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Sample records for activated bonding method

  1. Shape Bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  2. Method of bonding

    DOEpatents

    Saller, deceased, Henry A.; Hodge, Edwin S.; Paprocki, Stanley J.; Dayton, Russell W.

    1987-12-01

    1. A method of making a fuel-containing structure for nuclear reactors, comprising providing an assembly comprising a plurality of fuel units; each fuel unit consisting of a core plate containing thermal-neutron-fissionable material, sheets of cladding metal on its bottom and top surfaces, said cladding sheets being of greater width and length than said core plates whereby recesses are formed at the ends and sides of said core plate, and end pieces and first side pieces of cladding metal of the same thickness as the core plate positioned in said recesses, the assembly further comprising a plurality of second side pieces of cladding metal engaging the cladding sheets so as to space the fuel units from one another, and a plurality of filler plates of an acid-dissolvable nonresilient material whose melting point is above 2000.degree. F., each filler plate being arranged between a pair of said second side pieces and the cladding plates of two adjacent fuel units, the filler plates having the same thickness as the second side pieces; the method further comprising enclosing the entire assembly in an envelope; evacuating the interior of the entire assembly through said envelope; applying inert gas under a pressure of about 10,000 psi to the outside of said envelope while at the same time heating the assembly to a temperature above the flow point of the cladding metal but below the melting point of any material of the assembly, whereby the envelope is pressed against the assembly and integral bonds are formed between plates, sheets, first side pieces, and end pieces and between the sheets and the second side pieces; slowly cooling the assembly to room temperature; removing the envelope; and dissolving the filler plates without attacking the cladding metal.

  3. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  4. IMPROVED BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

    1964-04-28

    An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

  5. Bond dissociation enthalpies calculated by the PM3 method confirm activity cliffs in radical scavenging of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Amić, Dragan; Lucić, Bono; Kovacević, Goran; Trinajstić, Nenad

    2009-02-01

    Radical scavenging potency of flavonoids is associated with activity cliffs, i.e., small chemical modifications on flavonoid core can have a significant effect on activity. The presence or absence of the 3',4'-diOH and/or 3-OH group may serve as an activity switch for radical scavenging. The physicochemical background of such an indicator variable, defined previously (Amić et al. (2003) Croat Chem Acta 76:55-61), is confirmed by computation of bond dissociation enthalpies and selecting the minimal of all values relating to flavonoid OH groups. Bond dissociation enthalpies for hydrogen abstraction from OH groups for 29 flavonoids were calculated by the PM3 method. Minimal bond dissociation enthalpy values were obtained for OH groups attached to C-3, C-3' and C-4' positions, and they correspond to the previously introduced indicator variable. Taking into account some driving forces of the radical scavenging mechanism, it is possible to relate structural characteristics of flavonoids to their radical scavenging potency as well as to develop reliable structure-activity models.

  6. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  7. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  8. Method for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1986-10-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  9. Ultra precision and reliable bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The bonding of two materials through hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration is achieved at room temperature by applying hydroxide ions to at least one of the two bonding surfaces and by placing the surfaces sufficiently close to each other to form a chemical bond between them. The surfaces may be placed sufficiently close to each other by simply placing one surface on top of the other. A silicate material may also be used as a filling material to help fill gaps between the surfaces caused by surface figure mismatches. A powder of a silica-based or silica-containing material may also be used as an additional filling material. The hydroxide-catalyzed bonding method forms bonds which are not only as precise and transparent as optical contact bonds, but also as strong and reliable as high-temperature frit bonds. The hydroxide-catalyzed bonding method is also simple and inexpensive.

  10. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  11. Antibacterial activity of four dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Carrión, P; Bravo, M; Castillo, A

    2000-08-01

    The antibacterial action of bonding systems Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multipurpose and Prime-Bond was tested against 32 strains of the caries-producing bacteria Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Actinomyces spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Clostridium spp. An agar plate diffusion method was used with chlorhexidine as the positive control. Assays were performed in triplicate for each component (primer and adhesive) of the bonding systems. All the adhesives were found to inhibit bacterial growth but with differences in their spectra of action. The sum action of the Scotchbond Multipurpose components were most inhibitory and Prime-Bond was found to be the least effective system.

  12. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  13. Understanding acoustic methods for cement bond logging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Tao, Guo; Shang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    Well cementation is important for oil/gas production, underground gas storage, and CO2 storage, since it isolates the reservoir layers from aquifers to increase well integrity and reduce environmental footprint. This paper analyzes wave modes of different sonic/ultrasonic methods for cement bonding evaluation. A Two dimensional finite difference method is then used to simulate the wavefield for the ultrasonic methods in the cased-hole models. Waveforms of pulse-echo method from different interfaces in a good bonded well are analyzed. Wavefield of the pitch-catch method for free casing, partial or full bonded models with ultra-low density cement are studied. Based on the studies, the modes in different methods are considered as follows: the zero-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S0) for sonic method, the first-order symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (S1) for the pulse-echo method, and the zero-order anti-symmetric Leaky-Lamb mode (A0) for the pitch-catch method. For the sonic method, a directional transmitter in both the azimuth and axial directions can generate energy with a large incidence angle and azimuth resolution, which can effectively generate S0 and break out the azimuth limitation of the conventional sonic method. Although combination of pulse-echo and pitch-catch methods can determine the bonding condition of the third interface for the ultra-low density cement case, the pitch-catch cannot tell the fluid annulus thickness behind casing for the partial bonded cased-hole. PMID:27250137

  14. DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.

    1960-04-19

    A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

  15. The variational subspace valence bond method

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Graham D.

    2015-04-07

    The variational subspace valence bond (VSVB) method based on overlapping orbitals is introduced. VSVB provides variational support against collapse for the optimization of overlapping linear combinations of atomic orbitals (OLCAOs) using modified orbital expansions, without recourse to orthogonalization. OLCAO have the advantage of being naturally localized, chemically intuitive (to individually model bonds and lone pairs, for example), and transferrable between different molecular systems. Such features are exploited to avoid key computational bottlenecks. Since the OLCAO can be doubly occupied, VSVB can access very large problems, and calculations on systems with several hundred atoms are presented.

