10(-5) cm s(-1) based on the film-pore model and pseudo-second-order reaction model.

  12. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p < 0.05. The temperature increase (mean value and standard deviation) inside the pulp chamber for the HL group was 6.8 ± 2.8°C; for the DL group was 15.3 ± 8.8°C; and for the LED group was 1.9 ± 1.0°C for. The temperature variation (mean value and standard deviation) on the tooth surface, for the group irradiated with HL was 9.1 ± 2.2°C; for the group irradiated with DL were 25.7 ± 18.9°C; and for the group irradiated with LED were 2.6 ± 1.4°C. The mean temperature increase values were significantly higher for the group irradiated with DL when compared with groups irradiated with HL and LED ( p < 0.05). When applying the inferior limits of the interval of confidence of 95%, an application time of 38.7 s was found for HL group, and 4.4 s for DL group. The LED group did not achieve the critical temperatures for pulp or the periodontal, even when irradiated for 360 s. The HL and DL light sources may be used for dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  13. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  14. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  15. Bleaching in coral reef anthozoans: effects of irradiance, ultraviolet radiation, and temperature on the activities of protective enzymes against active oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, M. P.; Stochaj, W. R.; Tapley, D. W.; Shick, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    Recent widespread bleaching of coral reef anthozoans has been observed on the Great Barrier Reef, the Pacific coast of Panama, and in the Caribbean Sea. Bleaching events have been correlated with anomalously high sea surface temperatures which are presumed to cause the expulsion of zooxanthellae from their hosts. Our experimental results show that increases in temperature significantly reduce the total number of zooxanthellae per polyp. At the same time temperature, irradiance (photosynthetically active radiation=PAR), and ultraviolet radiation (UV) independently increase the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase within the zooxanthellae of the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum. Enzyme activities within the host are only suggestive of similar changes. These enzymes are responsible for detoxifying active forms of oxygen, and their elevated activities indirectly indicate an increase in the production of active oxygen species by increases in these environmental factors. Historically, bleaching has been attributed to changes in temperature, salinity, and UV. Increases in temperature or highly energetic UV radiation can increase the flux of active forms of oxygen, particularly at the elevated oxygen concentrations that prevail in the tissues during photosynthesis, with oxygen toxicity potentially mediating the bleaching event. Additionally, the concentration of UV absorbing compounds within the symbiosis is inversely related to temperature, potentially increasing exposure of the host and zooxanthellae to the direct effects of UV.

  16. Analysis of grating profiles of phase holograms recorded in silver halide emulsions and processed with combinations of various developers and bleaching agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2004-09-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). The phase gratings were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100 X) objective. The phase contrast photomicrographs were Fourier-analyzed. Thus first- second- and third-order modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. The ratio of the amplitudes of the higher-order modulations to that of the first-order one can serve as a measure of the nonlinearity of the holographic recording.

  17. Activity of bleach, ethanol and two commercial disinfectants against spores of Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Carly N; Dicristina, Jennifer A; Lindsay, David S

    2006-03-31

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a small protist parasite in the phylum Microspora. Hosts are infected by ingestion or inhalation of spores passed in the urine or feces. Infection with E. cuniculi is usually asymptomatic, except in young or immunocompromised hosts. This study examined the effects of various disinfectants on in vitro infectivity of E. cuniculi spores. Spores of E. cuniculi were exposed to several dilutions of commercial bleach, 70% ethanol and dilutions of commercial disinfectants HiTor and Roccal for 10 min and then loaded onto human fibroblast cells (Hs68 cells). Ten minutes of exposure to these disinfectants was lethal to E. cuniculi spores. Additional exposure time studies were done using dilutions of bleach at 0.1, 1 and 10%, and 70% ethanol. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 1 or 10% bleach for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Growth of E. cuniculi was observed in Hs68 cells inoculated with spores treated with 0.1% bleach for 30s or 1, 3 and 5 min, but not with spores treated for 7 min or longer. Exposure of E. cuniculi spores to 70% ethanol for 30s rendered them non-infectious for Hs68 cells. Spores of E. cuniculi are more sensitive to disinfectants than are coccidial oocysts and other parasite cysts. The relatively short contact time needed to kill spores indicates that disinfection of animal housing may be a viable means to reduce exposure of animals to E. cuniculi spores.

  18. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes.

  19. Temperature-regulated bleaching and lysis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis by the novel pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-07-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure culture, characterized microbiologically, and shown to cause bleaching when it was inoculated onto healthy corals at 25 degrees C. The pathogen was reisolated from the diseased tissues of the infected corals. The zooxanthella concentration in the bacterium-bleached corals was less than 12% of the zooxanthella concentration in healthy corals. When P. damicornis was infected with V. coralliilyticus at higher temperatures (27 and 29 degrees C), the corals lysed within 2 weeks, indicating that the seawater temperature is a critical environmental parameter in determining the outcome of infection. A large increase in the level of the extracellular protease activity of V. coralliilyticus occurred at the same temperature range (24 to 28 degrees C) as the transition from bleaching to lysis of the corals. We suggest that bleaching of P. damicornis results from an attack on the algae, whereas bacterium-induced lysis and death are promoted by bacterial extracellular proteases. The data presented here support the bacterial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  20. Field Agent Activities: Level 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussett, James

    One of a series of monographs providing information about the Delaware Model: A Systems Approach to Science Education (Del Mod System), this monograph describes the role of field agents. These agents are responsible for individual teachers who express a desire for involvement in improving teacher effectiveness and to be involved in the teaching of…

  1. Dental Bleaching Techniques; Hydrogen-carbamide Peroxides and Light Sources for Activation, an Update. Mini Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Féliz-Matos, Leandro; Hernández, Luis Miguel; Abreu, Ninoska

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbamide peroxides have been successfully used for many years; in the past century the dental bleaching technique suffered several changes and almost 10 years before new millennium the technique was finally recognized by the international agencies of regulation. It is important that Dentists handle the peroxides with the essential knowledge, because it is demonstrated that satisfactory final results of this technique depend on the correct diagnosis of stains, management of the substrates (enamel and dentin) and as well sensitivity. Dentists are exposed to several dental bleaching techniques, products and brands, and in the last 2 decades the devices for light activation of the peroxides have become an extensive catalog. Today, the technique is also suffering changes based on the effectiveness of the different light sources for peroxide activation and its relation to satisfactory final results of the technique. The purpose of this literature review is to explain the determinant factors that influence satisfactory final results of the techniques and provide a general overview, in order to achieve a treatment decision based on evidence. PMID:25646134

  2. Evaluation of the use of powdered activated carbon in membrane bioreactor for the treatment of bleach pulp mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Míriam C S; Lange, Liséte C; Borges, Cristiano P

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the use of powered activated carbon (PAC) in membrane bioreactor (MBR) employed in the treatment of bleach pulp mill effluents was evaluated. The MBR was operated with hydraulic residence time of 9.5 h and PAC concentration of 10 g/L. The addition of PAC to the MBR reduced the average concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the permeate from 215 mg/L (82% removal efficiency) to 135 mg/L (88% removal efficiency), producing an effluent that can be reused on bleaching stage. Moreover, the addition of PAC to the MBR resulted in the reduction in applied pressure and provided a more stable operation during the monitoring period. This occurrence was probably due to the increase of critical flux after the addition of PAC. The fouling mechanism was investigated and the results showed that controlling the concentration of soluble microbial products (SMP) and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) by using PAC and keeping the operational flux below critical flux is of major importance for MBR operational sustainability.

  3. Inhibition of photosynthetic CO₂ fixation in the coral Pocillopora damicornis and its relationship to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ross; Szabó, Milán; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Vass, Imre; Ralph, Peter J; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2014-06-15

    Two inhibitors of the Calvin-Benson cycle [glycolaldehyde (GA) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] were used in cultured Symbiodinium cells and in nubbins of the coral Pocillopora damicornis to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle triggers coral bleaching. Inhibitor concentration range-finding trials aimed to determine the appropriate concentration to generate inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle, but avoid other metabolic impacts to the symbiont and the animal host. Both 3 mmol l(-1) GA and 20 μmol l(-1) KCN caused minimal inhibition of host respiration, but did induce photosynthetic impairment, measured by a loss of photosystem II function and oxygen production. GA did not affect the severity of bleaching, nor induce bleaching in the absence of thermal stress, suggesting inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle by GA does not initiate bleaching in P. damicornis. In contrast, KCN did activate a bleaching response through symbiont expulsion, which occurred in the presence and absence of thermal stress. While KCN is an inhibitor of the Calvin-Benson cycle, it also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, and it is likely that this was the principal agent in the coral bleaching process. These findings do not support the hypothesis that temperature-induced inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle alone induces coral bleaching.

  4. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists’ awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used. PMID:28096946

  5. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists' awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05). Results. All the bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, there were significant differences in microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (P<0.001). However, no significant differences were detected in microhardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used.

  6. Activity Recognition for Agent Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    correspond to a real team, but is rather a visual illusion caused by a coincidental configuration of agents. 50 CHAPTER 4. STABR The behavior...each frame-pair were only classified with 76% accuracy, such a method would hallucinate false action transitions at unacceptable rates). Fortunately

  7. Evaluation of bleaching efficacy of 37.5% hydrogen peroxide on human teeth using different modes of activations: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Neha; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Patil, Jaya Prakash; Singh, Thakur Veerandar; Jyotsna, Sistla Venkata; Jain, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the role of light and laser sources in the bleaching ability of 37.5% H2 O2 on extracted human teeth. Materials and Methods: About 30 caries-free single-rooted maxillary central incisors were used for the study. Specimens were prepared by sectioning the crown portion of teeth mesiodistally, and labial surface was used for the study. Specimens were then immersed in coffee solution for staining. Color of each tooth was analyzed using Shadestar, a digital shademeter. Specimens were then divided into three groups of 10 each and were subjected to bleaching with 37.5% H2 O2, 37.5% H2 O2 + light activation, and 37.5% H2 O2 + laser activation, respectively. Postbleaching, the color was analyzed for all the specimens immediately and then after 1, 2, and 3 weeks intervals, respectively. Results: All the statistical analyses were done using SPSS version 17. Intra- and inter-group comparisons were done with Friedman test and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA, respectively. Statistical analysis concluded with a significant improvement in their shade values from baseline in all the three groups. Halogen light activation and laser-activated groups showed comparatively enhanced bleaching results over no-activation group, though the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that bleaching assisted with halogen light and laser showed increased lightness than nonlight activated group. Durability of bleaching results obtained postbleaching was maintained throughout the experimental trail period of 3 weeks for both halogen light and laser activation group, whereas no-light activation group presented with shade rebound after 2 weeks postbleaching. PMID:27217641

  8. Critical appraisal. Reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swift, Edward J

    2012-10-01

    Bleaching with peroxide agents compromises the adhesion of resin-based materials to enamel and dentin. The problem is likely caused by delayed release of oxygen from the teeth that inhibits resin polymerization at the interface. The typical method for avoiding problems with bonding to bleached teeth is simply to delay the bonding procedure for a week or two after bleaching. However, there is evidence that bonding can be done immediately if bleaching is followed by the application of an antioxidant. This Critical Appraisal reviews some of the published reports on the reversal of compromised bonding after bleaching via the use of antioxidants such as sodium ascorbate.

  9. New agents with antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Marco-Contelles, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Elena

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we report that a series of structurally simple a-halogenoacetamides show potent and excellent antimycobacterial activities against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv and drug-resistant M. avium.

  10. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries.

  11. Bleaching of kraft plus using dioxiranes: Structural effect of ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Wearing, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    Recent developments in totally chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching of kraft pulps have led to a new finding showing that dimethyldioxirane (DMD), formed by reaction of peroxymonosulphate with acetone, is a very effective and selective bleaching agent. Because of the high volatility of acetone, careful design and special equipment are needed for the DMD bleaching process in order to meet operational safety, health and emission control requirements. Other ketones are considered as alternatives to acetone for dioxirane bleaching; however, the use of alternative ketones exhibits different responses in bleaching compared to acetone. This paper examines the bleaching performance of a number of selected ketones in light of different chemical structures and properties of the ketones as well as bleaching variables.

  12. Removing polysaccharides-and saccharides-related coloring impurities in alkyl polyglycosides by bleaching with the H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system.

    PubMed

    Yanmei, Liu; Jinliang, Tao; Jiao, Sun; Wenyi, Chen

    2014-11-04

    The effect of H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system, namely NaHCO3 as alkaline agent with the (tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED)) TAED-activated peroxide system, bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution was studied by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the optimal bleaching conditions about H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution were as follows: molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 was 0.06, addition of H2O2 was 8.6%, addition of NaHCO3 was 3.2%, bleaching temperature of 50-65 °C, addition of MgO was 0.13%, and bleaching time was 8h. If too much amount of NaHCO3 was added to the system and maintained alkaline pH, the bleaching effect would be greatly reduced. Fixing molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 and increasing the amount of H2O2 were beneficial to improve the whiteness of alkyl polyglycosides, but adding too much amount of H2O2 would reduce the transparency. In the TAED-activated peroxide system, NaHCO3 as alkaline agent and buffer agent, could overcome the disadvantage of producing black precipitates when NaOH as alkaline agent.

  13. Efficient production of fatty acid methyl ester from waste activated bleaching earth using diesel oil as organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji; Du, Dongning; Sato, Masayasu; Park, Enoch Y

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry was investigated using fossil fuel as a solvent in the esterification of triglycerides. Lipase from Candida cylindracea showed the highest stability in diesel oil. Using diesel oil as a solvent, 3 h was sufficient to obtain a yield of approximately 100% of FAME in the presence of 10% lipase from waste ABE. Kerosene was also a good solvent in the esterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. Fuel analysis showed that the FAME produced using diesel oil as a solvent complied with the Japanese diesel standard and the 10% residual carbon amount was lower than that of FAME produced using other solvents. Use of diesel oil as solvent in the FAME production from the waste ABE simplified the process, because there was no need to separate the organic solvent from the FAME-solvent mixture. These results demonstrate a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME, for use as a biodiesel, from industrial waste resources containing waste vegetable oils.

  14. Lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production from waste activated bleaching earth as raw material in a pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Enoch Y; Sato, Masayasu; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    The production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry using lipase from Candida cylindracea was investigated in a 50-L pilot plant. Diesel oil or kerosene was used as an organic solvent for the transesterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. When 1% (w/w) lipase was added to waste ABE, the FAME content reached 97% (w/w) after reaction for 12 h at 25 degrees C with an agitation rate of 30 rpm. The FAME production rate was strongly dependent upon the amount of enzyme added. Mixtures of FAME and diesel oil at ratios of 45:55 (BDF-45) and 35:65 (BDF-35) were assessed and compared with the European specifications for biodiesel as automotive diesel fuel, as defined by pr EN 14214. The biodiesel quality of BDF-45 met the EN 14214 standard. BDF-45 was used as generator fuel, and the exhaust emissions were compared with those of diesel oil. The CO and SO2 contents were reduced, but nitrogen oxide emission increased by 10%. This is the first report of a pilot plant study of lipase-catalyzed FAME production using waste ABE as a raw material. This result demonstrates a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME from industrial waste resources containing vegetable oils for use as a biodiesel fuel.

  15. Socialization Agents and Activities of Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnon, Sara; Shamai, Shmuel; Ilatov, Zinaida

    2008-01-01

    Research examined the relative importance of peer groups for young adolescents as compared with diverse adult socialization agents--family, school, and community. The factors involved were teenagers' activities, preferences, feelings, and thoughts as to how they spend their leisure time, their preferences for help providers, and their sense of…

  16. Quantum Speedup for Active Learning Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Giuseppe Davide; Dunjko, Vedran; Makmal, Adi; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel; Briegel, Hans J.

    2014-07-01

    Can quantum mechanics help us build intelligent learning agents? A defining signature of intelligent behavior is the capacity to learn from experience. However, a major bottleneck for agents to learn in real-life situations is the size and complexity of the corresponding task environment. Even in a moderately realistic environment, it may simply take too long to rationally respond to a given situation. If the environment is impatient, allowing only a certain time for a response, an agent may then be unable to cope with the situation and to learn at all. Here, we show that quantum physics can help and provide a quadratic speedup for active learning as a genuine problem of artificial intelligence. This result will be particularly relevant for applications involving complex task environments.

  17. Use of 37% carbamide peroxide in the walking bleach technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-02-01

    Dental bleaching represents an effective, conservative, and relatively low-cost method for improving the appearance of discolored pulpless teeth. Among the bleaching techniques, the walking bleach technique with sodium perborate associated with water or hydrogen peroxide stands out because of its esthetic results and safety. A modified walking bleach technique with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide as the bleaching agent is presented. Additionally, the adverse effects of dental bleaching in the following restorative procedures are discussed, showing the advantages with the use of 37% carbamide peroxide.

  18. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    serine 139. Pretreatment of cells with NAC partially, peroxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase - 1 (37). This but significantly, attenuated the... Gy , concentrations of wortmannin (lanes 3-5) for 30 min prior to the addi- 2 h) (Fig. 4A). tion of 1 gm doxorubicin (lanes 2-5) and further incubation...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0318 TITLE: Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ebba U. Kurz, Ph.D. Susan P. Lees-Miller

  19. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite.

  20. Effects of black liquor shocks on activated sludge treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Morales, Gabriela; Pesante, Silvana; Vidal, Gladys

    2015-01-01

    Kraft pulp mills use activated sludge systems to remove organic matter from effluents. Process streams may appear as toxic spills in treatment plant effluents, such as black liquor, which is toxic to microorganisms of the activated sludge. The present study evaluates the effects of black liquor shocks in activated sludge systems. Four black liquor shocks from 883 to 3,225 mg chemical oxygen demand-COD L(-1) were applied during 24 hours in a continuously operating lab-scale activated sludge system. Removal efficiencies of COD, color and specific compounds were determined. Moreover, specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), sludge volumetric index (SVI) and indicator microorganisms were evaluated. Results show that the addition of black liquor caused an increase in COD removal (76-67%) immediately post shock; followed two days later by a decrease (-19-50%). On the other hand, SOUR ranged between 0.152 and 0.336 mgO2 g(-1) volatile suspended solids-VSS• min(-1) during shocks, but the initial value was reestablished at hour 24. When the COD concentration of the shock was higher than 1,014 mg/L, the abundance of stalked ciliates and rotifers dropped. Finally, no changes in SVI were observed, with values remaining in the range 65.8-40.2 mL g(-1) total suspended solids-TSS during the entire operating process. Based on the results, the principal conclusion is that the activated sludge system with the biomass adapted to the kraft pulp effluent could resist a black liquor shock with 3,225 mgCOD L(-1) of concentration during 24 h, under this study's conditions.

  1. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  2. Fluoride release of glass ionomer restorations after bleaching with two different bleaching materials

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of two bleaching agents on the fluoride release of three types of glass ionomer materials. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens of the tested materials (Ketac Fil, Photac Fil and F2000) were prepared by a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer instructions. Fluoride release measurements were made by using specific ion electrode. Results: Results revealed that bleaching with opalescence Xtra caused little increase in fluoride release from Ketac Fil and Photac Fil but has no effect on F2000. However, Opalescence Quick had no significant effect on the three tested materials. Conclusions: Bleaching effect on fluoride release is material dependent and time has a significant role on fluoride release. PMID:24883026

  3. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  4. Neutralization of radical toxicity by temperature-dependent modulation of extracellular SOD activity in coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi and its role as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Murali, Malliga Raman; Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2010-08-01

    Vibrio shiloi is the first and well-documented bacterium which causes coral bleaching, particularly, during summer, when seawater temperature is between 26 and 31 degrees C. Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiotic association between coral hosts and their photosynthetic microalgae zooxanthellae. This is either due to lowered resistance in corals to infection or increased virulence of the bacterium at the higher sea surface temperature. The concentration of the oxygen and resulting oxygen radicals produced by the zooxanthellae during photosynthesis are highly toxic to bacteria, which also assist corals in resisting the infection. Hence, in this study we examined the effect of different temperatures on the activity of a novel extracellular SOD in V. shiloi. We also partially characterized the SOD and clearly confirmed that the extracellular SOD produced by V. shiloi is Mn-SOD type, as it was not inhibited by H2O2 or KCN. Performing chemical susceptibility killing assay, we confirmed that extracellular SOD may act as first line of defense for the bacteria against the reactive oxygen species. Since, increased activity of novel Mn-SOD at higher temperature, leads to the neutralization of radical toxicity and facilitates the survival of V. shiloi. Hence, the extracellular Mn-SOD may be considered as a virulence factor.

  5. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  6. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-12-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice.

  7. Antiendotoxin activity of cationic peptide antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, M; Hancock, R E; Kelly, N M

    1996-01-01

    The endotoxin from gram-negative bacteria consists of a molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which can be shed by bacteria during antimicrobial therapy. A resulting syndrome, endotoxic shock, is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Thus, there is great interest in the development of antimicrobial agents which can reverse rather than promote sepsis, especially given the recent disappointing clinical performance of antiendotoxin therapies. We describe here two small cationic peptides, MBI-27 and MBI-28, which have both antiendotoxic and antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo in animal models. We had previously demonstrated that these peptides bind to LPS with an affinity equivalent to that of polymyxin B. Consistent with this, the peptides blocked the ability of LPS and intact cells to induce the endotoxic shock mediator, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), upon incubation with the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. MBI-28 was equivalent to polymyxin B in its ability to block LPS induction of TNF by this cell line, even when added 60 min after the TNF stimulus. Furthermore, MBI-28 offered significant protection in a galactosamine-sensitized mouse model of lethal endotoxic shock. This protection correlated with the ability of MBI-28 to reduce LPS-induced circulating TNF by nearly 90% in this mouse model. Both MBI-27 and MBI-28 demonstrated antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in neutropenic mice. PMID:8945527

  8. The adsorption of sympathomimetic agents by activated carbon hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Horres, C R; Hill, J B; Ellis, F W

    1976-01-01

    Sympathomimetic agents with mixed and pure alpha and beta adrenergic activity are adsorbed by coconut shell activated carbon from blood, sufficiently rapidly to markedly reduce the activity of these agents. The results of this study suggest that the site of injection of sympathomimetic agents being considered for correcting hypotension during activated carbon hemoperfusion be selected to permit systemic mixing before circulation into the adsorption device.

  9. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  10. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  11. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  12. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  14. Warm waters, bleached corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1990-10-12

    Two researchers, Tom Goreau of the Discovery Laboratory in Jamaica and Raymond Hayes of Howard University, claim that they have evidence that nearly clinches the temperature connection to the bleached corals in the Caribbean and that the coral bleaching is an indication of Greenhouse warming. The incidents of scattered bleaching of corals, which have been reported for decades, are increasing in both intensity and frequency. The researchers based their theory on increased temperature of the seas measured by satellites. However, some other scientists feel that the satellites measure the temperature of only the top few millimeters of the water and that since corals lie on reefs perhaps 60 to 100 feet below the ocean surface, the elevated temperatures are not significant.

  15. Nonvital tooth bleaching: a review of the literature and clinical procedures.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Tooth discoloration varies in etiology, appearance, localization, severity, and adhesion to tooth structure. It can be defined as being extrinsic or intrinsic on the basis of localization and etiology. In this review of the literature, various causes of tooth discoloration, different bleaching materials, and their applications to endodontically treated teeth have been described. In the walking bleach technique the root filling should be completed first, and a cervical seal must be established. The bleaching agent should be changed every 3-7 days. The thermocatalytic technique involves placement of a bleaching agent in the pulp chamber followed by heat application. At the end of each visit the bleaching agent is left in the tooth so that it can function as a walking bleach until the next visit. External bleaching of endodontically treated teeth with an in-office technique requires a high concentration gel. It might be a supplement to the walking bleach technique, if the results are not satisfactory after 3-4 visits. These treatments require a bonded temporary filling or a bonded resin composite to seal the access cavity. There is a deficiency of evidence-based science in the literature that addresses the prognosis of bleached nonvital teeth. Therefore, it is important to always be aware of the possible complications and risks that are associated with the different bleaching techniques.

  16. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  17. Coordinating Learning Agents for Active Information Collection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-30

    ranging from robocup soccer [26, 27], to rover coordination [19], to trading agents [25, 43], to air traffic management [32]. What makes this problem...Bazzan, A. and Ossowski, S. (eds.), Applications of Agent Technology in Traffic and Transportation ( Springer , 2005). [19] Mataric, M. J., Coordination...of Complex Systems ( Springer , 2004). September 16, 2009 16:40 WSPC/169-ACS 00230 472 K. Tumer and N. Khani [24] Pynadath, D. and Tambe, M., The

  18. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent.

  19. Post-bleaching sensitivity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Guacyra M; Guedes, Verónica L; Luna, Maria do R Ml; Carneiro-Jr, Américo M; Stegun, Roberto C

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This study analyzed the effectiveness of bleaching and tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching in patients with SCD. Forty volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 patients each (five with the SCD and five healthy controls) and treated using in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and different light activation protocols. No statistically significant difference was observed with relation to presence of tooth sensitivity, with or without use of a source of light for peroxide activation, and all bleaching therapies were effective, regardless of the technique employed and the presence/absence of sickle cell disease. The data showed that in-office dental bleaching is a viable alternative for improvement of oral esthetics for patients with SCD.

  20. The effects of coral bleaching on settlement preferences and growth of juvenile butterflyfishes.

    PubMed

    Cole, A J; Lawton, R J; Pisapia, C; Pratchett, M S

    2014-07-01

    Coral bleaching and associated mortality is an increasingly prominent threat to coral reef ecosystems. Although the effects of bleaching-induced coral mortality on reef fishes have been well demonstrated, corals can remain bleached for several weeks prior to recovery or death and little is known about how bleaching affects resident fishes during this time period. This study compared growth rates of two species of juvenile butterflyfishes (Chaetodon aureofasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus) that were restricted to feeding upon either bleached or healthy coral tissue of Acropora spathulata or Pocillopora damicornis. Coral condition (bleached vs. unbleached) had no significant effects on changes in total length or weight over a 23-day period. Likewise, in a habitat choice experiment, juvenile butterflyfishes did not discriminate between healthy and bleached corals, but actively avoided using recently dead colonies. These results indicate that juvenile coral-feeding fishes are relatively robust to short term effects of bleaching events, provided that the corals do recover.

  1. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  2. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  3. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  4. Arundo donax L. reed: new perspectives for pulping and bleaching. 5. Ozone-based TCF bleaching of organosolv pulps.

    PubMed

    Shatalov, A A; Pereira, H

    2008-02-01

    Three selected alkali-based organosolv pulps (alkali-sulfite-anthraquinone-methanol (ASAM), alkali-anthraquinone-methanol (organocell) and ethanol-soda) from agrofibre crop giant reed (Arundo donax L.) were bleached by an ozone-based TCF (totally chlorine- free) bleaching sequence AZE(R)QP (where A is an acidic pulp pre-treatment, Z is an ozone stage, (E(R)) is an alkaline extraction in the presence of reducing agent, Q is a pulp chelating, P is a hydrogen peroxide stage) without oxygen pre-bleaching, and compared with a conventional kraft pulp used as a reference. The different response on bleaching conditions within each bleaching stage was noted for all tested pulps. The pulp bleachability, in terms of brightness improvement or lignin removal per unit of applied chemicals, was found higher for the organocell pulp. The ASAM and ethanol-soda pulps showed the highest bleaching selectivity, expressed by viscosity loss per unit of lignin removed or brightness improved. The overall bleaching results of organosolv pulps were superior to kraft.

  5. Nitric oxide mediates coral bleaching through an apoptotic-like cell death pathway: evidence from a model sea anemone-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Thomas D; Bradley, Benjamin J; Davy, Simon K

    2013-12-01

    Coral bleaching (involving the loss of symbiotic algae from the cnidarian host) is a major threat to coral reefs and appears to be mediated at the cellular level by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we examined the specific role of NO in bleaching using the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella, a model system for the study of corals. Exposure of A. pulchella to high-temperature shock (26-33°C over <1 h) or an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione) resulted in significant increases in host caspase-like enzyme activity. These responses were reflected in the intensities of bleaching, which were significantly higher in heat- or NO-treated specimens than in controls maintained in seawater at 26°C. Notably, the inhibition of caspase-like activity prevented bleaching even in the presence of an NO donor or at elevated temperature. The additional use of an NO scavenger controlled for effects mediated by agents other than NO. We also exposed A. pulchella to a more ecologically relevant treatment (an increase from 26 to 33°C over 6-7 d). Again, host NO synthesis correlated with the activation of caspase-like enzyme activity. Therefore, we conclude that NO's involvement in cnidarian bleaching arises through the regulation of host apoptotic pathways.

  6. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents: approaches to modulate activity

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Angus M

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), such as the approved agents epoetin alfa and epoetin beta, has been used successfully for over 20 years to treat anemia in millions of patients. However, due to the relatively short half-life of the molecule (approximately 8 hours), frequent dosing may be required to achieve required hemoglobin levels. Therefore, a need was identified in some anemic patient populations for erythropoiesis stimulating agents with longer half-lives that required less frequent dosing. This need led to the development of second generation molecules which are modified versions of rHuEPO with improved pharma-cokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties such as darbepoetin alfa, a hyperglycosylated analog of rHuEPO, and pegzyrepoetin, a pegylated rHuEPO. Third generation molecules, such as peginesatide, which are peptide mimetics that have no sequence homology to rHuEPO have also recently been developed. The various molecular, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of these and other erythropoiesis stimulating agents will be discussed in this review. PMID:23847411

  7. Chemical analysis of bleach and hydroxide-based solutions after decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, F B; Gravett, M R; Self, A J; Wang, M; Chua, Hoe-Chee; Hoe-Chee, C; Lee, H S Nancy; Sim, N Lee Hoi; Jones, J T A; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    Detailed chemical analysis of solutions used to decontaminate chemical warfare agents can be used to support verification and forensic attribution. Decontamination solutions are amongst the most difficult matrices for chemical analysis because of their corrosive and potentially emulsion-based nature. Consequently, there are relatively few publications that report their detailed chemical analysis. This paper describes the application of modern analytical techniques to the analysis of decontamination solutions following decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). We confirm the formation of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine following decontamination of VX with hypochlorite-based solution, whereas they were not detected in extracts of hydroxide-based decontamination solutions by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We report the electron ionisation and chemical ionisation mass spectroscopic details, retention indices, and NMR spectra of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine, as well as analytical methods suitable for their analysis and identification in solvent extracts and decontamination residues.

  8. Microhardness and color monitoring of nanofilled resin composite after bleaching and staining

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Isabel Cristina G. Bandeira; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Rodrigues, José Augusto; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the effect of staining solutions on microhardness and shade changes of a nanofilled resin composite, which had been previously in contact with bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 disk-shaped specimens (10 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated with a nanofilled resin (Filtek Supreme) and photocured with a Light Emission Diode (LED) unit and then allocated into three groups to be bleached with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents or a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) product. Following bleaching, specimens within each group were subdivided into three groups to be immersed in coffee, red wine or distilled water. Microhardness and color were monitored at baseline, after bleaching and after staining. Results: Analysis of variance for split-plot design showed lower microhardness values when the composite had been in contact with HP (P < 0.0001). The specimens immersed in red wine and coffee provided lower microhardness values than those immersed in distilled water, regardless of the bleaching agent to which the composites were previously exposed. Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests demonstrated that the composite was lighter after bleaching with a 35% HP agent (P < 0.0500). Conclusion: The composite was darker as a result of being immersed either in red wine or coffee, regardless of the bleaching agent. PMID:24966764

  9. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Manzello, Derek P; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C; Nemeth, Richard S

    2007-07-17

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community.

  10. Ozone bleaching of recycled paper

    SciTech Connect

    Muguet, M.; Kogan, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Chlorinated bleaching chemicals, notably chlorine and hypochlorite, are still being used to bleach deinked, woodfree pulps. Increasing environmental concern about the use of these chemicals--coupled with the industry's efforts to increase the use of recycled fibers--highlight the need to develop better techniques for producing high-quality deinked pulp. Results presented in this report suggest that deinked fibers can be treated with ozone followed by a peroxide bleaching stage to produce a high-quality pulp.