  16. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1992-01-01

    A method of forming a composite by providing a ceramic capable of having zero electrical resistance and complete diamagnetism at superconducting temperatures, bonding a thin layer of Ag, Au or alloys thereof with the ceramic. Thereafter, there is bonded a first metal to the ceramic surface at a temperature less than about 400.degree. C., and then a second metal is bonded to the first metal at a temperature less than about 400.degree. C. to form a composite wherein the first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ti and alloys thereof and wherein the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Al, Cu, Pb and Zn and alloys thereof.

  17. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  18. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction... concerning the following information collection: Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. OMB Number:...

  19. METHOD OF MAKING METAL BONDED CARBON BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Goeddel, W.V.; Simnad, M.T.

    1961-09-26

    A method of producing carbon bodies having high structural strength and low permeability is described. The method comprises mixing less than 10 wt.% of a diffusional bonding material selected from the group consisting of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, titanium, nickel, chromium, silicon, and decomposable compounds thereof with finely divided particles of carbon or graphite. While being maintained at a mechanical pressure over 3,000 psi, the mixture is then heated uniformly to a temperature of 1500 deg C or higher, usually for less than one hour. The resulting carbon bodies have a low diffusion constant, high dimensional stability, and high mechanical strength.

  20. Facile and Promising Method for Michael Addition of Indole and Pyrrole to Electron-Deficient trans-β-Nitroolefins Catalyzed by a Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalyst Feist's Acid and Preliminary Study of Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Majid, Abdullah M. A.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Barakat, Assem; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Naushad, Mu.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist's acid (FA)) as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) ability, Feist's acid (FA) has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%). The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported. PMID:24574906

  1. Development of Blocked-Impurity-Band-Type Ge Detectors Fabricated with the Surface-Activated Wafer Bonding Method for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, M.; Kaneda, H.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ukai, S.; Shichi, K.; Wada, T.; Suzuki, T.; Watanabe, K.; Nagase, K.; Baba, S.; Kochi, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report the current status of the development of our new detectors for far-infrared (FIR) astronomy. We develop Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB)-type Ge detectors to realize large-format compact arrays covering a wide FIR wavelength range up to 200 \\upmu m. We fabricated Ge junction devices of different physical parameters with a BIB-type structure, using the room temperature, surface-activated wafer bonding (SAB) method. We measured the absolute responsivity and the spectral response curve of each device at low temperatures, using an internal blackbody source in a cryostat and a Fourier transform spectrometer, respectively. The results show that the SAB Ge junction devices have significantly higher absolute responsivities and longer cut-off wavelengths of the spectral response than the conventional bulk Ge:Ga device. Based upon the results, we discuss the optimum parameters of SAB Ge junction devices for FIR detectors. We conclude that SAB Ge junction devices possess a promising applicability to next-generation FIR detectors covering wavelengths up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m with high responsivity. As a next step, we plan to fabricate a BIB-type Ge array device in combination with a low-power cryogenic readout integrated circuit.

  2. Novel methods of bonding solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomaier, Rob

    2011-09-01

    Messy liquid adhesives, short work times, long cure times, difficult clean-up of stray adhesive - all of these are associated with liquid adhesives for bonding solar cells. Current adhesion methods have been in place since the '70s: mix a two-part liquid silicone adhesive, coat a portion of adhesive onto a section of substrate, place the cells in a vacuum bag and wait for the adhesive to cure. Alternatively, one can use a fairly complicated robotic procedure to apply adhesive then fix a cell down and, again, wait for the adhesive to cure. Some difficulties that need to be overcome include balancing the amount adhesive to spread out with the available worktime in order to get all the cells onto the substrate with good adhesion; controlling the bondline; ensuring that the adhesive cures correctly after application; and, finally, if there is any re-work, removing the part from the adhesive without damaging everything around it.

  3. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse. PMID:27584914

  4. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  5. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.

    1991-04-23

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof is disclosed. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, Au and alloys thereof. 3 figures.

  6. Method of bonding metals to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic or glass having a thin layer of silver, gold or alloys thereof at the surface thereof. A first metal is bonded to the thin layer and a second metal is bonded to the first metal. The first metal is selected from the class consisting of In, Ga, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cd, Pb, Tl and alloys thereof, and the second metal is selected from the class consisting of Cu, Al, Pb, An and alloys thereof.

  7. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  8. Method for bonding a transmission line to a downhole tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2007-11-06

    An apparatus for bonding a transmission line to the central bore of a downhole tool includes a pre-formed interface for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. The pre-formed interface includes a first surface that substantially conforms to the outside contour of a transmission line and a second surface that substantially conforms to the inside diameter of a downhole tool. In another aspect of the invention, a method for bonding a transmission line to the inside diameter of a downhole tool includes positioning a transmission line near the inside wall of a downhole tool and placing a mold near the transmission line and the inside wall. The method further includes injecting a bonding material into the mold and curing the bonding material such that the bonding material bonds the transmission line to the inside wall.

  9. Aryl isomerization during aliphatic CH bond activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, L.R.; Rothwell, I.P.

    1983-03-23

    The transition-metal-stablized benzyne or o-phenylene (n/sup 2/-C/sub 6/H/sub 4/) ligand has been shown to be both an interesting and reactive group. The ligand is normally generated in mononuclear systems by ..beta..- (ortho-) hydrogen abstraction from an aryl group, and this synthetic approach has allowed a stable example to be isolated and structurally characterized. Here the conclusive identification of a benzyne intermediate during the isomerization of a tantalum-aryl compound is reported. The reaction is interesting in that the ortho hydrogen is transferred to the carbon atom of a cyclometalated chelate, the reverse (isomerization) step thus involving the activation of an aliphatic CH bond by the intermediate benzyne.

  10. On the activation of σ-bonds by electric fields: A Valence Bond perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, Luis; Mora, Jose R.; Torres, F. Javier; Almeida, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    The activation of non-polar σ -bonds induced by an electric field is studied from the perspective of the Valence Bond theory. As representative examples we study the dissociation of the H-H and C-H bonds of molecular hydrogen and methane, respectively, under the experience of an homogeneous as well as an heterogeneous field oriented along the bond axis. For all cases, the increase in the electric field have similar effects: (i) the stabilization of the potential energy, (ii) an increment of the equilibrium bond length and (iii) the transition from an homolytic dissociation mechanism to an heterolytic one when the bond is subjected under a strong enough field. These general observations are thoroughly explained using a simple Valence Bond model that involve the increment of the resonance energy between the covalent and the ionic structures, and the curve crossing between the two structures after some field strength.