  11. Reversible photo-bleaching effect in a bismuth/erbium co-doped optical fiber under 830  nm irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingjie; Wei, Shuen; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-10-15

    We observed photo-bleaching in a bismuth/erbium co-doped optical fiber (BEDF) under 830 nm irradiation. As a result of the photo-bleaching, the absorption at 814 nm and the near-infrared luminescence at 1420 nm are decreased, indicating that the silicon-based bismuth active center (BAC-Si) in a BEDF is bleached in the process. We further found that the photo-bleaching is reversible under room temperature. This is the first time that the BAC-Si could be bleached under 830 nm irradiation, and the photo-bleaching is reversible. The underlying mechanism of the reversible photo-bleaching effect is discussed.

  12. Activities of Antimicrobial Agents against Intracellular Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Gerald L.; Coleman, Elizabeth J.

    2000-01-01

    Pneumococci can enter and survive inside human lung alveolar carcinoma cells. We examined the activity of azithromycin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, penicillin G, rifampin, telithromycin, and trovafloxacin against pneumococci inside and outside cells. We found that moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin, and telithromycin were the most active, but only telithromycin killed all intracellular organisms. PMID:10952618

  13. Synthesis and activities of antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Suami, T; Machinami, T; Hisamatsu, T

    1979-03-01

    N-(2-Chloroethyl)-N-nitrosocarbamoyl derivatives of glycosylamines have been prepared. Six N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosoureas, including three disaccharide derivatives, were submitted to a determination of antitumor activity. All the compounds tested exhibited strong antitumor activity against leukemia L1210 in mice.

  14. Novel 2-Aminobenzamides as Potential Orally Active Antithrombotic Agents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop potent antithrombotic agents, a series of novel 2-aminobenzamide derivatives were synthesized and screened for their in vivo antithrombotic activity. Among the 23 compounds tested, compound (8g) showed the most promising antithrombotic activity, which was comparable with clinically used aspirin or warfarin, but at variance with these standard drugs, 8g did not exhibit the increased bleeding time, suggesting its potential as a novel antithrombotic agent. PMID:24900559

  15. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  16. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  17. Effect of Power Bleaching on the Fluorosis Stained Anterior Teeth Case Series

    PubMed Central

    M, Annapoorna B; Tejaswi, Sunil; Shetty, Suneeth; K, Sowmya H

    2014-01-01

    Bleaching is a conservative method for restoring the colour of intrinsic discoloration of teeth. The combination of McInnes solution and power bleaching is effective procedure for bleaching of fluorosis stained teeth. Definitely bleaching with McInnes bleaching agent gives instant results, not dependent on patient’s compliance as other office based procedures, no dehydration of the tooth occurs with no damage to the pulp. Bleaching with this solution is esthetically pleasing and minimally invasive option for young patients rather than a complete coronal covering. The dentist is in complete control of the process throughout the treatment. It is a fast process the results are evident even after a single visit. PMID:25302292

  18. In Situ and In Vitro Effects of Two Bleaching Treatments on Human Enamel Hardness.

    PubMed

    Henn-Donassollo, Sandrina; Fabris, Cristiane; Gagiolla, Morgana; Kerber, Ícaro; Caetano, Vinícius; Carboni, Vitor; Salas, Mabel Miluska Suca; Donassollo, Tiago Aurélio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in situ the effects of two bleaching treatments on human enamel surface microhardness. Sixty enamel slabs from recently extracted thirty molars were used. The specimens were polished with sandpapers under water-cooling. The enamel samples were randomly divided in four groups, treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or Whitening Strips (WS) containing 10% hydrogen peroxide and using two conditions: in vitro or in situ model. For in situ condition, six volunteers wore an intra-oral appliance containing enamel slabs, while for in vitro condition the specimens were kept in deionized water after the bleaching protocols. The bleaching treatments were applied one-hour daily for 14 days. Similar amounts of bleaching agents were used in both conditions. Before and after bleaching treatments, microhardness was measured. Statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test) showed that in the in situ condition there was no statistically significant microhardness reduction in the bleached enamel (p>0.05). Significant decrease in hardness was observed for enamel slabs bleached with both treatments in the in vitro condition (p<0.05). Regarding the bleaching agents, in situ results showed no difference between HP and WS, while in vitro WS produced the lowest hardness value. It could be concluded that there was no deleterious effect on enamel produced by any of the bleaching protocols used in the in situ model. The reduction of hardness was only observed in vitro.

  19. Garcinia xanthones as orally active antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Li, Xiang; Sun, Haopeng; Wang, Xiaojian; Zhao, Li; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shenglie; Wang, Yanyan; Yang, Yingrui; Zeng, Su; Guo, Qinglong; You, Qidong

    2013-01-10

    Using a newly developed strategy whose key step is the regioselective propargylation of hydroxyxanthone substrates, 99 structurally diverse Garcinia natural-product-like xanthones based on gambogic acid were designed and synthesized and their in vitro antitumor activity was evaluated. A set of 40 related compounds was chosen for determination of their physicochemical properties including polar surface area, log D₇.₄, aqueous solubility, and permeability at pH 7.4. In the light of the in vitro antitumor activity and the physicochemical properties, two compounds were advanced into in vivo efficacy experiments. The antitumor activity of compound 112, administered po, showed more potent in vivo oral antitumor activity than gambogic acid.

  20. Color alteration in teeth subjected to different bleaching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briso, A. L. F.; Fonseca, M. S. M.; de Almeida, L. C. A. G.; Mauro, S. J.; Dos Santos, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the color alteration of teeth subjected to the action of different bleaching agents and the influence of light sources commonly used in association with these products, In GI, the specimens remained immersed in artificial saliva. The specimens in GII were bleached with a 10% carbamide peroxide gel 4 hours/day during 3 weeks; the teeth in the other three groups were subjected to three sessions of three 10-min applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel at 7-day intervals. In GIII, no light was used, while in GIV and GV the gel was associated with a quartz-tungsten-halogen light and a LED/laser source, respectively. The teeth color was evaluated before and 7 days after the bleaching sessions by reflectance spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Fisher's test (α = 0.05), and showed that a significant color change was obtained in all treated groups. After the first week of treatment and at the end of it, the bleaching protocols showed similar results. The results of the present study indicate that association of a light source is not necessary to obtain the bleaching effect and that optimal bleaching can be achieved with all techniques tested.

  1. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kaveh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching. PMID:27508161

  2. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (p<0.05). The teeth that were bleached with a blend of peroxide (10% or 16%) and the CPP-ACP paste presented increased microhardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  3. Asphaltenes as a surface active agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.; Storm, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Asphaltene represents the heavy-end materials of the crude oil, conventionally defined via solvent solubility (either heptane or pentane). Chemically, it consists of polynuclear aromatics with the H/C ratio close to unity. Additionally, it contains a great deal of heteroatoms, such as sulfur, nitrogen, nickel, vanadium, etc. Several experiments have revealed the surface activity of asphaltenes in some selected solvents through measurements of their rheology or critical micelle concentrations in these solvents. The asphaltene micelles were found thermodynamically reversible. In a two phase asphaltene/water system, asphaltenes appear to vary their surface activities depending upon the polarity of the aqueous phase. Our recent experiment further showed that asphaltene/water/toluene may form, water-in-oil emulsion under certain conditions.

  4. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Santak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Milosevic, Slobodan; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5). The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red–green–blue (RGB) colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30% and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue. PMID:27688375

  6. Intra-pulpal temperature rise of different tooth types during dental bleaching supported by an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Strakas, D; Tolidis, K; Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Vanweersch, L; Franzen, R; Gutknecht, N

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot in vitro study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber of the teeth, during Er,Cr:YSGG bleaching, as well as to show which teeth are the most susceptible in terms of pulp temperature increase during laser-activated bleaching treatment. Although Er:YAG studies have been published on this subject, it is the first time Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is tested. Fifteen teeth were tested--3 each of the following--(maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, canines, premolars and mandibular incisors). The bleaching procedure comprised an Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780 nm, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a yellow-coloured bleaching agent with a concentration of 38 % H2O2 (Power whitening, WHITEsmile GmbH, Germany). The tip used was a 6-mm long Z-type glass tip (MZ8) of a 800 μm diameter. Average output power was set to 1.25 W, pulse duration 700 μs (S-mode), whilst the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The results showed that the most susceptible teeth in terms of pulp temperature increase were the lateral maxillary incisors and the mandibular incisors. The mean temperature increase on these teeth was 1.06 and 1.00 °C, respectively, on 60 s Er,Cr:YSGG-supported bleaching.

  7. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  8. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-05

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy.

  9. Effects of LED-laser hybrid light on bleaching effectiveness and tooth sensitivity: a randomized clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolatto, Janaina F.; Pretel, Hermes; Neto, Carolina S.; Andrade, Marcelo F.; Moncada, Gustavo; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B.

    2013-08-01

    The study evaluated the effectiveness and the sensitivity of in-office tooth bleaching with the use of a hybrid photo-activation system composed by LEDs and lasers. 40 patients, both genders, aged 18 through 25 years, were randomly distributed into two treatment groups: group I, 35% hydrogen peroxide, with a total bleaching time of 135 min divided into three sessions, and group II, 35% hydrogen peroxide and photo-thermal catalysis by an LED-laser system (300 mW cm-2), for a total bleaching time of 72 min divided into three sessions. The treatment efficiency was measured by reflectance spectroscopy and sensitivity by a visual analog scale (VAS). The final luminosity value (ΔL), color variation (ΔE) and sensitivity (S) resulting from the treatments were analyzed by the generalized estimating equations method (GEEs), and Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons at 5% significance. The two groups presented similar colors (ΔE) and luminosities (ΔL) after treatment. Group I presented a greater sensitivity index (37.6 ± 5.9%) compared to group II (11.1 ± 3.3%), statistically significant at p < 0.05. The use of LED-laser hybrid light, as a catalyst of the bleaching agents, showed a significant decrease of provoked tooth sensitivity and a treatment time reduced by 53%, with the same aesthetic results as without a light source.

  10. Totally chlorine-free bleaching of flax pulp.

    PubMed

    Khristova, P; Tomkinson, J; Dimitrov, I; Valchev, I; Jones, G Lloyd

    2002-10-01

    Alkaline-sulphite Tamlin flax mill pulp of 34-41% brightness has been bleached with different totally chlorine-free (TCF) sequences (oxygen delignification, pressurised peroxide, peroxide without and with activator (TAED, tetraacetylethylenediamine) and with and without pre-treatment with ultrasound to 82% ISO brightness of the mill conventional CEH bleaching. Although the best results after oxygen delignification were obtained with pressurised peroxide, activated peroxide caused lower cellulose degradation and gave a higher pulp strength. The effects of temperature, retention time, chemical charge, TAED/peroxide ratio and alkalinity have been studied in order to maximise the brightness gain at lower viscosity loss. The chemistry and flexibility of TAED made it possible to activate the peroxide under conditions for which the peroxide alone is ineffective as a bleach, such as low alkalinity or low temperature. The presence of shives hindered the bleaching, but the bleached non-screened pulp was stronger than the screened one. Pre-treatment with ultrasound for 4 min of 1% pulp consistency gave 3-4% gain in ISO brightness for non-screened pulp and 2% for screened pulp and facilitated further delignification and peroxide bleaching.

  11. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  12. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  13. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Soares, Ana Flávia; Pangrazio, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; Wang, Linda; Ishikiriama, Sergio Kiyoshi; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-04-01

    The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  14. CO2 capture performance of bi-functional activated bleaching earth modified with basic-alcoholic solution and functionalization with monoethanolamine: isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pongstabodee, Sangobtip; Pornaroontham, Phuwadej; Pintuyothin, Nuthapol; Pootrakulchote, Nuttapol; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich

    2016-10-01

    CO2 capture performance of bifunctional activated bleaching earth (ABE) was investigated at atmospheric pressure. The sorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Caron-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analysis (CHN), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The CO2 capacity was enhanced via basic-modification and monoethanolamine (MEA) loading of the ABE sorbent to obtain a bifunctional surface property. Here, basic-modified calcined ABE with a 30wt.% MEA loading (SAB-30) showed the highest CO2 capture capacity, but this was decreased with excess MEA loading (>30wt.%). At a 10% (V/V) initial CO2 concentration feed, the maximum capacity of SAB-30 increased from 2.71mmol/g at 30°C (without adding moisture to the feed) to 3.3mmol/g at 50°C when adding 10% (V/V) moisture to the feed. Increasing the moisture concentration further reduced the maximum CO2 capacity due to the blocking effect of the excess moisture on the sorbent surface. However, SAB-30 could completely capture CO2 even in a 100% (V/V) initial CO2 concentration feed. A maximum CO2 capacity of 5.7mmol/g for SAB-30 was achieved at 30°C. Varying the ratio of sorbent weight to total flow rate of the gas stream had no discernible effect on the equilibrium CO2 capture capacity. Avrami's equation and Toth's isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data and suggested the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the CO2 capture process and the heterogeneous adsorption surface of SAB-30. Thermodynamics studies revealed that CO2 capture on the bifunctional SAB-30 is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature.

  15. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P<0.05). The SBS decreased for the adhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  16. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W.H.; Loebenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-20

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  17. Inhibition of bleach-induced luminol chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erina J M; Elliot, Douglas A; Miskelly, Gordon M

    2003-01-01

    The luminol chemiluminescence presumptive test for blood is based on the mild peroxidase activity of hemoglobin in basic peroxide solution. However, this test is subject to interference by strong oxidants, certain transition metal ions, and true peroxidases. This paper reports methods for reducing the interference caused by hypochlorite-containing bleaches. Amines such as 1,2-diaminoethane react rapidly with hypochlorite without interfering significantly with the hemoglobin-catalyzed oxidation. Thus, addition of 0.1 mol/L 1,2-diaminoethane to a standard luminol-peroxide spray lead to almost complete inhibition of hypochlorite-induced chemiluminescence while satisfactory chemiluminescence was still observed from bloodstains. If time allows, an alternative method for reducing interference from hypochlorite bleach is to wait several days until the bloodstains have dried thoroughly, by which time the hypochlorite will have decomposed.

  18. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  19. Tooth bleaching effects 
on the adhesive interface 
of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena; Thedei, Geraldo; Menezes-Oliveira, Maria Angélica; Nogueira, Ruchele D; Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching techniques on the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations. Cavities (3 x 3 x 2 mm) were prepared in 100 bovine incisor fragments, which were etched with a conventional adhesive system and restored with a nanocomposite. The fragments were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Control (no bleaching), At-home bleaching (HB) (10% hydrogen peroxide [HP]), In-office bleaching (OB) (35% HP), LED-activated bleaching (LB) (35% HP activated by LED), and Laser-activated bleaching (LaB) (35% HP activated by diode laser, λ = 880 nm). After bleaching, 10 samples per group were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5°C to 55°C), immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution, sectioned, evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and scored for microleakage. The other samples were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days, sectioned, and the enamel adjacent to the adhesive interface assessed by cross-sectional Knoop hardness. The data were compared using the one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). No differences between the microleakage indexes found for the control and experimental groups were observed. The enamel of the bleached groups located near the adhesive interface presented the same Knoop hardness numbers as the samples of the control group. Tooth bleaching does not damage the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations.

  20. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  1. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Marques, Marcelo Rocha; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW) or ascorbic acid (AA) 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time. PMID:26877990

  2. In-Vitro Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide Amorphous Calcium Phosphate on Enamel Susceptibility to Staining by Tea during Bleaching Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoom; Hashemi Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Zarenegad, Nafiseh; Tabari, Negin; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bleached enamel is more susceptible to staining, and application of remineralizing agents may decrease enamel susceptibility to staining. This study sought to assess the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on enamel susceptibility to staining during bleaching treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty central and lateral incisors and first premolar teeth were evaluated in four groups of 10. Group one specimens were subjected to in-office bleaching. Group two underwent in-office bleaching followed by surface treatment with CPP-ACP. Group three specimens received home bleaching and group four underwent home bleaching followed by CPP-ACP surface treatment. After each course of daily bleaching, specimens were immersed in tea solution. Home bleaching (15% carbamide peroxide) was performed for 14 days and in-office bleaching (40% hydrogen peroxide) was carried out in two sessions with an eight-day interval. The color of specimens was analyzed at baseline and post-intervention using Easy Shade Shade-Selection Device. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of bleaching type and surface treatment on color change. Then, the means were compared by Tukey’s HSD test (P=0.05). Results: The interaction effect of surface treatment and type of bleaching was not significant on any color parameter (P>0.05). Surface treatment had significant effects on ΔL (P=0.004). Type of bleaching had a significant effect on “b” parameter (P=0.00). The effect of bleaching type on ΔE was significant (P=0.00) but the effect of surface treatment was not (P=0.34). Conclusion: CPP-ACP had no significant effect on preventing enamel staining by tea during bleaching treatment. PMID:27123021

  3. Influence of 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching on compomers in their surface modifications and thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Choong-Bo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2002-12-01

    The surface modifications and the coefficient of thermal expansion of compomers after treatment with a 30% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent were investigated. Three compomers (Compoglass F, Elan and F2000) were nonbleached and bleached for 1 and 3 days. The surface modification and the coefficient of thermal expansion of each bleached compomer were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope and a thermomechanical analyzer, respectively. As a result, Compoglass F and Elan showed slight surface degradation, whereas F2000 showed many cracks on its surface and these cracks were not observed in Compoglass F and Elan. Bleached Elan and F2000 has changed to the extent where their the coefficient of thermal expansion increased compared with those of nonbleached specimens. In addition, bleached compomers showed a strong inverse correlation between the coefficient of thermal expansion and the volume percent of filler.

  4. Halloysite clay nanotubes for controlled delivery of chemically active agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullayev, Elshard

    In this work we explored the capabilities of halloysite nanotubes as capsules for encapsulation and controlled delivery of the chemically and biologically active substances. Halloysite is a two-layered aluminosilicate which has a predominantly hollow tubular structure in the submicron range and is chemically similar to kaolinite [1, 2]. In the first section of this work, we analyzed the structure of the halloysite nanotubes as well as its capability to encapsulate and deliver biologically and chemically active agents, similarities and differences between release characteristics of different agents and how these differences relate with their chemical structure. Models were used to describe the release characteristics of the active agents. Study of the interaction between loaded agents and halloysite nanotubes provides better understanding of the release characteristics of the loaded agents and how halloysite can be implemented for technological and medical applications. The second part of the work deals with self-healing coatings produced on the basis of halloysite nanotubes loaded with corrosion inhibitors. Self-healing coatings are one of the effective methods to protect metals from corrosion and deterioration. The difference between self-healing coatings and the usual coatings is the ability of the first to recover after the formation of the damages due to external or internal stresses. High efficiency of the self- healing coatings produced by halloysite nanotubes were demonstrated on 110 Copper alloys and 2024 aluminum alloys. Controlled delivery of the corrosion inhibitors with additional encapsulation of the halloysite nanotubes by synthesizing stoppers at tube endings was also demonstrated. Additional encapsulation of the halloysite nanotubes may be necessary when slow release of the loaded agents is required or rapid convection of the liquid in the surrounding environment takes place (since this may cause rapid release of the loaded agents without additional

  5. Decreasing effluent loads through bleaching modification.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ai Van

    2006-02-01

    Almost all of the kraft pulp bleach plants worldwide are now practicing elemental chlorine-free (ECF) process to comply with environmental regulations in different countries. Usually, these conventional ECF bleaching sequences contain one or two alkaline extraction stages of which the first one is often the principal source of color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the resulting effluent. However, the results of this study showed that the ECF sequences which did not include any alkaline extraction stage and contained solely chlorine dioxide decreased both the color and COD loads of the effluent. On the other hand, the ECF sequences containing both chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide but excluding the alkaline extraction stage could lower only the color but not the COD load. It is suggested that the total kappa factor (the ratio of the total active chlorine to the kappa number) affected the COD load and that the content of hexeneuronic acid groups influenced the color of the bleach effluent. Compared to the reference pulp, the viscosity of the pulp from the exclusively chlorine-dioxide-based ECF sequence without the alkaline extraction stage was lower but the tear index and sheet density at a given tensile index were similar.

  6. Effect of pH values of two bleaching gels on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Natalia Costa; da Costa Soares, Manuella Uilmann Silva; Nery, Marcela Maria; Sales, Wagno Silva; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Martinez

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH and the effect of remineralizing gels after bleaching in different time intervals. Sixty bovine incisors were divided into 2 groups (n = 30). Group 1 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) acid gel and Group 2 was bleached with a 35% HP neutral gel. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) according to the post-bleaching treatment used: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel, or application of a gel consisting of fluoride, potassium nitrate, and nanostructured calcium phosphate. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and enamel microhardness was evaluated at 24 hours and 15 days postbleaching. Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by means of 2-way ANOVA, with repeated measurements and Bonferroni's post-hoc test. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, no significant differences were found between the bleaching gels. At 15 days postbleaching, Group 2 samples demonstrated a significant reduction in microhardness. No significant differences were found between the remineralizing gels, though all of the postbleaching treatments after the use of 35% neutral gel were able to re-establish baseline microhardness. It was concluded that neutral bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness 15 days after bleaching and that the use of remineralizing gels did not significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel. However, in clinical situations, the acquired enamel pellicle protects tooth surfaces, and postbleaching, decalcified enamel would undergo recalcification. This study indicates that it is important to consider the bleaching agent's pH and composition when treating patients with reduced salivary secretion.

  7. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Material and Methods Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a light-curing unit. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups (n=25). In group 1 (control), the samples were stored in distilled water for 14 days. The samples in groups 2 and 3 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (8 hours daily) and 45% CP (30 minutes daily), respectively, for 14 days. Finally, the microhardness of samples was measured with Vickers hardness tester using a 100-g force for 20 seconds. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean microhardness values among the study groups, followed by post hoc Tukey test for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in the mean microhardness values among the study groups (P<0.001). Based on the results of Tukey test, microhardness in the bleached groups was significantly less than that in the control group (P<0.0005). In addition, microhardness in the 45% CP group was significantly less than that in the 15% CP group (P<0.0005). Conclusions Use of both bleaching agents during in-office and at-home bleaching techniques resulted in a decrease in surface microhardness of giomer. The unfavorable effect of in-office bleaching (45% CP) was greater than that of at-home bleaching (15% CP). Key words:Dental restorations, hardness, tooth bleaching. PMID:28210444

  8. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  9. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  10. Activities of Therapeutic Agents and Myristamidopropyl Dimethylamine against Acanthamoeba Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kilvington, Simon; Hughes, Reanne; Byas, James; Dart, John

    2002-01-01

    The activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) against Acanthamoeba strains recalcitrant to medical therapy were studied. MAPD minimum cysticidal concentrations were 6.25 to 25 μg/ml; 10 to 30 μg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill after 6 h, and 50 and 100 μg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill within 2 and 1 h, respectively. PMID:12019127

  11. Activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine against Acanthamoeba isolates.

    PubMed

    Kilvington, Simon; Hughes, Reanne; Byas, James; Dart, John

    2002-06-01

    The activities of therapeutic agents and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAPD) against Acanthamoeba strains recalcitrant to medical therapy were studied. MAPD minimum cysticidal concentrations were 6.25 to 25 microg/ml; 10 to 30 microg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill after 6 h, and 50 and 100 microg/ml gave at least a 3-log cyst kill within 2 and 1 h, respectively.

  12. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used.

  13. Does a toothpaste containing blue covarine have any effect on bleached teeth? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of bleaching toothpastes, both conventional and those containing the new whitening agent Blue Covarine, on teeth previously bleached by conventional techniques (in-office and at-home). Squared bovine enamel/dentin blocks (6.0 x 6.0 x 2.0 mm) were randomly distributed in 6 groups (n = 15), according to the technique used to bleach them (in-office: HP35%; at-home: PC10%) and the type of bleaching toothpaste (none: control; Blue Covarine containing: BC; and without Blue Covarine: NBC). Experimental groups denominated HP35%, HP35%BC and HP35%NBC received in-office tooth bleaching before toothbrushing, and groups PC10%, PC10%BC and PC10%NBC were subjected to at-home tooth bleaching prior to toothbrushing. After bleaching treatment, groups HP35%BC, PC10%BC, HP35%NBC and PC10%NBC underwent daily tooth brushing in a brushing machine for 3 minutes (150 strokes/min, with a load of 375 g). Tooth color alteration was measured by reflectance spectroscopy (Vita EasyShade, Vident, Brea, CA, USA) at: T0 (baseline) - after in-office or at-home bleaching treatment; T1 - immediately after tooth brushing; T2 - 7 days and T3 - 14 days after tooth brushing. Data was analyzed by repeated measures mixed ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test, with a significance level of 5%. Statistically significant differences were found between different experimental groups, evaluation times and for the interaction between them (p < 0.001). Tooth brushing using either bleaching toothpaste (conventional or with Blue Covarine) showed no color alteration on teeth previously bleached by in-office and at-home tooth bleaching. The use of bleaching toothpastes on previously bleached teeth did not produce a color alteration.

  14. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled. PMID:23674914

  15. Use of xylanase in the TCF bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Roncero, B.; Vidal, T.; Torres, A.L.; Colom, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental pressures are forcing the pulp and paper industry to develop new technologies that reduce or eliminate the presence of various contaminants in bleaching plant effluents. Oxygen delignification techniques, replacement of elemental chlorine with chlorine dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide and new agents as well as the use of xylanase enzymes for biobleaching, reduce o eliminate the production of chlorinated organic substances. This paper compares the sequence XOZP with OZP in the bleaching of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps. It has been studied the influence of enzymatic treatment on the consumption of bleaching agents: ozone and hydrogen peroxide. Chemical, physical, optical and refining properties of pulps, as well as COD and colour of effluent are also studied. The xylanase treatment is positive and it is possible to manufacture fully bleached pulps at high brightness and viscosity without using chlorine compounds at a low ozone and hydrogen peroxide consumption.

  16. Coordinating the activities of a planner and an execution agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, Austin

    1989-01-01

    A research program was defined that will explore the link between planning and execution systems. A simple scenario was defined in which a very capable off-line planning system interacts with the user and a smaller, less capable, on-line real-time system executing plans and reacting to faults. However, the on-line execution system may have a more flexible representation of the plans it is executing. This imbalance in the capabilities of the two agents involved should clarify some of the research objectives and give an experimental framework for the work. The task is to investigate the knowledge representations and communication protocols needed to link a user stating some requirements for a task to be carried out through a planning system to the (remote) execution agent that can carry out the user's wishes. The notion that a single representation can encapsulate the expression of the user's requirements, the capabilities for action, the communication to the execution agent, the successful or faulty response from the execution agent and the means of keeping the user informed, is examined. Methods of creating plan patches to update the plans separately held by each of the parties involved to keep them in step as they each react to changing circumstances in real-time is investigated. This involves the specification of plan patch attachment points that can be understood by the recipient. Transaction based methods are also investigated for coordinating the activities of the planner with those of the execution agent and user. The trial application area for the research is in the command and control of an advanced Earth Observation Space Platform.

  17. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  18. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  19. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  20. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel. PMID:25992987

  1. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  6. POZONE technology to bleach pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Shi, Y.; Le, L.; Wang, S.M.; Wei, J.; Chang, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    Currently, there has been a move in the pulp and paper industry to reduce or eliminate chlorine-based bleaching due to environmental concerns. The POZONE process, a chemical means of ozone production, has been used to bleach wood pulp. The brightness, Kappa number, and viscosity of wood pulp subjected to POZONE treatment have been determined. Brightness increases of up to 44 points and Kappa number decreases of as much as 22 points have been achieved. Promise for effective industrial application has been demonstrated.

  7. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal(®), Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto(®), and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  8. Mechanistic investigation of beta-galactosidase-activated MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk-Pearson, Lauren M; Femia, Frank J; Smith, Jeffrey; Parigi, Giacomo; Duimstra, Joseph A; Eckermann, Amanda L; Luchinat, Claudio; Meade, Thomas J

    2008-01-07

    We report a mechanistic investigation of an isomeric series of beta-galactosidase-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents. Our strategy focuses on the synthesis of macrocyclic caged-complexes that coordinatively saturate a chelated lanthanide. Enzyme cleavage of the complex results in an open coordination site available for water that creates a detectable MR contrast agent. The complexes consist of a DO3A Gd(III) chelator modified with a galactopyranose at the N-10 position of the macrocycle. We observed significant differences in relaxometric properties and coordination geometry that can be correlated to subtle variations of the linker between the macrocycle and the galactopyranose. After synthesis and purification of the R, S, and racemic mixtures of complexes 1 and 3 and measurement of the hydration number, water residence lifetime, and longitudinal relaxation rates, we propose mechanisms for water exclusion from the lanthanide in the precleavage state. While the stereochemistry of the linker does not influence the agents' properties, the mechanism of water exclusion for each isomer is significantly influenced by the position of modification. Data for one series with a methyl group substituted on the sugar-macrocycle linker at the alpha-position suggests a steric mechanism where the galactopyranose sugar blocks water from the Gd(III) center. In contrast, our observations for a second series with methyl substitution at the beta position of the sugar-macrocycle linker are consistent with a mechanism in which a bidentate anion occupies two available coordination sites of Gd(III) in the precleavage state.

  9. The myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil: a promising new inotropic agent.

    PubMed

    Nánási, Péter; Váczi, Krisztina; Papp, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure became a leading cause of mortality in the past few decades with a progressively increasing prevalence. Its current therapy is restricted largely to the suppression of the sympathetic activity and the renin-angiotensin system in combination with diuretics. This restrictive strategy is due to the potential long-term adverse effects of inotropic agents despite their effective influence on cardiac function when employed for short durations. Positive inotropes include inhibitors of the Na(+)/K(+) pump, β-receptor agonists, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Theoretically, Ca(2+) sensitizers may also increase cardiac contractility without resulting in Ca(2+) overload; nevertheless, their mechanism of action is frequently complicated by other pleiotropic effects. Recently, a new positive inotropic agent, the myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil, has been developed. Omecamtiv mecarbil binds directly to β-myosin heavy chain and enhances cardiac contractility by increasing the number of the active force-generating cross-bridges, presumably without major off-target effects. This review focuses on recent in vivo and in vitro results obtained with omecamtiv mecarbil, and discusses its mechanism of action at a molecular level. Based on clinical data, omecamtiv mecarbil is a promising new tool in the treatment of systolic heart failure.

  10. Perspective of surface active agents in baking industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asif; Arshad, Nazish; Ahmed, Zaheer; Bhatti, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Nomana; Ahmad, Hajra; Afreen, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Different researchers have previously used surfactants for improving bread qualities and revealed that these compounds result in improving the quality of dough and bread by influencing dough strength, tolerance, uniform crumb cell size, and improve slicing characteristics and gas retention. The objective of this review is to highlight the areas where surfactants are most widely used particularly in the bread industries, their role and mechanism of interaction and their contribution to the quality characteristics of the dough and bread. This review reveals some aspects of surface-active agents regarding its role physiochemical properties of dough that in turn affect the bread characteristics by improving its sensory quality and storage stability.

  11. Molluscicidal properties and selective toxicity of surface-active agents

    PubMed Central

    Visser, S. A.

    1965-01-01

    Of over 100 commercially produced surface-active agents tested against the bilharziasis vector snail Biomphalaria sudanica, 13 were found to possess considerable and highly selective molluscicidal properties at concentrations of less than 1 ppm for exposures of 48 hours. Against crustacea, fish, water plants, mosquito larvae, mice, and the eggs of B. sudanica, the toxicities of the 13 surfactants were slight. The chemicals did not appear to be absorbed by organic matter to any appreciable extent. It is thought that the toxicity to B. sudanica is of both a chemical and a physical nature. PMID:5294185

  12. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  13. Parametric bleaching of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the nonlinear bleaching of a dense plasma slab. In this new mechanism, the electromagnetic wave incident on the plasma decays into plasma waves and then reappears as a result of the coalescence of the plasma waves at the second boundary of the slab.