  11. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Roe, Lawrence H.; Migliori, Albert

    1995-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements.

  12. Bonded ultrasonic transducer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Roe, L.H.; Migliori, A.

    1995-11-14

    An ultrasonic transducer is formed as a diffusion bonded assembly of piezoelectric crystal, backing material, and, optionally, a ceramic wear surface. The mating surfaces of each component are silver films that are diffusion bonded together under the application of pressure and heat. Each mating surface may also be coated with a reactive metal, such as hafnium, to increase the adhesion of the silver films to the component surfaces. Only thin silver films are deposited, e.g., a thickness of about 0.00635 mm, to form a substantially non-compliant bond between surfaces. The resulting transducer assembly is substantially free of self-resonances over normal operating ranges for taking resonant ultrasound measurements. 12 figs.

  13. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  14. Predicting Promoter-Induced Bond Activation on Solid Catalysts Using Elementary Bond Orders.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Charlie; Latimer, Allegra A; Yoo, Jong Suk; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-09-17

    In this Letter, we examine bond activation induced by nonmetal surface promoters in the context of dehydrogenation reactions. We use C-H bond activation in methane dehydrogenation on transition metals as an example to understand the origin of the promoting or poisoning effect of nonmetals. The electronic structure of the surface and the bond order of the promoter are found to establish all trends in bond activation. On the basis of these results, we develop a predictive model that successfully describes the energetics of C-H, O-H, and N-H bond activation across a range of reactions. For a given reaction step, a single data point determines whether a nonmetal will promote bond activation or poison the surface and by how much. We show how our model leads to general insights that can be directly used to predict bond activation energetics on transition metal sulfides and oxides, which can be perceived as promoted surfaces. These results can then be directly used in studies on full catalytic pathways. PMID:26722740

  15. Calculation of activation energies for hydrogen-atom abstractions by radicals containing carbon triple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.; Laufer, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Activation energies are calculated by the bond-energy-bond-order (BEBO) and the bond-strength-bond-length (BSBL) methods for the reactions of C2H radicals with H2, CH4, and C2H6 and for the reactions of CN radicals with H2 and CH4. The BSBL technique accurately predicts the activation energies for these reactions while the BEBO method yields energies averaging 9 kcal higher than those observed. A possible reason for the disagreement is considered.

  16. Investigation of Adhesive Bond Cure Conditions using Nonlinear Ultrasonic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Tobias P.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to investigate various cure conditions of adhesive bonds using nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling. Several samples were used to obtain normal incidence, oblique incidence, and wave mixing.

  17. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shenbo

    2015-08-01

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels.

  18. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  19. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... Federal Register (76 FR 11254) on March 1, 2011, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This is a...

  20. 26 CFR 1.141-2 - Private activity bond tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.141-2 Private... and deliberate actions—(1) In general. An issue is an issue of private activity bonds if the issuer reasonably expects, as of the issue date, that the issue will meet either the private business tests or...

  1. 26 CFR 1.141-2 - Private activity bond tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.141-2 Private... and deliberate actions—(1) In general. An issue is an issue of private activity bonds if the issuer reasonably expects, as of the issue date, that the issue will meet either the private business tests or...

  2. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  3. Influence of preheating the bonding agent of a conventional three-step adhesive system and the light activated resin cement on dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Holanda, Daniel Brandão Vilela; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    Aims: to evaluate the influence of preheating the bonding agent (Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive/3M ESPE) and the light-activated resin cement (RelyX Venner/3M ESPE) on dentin microtensile bond strength. Materials and Methods: The exposed flat dentin surface of 40 human third molars were randomly distributed into four groups for cementation (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) (n = 10): G1-bond and resin cement, both at room temperature (22°C), G2-bond preheated to 58°C and cement at room temperature (22°C), G3-bond at room temperature (22°C) and the cement preheated to 58°C, G4-bond preheated to 58°C and cement preheated to 58°C. Sticks of dentin/block set measuring approximately 1 mm2 were obtained and used for the microtensile bond strength test. All sticks had their failure mode classified. Statistical analysis used: Factorial analysis of variance was applied, 2 × 2 (bond × cement) (P < 0.05). Results: Preheating the bonding agent (P = 0.8411) or the cement (P = 0.7155), yielded no significant difference. The interaction bond × cement was not significant (P = 0.9389). Conclusions: Preheating the bond and/or the light-activated resin cement did not influence dentin bond strength or fracture failure mode. PMID:24347889

  4. Method for joining metal by solid-state bonding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, L. Elkin; Fultz, Chester R.; Maulden, Kerry A.

    1979-01-01

    The present development is directed to a method for joining metal at relatively low temperatures by solid-state bonding. Planar surfaces of the metal workpieces are placed in a parallel abutting relationship with one another. A load is applied to at least one of the workpieces for forcing the workpieces together while one of the workpieces is relatively slowly oscillated in a rotary motion over a distance of about 1.degree.. After a preselected number of oscillations, the rotary motion is terminated and the bond between the abutting surfaces is effected. An additional load may be applied to facilitate the bond after terminating the rotary motion.

  5. Chemical bonding and quadrupole splittings of 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum in active sites of oxyhemoglobin as calculated by X α -discrete variation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryeva, E. I.

    2008-07-01

    Results of quantum-chemical X α -discrete variation method ( X α -DVM) calculations of interaction parameters between iron (II) and oxygen molecule in active sites of α- and β-subunits of oxyhemoglobin are presented within three models: without extra electron and in spin-unrestricted mode (model I); without extra electron and in spin-restricted mode (model II); with extra electrons in spin-unrestricted mode (model III). The electronic structure and 57Fe quadrupole splitting Δ E Q for the active site of α- and β-subunits (within model I) and only of the α-subunit (within models II and III) of oxyhemoglobin are calculated. The differences in Δ E Q values for these three models are discussed.

  6. Vacuum pull down method for an enhanced bonding process

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  7. BN Bonded BN fiber article and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1981-08-18

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising a bonding compound selected from boron oxide and boric acid and a structural fiber selected from the group consisting of boron oxide, boron nitride and partially nitrided boron oxide fibers, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the compound and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  8. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  9. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  10. Review of methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1987-02-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. In resistance heating, a single prepreg ply was placed between the composites and heated by passing electric current through the graphite fibers. With induction heating, a single ply of nickel coated graphite fibers was placed between the composites and heated. Ultrasonic welding was done by molding thermoplastic-only energy directors into the composites; the ultrasonic vibration melted these energy directors thereby fusion bonding the parts. 20 references.

  11. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has

  12. A Simplified Diagnostic Method for Elastomer Bond Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A simplified method has been developed for determining bond durability under exposure to water or high humidity conditions. It uses a small number of test specimens with relatively short times of water exposure at elevated temperature. The method is also gravimetric; the only equipment being required is an oven, specimen jars, and a conventional laboratory balance.

  13. Catalytic Diamination of Olefins via N–N Bond Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    , cyclic sulfamides are installed at the terminal carbons via a dehydrogenative diamination process. When α-methylstyrenes (lacking homoallylic hydrogens) react with Pd(0) and di-tert-butyldiaziridinone, spirocyclic indolines are formed with generation of four C–N bonds and one spiro quaternary carbon via allylic and aromatic C–H amination. With Cu(I) catalysts, various terminal olefins can be effectively diaminated at the double bonds using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone, di-tert-butylthiadiaziridine 1,1-dioxide, and 1,2-di-tert-butyl-3-(cyanimino)-diaziridine as nitrogen sources, giving a variety of imidazolidinones, cyclic sulfamides, and cyclic guanidines in good yields, respectively. In the case of monosubstituted olefins using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone as nitrogen source, the resulting diamination products (imidazolidinones) are readily dehydrogenated under the reaction conditions, leading to the corresponding imidazolinones in good yields. Esters can also be diaminated to form the corresponding hydantoins with di-tert-butyldiaziridinone in the presence of a Cu(I) catalyst. A radical mechanism is likely to be operating in these Cu(I)-catalyzed reaction processes. Asymmetric processes have also been developed for the Pd(0)- and Cu(I)-catalyzed diamination reactions. Biologically active compounds such as (+)-CP-99,994 and Sch 425078 have been synthesized via the diamination processes. The diamination reactions described herein provide efficient methods to access a wide variety of vicinal diamines from readily available olefins and show great potential for synthetic applications. PMID:25402963

  14. Catalytic diamination of olefins via N-N bond activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingguang; Cornwall, Richard G; Du, Haifeng; Zhao, Baoguo; Shi, Yian

    2014-12-16

    , cyclic sulfamides are installed at the terminal carbons via a dehydrogenative diamination process. When α-methylstyrenes (lacking homoallylic hydrogens) react with Pd(0) and di-tert-butyldiaziridinone, spirocyclic indolines are formed with generation of four C-N bonds and one spiro quaternary carbon via allylic and aromatic C-H amination. With Cu(I) catalysts, various terminal olefins can be effectively diaminated at the double bonds using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone, di-tert-butylthiadiaziridine 1,1-dioxide, and 1,2-di-tert-butyl-3-(cyanimino)-diaziridine as nitrogen sources, giving a variety of imidazolidinones, cyclic sulfamides, and cyclic guanidines in good yields, respectively. In the case of monosubstituted olefins using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone as nitrogen source, the resulting diamination products (imidazolidinones) are readily dehydrogenated under the reaction conditions, leading to the corresponding imidazolinones in good yields. Esters can also be diaminated to form the corresponding hydantoins with di-tert-butyldiaziridinone in the presence of a Cu(I) catalyst. A radical mechanism is likely to be operating in these Cu(I)-catalyzed reaction processes. Asymmetric processes have also been developed for the Pd(0)- and Cu(I)-catalyzed diamination reactions. Biologically active compounds such as (+)-CP-99,994 and Sch 425078 have been synthesized via the diamination processes. The diamination reactions described herein provide efficient methods to access a wide variety of vicinal diamines from readily available olefins and show great potential for synthetic applications. PMID:25402963

  15. Effect of UVA-activated riboflavin on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Cova, A; Breschi, L; Nato, F; Ruggeri, A; Carrilho, M; Tjäderhane, L; Prati, C; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Mazzoni, A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:21940521

  16. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  17. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, Richard M.; Tuthill, Clinton D.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1991-01-01

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals.

  18. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, R.M.; Tuthill, C.D.; Watkins, R.D.

    1991-04-23

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals. 2 figures.

  19. Bonding techniques for hybrid active pixel sensors (HAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigas, M.; Cabruja, E.; Lozano, M.

    2007-05-01

    A hybrid active pixel sensor (HAPS) consists of an array of sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. The most used way to connect these two different devices is bump bonding. This interconnection technique is very suitable for these systems because it allows a very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. However, there are other interconnection techniques available such as direct bonding. This paper, as a continuation of a review [M. Lozano, E. Cabruja, A. Collado, J. Santander, M. Ullan, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 473 (1-2) (2001) 95-101] published in 2001, presents an update of the different advanced bonding techniques available for manufacturing a hybrid active pixel detector.

  20. Selenium bond decreases ON resistance of light-activated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Vitrified amorphous selenium bond decreases the ON resistance of a gallium arsenide-silicon light-activated, low-level switch. The switch is used under a pulse condition to prolong switch life and minimize errors due to heating, devitrification, and overdrawing.