  14. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    PubMed

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  15. Modified Technique for Nonvital Tooth Bleaching: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Naglaa Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of a nonvital, discolored, maxillary central incisor bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with the use of glass ionomer cement as a mechanical barrier in an attempt to minimize the undesirable side effects of intracoronal bleaching. The patient was a 13-year-old boy complaining of a discolored nonvital upper-right central incisor and was selected for this study from the pedodontic clinic in the Shibin Elkom teaching hospital in June 2013. After successful endodontic treatment, the tooth was bleached by 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Xtra), activated by a standard curing light unit, and evaluated for any periapical changes by a periapical radiograph for a nine-months follow-up period. Radiographically, there was no evidence of cervical or apical resorption during the study period. PMID:26516453

  16. Wet deposition of the seeding agent after weather modification activities.

    PubMed

    Curić, Mladjen; Janc, Dejan

    2013-09-01

    Weather modification activities are performed mostly by cloud seeding. Some operational projects have been conducted for more than a half century and cover planetary scales. These activities have led to large amounts of seeding agents being deposited on the ground in precipitation. The main intent of this paper is to identify the spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits after hail suppression. The spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits is determined using the weather modification project measurements from seeding agent reports, two weather radars and 316 launching sites during a 5-year period. The estimated spatial distribution of the deposits is not uniform, with the maximum silver iodide amount located in the southern part of the study area (up to 140 μg m(-2)). Our results are comparable with the measurements performed by chemical analyses during other cloud seeding experiments. The maximum location coincides well with that of the maximum seeded hailstorm precipitation frequency. A new method for identifying the spatial pattern of wet-deposited material has been established. The location with the maximum amount is found. This method would be important as a means of placing samplers and monitoring at the representative sites because those are where most weather modification projects would be performed in the future.

  17. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    PubMed

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  18. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Doustfateme, Samaneh; Kaveh, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6): Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique. PMID:26681849

  19. Clinical performance of topical sodium fluoride when supplementing carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; da Silva, Melissa Aline; Pleffken, Patricia Rondon; Valera, Marcia Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the use of 0.11% topical sodium fluoride (SF) desensitizing agent to treat tooth sensitivity during a nightguard tooth whitening procedure. Thirty-two subjects bleached their teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel using an at-home bleaching technique with custom trays. During bleaching treatment, subjects were divided into 2 groups (n = 16). The subjects in Group 1 received a topical gel containing 0.11% SF; the subjects in Group 2 received a placebo gel (PG). Each subject was instructed to place the gel in his/her bleaching tray for 30 min every day following bleaching treatment. Results showed the use of SF did not affect the whitening efficacy of the 10% CP gel. Subjects who received the PG had significantly higher tooth sensitivity when compared with subjects who received SF (P < 0.00). The use of daily 0.11% SF after 10% CP bleaching gel reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching treatment.

  20. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  1. Opposing forces of aerosol cooling and El Nino drive coral bleaching on Caribbean reefs.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jennifer A; Watkinson, Andrew R; McWilliams, John P; Côté, Isabelle M

    2006-12-05

    Bleaching of corals as a result of elevated sea surface temperatures (SST) is rapidly becoming a primary source of stress for reefs globally; the scale and extent of this threat will depend on how the drivers of SST interact to influence bleaching patterns. We demonstrate how the opposing forces of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and levels of atmospheric aerosols drive regional-scale patterns of coral bleaching across the Caribbean. When aerosol levels are low, bleaching is largely determined by El Niño strength, but high aerosol levels mitigate the effects of a severe El Niño. High aerosol levels, resulting principally from recent volcanic activity, have thus protected Caribbean reefs from more frequent widespread bleaching events but cannot be relied on to provide similar protection in the future.

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies on nitrofuranyl antitubercular agents

    PubMed Central

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Ball, David M.; Buolamwini, John K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of nitrofuranylamide and related aromatic compounds displaying potent activity against M. tuberculosis has been investigated utilizing 3-Dimensional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (3D-QSAR) techniques. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to produce 3D-QSAR models that correlated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against M. tuberculosis with the molecular structures of the active compounds. A training set of 95 active compounds was used to develop the models, which were then evaluated by a series of internal and external cross-validation techniques. A test set of 15 compounds was used for the external validation. Different alignment and ionization rules were investigated as well as the effect of global molecular descriptors including lipophilicity (cLogP, LogD), Polar Surface Area (PSA), and steric bulk (CMR), on model predictivity. Models with greater than 70% predictive ability, as determined by external validation, and high internal validity (cross validated r2 > .5) have been developed. Incorporation of lipophilicity descriptors into the models had negligible effects on model predictivity. The models developed will be used to predict the activity of proposed new structures and advance the development of next generation nitrofuranyl and related nitroaromatic anti-tuberculosis agents. PMID:18701298

  3. ActivitySim: large-scale agent based activity generation for infrastructure simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gali, Emmanuel; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Mniszewski, Sue; Cuellar, Leticia; Teuscher, Christof

    2008-01-01

    The United States' Department of Homeland Security aims to model, simulate, and analyze critical infrastructure and their interdependencies across multiple sectors such as electric power, telecommunications, water distribution, transportation, etc. We introduce ActivitySim, an activity simulator for a population of millions of individual agents each characterized by a set of demographic attributes that is based on US census data. ActivitySim generates daily schedules for each agent that consists of a sequence of activities, such as sleeping, shopping, working etc., each being scheduled at a geographic location, such as businesses or private residences that is appropriate for the activity type and for the personal situation of the agent. ActivitySim has been developed as part of a larger effort to understand the interdependencies among national infrastructure networks and their demand profiles that emerge from the different activities of individuals in baseline scenarios as well as emergency scenarios, such as hurricane evacuations. We present the scalable software engineering principles underlying ActivitySim, the socia-technical modeling paradigms that drive the activity generation, and proof-of-principle results for a scenario in the Twin Cities, MN area of 2.6 M agents.

  4. Activity of catalytic silver nanoparticles modulated by capping agent hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Janani, Seralathan; Stevenson, Priscilla; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a facile in situ method is reported for the preparation of catalytic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using N-acyl tyramine (NATA) with variable hydrophobic acyl length. Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows that NATA exists initially as larger aggregates in alkaline aqueous solution. The addition of AgNO3 dissociates these larger aggregate and subsequently promotes the formation of self-assembled NATA and AgNPs. Characterization of AgNPs using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope revealed that the hydrophobic acyl chain length of NATA does not influence the particle size, shape and morphology. All NATA-AgNPs yielded relatively identical values in full width at half-maximum (FWHM) analysis, indicating that the AgNPs prepared with NATA are relatively polydispersed at all tested acyl chain lengths. These nanoparticles are able to efficiently catalyze the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol, 2-nitro aniline to 1,2-diamino benzene, 2,4,6-trinitro phenol to 2,4,6-triamino phenol by NaBH4 in an aqueous environment. The reduction reaction rate is determined to be pseudo-first order and the apparent rate constant is linearly dependent on the hydrophobic acyl chain length of the NATA. All reaction kinetics presented an induction period, which is dependent on the N-acyl chain length, indicating that the hydrophobic effects play a critical role in bringing the substrate to the metal nanoparticle surface to induce the catalytic reaction. In this study, however, the five catalytic systems have similar size and polydispersity, differing only in terms of capping agent hydrophobicity, and shows different catalytic activity with respect to the alkyl chain length of the capping agent. As discussed, the ability to modulate the metal nanoparticles catalytic property, by modifying the capping agent hydrophobicity represents a promising future for developing an efficient nanocatalyst without altering the size

  5. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several benzoic acid analogs showed antifungal activity against strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis. Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids increased by addition of a methyl, methoxyl...

  6. Effect of bleaching protocols with 38% hydrogen peroxide and post-bleaching times on dentin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Vitussi, Lilian Oliveira Cambaúva; Milani, Camila; Alfredo, Edson; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of bleaching protocols with 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and post-bleaching times on shear bond strength of a composite resin to dentin. One-hundred slabs of intracoronary dentin were included and randomly assigned into 2 groups according to the bleaching protocol: HP (2 applications of 10 min each) and HP activated by LED laser (2 applications of 10 min each/45 s of light activation). Groups were subdivided according to the post-bleaching time (n=10): 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 10 days and 14 days. The control group was unbleached and restored (n=10). The specimens were restored with Single Bond adhesive system/Filtek Z250 resin using a polytetrafluorethylene matrix and were submitted to the shear bond strength testa after 24 h,. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Unbleached group (0.283 ± 0.134) had the highest bond strength and was statistically similar (p>0.05) to HP/10 days (0.278 ± 0.064), HP + LED laser/10 days (0.280 ± 0.078), HP/14 days (0.281 ± 0.104), HP + LED laser/14 days (0.277 ± 0.093). Lower bond strength were verified in HP/1 day (0.082 ± 0.012), HP/3 days (0.079 ± 0.013), HP + LED laser/1 day (0.073 ± 0.018) and HP + LED laser/3 days (0.080 ± 0.015), which were statistically similar (p>0.05). HP/7 days (0.184 ± 0.154) and HP + LED laser/7 days (0.169 ± 0.102) had intermediate values (p<0.05). The restorative procedure of intracoronary dentin bleached with 38% HP with or without the use of light source should be performed after at least 10 days after the bleaching treatment.

  7. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  8. Do different bleaching protocols affect the enamel microhardness?

    PubMed Central

    Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Garrido Gabriel, Taisa R. Conti; Piola Rizzante, Fabio Antonio; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Soares Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tooth bleaching tends to increase enamel roughness and porosity, in addition to reducing surface microhardness. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching treatments using different hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentrations, with and without light activation on bovine enamel microhardness. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of sixty bovine incisors were flattened and polished and the enamel specimens were divided into six groups: G1 : c0 ontrol, exposed to artificial saliva; G2: 35% HP applied in two sessions (45’ each); G3: 35% HP applied in two sessions (3 × 15’ each); G4: 35% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus hybrid light (HL); G5: 25% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL; and G6: 15% HP applied in one session (3 × 7’30”) plus HL. After the treatment, the enamel specimens were stored in artificial saliva. The surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at the baseline, 24 h and 7 days after bleaching. The data was analyzed using the ANOVA test, followed by the Tukey–Krummer test (P < 0.05). Results: All bleaching procedures lead to a decrease in surface microhardness when compared with the control group after 24 h. The lowest change in surface microhardness was found in the specimens treated with 15% HP plus HL. However, 35% HP plus HL induced the highest decrease in surface microhardness. After 7 days of remineralization, the surface microhardness returned to normal levels for all bleached specimens. Conclusion: Therefore, it can be concluded that the bleaching protocols caused a slight enamel surface alteration. However, the remineralization process minimized these effects. PMID:25713480

  9. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  10. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; de Souza, João Batista; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p<.05. Results: The inflammation intensity and the number of macrophages were significantly greater in IO than in AH and CG (p<0.05). The results of CD31+ (blood vessels per mm2) were similar in CG (61.39±20.03), AH (52.29±27.62), and IO (57.43±8.69) groups (p>0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels. PMID:27812622

  11. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis.

    PubMed

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy.

  12. Effects of dental bleaching on the color, translucency and fluorescence properties of enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana M; Borges, Alessandra B; Torres, Carlos R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the color, translucency and fluorescence of bovine enamel and dentin submitted to different bleaching modalities. Pairs of enamel and dentin discs (3 mm in diameter) were obtained from 150 bovine teeth. In 75 of the pairs, one specimen had the enamel removed (Dentin Group). The dentin was removed from one specimen of the remaining 75 pairs (Enamel Group) and the other specimen was left unaltered (Enamel + Dentin). The evaluation of color, translucency and fluorescence was performed with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L* a* b*. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups: Control, composed of specimens that were not bleached, and two experimental subgroups, bleached with either 10% carbamide peroxide (CP10%) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP35%). The CP10% bleaching gel was applied 2 h/day for 14 days. The HP35% bleaching agent was applied using two applications of 30 min each, with a one week interval between each application. When not being bleached, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva. The color, translucency and fluorescence ratings were assessed using spectrophotometry 7 days after the treatment. Regarding color, significant differences were found between bleaching techniques in the groups Enamel and Enamel + Dentin, with a higher color difference for HP35%. Bleaching did not change the translucency of the dental tissues. There were significant differences for fluorescence for the HP35% subgroups of Dentin and Enamel + Dentin, and for the CP10% subgroup of Enamel. Dental bleaching changed the color and fluorescence of the dental tissues, however translucency was not affected.

  13. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate. PMID:28149472

  14. Model of bleaching and acquisition for superresolution microscopy controlled by a single wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Small, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We consider acquisition schemes that maximize the fraction of images that contain only a single activated molecule (as opposed to multiple activated molecules) in superresolution localization microscopy of fluorescent probes. During a superresolution localization microscopy experiment, irreversible photobleaching destroys fluorescent molecules, limiting the ability to monitor the dynamics of long-lived processes. Here we consider experiments controlled by a single wavelength, so that the bleaching and activation rates are coupled variables. We use variational techniques and kinetic models to demonstrate that this coupling of bleaching and activation leads to very different optimal control schemes, depending on the detailed kinetics of fluorophore activation and bleaching. Likewise, we show that the robustness of the acquisition scheme is strongly dependent on the detailed kinetics of activation and bleaching. PMID:22076257

  15. Body image disturbance and skin bleaching.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher A D; McLean, Shua-Kym

    2017-02-24

    This study looks at body image disturbance among Jamaicans who bleach their skin. The hypothesis states that there is a positive relationship between skin bleaching and body image disturbance. The study used a convenience sample of 160 participants with a skin bleaching group (n = 80) and a non-bleaching comparison group (n = 80). The instrument included demographic questions, the body image disturbance questionnaire (BIDQ), and questions about skin bleaching. The results of a t-test revealed that the skin bleaching group (M = 1.5255, SD = 0.42169) was not significantly different from the non-bleaching group (M = 1.4938, SD = 0.74217) in terms of body image disturbance, t(158) = 0.333, p = .740. The participants who bleached did not suffer from body image disturbance. Self-reports revealed that they bleached to acquire beauty, attract a partner, elude the police, and market skin bleaching products. The practice was fashionable and popular and it made some participants feel good, while others were fans of a popular musical artiste who bleached his skin. The majority of participants bleached because of the perceived personal, social, and entrepreneurial benefits of the practice and not because they suffered emotional distress, anxiety, and functional impairment because of their skin colour. However, there was some level of BID among the minority of participants who argued that they bleached because they wanted to be pretty so they were emotionally distressed about there body image and experienced functional impairment.

  16. Biological Activity of Coumarin Derivatives as Anti-Leishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Vineetha; Patil, Sohan; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Basu, Sudipta; Singh, Shailza

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis affects nearly 0.7 to 1.3 million people annually. Treatment of this disease is difficult due to lack of appropriate medication and the growing problem of drug resistance. Natural compounds such as coumarins serve as complementary therapeutic agents in addition to the current treatment modalities. In this study, we have performed an in-silico screening of the coumarin derivatives and their anti-leishmanial properties has been explored both in-vitro and in-vivo. One of the compounds (compound 2) exhibited leishmanicidal activity and to further study its properties, nanoliposomal formulation of the compound was developed. Treatment of cutaneous lesions in BALB/c mice with compound 2 showed significantly reduced lesion size as compared to the untreated mice (p<0.05) suggesting that compound 2 may possess anti-leishmanial properties. PMID:27768694

  17. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  18. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  19. Adaptive bleaching: A general phenomenon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory and field data bearing on the adaptive bleaching hypothesis (ABH) are largely consistent with it; no data of which we are aware refute it. We generalize the ABH in light of these data and observations. The population of zooxanthellae within an organism is dynamic, the diversity of zooxanthellae is both surprising and difficult to ascertain, and field experiments demonstrate both turn-over in zooxanthella types and habitat-holobiont correlations. Dynamic change in symbiont communities, and the idea of an equilibrium or optimal community that matches the environment at a particular place and time, are concepts that underlie or emerge from much of the recent literature. The mechanism we proposed to explain responses to acute bleaching appears to operate continuously, thereby enabling the host-symbiont holobiont to track even subtle environmental changes and respond promptly to them. These findings enhance the potential importance of the ABH in the outcomes of acute bleaching, which can (1) accelerate this process of holobiont change, and (2) change the set of possible trajectories for how symbiont communities might recover.

  20. Synthesis, antifungal activities and qualitative structure activity relationship of carabrone hydrazone derivatives as potential antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Ze-Yu; Wang, De-Long; Yan, Xiao-Nan; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2014-03-11

    Aimed at developing novel fungicides for relieving the ever-increasing pressure of agricultural production caused by phytopathogenic fungi, 28 new hydrazone derivatives of carabrone, a natural bioactive sesquisterpene, in three types were designed, synthesized and their antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lagenarium were evaluated. The result revealed that all the derivatives synthesized exhibited considerable antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo, which led to the improved activities for carabrone and its analogues and further confirmed their potential as antifungal agents.

  1. Effects of varying concentrations of bleach on in vitro HIV-1 replication and the relevance to injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Contoreggi, C; Jones, S; Simpson, P; Lange, W R; Meyer, W A

    2000-01-01

    The use of bleach (hypochlorite) as a disinfectant for drug injection equipment in the intravenous-drug-using population was recommended early in the HIV-1/AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological studies have challenged the use of bleach as an effective measure to prevent HIV-1 transmission. However, in vitro HIV-1 coculture studies have shown that a high concentration of bleach is an effective cytotoxic and potentially virucidal agent. In this study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 peripheral blood mononuclear cell cocultures containing low concentrations of hypochlorite in the media showed earlier conversion to HIV-1 positivity, as measured by the presence of p24 antigen. HIV-1 cocultures with high concentrations of hypochlorite in the culture media, which appeared to be highly cytotoxic, and HIV-1 cocultures without bleach in the media did not exhibit this early p24 antigen positivity. Hypochlorite chemically disinfects by releasing free chlorine that is a potent oxidant. In injection drug equipment, a low residual concentration of bleach is likely to remain in cleaned equipment despite rinsing with water. Low concentrations of oxidants have been shown to enhance tissue inflammation, in vivo, as well as HIV-1 replication in vitro. Previous studies have shown that despite vigorous cleaning of blood-contaminated injection syringes with bleach followed by water, microaggregates of residual blood remained in bleach-cleaned blood-contaminated syringes. Hypothetically, oxidant effects of the residual bleach in the bleach-cleaned syringes could enhance the possibility of infection by remaining HIV-1 contained in a contaminated syringe. We suggest that the likelihood of an injection drug user contracting HIV-1 through the sharing of a bleach-cleaned blood-contaminated syringe may be increased by the cotransmission of residual bleach and its localized tissue-inflammatory effects; however, this has not been statistically proven in epidemiological studies.

  2. Augmenting the activity of antifungal agents against aspergilli using structural analogues of benzoic acid as chemosensitizing agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structure-activity analysis revealed that antifungal activities of benzoic and gallic acids were increased against strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. terreus, causative agents of human aspergillosis, by addition of a methyl, methoxyl or a chloro group at position 4 of the aromatic ri...

  3. Wear and surface roughness of bovine enamel submitted to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Azevedo, Juliana Felippi David E Góes De; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated surface roughness and wear of bovine enamel following three different bleaching techniques and simulated brushing. Initial surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated and teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, control; Group 2, 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) activated by a hybrid light; Group 3, 35% HP activated by a halogen light; and Group 4, 16% carbamide peroxide. After bleaching, surface roughness was measured and teeth were subjected to 100,000 cycles of simulated brushing. After brushing, the final roughness and wear was determined. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences among groups comparing initial and postbleaching roughness. After brushing, significant differences were found between the control and experimental groups. Group 4 showed a significant increase in roughness values compared with Group 2. The control group showed significantly less wear than other groups. Bleaching techniques promoted increased roughness and wear of bovine enamel, when submitted to simulated brushing. Tooth enamel after bleaching can present a larger alteration in the amount of roughness due to brushing.

  4. Occurrence of Surface Active Agents in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Olkowska, Ewa; Ruman, Marek; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2014-01-01

    Due to the specific structure of surfactants molecules they are applied in different areas of human activity (industry, household). After using and discharging from wastewater treatment plants as effluent stream, surface active agents (SAAs) are emitted to various elements of the environment (atmosphere, waters, and solid phases), where they can undergo numerous physic-chemical processes (e.g., sorption, degradation) and freely migrate. Additionally, SAAs present in the environment can be accumulated in living organisms (bioaccumulation), what can have a negative effect on biotic elements of ecosystems (e.g., toxicity, disturbance of endocrine equilibrium). They also cause increaseing solubility of organic pollutants in aqueous phase, their migration, and accumulation in different environmental compartments. Moreover, surfactants found in aerosols can affect formation and development of clouds, which is associated with cooling effect in the atmosphere and climate changes. The environmental fate of SAAs is still unknown and recognition of this problem will contribute to protection of living organisms as well as preservation of quality and balance of various ecosystems. This work contains basic information about surfactants and overview of pollution of different ecosystems caused by them (their classification and properties, areas of use, their presence, and behavior in the environment). PMID:24527257

  5. Rapid test for distinguishing membrane-active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Prakash Singh, Maya

    2006-10-01

    In the search for antibacterial agents with a novel mode-of-action (MOA) many targeted cellular and cell-free assays are developed and used to screen chemical and natural product libraries. Frequently, hits identified by the primary screens include compounds with nonspecific activities that can affect the integrity and function of bacterial membrane. For a rapid dereplication of membrane-active compounds, a simple method was established using a commercially available Live/Dead(R) Bacterial Viability Kit. This method utilized two fluorescent nucleic acid stains, SYTO9 (stains all cells green) and propidium iodide (stains cells with damaged membrane red) for the drug-treated bacterial cells. The cells were then either examined visually by fluorescence microscopy or their fluorescence emissions were recorded using a multi-label plate reader set to measure emissions at two different wavelengths. The ratio of green versus red was compared to a standard curve indicating the percentage of live versus dead bacteria. Nine known antibiotics and 14 lead compounds from various antibacterial screens were tested with results consistent with their MOA.

  6. Cellulose oxidation and bleaching processes based on recombinant Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Flitsch, Annemarie; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-01-10

    Myriococcum thermophilum cellobiose dehydrogenase (MtCDH) was expressed in Pichia pastoris using the pPICZαA expression vector under the control of methanol inducible AOX promoter. The purified recombinant MtCDH with a specific activity of 3.1 Umg(-1) was characterized to obtain kinetic constants for various carbohydrate substrates. Additionally, the C1 oxidation of the reducing ends of cellobiose, cellotetraose and maltotriose by MtCDH was verified by HPLC-MS. MtCDH was employed to oxidize several different cellulose-based materials by production of hydrogen peroxide. Based on the obtained results a one-pot enzymatic scouring/bleaching process for cotton fabrics was developed using pectinases as scouring agent and MtCDH to produce H(2)O(2) for bleaching. An average increase in whiteness (Berger) ΔE of 26 and an average 95% increase in wettability were observed in all MtCDH treated fabrics. In addition, MtCDH oxidized typical colored cotton flavonoids (morin, rutin, isoquercitrin).

  7. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  8. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  9. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses.

  10. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Igarashi, A.; Hirai, Y.; Kumagai, Y.; Kurata, H.

    2008-05-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2), or an LED (835 mW/cm2) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L* a* b* color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained.

  11. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation.

  12. Bleaching induced tooth sensitivity: do the existing enamel craze lines increase sensitivity? A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Abdin, Sam; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between the presence of enamel craze lines and the prevalence of tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria (N = 23) were screened to detect the existence of enamel craze lines. In total, 460 teeth were subjected to bleaching where 49% of them presented enamel craze lines. After bleaching (15% hydrogen peroxide), the subjects were asked to rate the level of TS by answering a self-administered questionnaire. The majority of subjects (91%) experienced TS at the first day of bleaching. The TS prevalence decreased gradually to 22% at second day, to 17% at third day, and to 9% at fourth day. After the fourth day, no subject reported TS. While 15% of teeth with craze lines presented TS, 11% of teeth with no craze lines also showed TS. A positive but weak correlation (r = 0.214) was found between the existence of enamel craze lines and TS. In this clinical study, higher incidence of TS was found with the use of 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent compared to the previous studies. Patients who would undergo in-office bleaching should be informed that tooth sensitivity is a very often side effect but it may disappear within 1 week.

  13. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  14. House cleaning with chlorine bleach and the risks of allergic and respiratory diseases in children.

    PubMed

    Nickmilder, Marc; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Bernard, Alfred

    2007-02-01

    Chlorine bleach or sodium hypochlorite can inactivate common indoor allergens. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated to what extent regular house cleaning with bleach can influence the risks of respiratory and allergic diseases in children. We studied a group of 234 schoolchildren aged 10-13 yr among whom 78 children were living in a house cleaned with bleach at least once per week. Children examination included a questionnaire, an exercise-induced bronchoconstriction test and the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) and of serum total and aeroallergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E, Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D). Children living in a house regularly cleaned with bleach were less likely to have asthma (OR, 0.10; CI, 0.02-0.51), eczema (OR, 0.22; CI, 0.06-0.79) and of being sensitized to indoor aeroallergens (OR, 0.53; CI, 0.27-1.02), especially house dust mite (OR, 0.43; CI, 0.19-0.99). These protective effects were independent of gender, ethnicity, previous respiratory infections, total serum IgE level and of family history of allergic diseases. They were however abolished by parental smoking, which also interacted with the use of bleach to increase the risk of recurrent bronchitis (OR, 2.03; CI, 1.12-3.66). House cleaning with bleach had effect neither on the sensitization to pollen allergens, nor on the levels of exhaled NO and of serum CC16 and SP-D. House cleaning with chlorine bleach appears to protect children from the risks of asthma and of sensitization to indoor allergens while increasing the risk of recurrent bronchitis through apparently an interaction with parental smoking. As chlorine bleach is one of the most effective cleaning agent to be found, these observations argue against the idea conveyed by the hygiene hypothesis that cleanliness per se increases the risk of asthma and allergy.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a new bleaching product "Polanight" in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Tsubura, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Ryuji

    2005-09-01

    Home bleaching techniques have been applied as a safe and effective bleaching procedure. Many manufacturers are now marketing home tooth-bleaching products. The purpose of this study was to compare a new bleaching product, Polanight (PN) with a widely used home bleaching product, Opalescence (OP). Fifty-eight healthy Japanese volunteers of both sexes (18 to 47 years of age) were selected. Using a simultaneous split-mouth protocol, custom-made trays with PN and OP were applied to the maxillary right anterior teeth and left anterior teeth, respectively. The shades of the maxillary canine teeth were measured with a portable chromameter (Shade Eye Ex) at the first examination and at 4 weeks (after 2-week bleaching and 2-week rest). Tooth shade changes were analyzed using the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) Lab units. Means of whiteness-blackness difference (DeltaL*), redness-greenness difference (Deltaa*), and yellowness-blueness difference (Deltab*) were 4.00, -1.28 and -7.53 for PN, and 2.54, -0.99, and -5.56 for OP, respectively. Means of color difference (DeltaE*) were 9.23 and 7.78 for PN and OP, respectively. Treatment with either agent demonstrated significant bleaching effects produced by the treatment. The new product, PN, showed significant differences in DeltaL* (P < 0.05) and Deltab* (P < 0.005), but not in the redness-greenness (a*) value when compared with OP. Bleaching with PN was considered more effective than that with OP in the young patient group and in the women.

  16. Vascular targeting agents enhance chemotherapeutic agent activities in solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Siemann, Dietmar W; Mercer, Emma; Lepler, Sharon; Rojiani, Amyn M

    2002-05-01

    The utility of combining the vascular targeting agents 5,6-dimethyl-xanthenone-4 acetic acid (DMXAA) and combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) with the anticancer drugs cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) was evaluated in experimental rodent (KHT sarcoma), human breast (SKBR3) and ovarian (OW-1) tumor models. Doses of the vascular targeting agents that led to rapid vascular shutdown and subsequent extensive central tumor necrosis were identified. Histologic evaluation showed morphologic damage of tumor cells within a few hours after treatment, followed by extensive hemorrhagic necrosis and dose-dependent neoplastic cell death as a result of prolonged ischemia. Whereas these effects were induced by a range of CA4DP doses (10-150 mg/kg), the dose response to DMXAA was extremely steep; doses < or = 15 mg/kg were ineffective and doses > or = 20 mg/kg were toxic. DMXAA also enhanced the tumor cell killing of cisplatin, but doses > 15 mg/kg were required. In contrast, CA4DP increased cisplatin-induced tumor cell killing at all doses studied. This enhancement of cisplatin efficacy was dependent on the sequence and interval between the agents. The greatest effects were achieved when the vascular targeting agents were administered 1-3 hr after cisplatin. When CA4DP (100 mg/kg) or DMXAA (17.5 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr after a range of doses of cisplatin or CP, the tumor cell kill was 10-500-fold greater than that seen with chemotherapy alone. In addition, the inclusion of the antivascular agents did not increase bone marrow stem cell toxicity associated with these anticancer drugs, thus giving rise to a therapeutic gain.

  17. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  18. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  19. pH-Sensitive Microparticles with Matrix-Dispersed Active Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Calle, Luz M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods to produce pH-sensitive microparticles that have an active agent dispersed in a polymer matrix have certain advantages over microcapsules with an active agent encapsulated in an interior compartment/core inside of a polymer wall. The current invention relates to pH-sensitive microparticles that have a corrosion-detecting or corrosion-inhibiting active agent or active agents dispersed within a polymer matrix of the microparticles. The pH-sensitive microparticles can be used in various coating compositions on metal objects for corrosion detecting and/or inhibiting.

  20. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Material and Methods Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Results Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in hardness values among the two groups either before (p=0.131) or after (p=0.182) the bleaching procedures. Conclusions Tooth whitening through home bleaching or laser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching. PMID:26330939

  1. In-office vital tooth bleaching--what do lights add?

    PubMed

    Hein, Derek K; Ploeger, Brad J; Hartup, Jason K; Wagstaff, Rachelle S; Palmer, Timothy M; Hansen, Lee D

    2003-04-01

    Aqueous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been used clinically at 30% to 35% levels to lighten teeth for many years, but the process has required multiple visits. Heat and light have been used empirically in attempts to catalyze H2O2 decomposition and speed tooth lightening. The contribution of bleaching lights (LumaArch, Optilux 500, and Zoom!) to act as catalysts for lightening teeth was studied in 83 pairs of contralateral anterior maxillary and mandibular teeth on 15 human subjects. Split-arch design using centrals, laterals, and canines on one side treated with bleach plus light, were compared with contralateral teeth using bleach alone. Three researchers trained in the use of the Vitapan 3D-Master Shade Guide took shades with independently agreement within 0.5 value-chroma sum 89% of the time throughout the study Laboratory tests determined bleach gel chemistry, bleach light output, and effects on the bleaches of light alone and heat alone. Results showed that the three test lights did not lighten teeth more than their bleach gels alone. All teeth lightened to nearly the same degree (1.7 color increments), but LumaArch required 60% less time and Zoom! used 1/3 lower H2O2 concentration. Laboratory tests indicated that the proprietary chemicals mixed into each bleach gel just before use acted as catalysts and were probably responsible for more rapid lightening produced by LumaArch gel, and need for less H2O2 in Zoom! gel. Neither the heat produced by the accessory lights, nor the light output itself were responsible for catalytic activity with any of the three systems tested. Collectively, the data demonstrate positive effects from chemical catalysts added to bleaching gels. No output from any of the lights resulted in heat or light that catalyzed the gels.