  1. Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  2. Assessment of Proper Bonding Methods and Mechanical Characterization FPGA CQFPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Milton C.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses fractured leads on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) during flight vibration. Actions taken to determine root cause and resolution of the failure include finite element analysis (FEA) and vibration testing and scanning electron microscopy (with X-ray microanalysis) and energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) failure assessment. Bonding methods for surface mount parts is assessed, including critical analysis and assessment of random fatigue damage. Regarding ceramic quad flat pack (CQFP) lead fracture, after disassembling the attitude control electronics (ACE) configuration, photographs showed six leads cracked on FPGA RTSX72SU-1 CQ208B package located on the RWIC card. An identical package (FPGA RTSX32SU-1 CQ208B) mounted on the RWIC did not results in cracked pins due to vibration. FPGA lead failure theories include workmanship issues in the lead-forming, material defect in the leads of the FPGA packages, and the insecure mounting of the board in the card guides, among other theories. Studies were conducted using simple calculations to determine the response and fatigue life of the package. Shorter packages exhibited more response when loaded by out-of-plane displacement of PCB while taller packages exhibit more response when loaded by in-plane acceleration of PCB. Additionally, under-fill did not contribute to reducing stress in leads due to out-of-plane PCB loading or from component twisting, as much as corner bonding. The combination of corner bond and under-fill is best to address mechanical and thermal S/C environment. Test results of bonded parts showed reduced (dampened) amplitude and slightly shifted peaks at the un-bonded natural frequency and an additional response at the bonded frequency. Stress due to PCBB out-of-plane loading was decreased on in the corners when only a corner bond was used. Future work may address CQFP fatigue assessment, including the investigation of discrepancy in predicted fatigue damage, as well as

  3. Effect of water-ageing on dentine bond strength and anti-biofilm activity of bonding agent containing new monomer dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Eric J.; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent containing a new antibacterial monomer dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) as well as nanoparticles of silver (NAg) and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP), and to investigate the effects of water-ageing for 6 months on dentine bond strength and anti-biofilm properties for the first time. Methods Four bonding agents were tested: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) Primer and Adhesive control; SBMP + 5% DMADDM; SBMP + 5% DMADDM + 0.1% NAg; and SBMP + 5% DMADDM + 0.1% NAg with 20% NACP in adhesive. Specimens were water-aged for 1 d and 6 months at 37 °C. Then the dentine shear bond strengths were measured. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to inoculate bacteria on water-aged specimens and to measure metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFUs), and lactic acid production. Results Dentine bond strength showed a 35% loss in 6 months of water-ageing for SBMP control (mean ± sd; n = 10); in contrast, the new antibacterial bonding agents showed no strength loss. The DMADDM–NAg–NACP containing bonding agent imparted a strong antibacterial effect by greatly reducing biofilm viability, metabolic activity and acid production. The biofilm CFU was reduced by more than two orders of magnitude, compared to SBMP control. Furthermore, the DMADDM–NAg–NACP bonding agent exhibited a long-term antibacterial performance, with no significant difference between 1 d and 6 months (p > 0.1). Conclusions Incorporating DMADDM–NAg–NACP in bonding agent yielded potent and long-lasting antibacterial properties, and much stronger bond strength after 6 months of water-ageing than a commercial control. The new antibacterial bonding agent is promising to inhibit biofilms and caries at the margins. The method of DMADDM–NAg–NACP incorporation may have a wide applicability to other adhesives, cements and composites. PMID:23583528

  4. C-H bond activation by f-block complexes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; McMullon, Max W; Rieb, Julia; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-01-01

    Most homogeneous catalysis relies on the design of metal complexes to trap and convert substrates or small molecules to value-added products. Organometallic lanthanide compounds first gave a tantalizing glimpse of their potential for catalytic C-H bond transformations with the selective cleavage of one C-H bond in methane by bis(permethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanide methyl [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(CH3 )] complexes some 25 years ago. Since then, numerous metal complexes from across the periodic table have been shown to selectively activate hydrocarbon C-H bonds, but the challenges of closing catalytic cycles still remain; many f-block complexes show great potential in this important area of chemistry.

  5. C-H bond activation by f-block complexes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Polly L; McMullon, Max W; Rieb, Julia; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-01-01

    Most homogeneous catalysis relies on the design of metal complexes to trap and convert substrates or small molecules to value-added products. Organometallic lanthanide compounds first gave a tantalizing glimpse of their potential for catalytic C-H bond transformations with the selective cleavage of one C-H bond in methane by bis(permethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanide methyl [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(CH3 )] complexes some 25 years ago. Since then, numerous metal complexes from across the periodic table have been shown to selectively activate hydrocarbon C-H bonds, but the challenges of closing catalytic cycles still remain; many f-block complexes show great potential in this important area of chemistry. PMID:25384554

  6. Infrared Spectra and Hydrogen Bonds of Biologically Active Benzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shimko, A. N.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2013-09-01

    IR-Fourier spectra of solutions and crystals of biologically active benzaldehyde derivatives were studied. Specific features of the formation of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds were analyzed. Spectral signatures that characterized participation of the hydroxyl OH group and also the OCH3 and C=O groups in the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the three different types O-H···O-H, O-H···O-CH3, and O-H···O=C were revealed. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the types O-H···O-H and O-H···O-CH3 were absent for benzaldehyde derivatives in the crystal phase. Only hydroxyl and carbonyl groups participated in intermolecular interactions. This resulted in the formation of linear intermolecular dimers. Seven various configurations of the linear dimers were identified in solutions and crystals.

  7. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  8. Effect of bonding on the performance of a piezoactuator-based active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the structural vibrations of flexible beams is studied. A Modified Independent Modal Space Control (MIMSC) method is devised to select the optimal location, control gains and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the amplitudes of vibrations of beams to which these actuators are bonded, as well as the input control energy necessary to suppress these vibrations. The presented method accounts for the effects that the piezoelectric actuators and the bonding layers have on changing the elastic and inertial properties of the flexible beams. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the MIMSC method and to demonstrate the effect of the physical and geometrical properties of the bonding layer on the dynamic performance of the actively controlled beams. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised method in designing more realistic active control systems for flexible beams, in particular, and large flexible structures in general.

  9. Method of Bonding Optical Elements with Near-Zero Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; McClelland, Ryan; Byron, Glenn; Evans, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    The International X-ray Project seeks to build an x-ray telescope using thousands of pieces of thin and flexible glass mirror segments. Each mirror segment must be bonded into a housing in nearly perfect optical alignment without distortion. Forces greater than 0.001 Newton, or displacements greater than 0.5 m of the glass, cause unacceptable optical distortion. All known epoxies shrink as they cure. Even the epoxies with the least amount of shrinkage (<0.01%) cause unacceptable optical distortion and misalignment by pulling the mirror segments towards the housing as it cures. A related problem is that the shrinkage is not consistent or predictable so that it cannot be accounted for in the setup (i.e., if all of the bonds shrunk an equal amount, there would be no problem). A method has been developed that allows two components to be joined with epoxy in such a way that reduces the displacement caused by epoxy shrinking as it cures to less than 200 nm. The method involves using ultraviolet-cured epoxy with a displacement sensor and a nanoactuator in a control loop. The epoxy is cured by short-duration exposures to UV light. In between each exposure, the nano-actuator zeroes out the displacement caused by epoxy shrinkage and thermal expansion. After a few exposures, the epoxy has cured sufficiently to prevent further displacement of the two components. Bonding of optical elements has been done for many years, but most optics are thick and rigid elements that resist micro-Newton-level forces without causing distortion. When bonding thin glass optics such as the 0.40-mm thick IXO X-ray mirrors, forces in the micro- and milli-Newton levels cause unacceptable optical figure error. This innovation can now repeatedly and reliably bond a thin glass mirror to a metal housing with less than 0.2 m of displacement (<200 nm). This is an enabling technology that allows the installation of virtually stress-free, undistorted thin optics onto structures. This innovation is