  2. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  3. Effects of new formulas of bleaching gel and fluoride application on enamel microhardness: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Juliana B; Mazur, Rui Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the new formulas of bleaching products and the effect of subsequent applications of fluoride on the hardness of enamel during and after tooth bleaching. The crowns of 60 extracted intact human molars were sectioned longitudinally; the buccal part was embedded in acrylic resin, the occlusal part was ground flat, exposing enamel and dentin, and then polished. Baseline Knoop microhardness (KHN) of enamel was determined. The specimens were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 specimens, and each group was assigned to a specific 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent. A: Opalescence, B: Opalescence PF (3% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride), C: Nite White Excel 3 (ACP), D: Opalescence + F (acidulated phosphate fluoride 1.23%), E: Opalescence PF + F, F: Nite White Excel 3 + F. The teeth were bleached for eight hours; after each procedure, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Immediately after day 21 of bleaching, the specimens in groups D, E and F received fluoride 1.23% for five minutes. KHN tests w ere performedbefore (baseline = control), during (14, 21) and two weeks (35 days) after the bleaching procedure and were statistically compared using ANOVA/Tukey's t-test (alpha < 0.05). The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference among the bleaching materials (p = 0.123). A significant enamel KHN reduction (p < 0.001) was observed for all bleaching materials, with no difference among them. Two weeks after bleaching, all the groups that received fluoride showed a significant increase in microhardness. For the new bleaching formulas, the enamel was restored to a value similar to baseline.

  4. Effect of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength of hybrid composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Samanian, Noushmehr; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The entire effects of different bleaching regimens on the mechanical properties of composite resins have remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength (FS) of hybrid composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 80 bar-shaped specimens of hybrid composite resins were fabricated and randomly divided into four groups, 20 specimens in each group. First group (C) was considered as control. The other groups were treated by home bleaching (HB) agent, in-office bleaching (IB) agent, and the combination regimens (HIB), respectively. The FS was evaluated by three-point bending test by using a Universal Testing Machine. All data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 18, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Turkey's post hoc statistical tests (α = 0.05). Results: The maximum mean value of FS was seen in HB group with significant differences to other groups (P < 0.05). Also, the minimum FS was observed in group HIB. Conclusion: Application of different bleaching regimens does not have any adverse effect on the FS of hybrid composite resins. However, the administration of HB regimens seemed to have lesser negative impact on the FS. PMID:27099423

  5. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  6. The Activation of Free Dipeptides Promoted by Strong Activating Agents in Water Does not Yield Diketopiperazines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufils, Damien; Jepaul, Sandra; Liu, Ziwei; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The activation of dipeptides was studied in the perspective of the abiotic formation of oligopeptides of significant length as a requirement for secondary structure formation. The formation of piperazin-2,5-diones (DKP), previously considered as a dead end when activating free dipeptides, was shown in this work to be efficiently suppressed when using strong activating agents (e.g., carbodiimides). This behaviour was explained by the fast formation of a 5(4 H)-oxazolone intermediate at a rate that exceeds the time scale of the rotation of the peptide bond from the predominant trans-conformation into the cis-isomer required for DKP formation. No DKP was observed when using strong activating agents whereas phosphate mixed anhydrides or moderately activated esters were observed to predominantly yield DKP. The DKP side-reaction no longer constitutes a drawback for the C-terminus elongation of peptides. These results are considered as additional evidence that pathways involving strong activation are required to drive the emergence of living entities rather than close to equilibrium processes.

  7. The Activation of Free Dipeptides Promoted by Strong Activating Agents in Water Does not Yield Diketopiperazines.

    PubMed

    Beaufils, Damien; Jepaul, Sandra; Liu, Ziwei; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The activation of dipeptides was studied in the perspective of the abiotic formation of oligopeptides of significant length as a requirement for secondary structure formation. The formation of piperazin-2,5-diones (DKP), previously considered as a dead end when activating free dipeptides, was shown in this work to be efficiently suppressed when using strong activating agents (e.g., carbodiimides). This behaviour was explained by the fast formation of a 5(4H)-oxazolone intermediate at a rate that exceeds the time scale of the rotation of the peptide bond from the predominant trans-conformation into the cis-isomer required for DKP formation. No DKP was observed when using strong activating agents whereas phosphate mixed anhydrides or moderately activated esters were observed to predominantly yield DKP. The DKP side-reaction no longer constitutes a drawback for the C-terminus elongation of peptides. These results are considered as additional evidence that pathways involving strong activation are required to drive the emergence of living entities rather than close to equilibrium processes.

  8. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  9. The role of microorganisms in coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kushmaro, Ariel; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Banin, Ehud; Yossi, Loya

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiosis between the coral host and its endosymbiotic algae. The prevalence and severity of the disease have been correlated with high seawater temperature. During the last decade, the major hypothesis to explain coral bleaching is that high water temperatures cause irreversible damage to the symbiotic algae resulting in loss of pigment and/or algae from the holobiont. Here, we discuss the evidence for an alternative but not mutually exclusive concept, the microbial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  10. Coral bleaching: the role of the host.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew H; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Ralph, Peter J; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Very recently, research has focused on the possibility of corals switching symbionts as a means of adjusting to accelerating increases in sea surface temperature. Although symbionts are clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be readily explained by differences in symbionts among coral species. Here we outline several potential mechanisms by which the host might influence the bleaching response, and conclude that predicting the fate of corals in response to climate change requires both members of the symbiosis to be considered equally.

  11. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1995-10-10

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode. 5 figs.

  12. Electrochemical mercerization, souring, and bleaching of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Economical, pollution-free treatment of textiles occurs in a low voltage electrochemical cell that mercerizes (or scours), sours, and optionally bleaches without effluents and without the purchase of bulk caustic, neutralizing acids, or bleaches. The cell produces base in the cathodic chamber for mercerization and an equivalent amount of acid in the anodic chamber for neutralizing the fabric. Gas diffusion electrodes are used for one or both electrodes and may simultaneously generate hydrogen peroxide for bleaching. The preferred configuration is a stack of bipolar electrodes, in which one or both of the anode and cathode are gas diffusion electrodes, and where no hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode.

  13. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  14. Effects of sponge bleaching on ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: distribution and relative expression of ammonia monooxygenase genes associated with the barrel sponge Xestospongia muta.

    PubMed

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Erwin, Patrick M; Pawlik, Joseph R; Song, Bongkeun

    2010-10-01

    Sponge-mediated nitrification is an important process in the nitrogen cycle, however, nothing is known about how nitrification and symbiotic Archaea may be affected by sponge disease and bleaching events. The giant barrel sponge Xestospongia muta is a prominent species on Caribbean reefs that contains cyanobacterial symbionts, the loss of which results in two types of bleaching: cyclic, a recoverable condition; and fatal, a condition associated with the disease-like sponge orange band (SOB) syndrome and sponge death. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses, clone libraries, and relative mRNA quantification of ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) were performed using a RNA transcript-based approach to characterize the active ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) community present in bleached, non-bleached, and SOB tissues of cyclically and fatally bleached sponges. We found that non-bleached and cyclically bleached tissues of X. muta harbored a unique Crenarchaeota community closely related to those reported for other sponges. In contrast, bleached tissue from the most degraded sponge contained a Crenarchaeota community that was more similar to those found in sediment and sand. Although there were no significant differences in amoA expression among the different tissues, amoA expression was higher in the most deteriorated tissues. Results suggest that a shift in the Crenarchaeota community precedes an increase in amoA gene expression in fatally bleached sponges, while cyclic bleaching did not alter the AOA community structure and its amoA gene expression.

  15. Methods for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    2008-03-18

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method comprises the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention also provides a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  16. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  17. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  18. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  19. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P < 0.05). In groups 3 and 4 at start and group 2 at start and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  20. Efficacy of and effect on tooth sensitivity of in-office bleaching gel concentrations: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Reis, A; Kossatz, S; Martins, G C; Loguercio, A D

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the side effects of in-office bleaching agents, less-concentrated hydrogen peroxide (HP) gels have been released by manufacturers. We evaluated the tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching efficacy (BE) of two HP concentrations in this study. Gels containing 35% and 20% HP (HP35 and HP20, respectively) were applied on teeth of 60 caries-free patients. Color was recorded at baseline and one week after the first and second bleaching sessions using the Vita Classical shade guide. TS was recorded on a 0-4 scale. BE at each weekly recall was evaluated by Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Absolute risk of TS and its intensity was evaluated by Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). After two bleaching sessions, color change of approximately eight tabs was obtained with HP35; whereas, with HP20 it was six tabs (p<0.05). Only 26.7% (HP35) and 16.7% (HP20) of the participants reported TS, and no statistical differences were detected among them. Both in-office bleaching gels showed similar TS intensity, but the 35% HP agent produced faster bleaching.

  1. The effect of baking soda when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Costa, Leonardo Cesar

    2013-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 10% baking soda solution and sodium bicarbonate powder (applied with jets) when applied to bleached enamel prior to restorative treatment. The surfaces of 40 bovine incisors were flattened and divided into 5 groups (n = 8): Group B (bleached and restored, negative control), Group W (bleached, stored in distilled water for 7 days, and restored), Group BSJ (bleached, abraded with baking soda jet for 1 min, and restored), Group BSS (bleached, application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min, and restored), and Group R (restored, without bleaching, positive control). The samples were bleached in 1 session with 3 applications of 35% HP-based gel and activated with a LED appliance for 9 min each. Resin composite cylinders (2 mm height and 0.8 mm diameter) were made on the enamel surface after the acid etching and a conventional 1-step single vial adhesive application was performed. After storage in distilled water (37 ± 1°C, 24 hr), the microshear bond test was performed (1 mm/min). ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied to compare the results. The mean results of these tests showed that Groups W, BBS, and R were not statistically different. These groups also indicated a higher bond strength when compared with Groups B and BSJ. The application of 10% baking soda solution for 5 min may be an alternative pre-restorative treatment for bleached enamel, but further studies are needed to consider whether or not this treatment may be effectively used in clinical practice.

  2. Sensitization of bleached Stentor to far UV.

    PubMed

    Burchill, B R; Bordy, M; Grene, R B

    1979-10-01

    Stentors are more sensitive to far UV-induced delay of oral regeneration following bleaching of their UV-absorbant cortical pigment granules. This finding supports a subcortical location of UV-sensitive sites.

  3. A strategic framework for responding to coral bleaching events in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Maynard, J A; Johnson, J E; Marshall, P A; Eakin, C M; Goby, G; Schuttenberg, H; Spillman, C M

    2009-07-01

    The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The framework presented has two main inter-related components: an early warning system and assessment and monitoring. Both include the need to proactively and consistently communicate information on environmental conditions and the level of bleaching severity to senior decision-makers, stakeholders, and the public. Managers, being the most timely and credible source of information on bleaching events, can facilitate the implementation of strategies that can give reefs the best chance to recover from bleaching and to withstand future disturbances. The proposed framework is readily transferable to other coral reef regions, and can easily be adapted by managers to local financial, technical, and human resources.

  4. Effects of five carbamide peroxide bleaching gels on composite resin microhardness.

    PubMed

    Briso, André L F; Tuñas, Inger T C; de Almeida, Letícia C A G; Rahal, Vanessa; Ambrosano, Glaucia M B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of five home bleaching products containing 15-16% carbamide peroxide on the microhardness of microhybrid composite resin Z-250 (3M/Espe). A total of 72 specimens were fabricated in cylindrical acrylic matrices (4 x 2 mm), filled with composite resin and photo-activated for 40 seconds. They were divided in 6 study groups (n = 12), according to the bleaching product: Review (SS White), Magic Bleaching (Vigodent), Opalescence (Ultradent), Whiteness Perfect (FGM), Claridex (Biodinâmica), and a control group (not bleached). Specimens were exposed to 1 cc of bleaching gel for 6 hours daily for 2 weeks. The control group specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout this time. All the specimens were then analyzed in a microhardness tester. Knoop hardness measurements were performed, and the results were submitted to parametric statistical analysis (analysis of variance and Tukey's test). Mean Knoop values and standard deviation were: baseline, 68.52a (4.28); control, 63.42b (7.16); Whiteness Perfect, 57.57c (1.81); Magic Bleaching, 57.22c (3.84); Opalescence, 57.03cd (4.00); Claridex, 53.64de (3.33); Review 51.45e (2.82). Identical letters mean statistical equality according to Tukey's test at the 5% significance level. The products significantly decreased Z-250 (3M/Espe) microhardness.

  5. A Strategic Framework for Responding to Coral Bleaching Events in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, J. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Marshall, P. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Goby, G.; Schuttenberg, H.; Spillman, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The framework presented has two main inter-related components: an early warning system and assessment and monitoring. Both include the need to proactively and consistently communicate information on environmental conditions and the level of bleaching severity to senior decision-makers, stakeholders, and the public. Managers, being the most timely and credible source of information on bleaching events, can facilitate the implementation of strategies that can give reefs the best chance to recover from bleaching and to withstand future disturbances. The proposed framework is readily transferable to other coral reef regions, and can easily be adapted by managers to local financial, technical, and human resources.

  6. An effective ostrich oil bleaching technique using peroxide value as an indicator.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Sivanathan, Muniswaran; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Subramaniam, Thavamanithevi; Chiew, Gan Seng

    2011-07-05

    Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials) from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 °C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness.

  7. Evaluation of the effects of conventional versus laser bleaching techniques on enamel microroughness.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Saeid Nemati; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Assadian, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahareh

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, bleaching of the teeth within the dental office is one of the most widespread techniques to correct tooth discoloration. Variability of the materials and techniques accompanied with the trend toward esthetic restorations with minimally invasive approaches are increasing. The use of laser in this regard has also been taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office versus laser bleaching on surface roughness of enamel. Fifteen freshly extracted human molars were sectioned mesiodistally to produce 30 lingual and buccal enamel blocks. Samples were mounted in transparent acrylic resin blocks and polished before treatment. Samples were randomly assigned to laser bleaching (LB) and office bleaching (OB) groups (n = 15 each). Pretreatment evaluation of microroughness was carried out for all samples using profilometer. Samples were treated twice in the OB group with Opalescent Xtra Boost and in the LB group using a laser-activated gel. Microroughness was evaluated after bleaching in both groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA. Both methods increased enamel surface roughness. Microroughness changes were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). Microroughness significantly increased in the OB group (p > 0.05), but there was no significant difference in pre- and post-treatment roughness evaluation in the LB group (p < 0.05). Laser was considered a safer technique because it demonstrated a less surface roughness increase in comparison with the conventional office bleaching procedure.

  8. Permeability of different groups of maxillary teeth after 38% hydrogen peroxide internal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lívia Maria; Vansan, Luis Pascoal; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Marchesan, Melissa Andréia

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of internal tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the permeability of the coronal dentin in maxillary anterior teeth and premolars. Seventy teeth (14 per group) were used: central incisors (CI), lateral incisor (LI), canines (C), first premolars (1PM) and second premolars (2PM). Pulp chamber access and transversal sectioning at 2 mm from the cementoenamel junction were performed and the specimens were divided into 2 groups (n= 7): a) no treatment and b) bleaching with 38% H2O2. The bleaching agent was applied to the buccal surface and to the pulp chamber for 10 min. This procedure was repeated 3 times. The specimens were processed histochemically with copper sulfate and rubeanic acid, sectioned longitudinally, and digitalized in a scanner. The area of stained dentin was measured using Image Tool software. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). There was statistically significant difference (p<0.001) among the untreated groups, CI (0.23 +/- 0.26) having the lowest permeability and LI (10.14 +/- 1.89) the highest permeability. Among the bleached groups, dentin permeability was increased in all groups of teeth except for 2PM. It may be concluded that bleaching with 38% H2O2 affected dentin permeability near the pulp chamber in maxillary anterior teeth and in first and second premolars.

  9. Effect of Nano-Tricalcium Phosphate and Nanohydroxyapatite on the Staining Susceptibility of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Atai, Mohammad; Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Malekhoseini, Kosar; Rezai, Hamideh; Hamze, Faeze

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of nano-tricalcium phosphate (n-TCP) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HAP) on prevention of restaining of enamel after dental bleaching. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide for two weeks. Afterward, they were divided into five groups based on remineralization solution: no treatment (control), 10% n-TCP, 5% n-TCP, 10% n-HAP, and 5% n-HAP. Each group was daily immersed for 10 minutes in the restaining solution (tea) and for 3 minutes in the remineralization agent, respectively. This protocol was repeated for five days. Subsequently, three digital photographs (baseline, after bleaching, and after restaining) were analyzed by Adobe Photoshop software. The obtained L∗, a∗, b∗, and ΔE parameters were compared using ANOVA and Wilcoxon and Bonferroni tests. Results. After bleaching, there were significant changes in tooth colors (P < 0.001) while, after restaining and immersion in remineralization solutions, there were no significant differences in L∗, a∗, and b∗ values of different groups (P > 0.05). However, ΔE of 10% TCP was significantly lower than the control (P = 0.02) while there were no significant differences between the other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion. 10% n-TCP could significantly maintain the resultant color and reconstruct the enamel structure after bleaching. PMID:27347555

  10. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  11. Low Concentration H2O2/TiO_N in Office Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Bortolatto, J.F.; Pretel, H.; Floros, M.C.; Luizzi, A.C.C.; Dantas, A.A.R.; Fernandez, E.; Moncada, G.; de Oliveira, O.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this randomized double-blinded clinical trial was to test the efficacy and tooth sensitivity promoted by the use of an in-office 15% H2O2 bleaching agent containing nanoparticles of TiO_N photocatalyzed with LED/laser light (HP15) and a control of 35% H2O2 (HP35). Methods: Forty healthy volunteers, both sexes, aged 18 to 25 yr, were randomly distributed in 2 groups: HP15 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 48 min each, and HP35 (n = 20) was treated in 3 sessions of 45 min each. The efficacy (E) was evaluated by ΔE values measured via reflectance spectroscopy. The tooth sensitivity (S) was analyzed by visual analog scale (low, average, high, very high). The absolute risk reduction and the number needed to treat index were calculated. The data were analyzed by mixed repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni-correction t test (α = 0.05). Results: For the efficacy, significant differences were found for number of bleaching sessions (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.73 and π = 1.000) and for the interaction of number of sessions and bleaching protocols (p = .0001; ηp2 = 0.319 and π = 1.000. The tooth sensitivity level showed significant differences only between the bleaching protocols. Absolute risk reduction calculated was 52% and number needed to treat, 1.92. Conclusions: The bleaching agent with the lower concentration (HP15) promoted lower levels of tooth sensitivity and presented greater efficacy compared to the control (HP35) in patients between 18 and 25 yr old. The limitation of short-term evaluation did not provide information about the longevity of the tooth bleaching (Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Re Bec no. U1111-1150-4466). PMID:24868014

  12. Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-28

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

  13. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue by treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue.

  14. In vitro evaluation of calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel submitted to an in-office bleaching gel treatment containing calcium.

    PubMed

    Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Antunes, Edina Veloso Goncalves; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; do Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Florio, Flavia Martao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel surfaces before, during, and after treatment with in-office 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents with 2% calcium gluconate (WCa) or without calcium gluconate (W). Twenty sound human third molars were divided into 2 groups of 10. The bleaching agents were applied to the tooth surfaces in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions: WCa, 40 minutes per day at 3 sessions with 7-day intervals; W, 3 × 15 minutes per day at 3 sessions with 7-day intervals. Enamel microbiopsies were performed prior to the bleaching treatment, immediately after each bleaching session (first, second, and third applications), and 7 and 14 days following the last bleaching treatment. The concentration levels of calcium and phosphorus in the microbiopsy specimens were recorded spectrophotometrically. There was a statistically significant decrease in the calcium concentration 7 days after the last bleaching treatment, but there was a recovery to baseline values at 14 days, regardless of the bleaching agent used (WCa and W). When W was used, there was no difference in the phosphorus concentration over time. The phosphorus concentration in the WCa group decreased after the third application, showing a significant difference from the W group at this time. However, an increase in the phosphorus concentration was observed in the posttreatment period, and no significant differences were observed between values at baseline and those at 14 days posttreatment. The in-office bleaching gel containing 2% calcium gluconate did not affect the calcium and phosphorus concentrations in enamel as compared to a calcium-free bleaching agent.

  15. Sporicidal efficacy of pH-adjusted bleach for control of bioburden on production facility surfaces.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Anne Cornish; Smyth, Josephine N; Bhupathiraju, Vishvesh K

    2013-06-01

    pH-adjusted bleach was one of the agents used to disinfect contaminated public buildings in the USA following the 2001 bioterrorist attack with Bacillus anthracis spores. A USEPA fact sheet describes the preparation of pH-adjusted bleach by combining diluted sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with a controlled amount of 5 % acetic acid. This paper reports a modification of this procedure to qualify the use of pH-adjusted bleach for routine disinfection of cleanroom surfaces in pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities whenever a short contact time is desirable or there is a need for enhanced germicidal or sporicidal activity. Adjustment of pH was obtained reproducibly with either acetic acid or HCl, confirming the feasibility of developing standard procedures for the controlled addition of acid to diluted NaOCl solutions without compromising operator safety and convenience. Efficacy testing using spores from an in-house isolate of Bacillus pumilus confirmed that NaOCl solutions in the pH 5-8 range have much greater sporicidal activity on surfaces than do unadjusted alkaline solutions (pH > 11). With a contact time of 0.5 min, the log10 reduction in spore viable counts was >5.4 for the five representative surfaces tested relative to untreated controls. Solutions of pH-adjusted NaOCl are known to be less stable than unadjusted alkaline solutions. Stability studies were performed by monitoring sporicidal efficacy, level of free available chlorine (FAC), and pH. Testing included several NaOCl concentrations and adjustment to different starting pHs. The efficacy of pH-adjusted solutions persisted in open containers for at least 12 h even though some FAC degradation occurred. In addition, solutions of 0.29 or 0.50 % NaOCl stored at room temperature protected from light retained efficacy for at least 4 weeks, indicating that short-term storage of solutions is possible following pH adjustment. The inorganic chemical degradation of pH-adjusted NaOCl solutions generates

  16. Structure-activity relationship for the reactivators of acetylcholinesterase inhibited by nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Musilek, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Karasova, Jana; Soukup, Ondrej; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Hrabinova, Martina

    2013-08-01

    Nerve agents such as sarin, VX and tabun are organophosphorus compounds able to inhibit an enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE reactivators and anticholinergics are generally used as antidotes in the case of intoxication with these agents. None from the known AChE reactivators is able to reactivate AChE inhibited by all kinds of nerve agents. In this work, reactivation potency of seventeen structurally different AChE reactivators was tested in vitro and subsequently, relationship between their chemical structure and biological activity was outlined. VX was chosen as appropriate member of the nerve agent family.

  17. Symbiophagy as a cellular mechanism for coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Martinez, Jon; Kushmaro, Ariel; Woodley, Cheryl M; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is a major contributor to the global declines of coral reefs. This phenomenon is characterized by the loss of symbiotic algae, their pigments or both. Despite wide scientific interest, the mechanisms by which bleaching occurs are still poorly understood. Here we report that the removal of the symbiont during light and temperature stress is achieved using the host's cellular autophagic-associated machinery. Host cellular and subcellular morphologies showed increased vacuolization and appearance of autophagic membranes surrounding a variety of organelles and surrounding the symbiotic algae. Markers of autophagy (Rab 7 and LAS) corroborate these observations. Results showed that during stress the symbiont vacuolar membrane is transformed from a conduit of nutrient exchange to a digestive organelle resulting in the consumption of the symbiont, a process we term symbiophagy. We posit that during a stress event, the mechanism maintaining symbiosis is destabilized and symbiophagy is activated, ultimately resulting in the phenomenon of bleaching. Symbiophagy may have evolved from a more general primordial innate intracellular protective pathway termed xenophagy.

  18. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  19. Effects of pulp consistency and mixing intensity on ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, M.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that ozone bleaching is feasible only at low or high pulp consistencies. However, recent research suggests that ozone bleaching at medium consistency is possible under conditions of high-intensity mixing. This article presents experimental results for softwood and hardwood pulps that were ozone-bleached over a range of consistencies (3-40%) and mixing conditions. Ozone was pressurized and delivered by a proprietary automated system. Results indicate that ozone bleaching at medium consistency can be as effective as bleaching at high consistency. Medium-consistency bleaching has the advantage of greater selectivity, resulting in higher pulp viscosity.

  20. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  1. Spectroscopic features of native and bleached opio-melanins.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A; Mosca, L; De Marco, C

    1995-01-18

    Opioid peptides can be converted by tyrosinase into melanin-like compounds, in which the peptide moiety is retained. Such pigments, named opio-melanins, exhibit a characteristic absorption spectrum with a maximum at about 330 nm and a different solubility behaviour with respect to dopa-melanin, being completely soluble in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opio-melanins precipitate in aqueous solutions below pH 5.0, and show apparent pKa values of 3.1, 3.6 and 4.4 for Tyr-Gly-melanin, Tyr-Gly-Gly-melanin and leuenk-melanin, respectively. The concomitant oxidation of dopa and opioid peptides by tyrosinase produces mixed polymers, showing the distinctive absorption peak at 330 nm. In the dark, in the pH range 5.5-7.0 the pigments are completely stable, whereas H2O2 addition provokes a slight degradation. At higher pH values or under simulated solar illumination with or without hydrogen peroxide, bleaching occurs more rapidly than in dopa-melanin. Upon photoirradiation the absorption spectrum of opio-melanins undergoes a marked variation, the peak at 330 nm being replaced by a broad shoulder in the range 280-350 nm. The absorption spectra of native and bleached pigments and the extent of opio-melanins degradation by bleaching agents, confirm the hypothesis that the different initial structure of the precursors accounts for a final diverse polymeric architecture of these pigments with respect to dopa-melanin.

  2. Effects of home bleaching on surface hardness and surface roughness of an experimental nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Zuryati, Ab-Ghani; Qian, Ooi Qian; Dasmawati, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Home bleaching agents may not be safe for composite resins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 10 and 20% Opalescence® PF home bleaching agents on the surface roughness and hardness of universal nanocomposite (Filtek Z350), anterior nanocomposite (KeLFiL), and nanohybrid composite (TPH 3). Materials and Methods: Fifty-four composite resin samples with 18 samples for each type of composite resin were prepared using acrylic molds (4 × 2 mm). Each type of composite resin was further divided into three groups [n = 6 controls were placed in distilled water for 14 days and the other two groups of n = 6 were bleached with 10 and 20% carbamide peroxide (CP), respectively for 14 days]. Surface hardness of the composite resin was tested with a Vickers hardness tester, whereas surface roughness was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results: There were significant changes in the surface hardness of KeLFiL and TPH 3. However, all the tested materials showed no significant changes in the surface roughness. Conclusion: After 14 days of home bleaching treatment, there was no adverse effect on the surface roughness of all three composite resins, although the surface hardness for KeLFiL and TPH 3 were significantly reduced. PMID:23956541

  3. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. In vitro assessment of a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine as a sodium perborate's vehicle for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniel Pinto de; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Souza-Filho, Francisco José de; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess a gel base containing 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) as a vehicle to be mixed with sodium perborate for intracoronal bleaching of discolored teeth, comparing its bleaching efficacy to sodium perborate mixed with other vehicles; 37% carbamide peroxide and 30% hydrogen peroxide. There were 110 fresh bovine incisors artificially stained using whole blood. The samples were divided into 11 groups and the intracoronal bleaching was performed using the "walking bleach technique". The bleaching agents were replaced three times at 7-day intervals. Using digital photos and a shade guide created for bovine teeth, the samples were evaluated at day 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. On evaluation day, the photos were examined by three endodontists giving scores from 1 to 5 based on the shade guide created. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskall-Wallis test. After 28 days, all evaluated teeth received scores that were statistically similar. Groups that used sodium perborate and a liquid vehicle bleached faster than those that used a gel based vehicle. The CHX gel allowed dissociation for the bleaching agent. The 2% CHX gel exhibited a good potential for use as a vehicle for sodium perborate or as a complement for carbamide peroxide.

  5. Comparison between traditional and laser bleaching treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Ilene C. R.; Redigolo, Marcela L.; Liporoni, Priscila C. S.; Munin, Egberto

    2001-10-01

    Fifteen human embedded third molars were used in this in vitro study to evaluate the effects of two bleaching products associated or not with Argon laser application. The samples received a cervical-apical cut and were longitudinally cut into 4 parts resulting in 75 specimens. These parts were divided at random into 5 groups and submitted to the traditional power bleaching procedure for enamel. Group 1 was separated as a control group. Group 2 was exposed to 37 % carbamide peroxide bleaching solution and developed with an Argon laser application. The same solution was used in Group 3 but the bleaching was developed with an halogen lamp irradiation. 35 % carbamide peroxide were used in Groups 4 and 5. One was developed as Group 2 and the other as Group 3. The samples were analyzed under a photoreflectance experiment. We observed that Group 2 presented more white spectra than Group 3. However, Groups 4 and 5 showed the same results independent of the use of the laser or the halogen lamp for the light curing. Comparing both bleaching products, the 35 % carbamide peroxide was more efficient on its purposes than the other one.

  6. Bleaching with lignin-oxidizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Pratima; Anand, Aradhna; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2006-01-01

    General concern about the environmental impact of chlorine bleaching effluents has led to a trend towards elementary chlorine-free or totally chlorine free bleaching methods. Considerable interest has been focused on the use of biotechnology in pulp bleaching, as large number of microbes and the enzymes produced by them are known to be capable of preferential degradation of native lignin and complete degradation of wood. Enzymes of the hemicellulolytic type, particularly xylan-attacking enzymes xylanases are now used commercially in the mills for pulp treatment and subsequent incorporation into bleach sequences. Certain white-rot fungi can delignify Kraft pulps increasing their brightness and their responsiveness to brightening with chemicals. The fungal treatments are too slow but the enzymes produced from the fungi can also delignify pulps and these enzymatic processes are likely to be easier to optimize and apply than the fungal treatments. This article presents an overview of the developments in the application of lignin-oxidizing enzymes in bleaching of chemical pulps. The present knowledge of the mechanisms on the action of enzymes as well as the practical results and advantages obtained on the laboratory and industrial scale are discussed.

  7. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer, Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0-4) during bleaching and up to 48 h after each session. The primary outcome of absolute risk of tooth sensitivity was compared using the Fisher's exact test (α = 0.05). The intensity of tooth sensitivity and the efficacy of in-office bleaching were also statistically evaluated. No significant differences in absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were detected between the groups (p = 1.0 and p = 0.53, respectively). BE was also found to be similar between the groups (p = 0.67). Although the use of a nano-calcium phosphate paste associated with fluoride and potassium nitrate did not influence the whitening outcome, but it also did not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity.

  8. PSMA-Activated Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    media and the cell extract were run on the LCMS . Figure 3. MTT assay evaluating varying concentrations of I-PD...Society 62, 2422-2423. 7. Fujii, A., Tanaka, K., Tsuchiya, Y., Cook, E.S., 1971. Antistaphylococcal and Antifibrinolytic Activities of Omega- Amino ... Acids and Their L-Histidine Dipeptides. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 14, 354-&.

  9. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-12-18

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones.

  10. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones. PMID:26680690

  11. The influence of desensitizing dentifrices on pain induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Carlos Henrique; Rodrigues Filho, Rubens; Prates, Luiz Henrique Maykot; Sartori, Neimar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of desensitizing dentifrices used 15 days prior to and after in-office tooth bleaching could eliminate or reduce tooth sensitivity. After institutional review board approval and informed consent, 45 subjects were selected and divided into 3 groups according to the dentifrice selected: Colgate Total (CT), Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (CS) or Sensodyne ProNamel (SP). The subjects used toothpaste and a toothbrush provided to them for 15 days prior to bleaching. They were then submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium). Their tooth sensitivity was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for a week after each session. Their tooth shade alteration was measured with a Vitapan Classical shade guide to determine if the dentifrices could influence the effectiveness of the bleaching agent. The data were submitted to Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). The use of desensitizing dentifrices did not affect the bleaching efficacy. In regard to tooth sensitivity, there was a statistically significant difference between the results of the Control Group and Group T2 after the first session (p = 0.048). There was no statistically significant difference in the results for the other groups after the first session. In regard to the second session, there was no statistically significant difference in the results for all the groups. The use of a desensitizing dentifrice containing nitrate potassium reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching regimen. Dentifrices containing arginine and calcium carbonate did not reduce tooth sensitivity. Color change was not influenced by the dentifrices used.

  12. Rostral anterior cingulate activity generates posterior versus anterior theta activity linked to agentic extraversion.

    PubMed

    Chavanon, Mira-Lynn; Wacker, Jan; Stemmler, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    Recent research using the resting electroencephalogram (EEG) showed that posterior versus anterior theta activity (around 4-8 Hz) is consistently associated with agency, reflecting the dopaminergic core of extraversion (i.e., incentive motivation, positive emotion). Neuroimaging studies using various methodologies and experimental paradigms have converged on the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as a neurophysiological correlate of extraversion. The aim of the present study is integrate these lines of research by testing the hypothesis that posterior versus anterior EEG theta is at least partly based on ACC theta activity. Resting EEG data were analyzed in N = 78 healthy, male participants extremely high or low in agentic extraversion (aE). Using the low-resolution electromagnetic tomography algorithm, we localized the sources of aE-dependent intracerebral theta activity within rostral subdivisions of the ACC. The posterior versus anterior index and theta current density within the rostral ACC were significantly correlated (r = -.52), and both displayed high retest stability across 5 hr and were associated with traits from the aE spectrum. These neurophysiological correlates of aE and their possible functional significance are discussed.

  13. NRF2 activation by antioxidant antidiabetic agents accelerates tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiufei; Long, Min; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Liao, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yuren; Liao, Qian; Li, Wenjie; Tang, Zili; Tong, Qiang; Wang, Xiaocui; Fang, Fang; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Ouyang, Qin; Zhang, Donna D; Yu, Shicang; Zheng, Hongting

    2016-04-13

    Cancer is a common comorbidity of diabetic patients; however, little is known about the effects that antidiabetic drugs have on tumors. We discovered that common classes of drugs used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the hypoglycemic dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) saxagliptin and sitagliptin, as well as the antineuropathic α-lipoic acid (ALA), do not increase tumor incidence but increase the risk of metastasis of existing tumors. Specifically, these drugs induce prolonged activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated antioxidant response through inhibition of KEAP1-C151-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NRF2, resulting in up-regulated expression of metastasis-associated proteins, increased cancer cell migration, and promotion of metastasis in xenograft mouse models. Accordingly, knockdown of NRF2 attenuated naturally occurring and DPP-4i-induced tumor metastasis, whereas NRF2 activation accelerated metastasis. Furthermore, in human liver cancer tissue samples, increased NRF2 expression correlated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that antioxidants that activate NRF2 signaling may need to be administered with caution in cancer patients, such as diabetic patients with cancer. Moreover, NRF2 may be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for tumor metastasis.

  14. A clinical evaluation of bleaching using whitening wraps and strips.

    PubMed

    Matis, Bruce A; Cochran, Michael; Wang, Ge; Franco, Miguel; Eckert, George J; Carlotti, Ronald J; Bryan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of color change of teeth and the sensitivities of teeth and gums in an in vivo study. Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW2) and Crest Whitestrips Premium (WP2) were used twice a day and Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW1) were used once a day. Color evaluations occurred at baseline, after five and seven-day use of bleaching agent and 14 days post-bleaching. Color change was evaluated objectively and subjectively. Sensitivity evaluations were also accomplished. Seventy-six of the 78 subjects enrolled completed the study. All three products significantly lightened teeth. WW2 lightened more than WP2 and WW1 in L*, a*, b*, E and shade guide value. WP2 lightened more than WW1 in a*, b*, E and shade guide value. There was no difference in tooth sensitivity, but WW1 and WP2 caused less gingival sensitivity than WW2. The mean age of smokers was seven years younger than nonsmokers who qualified.

  15. Bleaching mechanism of silver halide photochromic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Gourier, D.; Vivien, D.; Prassas, M.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal bleaching of silver halide photochromic glasses is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of photoinduced CuII centers. During exposure to ultraviolet light, the only stable CuII species is the (CuIIVAg)A center, which is a CuII-silver vacancy complex with the vacancy in a nearest position. In the dark, this center rapidly decays via two parallel channels. The first involves the dissociation of the complex by displacement of the vacancy along a [110] direction, with an activation energy E3=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k30=3.4×105 s-1. The second channel involves the conversion of the (CuIIVAg)A center into a (CuIICl-VAg)B center, where the silver vacancy is in the next nearest position along the [100] direction. This process occurs with an activation energy E1=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k10=3.1×105 s-1. The (CuIICl-VAg)B center slowly decays by a vacancy hopping mechanism, with an activation energy E2=0.22 eV and a frequency factor k20=4.6 s-1. To explain these two decay channels, it is proposed that the (CuIIVAg)A and (CuIICl-VAg)B centers annihilate via the formation of a CuI ion and a neutral complex (AgIIVAg)A which migrates to the surface of the silver halide particle, where electron-hole recombination occurs.

  16. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  17. Bleaching and coating of organic nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Maibohm, C.; Brewer, J. R.; Sturm, H.; Balzer, F.; Rubahn, H.-G.

    2006-09-01

    Degradation of nanofibers made from organic molecules such as para-hexaphenylene or functionalized quaterphenylene via photoexcitation or thermal irradiation is investigated by optical and morphological studies. Under ambient air conditions and in the limit of strong excitation, the degradation of luminescence intensity is accompanied by an increasing surface roughness of the aggregates and by material depletion. Whereas the luminescence intensity is decreasing exponentially with increasing illumination time, the material removal follows a linear relationship. Ablation can be stopped and bleaching can be slowed down by irradiating the nanofibers in vacuum or by coating them with a few hundred nanometers thick layer of silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}). Since the latter treatments do not completely stop the bleaching, it is concluded that bleaching of nanofibers involves at least three independent processes, namely, intramolecular configuration change, photo-oxidation, and material removal.

  18. Mitigating the antimicrobial activities of selected organic acids and commercial sanitizers with various neutralizing agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoen Ju; Chen, Jinru

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the abilities of five neutralizing agents, Dey-Engley (DE) neutralizing broth (single or double strength), morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and sodium thiosulfate buffer, in mitigating the activities of acetic or lactic acid (2%) and an alkaline or acidic sanitizer (a manufacturer-recommended concentration) againt the cells of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC; n = 9). To evaluate the possible toxicity of the neutralizing agents to the STEC cells, each STEC strain was exposed to each of the neutralizing agents at room temperature for 10 min. Neutralizing efficacy was evaluated by placing each STEC strain in a mixture of sanitizer and neutralizer under the same conditions. The neutralizing agents had no detectable toxic effect on the STEC strains. PBS was least effective for neutralizing the activity of selected organic acids and sanitizers. Single-strength DE and sodium thiosulfate neutralized the activity of both acetic and lactic acids. MOPS buffer neutralized the activity of acetic acid and lactic acid against six and five STEC strains, respectively. All neutralizing agents, except double-strength DE broth, had a limited neutralizing effect on the activity of the commercial sanitizers used in the study. The double-strength DE broth effectively neutralized the activity of the two commercial sanitizers with no detectable toxic effects on STEC cells.

  19. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-03

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material. 23 figs.

  20. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    1999-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  1. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  2. Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils.

    PubMed

    Dorman, H J; Deans, S G

    2000-02-01

    The volatile oils of black pepper [Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae)], clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Myrtaceae)], geranium [Pelargonium graveolens L'Herit (Geraniaceae)], nutmeg [Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae), oregano [Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum (Link) Letsw. (Lamiaceae)] and thyme [Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae)] were assessed for antibacterial activity against 25 different genera of bacteria. These included animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all the organisms under test while their major components demonstrated various degrees of growth inhibition.

  3. Antianaerobic activity of sulopenem compared to six other agents.

    PubMed

    Ednie, Lois M; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-05-01

    Agar dilution MIC methodology was used to compare the activity of sulopenem with those of amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 431 anaerobes. Overall, MIC(50)/(90) values were as follows: sulopenem, 0.25/1.0 microg/ml; amoxicillin/clavulanate, 0.5/2.0 microg/ml; ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.5/4.0 microg/ml; piperacillin/tazobactam, 0.25/8.0 microg/ml; imipenem, 0.06/1.0 microg/ml; clindamycin, 0.25/16.0 microg/ml; and metronidazole, 1.0/4.0 microg/ml.

  4. The Synthesis and Study of Azole Carboxamide Nucleosides as Agents Active Against RNA Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-15

    5012 62770A 62770A8,1. AH 355 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) The Synthesis and Study of Azole Carboxamide Nucleosides as Agents Active...broad-spectrum antiviral agent has stimulated a great deal of effort toward the chemical synthesis of nucleosides of other azole heterocycles. During the...4 II. Chemistry and Discussion . . .. .. . 6 1. Synthesis of Certain 5’-Substituted Derivatives of Ribavirin and Tiazofurin . . .. . 6 2

  5. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of...

  7. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  8. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  9. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  10. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  11. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching... systems shall meet all the provisions of this section: (1) Bleaching systems that use chlorine; (2... process using secondary or non-wood fibers, that use chlorine dioxide. (b) The equipment at each...

  12. Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Jones, G. P.; Thorrold, S. R.; Planes, S.

    2011-06-01

    Coral bleaching and related reef degradation have caused significant declines in the abundance of reef-associated fishes. Most attention on the effects of bleaching has focused on corals, but bleaching is also prevalent in other cnidarians, including sea anemones. The consequences of anemone bleaching are unknown, and the demographic effects of bleaching on associated fish recruitment, survival, and reproduction are poorly understood. We examined the effect of habitat degradation including host anemone bleaching on fish abundance, egg production, and recruitment of the panda anemonefish ( Amphiprion polymnus) near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Following a high-temperature anomaly in shallow waters of the region, most shallow anemones to a depth of 6 m (approximately 35% of all the anemones in this area) were severely bleached. Anemone mortality was low but bleached anemones underwent a ~34% reduction in body size. Total numbers of A. polymnus were not affected by bleaching and reduction in shelter area. While egg production of females living in bleached anemones was reduced by ~38% in 2009 compared to 2008, egg production of females on unbleached anemones did not differ significantly between years. Total recruitment in 2009 was much lower than in 2008. However, we found no evidence of recruiting larvae avoiding bleached anemones at settlement suggesting that other factors or different chemical cues were more important in determining recruitment than habitat quality. These results provide the first field evidence of detrimental effects of climate-induced bleaching and habitat degradation on reproduction and recruitment of anemonefish.

  13. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475...

  16. Blockade of constitutively activated ERK signaling enhances cytotoxicity of microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Susumu; Uchiyama, Aya; Watanabe, Kazushi; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Inada, Yoshiyuki; Kawabata, Takumi; Iwashita, Ken-Ichi; Noda, Sinji; Ozaki, Kei-Ichi; Kohno, Michiaki

    2009-01-16

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many human tumor cell types. Given the cytoprotective role of this pathway, we examined whether its specific blockade might sensitize human tumor cells to the induction of apoptosis by various anticancer drugs. Although blockade of ERK signaling alone did not induce substantial cell death, it resulted in marked and selective enhancement of the induction of apoptosis by microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated. The synergistic activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent appeared to be responsible, at least in part, for this effect. These results suggest that administration of the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells with constitutive activation of the ERK pathway.

  17. Bleaching of fluorosis stains using sodium hypochlorite

    PubMed Central

    Penumatsa, Narendra Varma; Sharanesha, Rajashekhara Bhari

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis staining is commonly considered an esthetic problem because of the psychological impact of unesthetic maxillary anterior teeth. Numerous treatment approaches have been proposed, ranging from bleaching to enamel reduction to restorative techniques. Bleaching of hypomineralized enamel lesions, using 5% sodium hypochlorite, has been useful clinically. The technique described, in this case, appears to have advantages over other methods for improving the appearance of fluorotic lesions. It is simple, low cost, noninvasive, so the enamel keeps its structure, relatively rapid, and safe; it requires no special materials, and it can be used with safety on young permanent teeth. PMID:26538964

  18. Stability improvement in bleached phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-08-01

    An experimental study has been made of the influence of developer composition on the stability against the print-out effect of bleached, photographically recorded two-beam interference grating on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The diffraction efficiency has been increased by using potassium iodide and an iodine bleach process that converts a silver image into a dielectric image. An improvement in stability against the print-out effect has been observed by using two new developer compositions. Variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency against exposure to white light is shown graphically.

  19. Novel Oxidatively Activated Agents Modify DNA and are Enhanced by Ercc1 Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy R.; Bell-Horwath, Tiffany R.; Li, Guorui; Rollmann, Stephanie M.; Merino, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Agents that chemically modify DNA form a backbone of many cancer treatments. A key problem for DNA modifying agents is lack of specificity. To address this issue, we designed novel molecular scaffolds, termed An-Hq and An-Hq2, which are activated by a hallmark of some cancers: elevated concentrations of reactive oxygen species. Elevated reactive oxygen species are linked to oncogenesis and is found to increase in several aggressive cancers. The agents are quinones that, upon oxidation, form highly electrophilic species. In vitro studies identified the mode of addition to DNA. The aniline portion of An-Hq serves to enhance nucleophilic addition to the ethyl phenyl ether instead of forming common Michael additions. Structural characterization showed the agents add to 2′-deoxyguanosine at the N2,N3-positions. The product formed is a bulky hydroxy-N2,3-benzetheno-2′-deoxyguanosine adduct. In addition, the oxidatively activated agents added to 2′-deoxyadenosine and 2′-deoxycytidine, but not thymidine or 2′-deoxyinosine. These findings are confirmed by primer extension analysis of a 392 base pair DNA. The full-length primer extension product was reduced by 69.0 ± 0.6% upon oxidative activation of An-Hq2 compared to controls. Little sequence dependence was observed with 76% of guanine, adenine, and cytosine residues showing an increase in extension stops between two and four fold above controls. Benzetheno-nucleobase addition to double stranded DNA was confirmed by LC/MS of a self-complementary oligonucletide. Experiments were carried out to confirm in vivo DNA damage. Because of the lesion identified in vitro, we reasoned that nucleotide excision repair should be involved in reversing the effects of these oxidatively activated agents and enhance toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. Using an RNAi based approach, Ercc1 was silenced and survival monitored after injection of an agent. As expected, bulky cross-linking DNA modifying agents, cisplatin and

  20. Antianaerobic Activity of Sulopenem Compared to Six Other Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ednie, Lois M.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Agar dilution MIC methodology was used to compare the activity of sulopenem with those of amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 431 anaerobes. Overall, MIC50/90 values were as follows: sulopenem, 0.25/1.0 μg/ml; amoxicillin/clavulanate, 0.5/2.0 μg/ml; ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.5/4.0 μg/ml; piperacillin/tazobactam, 0.25/8.0 μg/ml; imipenem, 0.06/1.0 μg/ml; clindamycin, 0.25/16.0 μg/ml; and metronidazole, 1.0/4.0 μg/ml. PMID:19223615

  1. [Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity of certain preservative agents in cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Jantová, S; Hojerová, J; Hanusová, B; Mikulásová, M

    2001-09-01

    Cytotoxic effects of the preservative compounds for cosmetics JMAC TD, Bronopol, CA 24, and Euxyl K100 were studied. Bronopol demonstrated the highest cytotoxic effect on the proliferation of V79 and VH10 fibroblast cell lines--the IC100 values being 10 mg/l during the whole experiment. The preservatives CA 24 and Euxyl K100 showed 4-times and 5-times smaller cytotoxic activity than Bronopol IC100 = 42 or 50.3 mg/l). The preservative compounds on silver chloride ions JMAC TD manifested the lowest cytotoxicity of the preservatives tested (IC100 = 150 mg/l); 15-times smaller than Bronopol, 3.5-times smaller than CA 24 and 3-times smaller than Euxyl K100. The biocide JMAC TD did not exhibit mutagenic effects on the bacteria Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100.

  2. Chelating agents inhibit activity and prevent expression of streptococcal glucan-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Lü-Lü; Singh, J S; Galperin, M Y; Drake, D; Taylor, K G; Doyle, R J

    1992-01-01

    Several of the cariogenic mutans streptococci produce cell wall-associated glucan-binding lectins (GBLs). The lectins bind alpha-1,6-linked glucans and have no affinity for other polysaccharides or anomeric linkages. When citrate or lactate was included in the growth medium, expression of the activities of the GBLs of Streptococcus cricetus and S. sobrinus was prevented. Furthermore, chelating agents, including citrate, lactate, EDTA, and acetylacetone, were able to reversibly inhibit glucan-induced aggregation of GBL+ streptococci. In addition, the chelating agents prevented sucrose-dependent streptococcal adhesion to glass surfaces and dispersed preformed adherent masses of the streptococci. Neither citrate nor other chelating agents modified the activities of glucosyltransferases. Expression of the lectin could only be achieved by the addition of manganous ion to the growth medium. Chloramphenicol and other metabolic inhibitors prevented synthesis of GBL in cells obtained from manganese-deficient medium and shifted to manganous ion-sufficient medium. The GBL may be a manganoprotein, the manganese of which may be perturbed, but not removed, by chelating agents. During synthesis of the GBL, manganous ion may be required in order for the protein to achieve an active conformation. Citrate or other chelating agents may have promise as anticaries agents. Images PMID:1500189

  3. Pharmacological activity and toxicity of some neurotropic agents under conditions of experimental hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichek, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    The indices of pharmacological range, risk coefficients, ED50, LD50, the size of the area of toxic activity, and maximal tolerated and absolute lethal doses were compared in hypodynamic mice. The pharmacological activity of the test neurotropic agents exhibiting a central action underwent change, but their toxicity remained unchanged.

  4. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  5. Comparison of various bleaching processes for silver halide holographic emulsions using the refractive index modulation versus before-bleach optical density characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banyasz, Istvan

    2004-09-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). A pair of absorption and phase holograms was recorded at each value of the recording parameters. Optical densities before bleaching were determined using the absorption holograms. Then each phase grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100 X) objective. Thus modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. To characterize the processing, the modulation of the refractive index of the processed phase holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. These characteristics are especially useful for the comparison of various bleaching agents used with the same developer. Characteristics of similar forms were obtained for all the processing types, with significant differences in the slope and extent of the curves, so that sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could be compared directly.

  6. Antifungal activities of azole agents against the Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karla Carvalho; de Araujo, Crystiane Rodrigues; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Passos, Xisto Sena; de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we identified 95 Malassezia isolates by morphological and biochemical criteria and assessed the in vitro activity of fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole and voriconazole by broth microdilution against these species using slightly modified Leeming-Notman medium. The Malassezia isolates were identified as M. furfur (74), M. sympodialis (11), M. obtusa (8) and M. globosa (2). The modified Leeming-Notman medium used for susceptibility testing allowed good growth of Malassezia spp. Visual reading of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was readily achieved until Day 5 of incubation at 32 degrees C. Although high MIC values of 16 microg/mL for fluconazole were observed in 9.5% of Malassezia isolates, in general these microorganisms were susceptible to all drugs studied. Interestingly, one M. globosa isolate showed high MIC values for voriconazole, itraconazole and fluconazole. For the 95 strains, the MIC ranges were <0.03-4 microg/mL for ketoconazole, <0.03 to >16 microg/mL for voriconazole, <0.125 to >64 microg/mL for fluconazole and <0.03-16 microg/mL for itraconazole. In summary, the good reproducibility and visual readings obtained using modified Leeming-Notman medium suggest that this medium should be proposed for antifungal testing of drugs against Malassezia spp.

  7. Occupational eczema and asthma in a hairdresser caused by hair-bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Hougaard, Majken G; Menné, Torkil; Søsted, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Occupational allergic contact eczema and asthma caused by bleaching agents is seen in hairdressers. Bleaching agents contain persulfate salts, which are known to induce immediate reactions such as rhinitis, asthma, contact urticaria, and anaphylaxis. The immunologic mechanism is not, however, fully understood. The specific inhalation challenge test is considered to be the gold standard for diagnosing occupational asthma and rhinitis. However, this test is not always accessible. Therefore, the diagnosis of occupational allergic asthma caused by persulfate salts is made by combining a clinical history, a diagnosis of asthma, and a positive skin prick test (SPT). Standardized methods for performing SPT with persulfate salts are warranted. A case of a young hairdresser with occupational asthma and hand eczema caused by persulfate salts is presented, and the procedure for performing the SPT with ammonium persulfate and potassium persulfate is described in detail.

  8. Solid-state photochromic behavior and thermal bleaching kinetics of two novel pyrazolone phenylsemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Abdurehman, Samat; Liu, Lang; Jia, Dianzeng; Hu, Jianping; Guo, Jixi; Xie, Xiaolin

    2011-08-22

    Two novel photochromic compounds, 1,3-diphenyl-4-benzal-5-hydroxypyrazole 4-phenylsemicarbazone (1 a) and 1,3-diphenyl-4-(4-nitrobenzal)-5-hydroxypyrazole 4-phenylsemicarbazone (2 a), are synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Their properties, including photochromic behavior, fluorescence properties, and thermal bleaching kinetics, are investigated. The results show that the two compounds exhibit improved photochromic performance in coloration and thermal bleaching rates, excellent photostability, high fatigue resistance, and reversible fluorescence switching properties in the solid state in comparison to reported pyrazolone thiosemicarbazones. The thermal bleaching process obeys first-order kinetics. Bleaching of powders at 130 °C is completed within 90 s for 1 b (the colored isomer of 1 a) and 150 s for 2 b (the colored isomer of 2 a). The activation energy for the thermal bleaching process is determined to be 69 and 95 kJ mol(-1) , with frequency factors of 9.5×10(7) and 9.4×10(10) s(-1) for 1 b and 2 b, respectively.

  9. Variables and potential models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating of fluvial sediments rests on the assumption that sufficient sunlight is available to remove a previously obtained signal in a process deemed bleaching. However, luminescence signals obtained from sediment in the active channels of rivers often contain residual signals. This paper explores and attempts to build theoretical models for the bleaching of luminescence signals in fluvial settings. We present two models, one for sediment transported in an episodic manner, such as flood-driven washes in arid environments, and one for sediment transported in a continuous manner, such as in large continental scale rivers. The episodic flow model assumes that the majority of sediment is bleached while exposed to sunlight at the near surface between flood events and predicts a power-law decay in luminescence signal with downstream transport distance. The continuous flow model is developed by combining the Beer–Lambert law for the attenuation of light through a water column with a general-order kinetics equation to produce an equation with the form of a double negative exponential. The inflection point of this equation is compared with the sediment concentration from a Rouse profile to derive a non-dimensional number capable of assessing the likely extent of bleaching for a given set of luminescence and fluvial parameters. Although these models are theoretically based and not yet necessarily applicable to real-world fluvial systems, we introduce these ideas to stimulate discussion and encourage the development of comprehensive bleaching models with predictive power.

  10. Color and surface temperature variation during bleaching in human devitalized primary teeth: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, Isa T; Navarro, Ricardo S; Ciamponi, Ana Lídia; Miyakawa, Walter; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2008-01-01

    This study's purpose was to make an in vitro assessment of 2 whitening techniques in primary teeth, regarding color and temperature surface variation, during dental bleaching using different catalytic sources. Twenty-one extracted human upper central deciduous incisors were used in this in vitro study. The teeth were darkened with human blood for a period of 21 days. After preparing the teeth, they were randomly distributed into 2 groups, according to bleaching source of activation: (1) a diode laser (DL) group; and (2) a halogen lamp (HL) group. The bleaching process was performed, according to the manufacturer's guidelines, using Whiteness HP (FGM, Joinville, Brazil). The color was assessed by spectrophotometer (CIELab) and the VITA scale (3M) before and immediately after tooth whitening. The temperature increase in the radicular surface during the bleaching was registered with a thermographic camera ThermaCAM SC 3000 (Flir Systems, Danderyd, Sweden) at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN (São Paulo, Brazil). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of color changes, but there was a statistically significant difference for temperature variation. The use of a diode laser and halogen lamp both promoted whitening in devitalized primary teeth in vitro. As a catalytic source of energy, the diode laser--with the applied parameters--promoted a smaller temperature increase compared to the halogen lamp during the bleaching procedure on nonvital primary teeth.

  11. Molecular analysis of the biological bleaching of kraft pulps by Trametes versicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Dumonceaux, T.J.; Archibald, F.S.

    1996-10-01

    Biological bleaching of kraft pulps by the fungus Trametes versicolor, based on the biodegradation of the recalcitrant polymer, lignin, could replace chlorine-based bleaching in Canadian pulp and paper mills. Enzymes that may be involved in lignin degradation include manganese peroxidase (MnP), laccase, and cellobiose-quinone oxidoreductase (CBQase). All three of these enzymatic activities are thought to interact extensively in cyclic oxidation/reduction reactions which ultimately bring about the degradation of lignin. We have constructed a cDNA library from T versicolor with the aim of isolating clones encoding factors that are relevant to biobleaching. We first determined the optimum growth conditions for expression of bleaching-related mRNA. A clear induction of bleaching ability was observed when the fungus was preincubated with 0.25% acid-washed pulp; the augmentation of bleaching was not explained by differences in MnP or laccase levels, suggesting that the expression of either CBQase or unidentified biobleaching factors was responsible for the increased pulp brightness. mRNA isolated from induced cultures was used to construct a cDNA library in a XZAP vector. This library has been probed with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based upon a peptide sequence derived from purified CBQase, resulting in the identification of several hybridizing cDNA molecules. The CBQase clone will be used to examine in further detail the potential role of this enzyme in pulp biobleaching and lignin degradation.

  12. The influence of active vision on the exoskeleton of intelligent agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Patrice; Terry, Theodore B.

    2016-04-01

    Chameleonization occurs when a self-learning autonomous mobile system's (SLAMR) active vision scans the surface of which it is perched causing the exoskeleton to changes colors exhibiting a chameleon effect. Intelligent agents having the ability to adapt to their environment and exhibit key survivability characteristics of its environments would largely be due in part to the use of active vision. Active vision would allow the intelligent agent to scan its environment and adapt as needed in order to avoid detection. The SLAMR system would have an exoskeleton, which would change, based on the surface it was perched on; this is known as the "chameleon effect." Not in the common sense of the term, but from the techno-bio inspired meaning as addressed in our previous paper. Active vision, utilizing stereoscopic color sensing functionality would enable the intelligent agent to scan an object within its close proximity, determine the color scheme, and match it; allowing the agent to blend with its environment. Through the use of its' optical capabilities, the SLAMR system would be able to further determine its position, taking into account spatial and temporal correlation and spatial frequency content of neighboring structures further ensuring successful background blending. The complex visual tasks of identifying objects, using edge detection, image filtering, and feature extraction are essential for an intelligent agent to gain additional knowledge about its environmental surroundings.

  13. Higher-order harmonics in bleached silver halide holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2006-09-01

    A large number of plane wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed by various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). The phase gratings were studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100×) objective. The phase-contrast photomicrographs were Fourier analysed. Thus, first-, second-, and third-order modulations of the refractive index as a function of bias exposure and visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. The ratio of the amplitudes of higher-order modulations to that of the first-order can serve as a measure of the nonlinearity of the holographic recording.

  14. Effect of an Ice-Nucleating Activity Agent on Subzero Survival of Nematode Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Wergin, William P.; Yaklich, Robert W.; Carta, Lynn K.; Erbe, Eric F.; Murphy, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Juveniles of five species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans, Panagrellus redivivus, Pratylenchus agilis, Pristionchus pacificus, and Distolabrellus veechi, were added to solutions with (treatment) and without (control) a commercial ice-nucleating activity (INA) agent. Ten-microliter droplets of the solutions containing the juveniles were placed on glass microscope slides and transferred to a temperaturecontrolled freeze plate where the temperature was reduced to -6 to -8 °C. At this temperature, the droplets containing the INA agent froze while those without the agent remained liquid. After 2 minutes, the temperature of the plate was raised to 24 °C, and the slides were examined with a light microscope to determine the viability of the juveniles. The results showed that usually most juveniles (43% to 88%, depending on species) in solutions that did not contain the INA agent (controls) were active, indicating that the juveniles were capable of supercooling and were thereby protected from the subzero temperatures. Alternatively, less than 10% of the juveniles that had frozen for 2 minutes in solutions containing the INA agent remained viable, indicating that inoculative freezing of the solution was lethal to the supercooled juveniles. Our results suggest that, in geographical areas where winter temperatures may not be sufficiently low or sustained to freeze soil, the addition of an INA agent may help induce ice nucleation and thereby reduce the populations of nematode species that are unable to survive when the soil solution is frozen. PMID:19270966

  15. Activation of Aluminum as an Effective Reducing Agent by Pitting Corrosion for Wet-chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F−, Cl−, and Br− in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu2Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  16. Effect of Vital Bleaching on Disintegration Tendency of Glass Ionomer Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Mahmoud, Rasha Said; Tarakji, Bassel; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed to assess the effect of two bleaching agents on the disintegration tendency of three types of glass ionomers. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 specimens were prepared by using a split Teflon ring with an internal diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. The tested materials were applied and bleached according to manufacturer’s instructions. Dissolution measurements were made by calculating weight loss through different periods of the test; (one week, one month and three months) and they were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: All glass ionomer materials exhibited a degree of dissolution. Opalescence Xtra increased the dissolution of Photac Fil and F2000 significantly, while Opalescence Quick had no effect on dissolution of glass ionomer restoratives. Conclusion: Bleaching effect on dissolution of glass ionomers is material and time dependant. Care should be taken by clinicians When bleaching teeth that are restored by glass ionomer, because this dissolution may affect the physical properties of these restorations. PMID:24701538

  17. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  18. Effect of Fluoride Gels on Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    China, Ana L.P; Souza, Nayara M; Gomes, Yasmin do S. B. de L; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Silva, Cecy M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bleaching treatments containing added calcium and combined with neutral or acidic fluoride gels on tooth enamel was investigated in vitro through Knoop microhardness (KHN) and surface roughness (SR) measurements. A total of 60 bovine incisors were tested, including 30 for SR measurements and 30 for KHN measurements. The specimens were divided into 12 groups and subjected to a bleaching agent with hydrogen peroxide 35% (Whiteness HP 35% Maxx, FGM) or hydrogen peroxide 35% with calcium (Whiteness HP 35% Blue Calcium, FGM) and a fluoride treatment flugel acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) or flugel neutral fluoride (NF). Control specimens were submitted to bleaching treatments without fluoride. Microhardness tests were performed using a Knoop indentor. Roughness measurements were obtained using a roughness analyzer. Measurements were obtained before and after treatment. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C between treatments. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Treatments using APF combined with 35% HP caused a decrease in microhardness, while NF combined with HP 35% Ca increased the enamel hardness. Fluoride gels did not alter the SR of the bleached enamel. PMID:25419249

  19. Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.

    2002-03-04

    Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of

  20. Dust-free bleaching powder may not prevent symptoms in hairdressers with bleaching-associated rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jörn; Nilsson, Patrik; Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Kronholm Diab, Kerstin; Albin, Maria; Kåredal, Monica; Jönsson, Bo; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hairdressers have an increased risk for airway symptoms especially when using hair-bleaching powder containing persulfate. To minimize exposure, dust-free bleaching powder (DFP) has been made available. We studied the effects of regular powder (RP) or DFP on the airway symptoms of hairdressers with hair-bleaching associated rhinitis. Methods: Twelve hairdressers each performed three hair-bleachings on a wig in an exposure chamber. Half of the subjects used RP and half used DFP. Exposure to persulfate and ammonia was measured. Before and after each bleaching, the participants stated their degree of airway symptoms on a visual analogue scale. Nasal lavage and blood were sampled before exposure, after the last bleaching, and in the morning after exposure to measure inflammatory markers. Results: Exposure to persulfate was higher when using RP compared to DFP, 22 (11-55) vs. 12 (8-13) μg/m3; median (min-max). Exposure to ammonia did not differ between the groups. Both groups reported an increase in asthma-like symptoms and this increase was significant. Neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes increased after exposure in both groups; monocytes decreased the day after. In nasal lavage, IL-8 was increased the morning after for both types of powder, and the increase was significant in the total group. IL-6 increased immediately after exposure and the day after only in the group using RP. Conclusions: Although DFP powder emits lower levels of persulfate, effects are still elicited in symptomatic hairdressers. PMID:27488042

  1. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine.