  10. Wafer bonded virtual substrate and method for forming the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A. (Inventor); Zahler, James M. (Inventor); Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of forming a virtual substrate comprised of an optoelectronic device substrate and handle substrate comprises the steps of initiating bonding of the device substrate to the handle substrate, improving or increasing the mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates, and thinning the device substrate to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. The handle substrate is typically Si or other inexpensive common substrate material, while the optoelectronic device substrate is formed of more expensive and specialized electro-optic material. Using the methodology of the invention a wide variety of thin film electro-optic materials of high quality can be bonded to inexpensive substrates which serve as the mechanical support for an optoelectronic device layer fabricated in the thin film electro-optic material.

  11. Wafer bonded virtual substrate and method for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A.; Zahler, James M.; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i

    2007-07-03

    A method of forming a virtual substrate comprised of an optoelectronic device substrate and handle substrate comprises the steps of initiating bonding of the device substrate to the handle substrate, improving or increasing the mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates, and thinning the device substrate to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. The handle substrate is typically Si or other inexpensive common substrate material, while the optoelectronic device substrate is formed of more expensive and specialized electro-optic material. Using the methodology of the invention a wide variety of thin film electro-optic materials of high quality can be bonded to inexpensive substrates which serve as the mechanical support for an optoelectronic device layer fabricated in the thin film electro-optic material.

  12. Effect of adhesive application methods on bond strength to bovine enamel.

    PubMed

    Ando, Susumu; Watanabe, Takayuki; Tsubota, Keishi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Irokawa, Atsushi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2008-06-01

    Single-step self-etch adhesive systems have been developed to simplify and shorten bonding procedures. With the gain in popularity of these simplified systems, their reliability has become a focus of interest. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of adhesive application method on enamel bond strength. Two commercial single-step self-etch adhesive systems, Clearfil tri-S Bond, and G-Bond, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. Adhesives were only applied without agitation (inactive) or were agitated by a brush (active), and resin composites were condensed into the mold on the enamel surface and light-activated. Ten specimens per test group were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, then shear-tested at a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test were used. The bond strengths for active application were higher than those for inactive application. Significant differences were found for both adhesive systems. From the results of this study, active application of single-step self-etch adhesive may help to ensure the creation of a roughened enamel surface and enhance the penetration of resin monomer into the subsurface demineralized enamel. PMID:18587208

  13. Topological properties of hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds from charge densities obtained by the maximum entropy method (MEM)

    PubMed Central

    Netzel, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Charge densities have been determined by the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) from the high-resolution, low-temperature (T ≃ 20 K) X-ray diffraction data of six different crystals of amino acids and peptides. A comparison of dynamic deformation densities of the MEM with static and dynamic deformation densities of multipole models shows that the MEM may lead to a better description of the electron density in hydrogen bonds in cases where the multipole model has been restricted to isotropic displacement parameters and low-order multipoles (l max = 1) for the H atoms. Topological properties at bond critical points (BCPs) are found to depend systematically on the bond length, but with different functions for covalent C—C, C—N and C—O bonds, and for hydrogen bonds together with covalent C—H and N—H bonds. Similar dependencies are known for AIM properties derived from static multipole densities. The ratio of potential and kinetic energy densities |V(BCP)|/G(BCP) is successfully used for a classification of hydrogen bonds according to their distance d(H⋯O) between the H atom and the acceptor atom. The classification based on MEM densities coincides with the usual classification of hydrogen bonds as strong, intermediate and weak [Jeffrey (1997) ▶. An Introduction to Hydrogen Bonding. Oxford University Press]. MEM and procrystal densities lead to similar values of the densities at the BCPs of hydrogen bonds, but differences are shown to prevail, such that it is found that only the true charge density, represented by MEM densities, the multipole model or some other method can lead to the correct characterization of chemical bonding. Our results do not confirm suggestions in the literature that the promolecule density might be sufficient for a characterization of hydrogen bonds. PMID:19767685

  14. Bonding Analysis of Amino Resin Wood Adhesive with Pesticide Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Rajin, Mariani; Siambun, Nancy Julius

    Wood base industries are among the dominant players in Malaysia economic activities. In this research, by using Response Surface Method (RSM), studies of bonding between Disodium Tetraborate Decahydrate (DTD) pesticide and various formulation of wood adhesive i.e., Melamine-Urea-Formaldehyde (MUF) resin is carried out. The RSM formulated twenty-five MUF formulations, consisting combination of different amount of formaldehyde, melamine, urea added in stage-1 and stage-2 of resin synthesis and DTD pesticide. The liquid products of resin are then hardened and tested using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red (FTIR) and visible spectrophotometer (VIS), to analyse the bonding of the resin and pesticide. The data from the FTIR and VIS analysis were then compiled and analysed using Response Surface Method. The results show that, different amount of the formaldehyde, melamine, urea and DTD pesticide, gives specific impact to the strength of MUF resin-pesticide bonding.