  2. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, G. P. V.; Varma, K. Ravi; Shetty, K. Harish; Kumar, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were not influenced by the

  3. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Terry P.; Kerry, James T.; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G.; Anderson, Kristen D.; Baird, Andrew H.; Babcock, Russell C.; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C.; Butler, Ian R.; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E.; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Dalton, Steven J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C. Mark; Figueira, Will F.; Gilmour, James P.; Harrison, Hugo B.; Heron, Scott F.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Kennedy, Emma V.; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; McWilliam, Michael J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Pears, Rachel J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J.; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R.; Willis, Bette L.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-03-01

    During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  4. Chronic parrotfish grazing impedes coral recovery after bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotjan, Randi D.; Dimond, James L.; Thornhill, Daniel J.; Leichter, James J.; Helmuth, Brian; Kemp, Dustin W.; Lewis, Sara M.

    2006-08-01

    Coral bleaching, in which corals become visibly pale and typically lose their endosymbiotic zooxanthellae ( Symbiodinium spp.), increasingly threatens coral reefs worldwide. While the proximal environmental triggers of bleaching are reasonably well understood, considerably less is known concerning physiological and ecological factors that might exacerbate coral bleaching or delay recovery. We report a bleaching event in Belize during September 2004 in which Montastraea spp. corals that had been previously grazed by corallivorous parrotfishes showed a persistent reduction in symbiont density compared to intact colonies. Additionally, grazed corals exhibited greater diversity in the genetic composition of their symbiont communities, changing from uniform ITS2 type C7 Symbiodinium prior to bleaching to mixed assemblages of Symbiodinium types post-bleaching. These results suggest that chronic predation may exacerbate the influence of environmental stressors and, by altering the coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis, such abiotic-biotic interactions may contribute to spatial variation in bleaching processes.

  5. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Kerry, James T; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Anderson, Kristen D; Baird, Andrew H; Babcock, Russell C; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C; Butler, Ian R; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R; Cumming, Graeme S; Dalton, Steven J; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C Mark; Figueira, Will F; Gilmour, James P; Harrison, Hugo B; Heron, Scott F; Hoey, Andrew S; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Kennedy, Emma V; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M; Lowe, Ryan J; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Malcolm, Hamish A; McWilliam, Michael J; Pandolfi, John M; Pears, Rachel J; Pratchett, Morgan S; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R; Willis, Bette L; Wilson, Shaun K

    2017-03-15

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  6. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions.

  7. Kraft Pulp Bleaching and Delignification by Dikaryons and Monokaryons of Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Addleman, Katherine; Archibald, Frederick

    1993-01-01

    The ability of 10 dikaryotic and 20 monokaryotic strains of Trametes (Coriolus) versicolor to bleach and delignify hardwood and softwood kraft pulps was assessed. A dikaryon (52P) and two of its mating-compatible monokaryons (52J and 52D) derived via protoplasting were compared. All three regularly bleached hardwood kraft pulp more than 20 brightness points (International Standards Organization) in 5 days and softwood kraft pulp the same amount in 12 days. Delignification (kappa number reduction) by the dikaryon and the monokaryons was similar, but the growth of the monokaryons was slower. Insoluble dark pigments were commonly found in the mycelium, medium, and pulp of the dikaryon only. Laccase and manganese peroxidase (MnP) but not lignin peroxidase activities were secreted during bleaching by all three strains. Their laccase and MnP isozyme patterns were compared on native gels. No segregation of isozyme bands between the monokaryons was found. Hardwood kraft pulp appeared to adsorb several laccase isozyme bands. One MnP isozyme (pI, 3.2) was secreted in the presence of pulp by all three strains, but a second (pI, 4.9) was produced only by 52P. A lower level of soluble MnP activity in one monokaryon (52D) was associated with reduced bleaching ability and a lower level of methanol production. Since monokaryon 52J bleached pulp better than its parent dikaryon 52P, especially per unit of biomass, this genetically simpler monokaryon will be the preferred subject for further genetic manipulation and improvement of fungal pulp biological bleaching. Images PMID:16348851

  8. Multi-Agent System for Managing Human Activities in Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenkenghost, Debra; Bonasso, R. Peter

    2006-01-01

    In manned space operations today, the astronauts' activity schedules are preplanned and adjusted daily on Earth. We have developed the Distributed Collaboration and Interaction (DCI) multi-agent system to investigate automating aspects of human activity management. The DCI System assists (1) plan generation, (2) human activity tracking, (3) plan revision, and (4) mixed initiative interaction with the plan. We have deployed and evaluated the DCI system at JSC to assist control engineers in managing anomaly handling activities for automated life support systems. DCI operated round the clock for 20 months in the Water Research Facility at JSC. Using this software, we reduced anomaly response time by engineers from up to 10 hours in previous tests to under an hour. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that agent assistance for schedule management has potential to improve astronaut activity awareness and reduce response time in situations where crew are interrupted to handle anomalies.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and chemical burns after exposure to chlorine-containing bleach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Chang, Jin-Sun; Ahn, Seong; Kim, Tae-Ok; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Lim, Jung-Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine-containing bleach can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chemical burns. However, simultaneous occurrence of the two conditions caused by this agent is very rare. We describe the case of a 74-year-old female who presented with shortness of breath and hemoptysis following accidental exposure to chlorine-containing bleach. She had second- to third-degree chemical burns on both buttocks and thighs, and received mechanical ventilation because of the development of ARDS. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on day 6 of hospitalization because of the rapid improvement of hypoxemia, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for further management of the chemical burns on day 18.

  10. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-06-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  11. 21 CFR 178.3400 - Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents. 178.3400 Section 178.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants...

  12. Identity Agents: Parents as Active and Reflective Participants in their Children's Identity Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Elli P.; Ventura, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces the concept of identity agents. This concept refers to those individuals who actively interact with children and youth with the intention of participating in their identity formation, and who reflectively mediate larger social influences on identity formation. This contrasts with the focus of mainstream research in the…

  13. SHEDDING LIGHT ON CORALS HEALTH: INTERACTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SOLAR RADIATION WITH BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral bleaching and declines in coral reef health in recent years have been attributed in part to processes driven by UV and/or visible light. For coral assemblages, exposure to UV light is often an unavoidable consequence of having access to visible (photosynthetically active) ...

  14. Bleach boosting effect of xylanase A from Bacillus halodurans C-125 in ECF bleaching of wheat straw pulp.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-qiong; Han, Shuang-yan; Zhang, Na; Hu, Hui; Zheng, Sui-ping; Ye, Yan-rui; Lin, Ying

    2013-02-05

    Past studies have revealed major difficulties in applications of xylanase in the pulp and paper industry as enzymes isolated from many different species could not tolerate high temperatures or highly alkaline conditions. The thermostable xylanase A from Bacillus halodurans C-125 (C-125 xylanase A) was successfully cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris with a yield as high as 3361 U/mL in a 2 L reactor. Its thermophilic and basophilic properties (optimal activity at 70 °C and pH 9.0), together with the fact it is cellulase-free, render this enzyme attractive for compatible applications in the pulp and paper industry. The pretreatment of wheat straw pulp with C-125 xylanase A at pH 9.0 and 70 °C for 90 min induced the release of both chromophores (Ab(237), Ab(254), Ab(280)) and hydrophobic compounds (Ab(465)) into the filtrate as well as sugar degradation. Moreover, the addition of 10 U xylanase to 1 g wheat straw pulp (dry weight) as pretreatment improved brightness by 5.2% ISO and decreased the kappa number by 5.0% when followed by hydrogen peroxide bleaching. In addition, compared with two commercial enzymes, Pulpzyme HC and AU-PE89, which are normally incorporated in ECF bleaching of wheat straw pulp, C-125 xylanase A proved to be more effective in enhancing brightness as well as preserving paper strength properties. When evaluating the physical properties of pulp samples, such as tensile index, tearing index, bursting index, and post-color (PC) number, the enzymes involved in pretreating pulps exhibited better or the same performances as chemical treatment. Compared with chemical bleaching, chlorine consumption can be significantly reduced by 10% for xylanase-pretreated wheat straw pulp while maintaining the brightness together with the kappa number at the same level. Scanning electron microscopy revealed significant surface modification of enzyme-pretreated pulp fibers with no marked fiber disruptions.

  15. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    PubMed

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  16. Differential nitric oxide synthesis and host apoptotic events correlate with bleaching susceptibility in reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, T. D.; Krueger, T.; Becker, S.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Coral bleaching poses a threat to coral reefs worldwide. As a consequence of the temperature-induced breakdown in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, bleaching can have extensive effects on reef communities. However, our understanding of bleaching at a cellular level is limited, and this is particularly true regarding differential susceptibility among coral species. Recent work suggests that bleaching may represent a host innate immune-like response to symbiont dysfunction that involves synthesis of the signalling compound nitric oxide (NO) and the induction of host apoptotic-like cell death. In this study, we examined the activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes alongside oxidised NO accumulation (a proxy for NO synthesis) in the reef corals Acropora millepora, Montipora digitata, and Pocillopora damicornis during experimental thermal stress. P. damicornis was the most sensitive species, suffering mortality (tissue sloughing) after 5 days at 33 °C but non-lethal bleaching after 9 days at 31.5 °C. A. millepora bleached at 33 °C but remained structurally intact, while M. digitata showed little evidence of bleaching. P. damicornis and A. millepora both exhibited evidence of temperature-induced NO synthesis and, after 5 days of heating, levels of oxidised NO in both species were fivefold higher than in controls maintained at 28.5 °C. These responses preceded bleaching by a number of days and may have occurred before symbiont dysfunction (measured as chlorophyll a degradation and oxidised NO accumulation). In A. millepora, apparent NO synthesis correlated with the induction of host apoptotic-like pathways, while in P. damicornis, the upregulation of apoptotic pathways occurred later. No evidence of elevated NO production or apoptosis was observed in M. digitata at 33 °C and baseline activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes was negligible in this species. These findings provide important physiological data in the context of the responses of corals to global change and

  17. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  18. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of bleach routinely used in health facilities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Daniel; Admassu, Aschalew; Wassie, Belaynew; Biadglegne, Fantahun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Ethiopia, the most widely used disinfectant is 5% Hypochlorites. However, Ethiopian national health safety and infection prevention guideline recommendation on the use of bleach is not consistent and varying from 0.1%-4%. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the effective time-concentration relationship of sodium hypochlorite against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the absence of any organic load. Methods This experimental study was conducted in Bahir Dar Regional laboratory from February-June 2013. Test suspensions of 1.5 X 108 CFU/ml prepared using normal saline containing 0.5% tween 80. From 5% stock, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% bleach was prepared. A 1ml of test strain suspension and 1ml of bleach mixed and allowed to stand until the specified time achieved, neutralized by 48 ml phosphate buffer. 100µl from the diluted sediment were spread on two L-J mediums and incubated at 37°C for 8 weeks. Results When 0. 1% bleach was used for 10 min, majority 11/20 of isolates showed 3 x 103 CFU/ml growth (ME = 4.4) which was inefficient. However, when the time increased, the log10 reduction was acceptable, ME >5 and it was effective. The bleach solution containing 0.5% and above was effective in all respective times. In this study, there is no difference observed in the tuberculocidal activity of bleach against resistant and sensitive strains. Conclusion Our study showed that in the absence of any organic load, 0.1% bleaches over 15 min and 0.5% bleaches over 10 min was found to be tuberculocidal. PMID:26668688

  20. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders.

    PubMed

    Anthony, K R N; Kline, D I; Diaz-Pulido, G; Dove, S; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-11-11

    Ocean acidification represents a key threat to coral reefs by reducing the calcification rate of framework builders. In addition, acidification is likely to affect the relationship between corals and their symbiotic dinoflagellates and the productivity of this association. However, little is known about how acidification impacts on the physiology of reef builders and how acidification interacts with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcification responses of crustose coralline algae (CCA) and branching (Acropora) and massive (Porites) coral species in response to acidification and warming. Using a 30-tank experimental system, we manipulated CO(2) levels to simulate doubling and three- to fourfold increases [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projection categories IV and VI] relative to present-day levels under cool and warm scenarios. Results indicated that high CO(2) is a bleaching agent for corals and CCA under high irradiance, acting synergistically with warming to lower thermal bleaching thresholds. We propose that CO(2) induces bleaching via its impact on photoprotective mechanisms of the photosystems. Overall, acidification impacted more strongly on bleaching and productivity than on calcification. Interestingly, the intermediate, warm CO(2) scenario led to a 30% increase in productivity in Acropora, whereas high CO(2) lead to zero productivity in both corals. CCA were most sensitive to acidification, with high CO(2) leading to negative productivity and high rates of net dissolution. Our findings suggest that sensitive reef-building species such as CCA may be pushed beyond their thresholds for growth and survival within the next few decades whereas corals will show delayed and mixed responses.

  1. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  2. Effect of Activating Agent on the Preparation of Bamboo-Based High Surface Area Activated Carbon by Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hongying; Wu, Jian; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo

    2016-06-01

    The present work attempts to convert bamboo into a high surface area activated carbon via microwave heating. Different chemical activating agents such as KOH, NaOH, K2CO3 and Na2CO3 were utilized to identify a most suitable activating agent. Among the activating agents tested KOH was found to generate carbon with the highest porosity and surface area. The effect of KOH/C ratio on the porous nature of the activated carbon has been assessed. An optimal KOH/C ratio of 4 was identified, beyond which the surface area as well as the pore volume were found to decrease. At the optimized KOH/C ratio the surface area and the pore volume were estimated to be 3,441 m2/g and 2.093 ml/g, respectively, with the significant proportion of which being microporous (62.3%). Activated carbon prepared under the optimum conditions was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Activated carbons with so high surface area and pore volume are very rarely reported, which could be owed to the nature of the precursor and the optimal conditions of mixture ratio adopted in the present work.

  3. The effect of three different mouthrinses on the surface hardness, gloss and colour change of bleached nano composite resins.

    PubMed

    Gurgan, Sevil; Yalcin Cakir, Filiz

    2008-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of three mouthrinses (Listerine--alcohol containing, Oral B--alcohol free and Rembrandt Plus--peroxide whitening rinse) on the surface hardness, gloss and colour of a nanofill (Filtek Supreme) and nanohybrid (Simile) composite resin that had been subjected to bleaching treatment. 30 specimens of each material were fabricated and randomly divided into three groups of 10. The hardness, gloss and CIE Lab colour parameters of each specimen were assessed prior to the experiments. Specimens were exposed to the 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent (Vivastyle) for 2 hours per day for 14 days. Following the bleaching treatment measurements were repeated. The specimens were then conditioned with mouthrinses for 12 hours which was equivalent in time to 1 year of two minutes daily use. The specimens were measured again for hardness, gloss and colour and data were subjected to the statistical analysis. The result of this study showed no statististical difference between the restorative materials after bleaching and the use of mouthrinses (p > 0.05). Bleaching treatment and the use of mouthrinses af fected the hardness, gloss and colour of both resins. Significant differences were observed with the use of mouthrinses for all parameters (p < 0.05). Rembrandt Plus promoted the greatest changes, followed by Listerine and Oral B.

  4. The effect of tooth bleaching on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Mehmet; Aksakalli, Sertac; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Demir, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using self-etching primer systems. Methods: Forty five freshly extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 15 teeth each: control (group 1), 10% carbamide peroxide at-home bleached (group 2), and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleached (group 3). Three weeks later, all brackets were bonded using a self-etching primer system. The shear bond strength of these brackets was measured and recorded in MPa. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were determined after the brackets failed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis test, pairwise comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test and ARI scores were analyzed using a chi-square test at a significance level of P<.05. Results: The shear bond strengths of group 1 (mean: 17.7 ± 9.7 MPa) were significantly higher (P<.05) than those of group 3 (mean: 9.9 ± 5.4 MPa). No significant differences were found between group 2 (mean: 12.3 ± 4.7) and either group 1 or group 3 (P>.05). ARI scores did not differ significantly among the 3 groups. Conclusions: The use of 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching does not significantly reduce shear bond strength values. In contrast, use of 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching significantly reduces these values. PMID:23408777

  5. Discovery of novel dual-action antidiabetic agents that inhibit glycogen phosphorylase and activate glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaojie; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Qingzhang; Leng, Ying; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Dual-target-directed agents simultaneously inhibiting glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and activating glucokinase (GK) could decelerate the inflow of glucose from glycogenolysis and accelerate the outflow of glucose in the liver, therefore allow for a better control over hyperglycaemia in a synergetic manner. A series of hybrid compounds were designed by structure-assisted and ligand-based strategies. In vitro bioassays found two novel compounds (1j, 6g) worthy of further optimization on balance of dual action to GP and GK. In addition, for single-target activity, two compounds exhibited more potent GP inhibitory activity and four compounds showed better GK activation than their corresponding references.

  6. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Khadem, Parvin; Soltanian, Aliraza; Azizi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15): G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP); G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05). Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa) and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa), respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001). No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05). Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel. PMID:28127316

  7. Synthesis and alkylation activity of a nitrogen mustard agent to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard agents are widely used for the clinical treatment of cancers. A nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agent was synthesized utilizing nicotinic acid as the carrier of the alkylating substituent (-OCH2CH2N(CH2CH2Cl)2) that forms an ester group (R-C(O)-OR) on a heterocyclic ring. The N-mustard agent is a solid at room temperature and is stable for more than 6 weeks when stored at -10 degrees C. To determine the kinetics of alkylation activity a nucleophilic primary amine compound (4-chloroaniline) was placed in aqueous solution with the mustard agent at physiological pH 7.4 (pH of blood) and 37 degrees C. The alkylation reaction was found to be second-order with rate equation: rate = k2[N-mustard][Nu], where Nu = nucleophile and k2 = 0.0415 L/(mol x min). Pharmacological descriptors calculated showed values indicating a strong potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. The partition coefficient (Log P) of the mustard agent is 1.95 compared with 0.58 for nicotinic acid. Values of descriptors such as dipole, polar surface area, Log BB, molar refractivity, parachor, and violations of Rule of 5 were found to be 5.057 Debye, 42.44 A2, 0.662, 72.7 cm3, 607.7 cm3, and 0.0 for the N-mustard agent. Value of polar surface area for the mustard agent (42.44 A2) predicts that >90% of any amount present in the intestinal tract will be absorbed.

  8. Penetration of 38% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine and human teeth submitted to office bleach technique.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Gasparoto Mancini, Maria Nadir; Menezes, Marcia Maciel

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulp chamber penetration of peroxide bleaching agent in human and bovine teeth after office bleach technique. All the teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical of the cement-enamel junction and were divided into 2 groups, A (70 third human molars) and B (70 bovine lateral incisors), that were subdivided into A1 and B1 restored by using composite resin, A2 and B2 by using glass ionomer cement, and A3 and B3 by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement; A4, A5, B4, and B5 were not restored. Acetate buffer was placed in the pulp chamber, and the bleaching agent was applied for 40 minutes as follows: A1-A4 and B1-B4, 38% hydrogen peroxide exposure and A5 and B5, immersion into distilled water. The buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco crystal violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Dunnett, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey tests (5%). A higher level of hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp chamber in resin-modified glass ionomer cements in bovine (0.79 +/- 0.61 microg) and human (2.27 +/- 0.41 microg) groups. The bleaching agent penetration into the pulp chamber was higher in human teeth for any experimental situation. The penetration of the hydrogen peroxide depends on restorative materials, and under the conditions of this study human teeth are more susceptible to penetration of bleaching agent into the pulp chamber than bovine teeth.

  9. Photobacterium rosenbergii sp. nov. and Enterovibrio coralii sp. nov., vibrios associated with coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Thompson, F L; Thompson, C C; Naser, S; Hoste, B; Vandemeulebroecke, K; Munn, C; Bourne, D; Swings, J

    2005-03-01

    Six new Vibrio-like isolates originating from different species of bleached and healthy corals around Magnetic Island (Australia) were investigated using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA, recA and rpoA gene sequences split the isolates in two new groups. Strains LMG 22223(T), LMG 22224, LMG 22225, LMG 22226 and LMG 22227 were phylogenetic neighbours of Photobacterium leiognathi LMG 4228(T) (95.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), whereas strain LMG 22228(T) was related to Enterovibrio norvegicus LMG 19839(T) (95.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The two new groups can be distinguished from closely related species on the basis of several phenotypic features, including fermentation of d-mannitol, melibiose and sucrose, and utilization of different compounds as carbon sources, arginine dihydrolase activity, nitrate reduction, resistance to the vibriostatic agent O/129 and the presence of fatty acids 15 : 0 iso and 17 : 0 iso. The names Photobacterium rosenbergii sp. nov. (type strain LMG 22223(T)=CBMAI 622(T)=CC1(T)) and Enterovibrio coralii sp. nov. (type strain LMG 22228(T)=CBMAI 623(T)=CC17(T)) are proposed to accommodate these new isolates. The G+C contents of the DNA of the two type strains are respectively 47.6 and 48.2 mol%.

  10. Refractive index modulation vs. before-bleach optical density modulation characteristics of silver halide phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bányász, I.

    2005-01-01

    A large number of plane-wave holograms were recorded in Agfa-Gevaert 8E75HD holographic plates, at a wide range of bias exposures and fringe visibilities. The plates were processed with various combinations of developers (AAC, Pyrogallol and Catechol) and bleaching agents (R-9 and EDTA). A pair of absorption and phase holograms was recorded at each value of the recording parameters. Optical densities before bleaching were determined using the absorption holograms. Then each phase grating was studied by phase-contrast microscopy, using a high-power immersion (100×) objective. Thus modulation of the refractive index as a function of the bias exposure and the visibility of the recording interference pattern could be determined. To characterize the processing, the modulation of the refractive index of the processed phase holograms was related to the amplitude of the optical density modulation obtained at the development step. These characteristics are especially useful for the comparison of various bleaching agents used with the same developer. Characteristics of similar forms were obtained for all the processing types, with significant differences in the slope and extent of the curves, so that sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range of the processes could be compared directly.

  11. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents, alone and in combination, against Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from blood.

    PubMed

    Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-11-01

    In vitro activities of 15 antimicrobial agents against 90 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from blood cultures from hospitalized patients were determined using the agar dilution method. Imipenem, ofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin had the best antimicrobial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC50s) of 0.25 mu g/ml and MIC90s of 0.5-1 mu g/ml. beta-lactam antibiotics other than imipenem had poor activity, with MIC50s ranging from 8 to 64 mu g/ml and MIC90s from 32 to > or = 256 mu g/ml. The checkerboard titration method was used to study the effects of combination of two antimicrobial agents. Combinations of ceftazidime, aztreonam, imipenem, or ciprofloxacin with amikacin showed either synergistic effects or partial synergistic effects for 40.9%-86.4% of 22 tested strains. The best in vitro activity was observed with the combination of imipenem and amikacin. No antagonistic effects were observed with the combination of imipenem and amikacin. Synergistic effects were confirmed by time-kill curve studies. In conclusion, imipenem, ofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were the three most active agents against human blood isolates of A. baumannii. The combination of a beta-lactam or ciprofloxacin with amikacin was synergistic for some of the isolates.

  12. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure.

  13. Evaluation of Colloids and Activation Agents for Determination of Melamine Using UV-SERS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    UV-SERS measurements offer a great potential for environmental or food (detection of food contaminats) analytics. Here, the UV-SERS enhancement potential of various kinds of metal colloids, such as Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, Au–Ag core–shell, and Ag–Au core–shell with different shapes and sizes, were studied using melamine as a test molecule. The influence of different activation (KF, KCl, KBr, K2SO4) agents onto the SERS activity of the nanomaterials was investigated, showing that the combination of a particular nanoparticle with a special activation agent is extremely crucial for the observed SERS enhancement. In particular, the size dependence of spherical nanoparticles of one particular metal on the activator has been exploited. By doing so, it could be shown that the SERS enhancement increases or decreases for increasing or decreasing size of a nanoparticle, respectively. Overall, the presented results demonstrate the necessity to adjust the nanoparticle size and the activation agent for different experiments in order to achieve the best possible UV-SERS results. PMID:22428076

  14. Agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    The active hybridization technique provides an effective approach to combining the best properties of a heterogeneous set of power sources to achieve higher energy density, power density and fuel efficiency. Active hybrid power sources can be used to power hybrid electric vehicles with selected combinations of internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, and/or supercapacitors. They can be deployed in all-electric ships to build a distributed electric power system. They can also be used in a bulk power system to construct an autonomous distributed energy system. An important aspect in designing an active hybrid power source is to find a suitable control strategy that can manage the active power sharing and take advantage of the inherent scalability and robustness benefits of the hybrid system. This paper presents an agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed agent-based power sharing scheme, simulation studies are performed for a hybrid power source that can be used in a solar car as the main propulsion power module. Simulation results clearly indicate that the agent-based control framework is effective to coordinate the various energy sources and manage the power/voltage profiles.

  15. A new macromolecular paramagnetic MR contrast agent binds to activated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Chaubet, Frédéric; Bertholon, Isabelle; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bazeli, Ramin; Alsaid, Hasan; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Zahir, Charaf; Even, Pascale; Bachelet, Laure; Touat, Ziad; Lancelot, Eric; Corot, Claire; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle; Letourneur, Didier

    2007-07-01

    A new functionalized macromolecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent has been developed from a carboxymethyldextran-Gd(DOTA) devoid of biospecificity. The functionalized contrast agent was synthesized in order to mimic PSGL-1, the main ligand of P-selectin, a glycoprotein mainly expressed on the surface of activated platelets. The starting compound, CM1, was first carboxymethylated by monochloroacetic acid leading to a series of 10 derivatives varying in their carboxymethyl content. CM8 derivative, with a degree of substitution in carboxymethyl of 0.84, was chosen for subsequent fluorolabeling and sulfation to give CM8FS. CM8FS has an average number molecular weight of 27 000 +/- 500 g/mol, a hydrodynamic radius of 5.7 +/- 0.2 nm and a high relaxivity (r(1) = 11.2/mM (Gd)/s at 60 MHz). Flow cytometry experiments on whole human blood or on isolated platelets evidenced in vitro a preferential binding of CM8FS on TRAP-activated human platelets. Interestingly, CM8FS did not bind to other blood cells or to resting platelets. Pellets of TRAP-activated human platelets have also been imaged in tubes with a 1.5 T MR imager. A MR signal was observed for activated platelets incubated with CM8FS. Altogether, these in vitro results evidenced the recognition of activated human platelets by a fluorescent paramagnetic contrast agent grafted with carboxyl and sulfate groups. This biomimetic approach associated with the versatile macromolecular platform appears promising for the development of new contrast agents for molecular imaging of activated platelets in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and aneurysms.

  16. Efficacy of Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seoul Hee; Lee, Hae June; Hong, Jin Woo; Kim, Gyoo Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The conventional light source used for tooth bleaching has the potential to cause thermal damage, and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. In this study, we evaluated bleaching efficacy, temperature, and morphological safety after tooth bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma. Tooth bleaching combined with plasma had improved efficacy in providing a higher level of brightness. The temperature of the pulp chamber was maintained around 37°C, indicating that the plasma does not cause any thermal damage. The morphological results of tooth bleaching with plasma did not affect mineral composition under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. On the basis of these results, the application of plasma and low concentration of 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) has a high capability for effective tooth bleaching. It can be documented that plasma is a safe energe source, which has no deleterious effects on the tooth surface. PMID:25685843

  17. The 2014 summer coral bleaching event in subtropical Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Xie, James Y; Lau, Dickey C C; Kei, Keith; Yu, Vriko P F; Chow, Wing-Kuen; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2017-04-06

    We reported a coral bleaching event that occurred in August-September 2014 in Hong Kong waters based on video transect surveys conducted at eight sites. The bleaching affected eight species of corals with different growth forms. Bleaching at seven of the eight study sites was minor, affecting only 0.4-5.2% colonies and 0.8-10.0% coral-covered area. Sharp Island East, however, suffered from a moderate level of bleaching, with 13.1% colonies and 30.1% coral-covered area affected. Examination of the government's environmental monitoring data indicated abnormal water quality conditions preceding and during the bleaching event. Follow-up field surveys of tagged colonies showed that 76% of them had fully recovered, 12% partially recovered, and 12% suffered from mortality. These results indicate that the subtropical corals of Hong Kong are not immune to bleaching, and there is a need to study their responses under climate change scenarios.

  18. A comparison of the sensitivity of four Staphylococcus aureus isolates to two chlorine-based disinfectants and an eco-friendly commercially available cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Adukwu, Emmanuel C; Allen, Stuart C; Phillips, Carol Ann

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of household bleach, a sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC)-based disinfectant and an eco-friendly cleaning agent (EFCA) on four Staphylococcus aureus strains, including two isolated from community infections. The products were assessed using the suspension (EN 1276) and surface (EN 13697) tests, while biofilm activity was determined using the 96-well plate method. Bleach and NaDCC caused > 5 log reduction in viable counts within 5 min in suspension, whilst on surfaces the reduction was < 3 log. Bleach at 5000 ppm free available chlorine completely eradicated MSSA NCTC 13297 and PVL CA MSSA biofilms within 10 min, but not at 500 and 50 ppm, NaDCC was less effective against biofilms. The EFCA demonstrated no antimicrobial activity. It is of concern that at the recommended "use" dilution, bleach did not eradicate biofilms. Although increasing contact time and/or concentration should improve the activity, this may not be acceptable to the user.

  19. Combined bleaching and hydrolysis for isolation of cellulose nanofibrils from waste sackcloth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yang; Jiang, Yaoquan; Song, Yuanyuan; Cao, Shaomei; Miao, Miao; Feng, Xin; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-10-20

    A convenient and low cost process to prepare cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) from waste sackcloth by using H2O2/HNO3 solution as both bleaching agent and hydrolysis medium was recommended. The resultant CNF with high crystallinity was initially synthesized by the chemical disintegration process for the removal of non-cellulosic components and the crystallinity of CNF was 68.11% compared with that of sackcloth fibers (48.28%). The decomposition temperature of CNF was about 340°C, which indicated that the thermal stability of the fibers was increased after the combined bleaching and hydrolysis. Subsequently, the homogenous CNF colloidal suspensions in water, ethanol and acetone were obtained after sonication treatment. The CNF in water suspensions with 20-50nm in width and hundreds of nanometers in length was ultimately prepared under the conditions of different ultrasonic time.

  20. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of 24 antimicrobial agents against Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

    PubMed

    Vanhoof, R; Gordts, B; Dierickx, R; Coignau, H; Butzler, J P

    1980-07-01

    The bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of 24 antimicrobial agents were tested with the Dynatech MIC 2000 system against 86 strains of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni from human sources. The penicillins (penicillin G, ampicillin, amoxycillin, carbenicillin) had poor activity. Ampicillin and amoxycillin were equally active. Cefotaxime revealed a rather good activity. Erythromycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, and furazolidone were the most active compounds. Two strains (2.3%) were resistant to erythromycin. One strain (1.2%) was completely resistant to tobramycin. The tetracyclines (tetracyline, doxycycline, minocycline) were generally effective, but 8% of the strains were totally resistant to them. Minocycline was the most active. Chloramphenicol, thiamphenicol, and clindamycin had good activity. The bacteriostatic and bactericidal distributions for colistin, nalidixic acid, and metronidazole were broad.

  1. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Broad Reactivity of the Nerve Agent Sarin.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Adriaan W; Mol, Marijke A E; van den Berg, Roland M; Fidder, A; van der Marel, Gijs A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Noort, Daan

    2009-04-01

    Elucidation of noncholinesterase protein targets of organophosphates, and nerve agents in particular, may reveal additional mechanisms for their high toxicity as well as clues for novel therapeutic approaches toward intoxications with these agents. Within this framework, we here describe the synthesis of the activity-based probe 3, which contains a phosphonofluoridate moiety, a P-Me moiety, and a biotinylated O-alkyl group, and its use in activity-based protein profiling with two relevant biological samples, that is, rhesus monkey liver and cultured human A549 lung cells. In this way, we have unearthed eight serine hydrolases (fatty acid synthase, acylpeptide hydrolase, dipeptidyl peptidase 9, prolyl oligopeptidase, carboxylesterase, long-chain acyl coenzyme A thioesterase, PAF acetylhydrolase 1b, and esterase D/S-formyl glutathione hydrolase) as targets that are modified by the nerve agent sarin. It is also shown that the newly developed probe 3 might find its way into the development of alternative, less laborious purification protocols for human butyrylcholinesterase, a potent bioscavenger currently under clinical investigation as a prophylactic/therapeutic for nerve agent intoxications.

  2. Levels of immunity parameters underpin bleaching and disease susceptibility of reef corals.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline V; Bythell, John C; Willis, Bette L

    2010-06-01

    Immunity is a key life history trait that may explain hierarchies in the susceptibility of corals to disease and thermal bleaching, two of the greatest current threats to coral health and the persistence of tropical reefs. Despite their ongoing and rapid global decline, there have been few investigations into the immunity mechanisms of reef-building corals. Variables commonly associated with invertebrate immunity, including the presence of melanin, size of melanin-containing granular cells, and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, as well as concentrations of fluorescent proteins (FPs), were investigated in hard (Scleractinia) and soft (Alcyonacea) corals spanning 10 families from the Great Barrier Reef. Detectable levels of these indicators were present in all corals investigated, although relative investment differed among coral taxa. Overall levels of investment were inversely correlated to thermal bleaching and disease susceptibility. In addition, PO activity, melanin-containing granular cell size, and FP concentration were each found to be significant predictors of susceptibility and thus may play key roles in coral immunity. Correlative evidence that taxonomic (family-level) variation in the levels of these constituent immunity parameters underpins susceptibility to both thermal bleaching and disease indicates that baseline immunity underlies the vulnerability of corals to these two threats. This reinforces the necessity of a holistic approach to understanding bleaching and disease in order to accurately determine the resilience of coral reefs.

  3. Using an agent-based model to simulate children’s active travel to school

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the multiple advantages of active travel to school, only a small percentage of US children and adolescents walk or bicycle to school. Intervention studies are in a relatively early stage and evidence of their effectiveness over long periods is limited. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the utility of agent-based models in exploring how various policies may influence children’s active travel to school. Methods An agent-based model was developed to simulate children’s school travel behavior within a hypothetical city. The model was used to explore the plausible implications of policies targeting two established barriers to active school travel: long distance to school and traffic safety. The percent of children who walk to school was compared for various scenarios. Results To maximize the percent of children who walk to school the school locations should be evenly distributed over space and children should be assigned to the closest school. In the case of interventions to improve traffic safety, targeting a smaller area around the school with greater intensity may be more effective than targeting a larger area with less intensity. Conclusions Despite the challenges they present, agent based models are a useful complement to other analytical strategies in studying the plausible impact of various policies on active travel to school. PMID:23705953

  4. Thiazole: a promising heterocycle for the development of potent CNS active agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumari, Shikha; Tiwari, Manisha

    2015-03-06

    Thiazole is a valuable scaffold in the field of medicinal chemistry and has accounted to display a variety of biological activities. Thiazole and its derivatives have attracted continuing interest to design various novel CNS active agents. In the past few decades, thiazoles have been widely used to develop a variety of therapeutic agents against numerous CNS targets. Thiazole containing drug molecules are currently being used in treatment of various CNS disorders and a number of thiazole derivatives are also presently in clinical trials. A lot of research has been carried out on thiazole and their analogues, which has proved their efficacy to overcome several CNS disorders in rodent as well as primate models. The aim of present review is to highlights diverse CNS activities displayed by thiazole and their derivatives. SAR of this nucleus has also been well discussed. This review covers the recent updates present in literature and will surely provide a greater insight for the designing and development of potent thiazole based CNS active agents in future.

  5. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  6. Effect of various capping agents on photocatalytic, antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Akhil, K; Jayakumar, J; Gayathri, G; Khan, S Sudheer

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are extensively used in a wide variety of commercial products including sunscreens, textiles and paints It is a known fact that ZnO NPs are not stable when dispersed in water, therefore manufacturers use several surface modifying agents to increase the stability of ZnO NPs. In the present study, ZnO NPs were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation with and without the use of surface modifying agents including ethylene glycol (EG), gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Preliminary characterization was done by UV-Visible spectroscopy. Electron microscopic analysis showed that the particles were hexagonal in shape. The hydrodynamic size distribution was analyzed by using dynamic light scattering method and crystalline nature was determined by X-ray diffraction method. The study evaluated the photocatalytic, antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of the particles with and without the addition of surface modifying agents. The capping of the particle was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was checked against methylene blue. Capping of the particles reduced the photocatalytic activity of the particles. The antibacterial and antibiofilm activities were checked against Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 3160) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 1688). Antibacterial activity was analyzed by simple plate count method both under dark as well as light condition. Antibiofilm activity was checked in both pre- and post-biofilm formation period under both dark as well as light condition. The activity was evaluated via crystal violet staining method. All the particles showed good antibacterial and antibiofilm activities.

  7. [Design and study of new agents having antitubercular activity: the original compound perchlosone as a potent agent of etiotropic therapy for tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, T I; Aleksandrova, A E; Antonenkova, E V; Elokhina, V N; Nakhmanovich, A S

    1999-01-01

    Studies dealing with the design of new antituberculous agents based on goal-oriented synthesis have provided the agent Perchlosone which is similar to isoniazid and rifampicin, produces in tuberculostatic activity against sensitive laboratory cultured mycobacteria, produces an inhibitory action on polyresistant clinical strains. Experiments on animals (mice, rabbits) with experimental tuberculosis have established that Perchlosone and isoniazid have equal therapeutical properties, and the former shows a synergist interaction with rifampicin, has neither mutagenic activity nor negative effects on immunity and the surfactant system of the lung.

  8. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  9. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-02-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  10. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    PubMed Central

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  11. Internal bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vachon, C; Vanek, P; Friedman, S

    1998-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide to internally bleach discolored teeth. Following pulp removal, 38 tooth crowns were stained with erythrocytes and bleached 3 times over 14 days using either 10% carbamide peroxide or 30% H2O2 and sodium perborate. The pulp chambers were subsequently filled, and the tooth crowns stored for 3 months. The shades of the crowns were measured using reflectance spectroscopy prior to and at several time points following bleaching. Using statistical analysis, the authors determined that both materials significantly improved the shade of the crowns, and that 10% carbamide peroxide could be utilized clinically to internally bleach nonvital discolored teeth.

  12. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Heiden, Anke; Blunck, Uwe; Zimmer, Stefan; Seemann, Rainer; Roulet, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    This clinical study compared the effectiveness of bleaching non-vital teeth with an open pulp chamber during bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide compared to the modified walking bleach technique and extracoronal bleaching. Sixty discolored, non-vital teeth were treated. They were divided into three groups. Each group was treated with one of the bleaching materials and methods: extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks as negative control (Group A), intracoronally using sodium perborate mixed with 3% hydrogen peroxide (modified walking bleach technique) (Rotstein, Mor & Friedman, 1993) for four weeks (Group B) and intracoronally and extracoronally using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks (Group C) (Liebenberg, 1997). Tooth color was measured at baseline, (BL), immediately post-bleaching (IP) and six months post-bleaching (SP) with a colorimeter (Castor, Sigma, Germany) using a tooth-positioning jig. The color was determined according to the CIELAB system, which records lightness as L* and chromaticity coordinates as a* and b*. The difference in L* and b* among the three groups was significant between BL and IP examination. The post-bleaching, whitening effect in Group C was significantly better, but after six months, in Group C, it was as effective as in Group B.

  13. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  14. Vulnerable families as active agents of their own change process: a bidirectional perspective.

    PubMed

    Goh, Esther C L

    2015-04-01

    The literature on successful practice with vulnerable families reports social workers' efforts in forging therapeutic bonds with clients, their ability to both recognize clients' strengths and pain and support them as they work through adversity. Vulnerable families' own contribu- tions to their change process, however, have remained largely opaque. This article offers concrete conceptual tools to consider both social workers and clients from vulnerable families as active agents in the change process. Empirical evidence collected by practitioner-researchers through in-depth discussions with 10 vulnerable families illustrates clients' agentic capacities for autonomy, construction, and action as well as joint construction and maintenance of the helping relationships with social workers, thereby illustrating their active contribution to the process of change.

  15. Salinomycin: a novel anti-cancer agent with known anti-coccidial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Fengfei; Wong, Eric T; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M; Wu, Erxi

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin, traditionally used as an anti-coccidial drug, has recently been shown to possess anti-cancer and anti-cancer stem cell (CSC) effects, as well as activities to overcome multi-drug resistance based on studies using human cancer cell lines, xenograft mice, and in case reports involving cancer patients in pilot clinical trials. Therefore, salinomycin may be considered as a promising novel anti-cancer agent despite its largely unknown mechanism of action. This review summarizes the pharmacologic effects of salinomycin and presents possible mechanisms by which salinomycin exerts its anti-tumorigenic activities. Recent advances and potential complications that might limit the utilization of salinomycin as an anti-cancer and anti-CSC agent are also presented and discussed.

  16. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  17. Network Interventions on Physical Activity in an Afterschool Program: An Agent-Based Social Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Shoham, David A.; Tesdahl, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We studied simulated interventions that leveraged social networks to increase physical activity in children. Methods. We studied a real-world social network of 81 children (average age = 7.96 years) who lived in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, and attended public schools and 1 of 2 structured afterschool programs. The sample was ethnically diverse, and 44% were overweight or obese. We used social network analysis and agent-based modeling simulations to test whether implementing a network intervention would increase children’s physical activity. We tested 3 intervention strategies. Results. The intervention that targeted opinion leaders was effective in increasing the average level of physical activity across the entire network. However, the intervention that targeted the most sedentary children was the best at increasing their physical activity levels. Conclusions. Which network intervention to implement depends on whether the goal is to shift the entire distribution of physical activity or to influence those most adversely affected by low physical activity. Agent-based modeling could be an important complement to traditional project planning tools, analogous to sample size and power analyses, to help researchers design more effective interventions for increasing children’s physical activity. PMID:25689202

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of diarylthiazole derivatives as antimitotic and antivascular agents with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Zhuang; Liu, Yibin; Ma, Liang; Wu, Yuzhe; He, Lin; Shao, Mingfeng; Yu, Kun; Wu, Wenshuang; Pu, Yuzhi; Nie, Chunlai; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-07-01

    By switching position of the N and S atom in the thiazole ring which were similar to the previously reported agent 5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-(3',4',5'-trimethoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-amine, a series of 4,5-diarylthiazole derivatives were synthesized using Friedel-Crafts reaction based on chemical modification of Combrestatatin A-4 (CA-4). Their antiproliferative activities were evaluated and identified as new microtubule destabilizing agents. Structure-activity relationship study indicated that compound 8a with 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl group at the C-4 position and 4-ethoxyphenyl group at the C-5 position of 2-amino substituted thiazole was of the most potent inhibitory activity in this series. 8a was found to exhibit the IC50 values of 8.4-26.4nM in five human cancer cell lines, with comparable inhibition effects to CA-4. Moreover, 8a showed potency as a tubulin polymerization inhibitor, with colchicine site binding ability and comparable extent of inhibition against the growth of P-glycoprotein over-expressing multidrug resistant cell lines. Mechanism studies revealed that 8a could block the progression of cell cycle in the G2/M phase and result in cellular apoptosis in cancer cells. As a new tubulin destabilizing agent, 8a was also found high antivascular activity as it concentration-dependently reduced the cell migration and disrupted capillary like tube formation of HUVEC cells. Furthermore, 8a significantly suppressed the tumor growth in HCT116 and SK-OV-3 xenograft models with tumor growth inhibitory rate of 55.12% and 72.7%, respectively. Our studies highlighted that 8a was a promising microtubule targeting antitumor agent.

  19. Novel Bis-Indole Agents Active Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael R.; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Good, Caryn E.; Butler, Michelle M.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Endimiani, Andrea; Bonomo, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro activity of five novel Microbiotix bis-indole agents (MBXs) against 30 multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii (including 18 resistant to carbapenems) was evaluated. Overall, MIC90s ranged from 1-8 μg/ml, whereas those for imipenem were > 64 μg/ml. MBX 1196 was the most potent (MIC90 1 μg/ml). MBXs are compounds that are highly effective against MDR A. baumannii. PMID:21146724

  20. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  1. Comparison of two different laser wavelengths' dental bleaching results by photo-Fenton reaction: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lagori, G; Rocca, J P; Brulat, N; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Fornaini, C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary in vitro test on the possible use of two different laser wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, to improve the dental bleaching results. To perform the test, the degradation of a dye, rhodamine B, under the effects of hydrogen peroxide was used. One hundred and twenty vials were divided into four groups of 30 samples each and, while three of them were irradiated with different wavelengths, 365 nm (reference), 405 nm and 532 nm, the fourth was the non-irradiated control group. Each of the four groups was further divided into three subgroups of 10 cuvettes (n = 10) each. The three subgroups included a group with a rhodamine (RH) solution, a rhodamine and hydrogen peroxide (RH + HP) solution and a rhodamine plus hydrogen peroxide and ferrous gluconate (RH + FR) solution. When hydrogen peroxide was present, only UVA irradiation was able to produce significant results, whereas when the photo-Fenton reaction occurred, all the three wavelengths were able to produce a significant degradation of rhodamine B, with better results for longer wavelengths in comparison with short wavelengths. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the light of the two laser devices, even remaining less effective than UV activation, showed its ability to improve the performance of bleaching agents based on Fenton photocatalysis, whereas when used in combination with hydrogen peroxide only, the 405-nm laser displayed a small effect and the 532-nm laser produced no effects.

  2. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  3. Synthesis and biological activity of thiazolyl-acetic acid derivatives as possible antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Fumoto, Yasuko; Shouno, Tomoaki; Maseda, Hideaki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    5a-h, a series of (5-substituted-2-methyl-1,3-thiazole-4-yl) acetic acids as heterocyclic acetic acid derivatives, was designed and synthesized from ethyl acetoacetate. The synthesized compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities against bacterial and fungal strains, and their characteristics were investigated by assays under various temperature and pH conditions. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with the use of sheep erythrocytes and human neonate dermal fibroblasts. Similarly, agents such as lauric acid 6 and parabens 7a-b, which are used as preservative agents for commercial cosmetics and detergents, were assayed for comparison. Although the structure of 5a is simple, comprising a thiazole attached with an octyl group and acetic acid moiety, the compound showed stronger and broader antibacterial and antifungal activities among the 5 series against the tested microbes other than gram-negative bacteria. Interestingly, 5a overcame the weak antifungal activity of parabens 7a-b. Also, the cytotoxicity of 5a was less than that of parabens 7a-b, especially to human dermal fibroblasts. These results suggest that thiazolyl-acetic acid 5a is a potentially effective biocide, and that it could be used as a preservative agent in commercially sold cosmetics and detergents, facilitated by the hydrophilic and charge properties of its carboxylic acid moiety.

  4. Sensitive detection of chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals using active open-path FTIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, William T.

    2004-03-01

    Active open-path FTIR sensors provide more sensitive detection of chemical agents than passive FTIRs, such as the M21 RSCAAL and JSLSCAD, and at the same time identify and quantify toxic industrial chemicals (TIC). Passive FTIRs are bistatic sensors relying on infrared sources of opportunity. Utilization of earth-based sources of opportunity limits the source temperatures available for passive chemical-agent FTIR sensors to 300° K. Active FTIR chemical-agent sensors utilize silicon carbide sources, which can be operated at 1500° K. The higher source temperature provides more than an 80-times increase in the infrared radiant flux emitted per unit area in the 7 to 14 micron spectral fingerprint region. Minimum detection limits are better than 5 μgm/m3 for GA, GB, GD, GF and VX. Active FTIR sensors can (1) assist first responders and emergency response teams in their assessment of and reaction to a terrorist threat, (2) provide information on the identification of the TIC present and their concentrations and (3) contribute to the understanding and prevention of debilitating disorders analogous to the Gulf War Syndrome for military and civilian personnel.

  5. Decontamination of chemical agents in Freon-113. Final report, February 1984-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.C.; Collins, K.R.; Ward, J.R.; Richmond, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    Freon solubilizes hydrophobic chemical warfare agents, such as soman, without damaging sensitive electronic equipment, such as night-vision goggles or communication equipment. Freon is used in this manner in the Nonaqueous Equipment Decontamination System (NAEDS) under development at CRDEC. The contaminated Freon is returned to a still, after which it is distilled through an aqueous layer containing bleach to decontaminate the residual agent. This report describes the results of experiments to measure how effectively agent is destroyed in the NAEDS. These results show that residual agent is still left in the redistilled Freon, and there is little difference whether the active decontaminant is removed from the aqueous layer. A mixture was prepared consisting of a 1:1:1 mixture of ethanol, 8 m sodium hydroxide, and Freon. It was demonstrated that the use of this mixture in the NAEDS would destroy all agent and that the redistilled Freon was free of soman. Freon-113, Bleach, Decontamination, Distillation, Non-Aqueous equipment decontamination system, Ethanol blend.

  6. Effect of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without addition of calcium on the enamel surface.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Izadora Quintela Souza; Silva, Lucas Nunes de Brito; Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; de Lima Neto, Cantídio Francisco; Dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa; Fragoso, Larissa Silveira de Mendonça

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effectiveness and effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without calcium on color, micromorphology, and the replacement of calcium and phosphate on the enamel surface. Thirty bovine enamel blocks (5.0 × 5.0 mm) were placed into the following groups: G1: artificial saliva (control); G2: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel without calcium (Whiteness HP Maxx-FGM); and G3: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with calcium (Whiteness HP Blue-FGM). Three color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer: untreated (baseline), after performing staining, and after application of bleaching agents. Calcium deposition on the enamel was evaluated before and after the application of bleaching agents using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The enamel surface micromorphology was observed under scanning electron microscopy. The pH of each product was measured. The data were subjected to one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and any differences were analyzed using Tukey's test (P < 0.05). G3 showed greater variation in total color after the experiment than G2 and G1; there was no significant difference in calcium or phosphorus concentration before and after the experimental procedures; morphological changes were observed only in G2 and G3; and the pH values of the Whiteness HP Maxx and Whiteness HP Blue bleaching agents were 5.77 and 7.79, respectively. The 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium showed greater bleaching potential, but the addition of calcium had no effect in terms of reducing morphological changes or increasing the calcium concentration on the enamel surface.

  7. New investigational drugs with single-agent activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) is rapidly evolving. In the United States, four drugs (panobinostat, ixazomib, daratumumab and elotuzumab) were approved for the treatment of MM in 2015. As a result of improved diagnosis and therapy, there has been a dramatic improvement in the outcome of MM in the last decade, probably more than any other malignancy. Numerous agents continue to be studied in preclinical models and in clinical trials, with many demonstrating clinical efficacy that appears promising enough to have a trajectory for regulatory approval. The purpose of this article is to summarize the current data and provide perspective on new investigational agents with promising single-agent activity in MM. The agents reviewed include Isatuximab, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody; marizomib, a new proteasome inhibitor; oprozomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor; filanesib (ARRY-520), a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor; dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; venetoclax (ABT-199), a selective BCL-2 inhibitor; and LGH-447, pan PIM kinase inhibitor. PMID:27471867

  8. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Antidermatophyte Activities of NND-502, a Novel Optically Active Imidazole Antimycotic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Niwano, Yoshimi; Kuzuhara, Naoki; Kodama, Hiroki; Yoshida, Masanori; Miyazaki, Tsuneo; Yamaguchi, Hideyo

    1998-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo antidermatophyte activities of NND-502, a new imidazole antimycotic agent, were compared with those of two existing antifungal agents, lanoconazole and terbinafine. NND-502 exhibited strong in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton spp.; its MIC was 1 to 4 times lower than that of lanoconazole or terbinafine. In an in vivo study with a guinea pig model of tinea pedis, 7-day topical treatment with a 0.5% solution of NND-502 (dissolved in polyethylene glycol 400) was more effective than that with a 0.5% solution of either lanoconazole or terbinafine for eradicating fungi from the infected feet. When the duration of treatment was shortened to 3 days, a topical 1% solution of NND-502 achieved a complete mycological cure, while topical 1% solutions of lanoconazole and terbinafine did not. PMID:9559824

  10. Apoptosis and the selective survival of host animals following thermal bleaching in zooxanthellate corals.

    PubMed

    Tchernov, Dan; Kvitt, Hagit; Haramaty, Liti; Bibby, Thomas S; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Falkowski, Paul G

    2011-06-14

    During the past several decades, numerous reports from disparate geographical areas have documented an increased frequency of "bleaching" in reef-forming corals. The phenomenon, triggered by increased sea surface temperatures, occurs when the cnidarian hosts digest and/or expel their intracellular, photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae" in the genus Symbiodinium). Although coral bleaching is often followed by the death of the animal hosts, in some cases, the animal survives and can be repopulated with viable zooxanthellae. The physiological factors determining the ability of the coral to survive bleaching events are poorly understood. In this study, we experimentally established that bleaching and death of the host animal involve a caspase-mediated apoptotic cascade induced by reactive oxygen species produced primarily by the algal symbionts. In addition, we demonstrate that, although some corals naturally suppress caspase activity and significantly reduce caspase concentration under high temperatures as a mechanism to prevent colony death from apoptosis, even sensitive corals can be prevented from dying by application of exogenous inhibitors of caspases. Our results indicate that variability in response to thermal stress in corals is determined by a four-element, combinatorial genetic matrix intrinsic to the specific symbiotic association. Based on our experimental data, we present a working model in which the phenotypic expression of this symbiont/host relationship places a selective pressure on the symbiotic association. The model predicts the survival of the host animals in which the caspase-mediated apoptotic cascade is down-regulated.

  11. Nutrient enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Smith, Edward G.; Hunt, Alan N.; Legiret, François-Eric; Postle, Anthony D.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching, resulting from the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis has been identified as the most severe threat to coral reef survival on a global scale. Regionally, nutrient enrichment of reef waters is often associated with a significant loss of coral cover and diversity. Recently, increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have been linked to a reduction of the temperature threshold of coral bleaching, a phenomenon for which no mechanistic explanation is available. Here we show that increased levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in combination with limited phosphate concentrations result in an increased susceptibility of corals to temperature- and light-induced bleaching. Mass spectrometric analyses of the algal lipidome revealed a marked accumulation of sulpholipids under these conditions. Together with increased phosphatase activities, this change indicates that the imbalanced supply of dissolved inorganic nitrogen results in phosphate starvation of the symbiotic algae. Based on these findings we introduce a conceptual model that links unfavourable ratios of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the water column with established mechanisms of coral bleaching. Notably, this model improves the understanding of the detrimental effects of coastal nutrient enrichment on coral reefs, which is urgently required to support knowledge-based management strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

  12. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  13. Surface Decontamination of Blister Agents Lewisite, Sulfur ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L) are blister agents that have a high potential for terrorist use. Agent Yellow (HL) is the eutectic mixture of HD and L. Bench-scale testing was used to determine the residual amount of these chemical warfare agents remaining on three building materials coupons (wood, metal and glass) after application of various decontaminants (household bleach, full strength and dilute; hydrogen peroxide 3 % solution; and EasyDECON® DF200).

  14. The incorporation of activities to control dengue by community health agents

    PubMed Central

    Cazola, Luiza Helena de Oliveira; Tamaki, Edson Mamoru; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; de Andrade, Sonia Maria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the performance of Community Health Agents when dengue control activities were added to their tasks. METHODS Performance was measured comparing the evolution of selected indicators from the Brazilian National Dengue Control Program and the Family Health Strategy for 2002 to 2008 in the municipality of Sao Gabriel do Oeste, MS, Central Western Brazil, with those of Rio Verde de Mato Grosso, neighboring municipality with demographic, socioeconomic and health services similarities. Data were collected from municipal databases of the Information System for Yellow Fever and Dengue and the Information System for Primary Healthcare of the Mato Grosso do Sul State Health Office. The variables selected for the family health strategy activities were: monthly home visits, pregnant women whose antenatal care began in the first trimester, children under one with up-to-date vaccinations and hypertensive patients. Those selected for the Brazilian National Dengue Control Program were: properties inspected with Aedes aegypti and properties not inspected. RESULTS The two municipalities maintained a similar trend in dengue control indicators in the period studied. With regard to the Family Health Strategy, in 2002 Sao Gabriel do Oeste was better off in three of the four indicators studied, however, this situation was reversed at the end of the period when the county was overtaken by Rio Verde de Mato Grosso in three of the four indicators analyzed, including, the monthly average community health worker visits per registered family, the main activity of a Family Health Strategy agent. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the National Dengue Control Program into the Family Health Strategy is viable and developed without prejudice to dengue control activities, however, the same did not occur with the activities of family health in Sao Gabriel do Oeste. The additional workload of the community health workers is the most likely hypothesis for the declining performance of these

  15. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage.

  16. Bacterial and archaeal communities in bleached mottles of tropical podzols.

    PubMed

    Silva, K J; Vidal-Torrado, P; Lambais, M R

    2015-02-01

    Podzols frequently show bleached mottles depleted in organic matter, most readily visible in the Bh horizons. Even though the process of bleached mottles development is not understood, it has been suggested that the selective degradation of organic matter by soil microorganisms has a major contribution. In this study, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities along three Brazilian coastal podzol profiles, as well as in bleached mottles and their immediate vicinity, using 16S rRNA gene profiling. Our results showed that the bacterial and archaeal community structures in the studied podzols varied with depth and that the bacterial communities in the bleached mottles were significantly different from that in their immediate vicinity. In contrast, the archaeal communities in bleached mottles were significantly different from their vicinity only in the Bertioga (BT) profile, based on sequencing of amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene. Redundancy analyses showed that the bacterial community structures in the bleached mottles of BT were negatively associated mostly with the levels of organic carbon, exchangeable-aluminum (Al), exchangeable potassium, and Al-saturation, whereas in the surrounding soil, the opposite was observed. In the Ilha Comprida (IC) profiles, no such relationships were observed, suggesting distinct drivers of the bacterial community structures in bleached mottles of different podzols. In the bleached mottles of the BT profile, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas were the most abundant Bacteria, whereas in the IC profiles, OTUs related to Acidobacteria were predominant. Thermoprotei (Crenarchaeota) were the most abundant Archaea in the bleached mottles and in their immediate vicinity. Based on the diverse metabolic capabilities of Pseudomonas and Acidobacteria, our data suggest that these groups of bacteria may be involved in the development of bleached mottles in the podzols studied and that the selection of

  17. Laser Teeth Bleaching: Evaluation of Eventual Side Effects on Enamel and the Pulp and the Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Light and heat increase the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide. There is no evidence that light activation (power bleaching with high-intensity light) results in a more effective bleaching with a longer lasting effect with high concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. Laser light differs from conventional light as it requires a laser-target interaction. The interaction takes place in the first instance in the bleaching gel. The second interaction has to be induced in the tooth, more specifically in the dentine. There is evidence that interaction exists with the bleaching gel: photothermal, photocatalytical, and photochemical interactions are described. The reactivity of the gel is increased by adding photocatalyst of photosensitizers. Direct and effective photobleaching, that is, a direct interaction with the colour molecules in the dentine, however, is only possible with the argon (488 and 415 nm) and KTP laser (532 nm). A number of risks have been described such as heat generation. Nd:YAG and especially high power diode lasers present a risk with intrapulpal temperature elevation up to 22°C. Hypersensitivity is regularly encountered, being it of temporary occurrence except for a number of diode wavelengths and the Nd:YAG. The tooth surface remains intact after laser bleaching. At present, KTP laser is the most efficient dental bleaching wavelength. PMID:25874258

  18. Chicken cathelicidin-2-derived peptides with enhanced immunomodulatory and antibacterial activities against biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Molhoek, E Margo; van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Dijk-Knijnenburg, Helma; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H; Boele, Linda C L; Kaman-van Zanten, Wendy E; Haagsman, Henk P; Bikker, Floris J

    2010-09-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are considered to be excellent candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Recently, it was demonstrated that the peptide C1-15, an N-terminal segment of chicken HDP cathelicidin-2, exhibits potent antibacterial activity while lacking cytotoxicity towards eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we report that C1-15 is active against bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis that may potentially be used by bioterrorists. Substitution of single and multiple phenylalanine (Phe) residues to tryptophan (Trp) in C1-15 resulted in variants with improved antibacterial activity against B. anthracis and Y. pestis as well as decreased salt sensitivity. In addition, these peptides exhibited enhanced neutralisation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities of these C1-15-derived peptides are exerted at concentrations far below the concentrations that are toxic to human PBMCs. Taken together, we show that Phe-->Trp substitutions in C1-15 variants enhances the antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities against pathogenic bacteria, including those that may potentially be used as biological warfare agents.

  19. A structure-activity analysis of the variation in oxime efficacy against nerve agents

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Donald M. Koplovitz, Irwin; Worek, Franz; Sweeney, Richard E.

    2008-09-01

    A structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the variation in oxime efficacy of 2-PAM, obidoxime, HI-6 and ICD585 against nerve agents. In vivo oxime protection and in vitro oxime reactivation were used as indicators of oxime efficacy against VX, sarin, VR and cyclosarin. Analysis of in vivo oxime protection was conducted with oxime protective ratios (PR) from guinea pigs receiving oxime and atropine therapy after sc administration of nerve agent. Analysis of in vitro reactivation was conducted with second-order rate contants (k{sub r2}) for oxime reactivation of agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from guinea pig erythrocytes. In vivo oxime PR and in vitro k{sub r2} decreased as the volume of the alkylmethylphosphonate moiety of nerve agents increased from VX to cyclosarin. This effect was greater with 2-PAM and obidoxime (> 14-fold decrease in PR) than with HI-6 and ICD585 (< 3.7-fold decrease in PR). The decrease in oxime PR and k{sub r2} as the volume of the agent moiety conjugated to AChE increased was consistent with a steric hindrance mechanism. Linear regression of log (PR-1) against log (k{sub r2} {center_dot} [oxime dose]) produced two offset parallel regression lines that delineated a significant difference between the coupling of oxime reactivation and oxime protection for HI-6 and ICD585 compared to 2-PAM and obidoxime. HI-6 and ICD585 appeared to be 6.8-fold more effective than 2-PAM and obidoxime at coupling oxime reactivation to oxime protection, which suggested that the isonicotinamide group that is common to both of these oximes, but absent from 2-PAM and obidoxime, is important for oxime efficacy.

  20. NIR-activated iron oxides as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Pei-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Chia; Li, Meng-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are commonly used contrast agents for theranostic nanomedicines because of their advantages of good biocompatibility, high stability in physiological conditions, low cytotoxicity and excellent safety record in clinical settings for human use. In this study, we developed a NIR-activated iron oxide (NIR-Fe3O4) nanoparticle as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unlike traditional iron oxides, the developed NIR-Fe3O4 owns biocompatibility and optical tunability capable of providing strong optical absorption in the NIR range for PA signal generation. Its intrinsic magnetic property enables the active magnetic tumor targeting. Phantom experiments were performed to confirm the tunability of NIR-Fe3O4's optical absorption in NIR and demonstrate its magnetic targeting capability. The PA signal response of NIR-Fe3O4 as a function of concentration was also investigated. The results showed that the PA signal of NIR-Fe3O4 with OD=1.25 was comparable to that of blood at 715 nm - the wavelength of peak absorption of the used NIR-Fe3O4. Moreover, the PA signal from NIR-Fe3O4 could be further improved by magnetic targeting. Overall, we proved that the potential of the developed NIR-Fe3O4 as a good tumor targeting contrast agent of PA imaging.