  15. Microshear bond strength according to dentin cleansing methods before recementation

    PubMed Central

    Taşar, Simge; Ulusoy, Mutahhar Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser in different output powers for removing permanent resin cement residues and therefore its influence on microshear bond strength compared to other cleaning methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS 90 extracted human molars were sectioned in 1 mm thickness. Resin cement was applied to surface of sliced teeth. After the removal of initial cement, 6 test groups were prepared by various dentin surface treatment methods as follows: no treatment (Group 1), ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid application (Group 2), Endosolv R application (Group 3), 1.25 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 4), 2 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 5) and 3.5 W Erbium, Chromium:Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser irradiation (Group 6). The topography and morphology of the treated dentin surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (n=2 for each group). Following the repetitive cementation, microshear bond strength between dentin and cement (n=26 in per group) were measured with universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by Kruskal Wallis H Test with Bonferroni correction (P<.05). Fracture patterns were investigated by light microscope. RESULTS Mean microshear bond strength ± SD (MPa) for each group was 34.9 ± 17.7, 32.1 ± 15.8, 37.8 ± 19.3, 31.3 ± 12.7, 44.4 ± 13.6, 40.2 ± 13.2 respectively. Group 5 showed significantly difference from Group 1, Group 2 and Group 4. Also, Group 6 was found statistically different from Group 4. CONCLUSION 2 W and 3.5 W Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet laser application were found efficient in removing resin residues. PMID:24843391

  16. Modification of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides by direct C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2015-03-17

    Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  17. α-Halogenoacetanilides as hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts that activate carbonyl bonds: fluorine versus chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Koeller, Sylvain; Thomas, Coralie; Peruch, Fréderic; Deffieux, Alain; Massip, Stéphane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Desvergne, Jean-Pierre; Milet, Anne; Bibal, Brigitte

    2014-03-01

    α-Halogenoacetanilides (X=F, Cl, Br) were examined as H-bonding organocatalysts designed for the double activation of CO bonds through NH and CH donor groups. Depending on the halide substituents, the double H-bond involved a nonconventional CH⋅⋅⋅O interaction with either a HCXn (n=1-2, X=Cl, Br) or a HCAr bond (X=F), as shown in the solid-state crystal structures and by molecular modeling. In addition, the catalytic properties of α-halogenoacetanilides were evaluated in the ring-opening polymerization of lactide, in the presence of a tertiary amine as cocatalyst. The α-dichloro- and α-dibromoacetanilides containing electron-deficient aromatic groups afforded the most attractive double H-bonding properties towards CO bonds, with a NH⋅⋅⋅O⋅⋅⋅HCX2 interaction.

  18. Activation of C-H and B-H bonds through agostic bonding: an ELF/QTAIM insight.

    PubMed

    Zins, Emilie-Laure; Silvi, Bernard; Alikhani, M Esmaïl

    2015-04-14

    Agostic bonding is of paramount importance in C-H bond activation processes. The reactivity of the σ C-H bond thus activated will depend on the nature of the metallic center, the nature of the ligand involved in the interaction and co-ligands, as well as on geometric parameters. Because of their importance in organometallic chemistry, a qualitative classification of agostic bonding could be very much helpful. Herein we propose descriptors of the agostic character of bonding based on the electron localization function (ELF) and Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) topological analysis. A set of 31 metallic complexes taken, or derived, from the literature was chosen to illustrate our methodology. First, some criteria should prove that an interaction between a metallic center and a σ X-H bond can indeed be described as "agostic" bonding. Then, the contribution of the metallic center in the protonated agostic basin, in the ELF topological description, may be used to evaluate the agostic character of bonding. A σ X-H bond is in agostic interaction with a metal center when the protonated X-H basin is a trisynaptic basin with a metal contribution strictly larger than the numerical uncertainty, i.e. 0.01 e. In addition, it was shown that the weakening of the electron density at the X-Hagostic bond critical point with respect to that of X-Hfree well correlates with the lengthening of the agostic X-H bond distance as well as with the shift of the vibrational frequency associated with the νX-H stretching mode. Furthermore, the use of a normalized parameter that takes into account the total population of the protonated basin, allows the comparison of the agostic character of bonding involved in different complexes. PMID:25760795

  19. Analysis Method for Inelastic, Adhesively Bonded Joints with Anisotropic Adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Klang, Eric C.

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional analysis method for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives with nonlinear material behavior is presented in the proposed paper. The strain and resulting stress field in a general, bonded joint overlap are determined by using a variable-step, finite-difference solution algorithm to iteratively solve a system of first-order differential equations. Applied loading is given by a system of combined extensional, bending, and shear forces that are applied to the edge of the joint overlap. Adherends are assumed to behave as linear, cylindrically bent plates using classical laminated plate theory that includes the effects of first-order transverse shear deformation. Using the deformation theory of plasticity and a modified von-Mises yield criterion, inelastic material behavior is modeled in the adhesive layer. Results for the proposed method are verified against previous results from the literature and shown to be in excellent agreement. An additional case that highlights the effects of transverse shear deformation between similar adherends is also presented.

  20. THz quantum cascade lasers with wafer bonded active regions.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, M; Deutsch, C; Benz, A; Cole, G D; Detz, H; Andrews, A M; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G; Unterrainer, K

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with a 30 μm thick double-metal waveguide, which are fabricated by stacking two 15 μm thick active regions using a wafer bonding process. By increasing the active region thickness more optical power is generated inside the cavity, the waveguide losses are decreased and the far-field is improved due to a larger facet aperture. In this way the output power is increased by significantly more than a factor of 2 without reducing the maximum operating temperature and without increasing the threshold current.

  1. Electrical Bonding: A Survey of Requirement, Methods, and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides information helpful to engineers imposing electrical bonding requirements, reviewing waiver requests, or modifying specifications on various space programs. Electrical bonding specifications and some of the processes used in the United States have been reviewed. This document discusses the specifications, the types of bonds, the intent of each, and the basic requirements where possible. Additional topics discussed are resistance versus impedance, bond straps, corrosion, finishes, and special applications.

  2. Tissue factor activation: is disulfide bond switching a regulatory mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Mandal, Samir K.