  1. Environmental factors affect the activity of biocontrol agents against ochratoxigenic Aspergillus carbonarius on wine grape.

    PubMed

    De Curtis, F; de Felice, D V; Ianiri, G; De Cicco, V; Castoria, R

    2012-09-17

    The influence of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the activity of three biocontrol agents-the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima LS16 and two strains of the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans LS30 and AU34-2-against infection by A. carbonarius and ochratoxin A (OTA) accumulation in wine grape berries was investigated in lab-scale experiments. The presence of wounds on grape skin dramatically favored infection of berries by A. carbonarius strain A1102, since unwounded berries showed very low levels of infection at all conditions of RH and temperature tested. Artificially wounded berries pre-treated with the biocontrol agents were inoculated with the ochratoxigenic A. carbonarius strain A1102 and were incubated for 5 days at two levels of RH (60% and 100%) and three different temperatures (20, 25 and 30 °C). The three biocontrol agents were able to prevent infections at 60% RH and 20 °C. At 60% RH and 25 °C only strain AU34-2 achieved some protection on day 5, whereas at 30 °C a limited biocontrol efficacy was evident only up to day 2. At 100% RH, LS16, LS30 and AU34-2 showed effective protection of grape berries at 20 °C until the 5th day of incubation. The three biocontrol agents achieved significant protection at higher temperatures only until the 2nd day after the beginning of the experiment: all three strains at 25 °C, and only strain LS16 at 30 °C. After 5 days, the three biocontrol agents were able to significantly reduce the level of OTA in berries at all the conditions tested. This occurred even when protection from infection was not significant, except at 30 °C and 100% of RH for all the three strains, and at 25 °C and 100% of RH for strain LS16. The biocontrol agents displayed a higher rate of colonization on grape berries at 20 and 25 °C than at 30 °C. The higher value of RH (100%) appeared to increase the rate of colonization, in particular at 20 and 25 °C. Taken together, our results emphasize the significant influence of

  2. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  3. Effect of fluoride-treated enamel on indirect cytotoxicity of a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel to pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of fluoride solutions applied to enamel to protect pulp cells against the trans-enamel and transdentinal cytotoxicity of a 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching gel. The CP gel was applied to enamel/dentin discs adapted to aicial pulp chambers (8 h/day) during 1, 7 or 14 days, followed by fluoride (0.05% or 0.2%) application for 1 min. The extracts (culture medium in contact with dentin) were applied to MDPC-23 cells for 1 h, and cell metabolism (MTT assay), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and cell membrane damage (flow cytometry) were analyzed. Knoop microhardness of enamel was also evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=0.05). For the MTT assay and ALP activity, significant reductions between the control and the bleached groups were observed (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference occurred among bleached groups (p>0.05), regardless of fluoride application or treatment days. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated 30% of cell membrane damage in all bleached groups. After 14 days of treatment, the fluoride-treated enamel presented significantly higher microhardness values than the bleached-only group (p<0.05). It was concluded that, regardless of the increase in enamel hardness due to the application of fluoride solutions, the treated enamel surface did not prevent the toxic effects caused by the 16% CP gel to odontoblast-like cells.

  4. Microtubule inhibitors: Differentiating tubulin-inhibiting agents based on mechanisms of action, clinical activity, and resistance.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A

    2009-08-01

    Microtubules are important cellular targets for anticancer therapy because of their key role in mitosis. Microtubule inhibitors (MTI) such as taxanes, vinca alkaloids, and epothilones stabilize or destabilize microtubules, thereby suppressing microtubule dynamics required for proper mitotic function, effectively blocking cell cycle progression and resulting in apoptosis. In spite of their antitumor activity, innate or acquired drug resistance to MTIs such as the taxanes is common, limiting their overall clinical efficacy. Further insight into the mechanisms of action of microtubule-targeting drugs has lead to the discovery of novel agents that may provide higher efficacy with limited toxicity and help overcome resistance to conventional MTIs. This review will focus on the different mechanisms of action of MTIs, potential factors related to resistance and tolerability, and will discuss the recent approval as well as the development of new antineoplastic agents.

  5. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  6. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  7. Does coral bleaching mean global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    This article discusses the implications of global warming on the marine ecosystems. In recent hearings of the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, plans were made to introduce legislation for control of greenhouse-gas emissions, conservation of biological diversity, forest conservation, world population planning, sustainable economic development , increased fuel efficiency, and increased research into Earth-system processes. Research is required to ascertain the meaning of coral bleaching, which is the mass expulsion of symbiotic algae, called zooxanthellae, which gives the coral its color. Many scientists think that the death of the algae is an early indicator for massive destruction of the marine ecosystem.

  8. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    SciTech Connect

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  9. Climate change and coral reef bleaching: An ecological assessment of long-term impacts, recovery trends and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew C.; Glynn, Peter W.; Riegl, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    regenerating and recovering coral reefs have originated from broadcast spawning taxa with a potential for asexual growth, relatively long distance dispersal, successful settlement, rapid growth and a capacity for framework construction. Whether or not affected reefs can continue to function as before will depend on: (1) how much coral cover is lost, and which species are locally extirpated; (2) the ability of remnant and recovering coral communities to adapt or acclimatize to higher temperatures and other climatic factors such as reductions in aragonite saturation state; (3) the changing balance between reef accumulation and bioerosion; and (4) our ability to maintain ecosystem resilience by restoring healthy levels of herbivory, macroalgal cover, and coral recruitment. Bleaching disturbances are likely to become a chronic stress in many reef areas in the coming decades, and coral communities, if they cannot recover quickly enough, are likely to be reduced to their most hardy or adaptable constituents. Some degraded reefs may already be approaching this ecological asymptote, although to date there have not been any global extinctions of individual coral species as a result of bleaching events. Since human populations inhabiting tropical coastal areas derive great value from coral reefs, the degradation of these ecosystems as a result of coral bleaching and its associated impacts is of considerable societal, as well as biological concern. Coral reef conservation strategies now recognize climate change as a principal threat, and are engaged in efforts to allocate conservation activity according to geographic-, taxonomic-, and habitat-specific priorities to maximize coral reef survival. Efforts to forecast and monitor bleaching, involving both remote sensed observations and coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models, are also underway. In addition to these efforts, attempts to minimize and mitigate bleaching impacts on reefs are immediately required. If significant reductions in

  10. HURON (HUman and Robotic Optimization Network) Multi-Agent Temporal Activity Planner/Scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Hook; Mrozinski, Joseph J.; Elfes, Alberto; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Shelton, Kacie E.; Smith, Jeffrey H.; Lincoln, William P.; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    HURON solves the problem of how to optimize a plan and schedule for assigning multiple agents to a temporal sequence of actions (e.g., science tasks). Developed as a generic planning and scheduling tool, HURON has been used to optimize space mission surface operations. The tool has also been used to analyze lunar architectures for a variety of surface operational scenarios in order to maximize return on investment and productivity. These scenarios include numerous science activities performed by a diverse set of agents: humans, teleoperated rovers, and autonomous rovers. Once given a set of agents, activities, resources, resource constraints, temporal constraints, and de pendencies, HURON computes an optimal schedule that meets a specified goal (e.g., maximum productivity or minimum time), subject to the constraints. HURON performs planning and scheduling optimization as a graph search in state-space with forward progression. Each node in the graph contains a state instance. Starting with the initial node, a graph is automatically constructed with new successive nodes of each new state to explore. The optimization uses a set of pre-conditions and post-conditions to create the children states. The Python language was adopted to not only enable more agile development, but to also allow the domain experts to easily define their optimization models. A graphical user interface was also developed to facilitate real-time search information feedback and interaction by the operator in the search optimization process. The HURON package has many potential uses in the fields of Operations Research and Management Science where this technology applies to many commercial domains requiring optimization to reduce costs. For example, optimizing a fleet of transportation truck routes, aircraft flight scheduling, and other route-planning scenarios involving multiple agent task optimization would all benefit by using HURON.

  11. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  12. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  13. Formation of organochlorine by-products in bleached laundry.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Anthony, Laura N

    2013-02-01

    Laundering fabrics with chlorine bleach plays a role in health and hygiene as well as aesthetics. However, laundry bleaching may create chlorinated by-products with potentially adverse human health effects. Studies have shown that toxic chlorinated gases are produced in the headspace of washing machines when hypochlorite-containing bleach is used. Laundry bleaching has also been implicated in contributing dissolved organochlorine to municipal wastewater. However, there have been no reports of organochlorines produced and retained in fabric as a result of laundry bleaching. We have used a chlorine-specific X-ray spectroscopic analysis to demonstrate the formation of organochlorine by-products in cotton fabrics laundered with chlorine bleach under typical household conditions. Organochlorine formation increases at higher wash temperature. At least two pools of organochlorine are produced in bleached fabric: a labile fraction that diminishes over several months of storage time as well as a more stable fraction that persists after more than 1 year. Our results also suggest that residual hypochlorite remains in fabric after laundering with bleach, presenting the possibility of direct and sustained dermal contact with reactive chlorine. This study provides a first step toward identifying a new risk factor for elevated organochlorine body burdens in humans.

  14. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  15. Coral bleaching: a potential biomarker of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Meehan, W J; Ostrander, G K

    1997-04-25

    Coral bleaching refers to the loss of symbiotic algae by host corals, or to the loss of pigmentation by the algae themselves, causing corals to appear white or "bleached." Some corals may regain algae or pigmentation and survive, but when bleaching is severe the host coral dies. Coral bleaching events have increased dramatically in the last two decades, and coral reefs throughout the world have been extensively degraded as a result. This article reviews coral bleaching for investigators working in the field of toxicology and environmental health, a group of scientists not normally exposed to this issue. Several environmental stressors have been correlated with bleaching, including fluctuations in sea surface temperatures and salinity, increased sedimentation, increased solar radiation, and contaminants such as oil and herbicides. Molecular mechanisms of bleaching are only beginning to be investigated and are thus far poorly understood. Toxicologists have the potential to make significant contributions toward understanding anthropogenic aspects of coral bleaching and elucidating molecular mechanisms of this important environmental problem.

  16. Population dynamics of zooxanthellae during a bacterial bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkar, N.; Fine, M.; Kramarsky-Winter, E.; Loya, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Each summer 80-90% of the colonies of Oculina patagonica undergo bleaching off the Mediterranean coast of Israel. To investigate fluctuations through a yearly bleaching cycle, monthly measurements of zooxanthella density, mitotic index and chlorophyll- a concentration were conducted. Results showed (1) a significant negative correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) and zooxanthella density; (2) both significantly lower zooxanthella mitotic index and higher chlorophyll -a per zooxanthella content during the bleaching season compared with the non-bleaching period; (3) prior to bleaching, a lag between the peak of zooxanthella density and chlorophyll- a concentration followed by a similar lag during recovery. Zooxanthella density declined significantly between March and May while chlorophyll- a concentration peaked in April, and then declined. Zooxanthella density increased significantly in November while chlorophyll- a concentration increased significantly in January. We conclude that during bacterial bleaching events, zooxanthellae are severely damaged. However, by the time of the following bleaching event the coral tissues regain their “normal” (pre-bleaching) zooxanthella population density.

  17. Genotoxic potential of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide in dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Aline Ferreira de; Torre, Eliana do Nascimento; Selayaran, Maicon Dos Santos; Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Etges, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has become one of the most frequently requested esthetic treatments in dental offices. Despite the high clinical success observed with this procedure, some adverse effects have been reported, including a potential for developing premalignant lesions, root resorption and tooth sensitivity, especially when misused. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic response using a micronucleus (MN) assay, after the application of two concentrations of carbamide peroxide. Thirty-seven patients were divided into two groups and randomly received either a 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (19) or a 16% carbamide peroxide (18) concentration for 21 days in individual dental trays. Gingival margin cells were collected immediately before the first use (baseline), and then 15 and 45 days after baseline. The cells were placed on a histological slide, stained by the Feulgen technique, and evaluated by an experienced blinded examiner. One thousand cells per slide were counted, and the MN rate was determined. The two groups were analyzed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test. A slight increase in MN was observed for both groups, in comparison with the baseline, at 15 days. However, no difference was observed between the two groups (10% and 16%), at either 15 or 45 days (p = 0.90). When bleaching is not prolonged or not performed very frequently, bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide alone will not cause mutagenic stress on gingival epithelial cells.

  18. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time.

  19. Physiological and biogeochemical traits of bleaching and recovery in the mounding species of coral Porites lobata: implications for resilience in mounding corals.

    PubMed

    Levas, Stephen J; Grottoli, Andréa G; Hughes, Adam; Osburn, Christopher L; Matsui, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ(13)C of the skeletal, δ(13)C, and δ(15)N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions). Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via (13)C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic sources of

  20. Physiological and Biogeochemical Traits of Bleaching and Recovery in the Mounding Species of Coral Porites lobata: Implications for Resilience in Mounding Corals

    PubMed Central

    Levas, Stephen J.; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Hughes, Adam; Osburn, Christopher L.; Matsui, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ13C of the skeletal, δ13C, and δ15N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions). Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via 13C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic sources of fixed carbon

  1. Structure-activity relationship study of novel iminothiadiazolo-pyrimidinone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Atmika; Kaneko, Keiichi; Watanabe, Ayako; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shigeki, Matsunaga; Kanai, Motomu; Motomu, Kanai; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2013-11-01

    An iminothiadiazolo-pyrimidinone derivative, 0002-04-KK, harboring a furan moiety, acts as an antimicrobial agent with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Staphylococcus aureus of 25 μg ml(-1). Several derivatives of 0002-04-KK were synthesized and among them 0026-59-KK, harboring a nitrofuran moiety, had the most potent antimicrobial activity with an MIC of 6 μg ml(-1). Both 0002-04-KK and 0026-59-KK inhibited the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis was inhibited by 0026-59-KK, and slightly inhibited by 0002-04-KK. Derivative 0002-04-KK showed bactericidal activity in contrast to the bacteriostatic activity of 0002-04-KK. Derivative 0002-04-KK had less toxicity in silkworms (lethal dose fifty (LD50): >230 μg g(-1)) than 0002-04-KK (LD50: 100 μg g(-1)). The bactericidal activity against S. aureus was because of the nitrofuran moiety. These findings suggest that iminothiadiazolo-pyrimidinone compounds could be used as lead molecules to develop antimicrobial agents.

  2. An In vitro Study on Post Bleaching Pigmentation Susceptibility of Teeth and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Latha, S Pushpa; Hegde, Vani; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the susceptibility of teeth for repigmentation after bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were assigned to three groups (n = 12). Group 1 was bleached using 30% w/v hydrogen peroxide 15 min 3 times a day every other day for 4 days. In Group 2 was bleached using 16% carbamide peroxide (Polanight), 90 min a day for 15 days. 2 days later, the shades of the bleached teeth were recorded. Remaining 4 teeth were bleached according to Group 1 and 2 and were subjected to atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy analysis. Results: Specimens of athome bleaching were lighter than the specimens of inoffice bleaching. Conclusion: The susceptibility of enamel to pigmentation can be increased after bleaching, and pigmentation is greater if bleaching is performed with H2O2. The percentage change (lighter) was more for athome bleaching specimens as compared to inoffice bleaching specimens. PMID:25395800

  3. Effect of a Combined Bleaching Regimen on the Microhardness of a Sealed Methacrylate-based and a Silorane-based Composite

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, F; Doustfatemeh, S

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The use of tooth bleaching agents has been very popular treatment in dentistry. The bleaching agents have an inherent potential to impair surface properties of existing composite resin restorations. Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of a combined bleaching regimen on the surface microhardness of a Silorane-based and a sealed methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Method: Forty-five specimens of methacrylate-based composite (Ice) and 18 specimens of Silorane composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; USA) were prepared and randomly divided into 5 (1-5) and 2 (6-7) groups (n=9), respectively. After 8-week aging, groups 1 and 6 were remained with no treatment. In groups 2, 4 and 5, the specimens were covered by a surface sealant and light cured. In groups 3, 4, 5 and 7, the specimens were bleached with hydrogen peroxide 40% and then carbamide peroxide 20% for seven days. In group 5, after bleaching, the sealant was removed by polishing. Surface microhardness was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results: The microhardness values of groups 2 to 4 were significantly lower than that of group1 (p <0.05). There was no significant difference among groups 1, 5, 6 and 7 (p> 0.05). Conclusion: The combined bleaching regimen used in this study had a substantial negative effect on methacrylate and sealed methacrylate composites but not on Silorane composite. Polishing following the bleaching on the sealed composite yielded a hardness value similar to that of unsealed methacrylate composite (control). PMID:24724132

  4. Coral reef bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep atolls, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth, Ramar; Gopi, Mohan; Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith; Thangaradjou, Thirunavukarassu; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2012-03-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010. Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon, which triggered widespread bleaching of corals. The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%). The SST increased up to 34 °C with an average maximum SST of 32.5 during the study °C period between May and June 2010. Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side. This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST. Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010, at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  5. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  6. [Effects of nootropic agents on visual functions and lacrimal antioxidative activity in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Davydova, N G; Kuznetsova, T P; Borisova, S A; Abdulkadyrova, M Zh

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an investigation of the effect of the nootropic agents pantogam and nooclerine on visual functions in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. These agents have been found to have a beneficial effect on the functional activity of the retina and optic nerve, light sensitivity, hemo- and hydrodynamics of the eye.

  7. Local effects of bleaching in retinal rods of the toad.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, D A; Lamb, T D

    1982-01-01

    1. Suction electrode recordings were used to study the recovery of responsiveness in single toad rods after bleaching a small fraction (less than 5%) of the rhodopsin. 2. After a spatially uniform bleach that initially abolished the dark current over the entire length of the outer segment, the more proximal regions recovered faster than the more distal regions. For a time the most basal region was almost fully recovered while the tip remained fully saturated. 3. Such a gradient of responsiveness did not occur during uniform steady background illumination of dark-adapted cells. 4. The entire outer segment recovered uniformly after a longitudinally graded bleach that simulated the pattern produced by self-screening in the intact eye. 5. The recovery of the distal end of the outer segment was not affected by a bleach at the proximal end. This suggests that the differences in recovery rate reflect intrinsic local properties of the outer segment rather than longitudinal diffusion of a substance from the inner segment. 6. For at least the first 3 min after bleaching with a narrow transverse slit the reduction of responsiveness remained most pronounced in the bleached region, suggesting that this effect of bleaching does not spread extensively. 7. The increased noise induced by bleaching is shown to originate locally in the bleached region of outer segment. 8. When the tip was locally saturated after a bleach or during steady light, the current recorded from the tip was predominantly capacitive, resulting from intracellular voltage change. This indicates that when the dark current is abolished the outer segment plasma membrane has negligible leakage conductance. PMID:7131322

  8. Influence of Intermediary Filling Material on Microleakage of Intracoronally Bleached and Restored Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Feiz, Atieh; Ebadi, Maysam

    2009-01-01

    Background: Failure of composite restorations in terms of microleakage after intracoronal bleaching has been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro effect of sodium ascorbate and calcium hydroxide as intermediary filling materials to repair the microleakage associated with adhe-sive restoration following intracoronal bleaching. Methods: Sixty endodontically-treated incisors with access cavities extended to the cementoenamel junction in gingival margin were randomly divided into five equal groups. In group 1, cavities were restored by applying Single Bond and Z100 composite resin. In groups 2-5, 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was placed into the pulp chamber and sealed for 5 days. In group 2, teeth were then restored as in group 1. In groups 3 and 4, 10% sodium ascorbate gel and calcium hydroxide paste were applied in the pulp chamber for 40 hours, removed, rinsed and then, restored. In group 5, the cavities were incu-bated for 7 days and then, restored. Samples were thermocycled, immersed in basic fuschin, and sec-tioned. Dye penetration was scored using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in enamel margins (P = 0.163). In dentinal margins (P = 0.003), groups 1, 3 and 5 exhibited similar leakage patterns, each one of groups 1, 3 and 5 had sig-nificant differences with each one of groups 2 and 4. Conclusion: Intracoronal bleaching using 35% H2O2 gel increases the microleakage in dentinal margins. Application of the antioxidant agent or a seven-day delay following bleaching may improve the marginal integrity. Applying calcium hydroxide might jeopardize dentinal sealing. PMID:21528025

  9. Bleaching process preferred to decontaminate odorants

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The problem of decontaminating and disposing of out-of-service gas odorizers has long faced both gas transmission and distribution companies since the early 1980s. Finding a methodology to safely and effectively decontaminate odorant-contaminated equipment has caused many companies to simply cap the equipment and put it in storage. The recommended process of decontamination by odorant manufacturers is currently a bleaching-type process. A sodium hypochlorite solution is added to water and either circulated or left standing in the contaminated equipment. The sodium hypochlorite effectively neutralizes the smell of the odorant and slightly corrodes the inside of the equipment to neutralize any odorant which has permeated the metal. The waste sodium hypochlorite and water is then shipped as hazardous waste (pH of 12.5) or non-hazardous waste after the pH has been adjusted. The bleaching process has proven cost-effective and less time-consuming than most other methods including bioremediation. To effectively use it, there are several problems to overcome--most importantly the removal of residual product and the release of vapors into the atmosphere. River Valley Technologies, a contractor located in Cincinnati, OH, specializing in odorant-equipment decontamination, has developed several methods and engineering controls to eliminate most of the problems associated with decontaminating odorant equipment. The paper describes these methods.

  10. Alkylating agents and immunotoxins exert synergistic cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells. Mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, Y J; O'Briant, K C; Xu, F J; Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Bast, R C

    1993-01-01

    Alkylating agents can be administered in high dosage to patients with ovarian cancer using autologous bone marrow support, but drug-resistant tumor cells can still persist. Immunotoxins provide reagents that might eliminate drug resistant cells. In the present study, concurrent treatment with alkylators and immunotoxins proved superior to treatment with each agent alone. Toxin immunoconjugates prepared from different monoclonal antibodies and recombinant ricin A chain (rRTA) inhibited clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in limiting dilution assays. When alkylating agents and toxin conjugates were used in combination, the addition of the immunotoxins to cisplatin, or to cisplatin and thiotepa, produced synergistic cytotoxic activity against the OVCA 432 and OVCAR III cell lines. Studies performed to clarify the mechanism of action showed that cisplatin and thiotepa had no influence on internalization and binding of the 317G5-rRTA immunotoxin. Intracellular uptake of [195m]Pt-cisplatin was not affected by the immunoconjugate and thiotepa. The combination of the 317G5-rRTA and thiotepa, as well as 317G5-rRTA alone, increased [195m]Pt cisplatin-DNA adduct levels. The immunotoxin alone and in combination with the alkylators decreased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced glutathione-S-transferase activity. Repair of DNA damage induced by the combination of alkylators and 317G5-rRTA was significantly reduced when compared to repair after damage with alkylators alone. These findings suggest that immunotoxins affect levels and activity of enzymes required for the prevention and repair of alkylator damage. Images PMID:8227359

  11. Agents that activate the High Osmolarity Glycerol pathway as a means to combat pathogenic molds.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Annegret; Spadinger, Anja; Löwe, Axel; Seeger, Allison; Ebel, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of invasive fungal infections often fails due to the limited number of therapeutic options. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of agents activating the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) pathway on molds that cause infections in humans and livestock. We found that agents like fludioxonil and iprodione, have a clear anti-fungal activity against pathogenic Aspergillus, Lichtheimia, Rhizopus and Scedosporium species. Only A. terreus turned out to be resistant to fludioxonil, even though it is sensitive to iprodione and able to adapt to hyperosmotic conditions. Moreover, the A. terreus tcsC gene can fully complement an A. fumigatus ΔtcsC mutant, thereby also restoring its sensitivity to fludioxonil. The particular phenotype of A. terreus is therefore likely to be independent of its TcsC kinase. In a second part of this study, we further explored the impact of fludioxonil using A. fumigatus as a model organism. When applied in concentrations of 1-2μg/ml, fludioxonil causes an immediate growth arrest and, after longer exposure, a quantitative killing. Hyphae respond to fludioxonil by the formation of new septa and closure of nearly all septal pores. Mitosis occurs in all compartments and is accompanied by a re-localization of the NimA kinase to the cytoplasm. In the swollen compartments, the massive extension of the cell wall triggers a substantial reorganization resulting in an enhanced incorporation of chitin and, most strikingly, a massive loss of galactomannan. Hence, HOG-activating agents have dramatic cell biological consequences and may represent a valuable, future element in the armory that can be used to combat mold infections.

  12. In vitro activities of 47 antimicrobial agents against three Campylobacter spp. from pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gebhart, C J; Ward, G E; Kurtz, H J

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 47 antimicrobial agents against 30 isolates of Campylobacter species from pigs were determined by the agar dilution technique. The isolates were obtained from pigs with proliferative enteritis and included 10 strains each of Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter sputorum subsp. mucosalis, and "Campylobacter hyointestinalis Gebhart et al." (this name is not on the Approved Lists). Carbadox, furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, and dimetridazole were the most active drugs, inhibiting all three Campylobacter species with a MIC for 50% of the isolates of 2 micrograms/ml or less. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, cefazolin, sulfachloropyridazine, novobiocin, vancomycin, sulfathiazole, cyclohexamide, bacitracin, p-arsanilic acid, and colistin were the least active, with MICs for 50% of the isolates ranging from 16 to greater than or equal to 128 micrograms/ml. PMID:3985597

  13. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Murty, V L; Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-11-01

    1. A glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin was identified in the extracellular material elaborated by Helicobacter pylori, a pathogen implicated in the etiology of gastric disease. 2. The purified enzyme displayed an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa, and exhibited maximum activity at pH 5.7 in the presence of 0.3% Triton X-100 and 100 mM CaCl2. 3. The H. pylori glycosulfatase activity towards human gastric sulfomucin was inhibited by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide. The inhibitory effect was proportional to the concentration of sulglycotide up to 20 micrograms/ml, at which a 98% decrease in mucin desulfation occurred. However, the drug lost the inhibitory effect following its chemical desulfation. 4. The results demonstrate that sulglycotide is a potent inhibitor of H. pylori glycosulfatase and, hence, may be of value in the treatment of gastric disease associated with this bacterial infection.

  14. Anti-angiogenic activity of a novel synthetic agent, 9alpha-fluoromedroxyprogesterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, T; Tsuboi, H; Murata, N; Uchida, M; Kohno, T; Sugino, E; Hibino, S; Shimamura, M; Oikawa, T

    1999-10-18

    9Alpha-fluoromedroxyprogesterone acetate (FMPA) is a novel synthetic analog of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), widely used as therapeutic agent for breast and endometrium cancers. FMPA showed almost the same binding affinities to the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors as MPA. In the rabbit corneal assay, FMPA, MPA and fumagillin significantly inhibited the angiogenic response induced by rat mammary tumor at doses of 0. 1, 1 and 50 microg/pellet, respectively, so FMPA showed greater anti-angiogenic activity than MPA and fumagillin. In the mouse dorsal air sac method, FMPA inhibited the mouse sarcoma 180 cell-induced angiogenesis by oral administration at a dose of 200 mg/kg. FMPA inhibited the activity of plasminogen activator (PA) in bovine endothelial cells. These results suggest that FMPA may be useful for diseases associated with angiogenesis by oral administration.

  15. In vitro antifungal activity of dihydroxyacetone against causative agents of dermatomycosis.

    PubMed

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Vieira, Fabiane Jamono; Mondadori, Andressa Grazziotin; Oppe, Tércio Paschke; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2011-04-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a three-carbon sugar, is the browning ingredient in commercial sunless tanning formulations. DHA preparations have been used for more than 50 years and are currently highly popular for producing temporary pigmentation resembling an ultraviolet-induced tan. In this work, the in vitro antifungal activity of dihydroxyacetone was tested against causative agents of dermatomycosis, more specifically against dermatophytes and Candida spp. The antifungal activity was determined by the broth microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines for yeasts and filamentous fungi. The data obtained show that the fungicidal activity varied from 1.6 to 50 mg ml(-1). DHA seems to be a promising substance for the treatment of dermatomycosis because it has antifungal properties at the same concentration used in artificial suntan lotions. Therefore, it is a potential low-toxicity antifungal agent that may be used topically because of its penetration into the corneal layers of the skin.

  16. Removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents: adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-González, María P; García-Díaz, Esmeralda; González-Perea, Mario; Mattusch, Jürgen

    2017-01-31

    Three carbon samples were employed in this work, including commercial (1690 m(2) g(-1)), activated carbon prepared from guava seeds (637 m(2) g(-1)), and activated carbon prepared from avocado kernel (1068 m(2) g(-1)), to study the adsorption of the following gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs): gadoterate meglumine Dotarem®, gadopentetate dimeglumine Magnevist®, and gadoxetate disodium Primovist®. The activation conditions with H3PO4 were optimized using a Taguchi methodology to obtain mesoporous materials. The best removal efficiency by square meter in a batch system in aqueous solution and model urine was achieved by avocado kernel carbon, in which mesoporosity prevails over microporosity. The kinetic adsorption curves were described by a pseudo-second-order equation, and the adsorption isotherms in the concentration range 0.5-6 mM fit the Freundlich equation. The chemical characterization of the surfaces shows that materials with a greater amount of phenolic functional groups adsorb the GBCA better. Adsorption strongly depends on the pH due to the combination of the following factors: contrast agent protonated forms and carbon surface charge. The tested carbon samples were able to adsorb 70-90% of GBCA in aqueous solution and less in model urine. This research proposes a method for the elimination of GBCA from patient urine before its discharge into wastewater.

  17. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  18. The efficacy of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home bleaching on sound and demineralized enamel

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Majid; Mohammadpour, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the effectiveness of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home-bleaching in sound and demineralized enamel. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 120 freshly-extracted bovine incisors. Half of the specimens were stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Following exposure to a tea solution for 7.5 days, the specimens were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 30 according to the type of enamel and the bleaching procedure employed. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of demineralized teeth subjected to in-office bleaching and home bleaching, whereas in groups 3 and 4, sound teeth were subjected to in-office and home bleaching, respectively. A diode laser (810 nm, 2 W, continuous wave, four times for 15 seconds each) was employed for assisting the in-office process. The color of the specimens was measured before (T1) and after (T2) staining and during (T3) and after (T4) the bleaching procedures using a spectrophotometer. The color change (ΔE) between different treatments stages was compared among the groups. Results: There were significant differences in the color change between T2 and T3 (ΔE T2–T3) and T2 and T4 (ΔE T2–T4) stages among the study groups (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison by Duncan test revealed that both ΔET2–T3 and ΔET2–T4 were significantly greater in demineralized teeth submitted to laser-assisted in-office bleaching (group 1) as compared to the other groups (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Laser-assisted in-office bleaching could provide faster and greater whitening effect than home bleaching on stained demineralized enamel, but both procedures produced comparable results on sound teeth. PMID:26877590

  19. Effect of polyester blends in hydroentangled raw and bleached cotton nonwoven fabrics on the adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC), a cationic surfactant commonly employed as an antimicrobial agent, on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics (applicable for wipes) including raw cotton, bleached cotton, and their blends with polyester (PES) were stu...

  20. Evaluation of RSDL, M291 SDK, 0.5% Bleach, 1% Soapy Water and SERPACWA. Part 1: Challenge with VX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    compounds that act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that aids in the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. This neurotransmitter...decontamination (Sidell, 1997). If these items are not available, a solution of soap and water may be used to physically remove the agent. The M291 SDK was...decontaminated at the conclusion of each experiment. These experiments were conducted between 3 Nov 04 and 28 Mar 05, except that 5 bleach animals and 3 soap