    2007-01-01

    A majority of tissue factor (TF) on cell surfaces exists in a cryptic form (ie, coagulation function inactive) but retains its functionality in cell signaling. Recent studies have suggested that cryptic TF contains unpaired cysteine thiols and that activation involves the formation of the disulfide bond Cys186-Cys 209 and that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) regulates TF coagulant and signaling activities by targeting this disulfide bond. This study was carried out to investigate the validity of this novel concept. Although treatment of MDA 231 tumor cells, fibroblasts, and stimulated endothelial cells with the oxidizing agent HgCl2 markedly increased the cell-surface TF coagulant activity, the increase is associated with increased anionic phospholipids at the cell surface. Annexin V, which binds to anionic phospholipids, attenuated the increased TF coagulant activity. It is noteworthy that treatment of cells with reducing agents also increased the cell surface TF activity. No evidence was found for either detectable expression of PDI at the cell surface or association of TF with PDI. Furthermore, reduction of PDI with the gene silencing had no effect on either TF coagulant or cell signaling functions. Overall, the present data undermine the recently proposed hypothesis that PDI-mediated disulfide exchange plays a role in regulating TF procoagulant and cell signaling functions. PMID:17726162

  3. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-2T - Private activity bond defined (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... activity bond” means any industrial development bond or student loan bond the interest on which is exempt... the term “student loan bond.” There are five exceptions to the general definition of the term “private... apply to obligations issued to refund a prior issue of student loan bonds? A-14: In the case of...

  4. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-2T - Private activity bond defined (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... activity bond” means any industrial development bond or student loan bond the interest on which is exempt... the term “student loan bond.” There are five exceptions to the general definition of the term “private... apply to obligations issued to refund a prior issue of student loan bonds? A-14: In the case of...

  5. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-2T - Private activity bond defined (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity bond” means any industrial development bond or student loan bond the interest on which is exempt... the term “student loan bond.” There are five exceptions to the general definition of the term “private... apply to obligations issued to refund a prior issue of student loan bonds? A-14: In the case of...

  6. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-2T - Private activity bond defined (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... activity bond” means any industrial development bond or student loan bond the interest on which is exempt... the term “student loan bond.” There are five exceptions to the general definition of the term “private... apply to obligations issued to refund a prior issue of student loan bonds? A-14: In the case of...

  7. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-2T - Private activity bond defined (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activity bond” means any industrial development bond or student loan bond the interest on which is exempt... the term “student loan bond.” There are five exceptions to the general definition of the term “private... apply to obligations issued to refund a prior issue of student loan bonds? A-14: In the case of...

  8. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  9. Bond-valence methods for pKa prediction. II. Bond-valence, electrostatic, molecular geometry, and solvation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Doud, Darrin

    2006-08-15

    In a previous contribution, we outlined a method for predicting (hydr)oxy-acid and oxide surface acidity constants based on three main factors: bond valence, Me?O bond ionicity, and molecular shape. Here electrostatics calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to qualitatively show that Me?O bond ionicity controls the extent to which the electrostatic work of proton removal departs from ideality, bond valence controls the extent of solvation of individual functional groups, and bond valence and molecular shape controls local dielectric response. These results are consistent with our model of acidity, but completely at odds with other methods of predicting acidity constants for use in multisite complexation models. In particular, our ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of solvated monomers clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding between (hydr)oxo-groups and water molecules adjusts to obey the valence sum rule, rather than maintaining a fixed valence based on the coordination of the oxygen atom as predicted by the standard MUSIC model.

  10. The impact of polymerization method on tensile bond strength between denture base and acrylic teeth.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed; Binmgren, Mohammed A; Alsaleem, Samah O; Vellappally, Sajith; Assery, Mansour K; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Failure of the bond between acrylic teeth and the denture base resin interface is one of the major concern in prosthodontics. The new generation of denture bases that utilize alternate polymerization methods are being introduced in the market. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods on bonding quality between the denture base and artificial teeth. Sixty test specimens were prepared (20 in each group) and were polymerized using heat, microwave and visible light curing. The tensile strength was recorded for each of the samples, and the results were analyzed statistically. The light-activated Eclipse™ System showed the highest tensile strength, followed by heat curing. The microwave-cured samples exhibited the least bonding to the acrylic teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the new generation of light-cured denture bases showed significantly better bonding to acrylic teeth and can be used as an alternative to the conventional heat-polymerized denture base.

  11. The impact of polymerization method on tensile bond strength between denture base and acrylic teeth.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed; Binmgren, Mohammed A; Alsaleem, Samah O; Vellappally, Sajith; Assery, Mansour K; Sukumaran, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Failure of the bond between acrylic teeth and the denture base resin interface is one of the major concern in prosthodontics. The new generation of denture bases that utilize alternate polymerization methods are being introduced in the market. The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of polymerization methods on bonding quality between the denture base and artificial teeth. Sixty test specimens were prepared (20 in each group) and were polymerized using heat, microwave and visible light curing. The tensile strength was recorded for each of the samples, and the results were analyzed statistically. The light-activated Eclipse™ System showed the highest tensile strength, followed by heat curing. The microwave-cured samples exhibited the least bonding to the acrylic teeth. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the new generation of light-cured denture bases showed significantly better bonding to acrylic teeth and can be used as an alternative to the conventional heat-polymerized denture base. PMID:25307813

  12. Application of the Covalent Bond Classification Method for the Teaching of Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Malcolm L. H.; Parkin, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The Covalent Bond Classification (CBC) method provides a means to classify covalent molecules according to the number and types of bonds that surround an atom of interest. This approach is based on an elementary molecular orbital analysis of the bonding involving the central atom (M), with the various interactions being classified according to the…

  13. Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kreider, Kenneth G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

  14. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  15. Highly dispersed buckybowls as model carbocatalysts for C–H bond activation

    SciTech Connect

    Soykal, I. Ilgaz; Wang, Hui; Park, Jewook; Li, An-Ping; Liang, Chengdu; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-03-19

    Buckybowl fractions dispersed on mesoporous silica constitute an ideal model for studying the catalysis of graphitic forms of carbon since the dispersed carbon nanostructures contain a high ratio of edge defects and curvature induced by non-six-membered rings. Dispersion of the active centers on an easily accessible high surface area material allowed for high density of surface active sites associated with oxygenated structures. This report illustrates a facile method of creating model polycyclic aromatic nano-structures that are not only active for alkane C-H bond activation and oxidative dehydrogenation but also can be practical catalysts to be eventually used in industry.

  16. Formation of disulfide bonds in insect prophenoloxidase enhances immunity through improving enzyme activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Peng, Qin; Ling, Erjun

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 copper proteins, including insect prophenoloxidase (PPO), contain two copper atoms in the active site pocket and can oxidize phenols. Insect PPO plays an important role in immunity. Insects and other invertebrates show limited recovery from pathogen invasion and wounds if phenoloxidase (PO) activity is low. In most insect PPOs, two disulfide bonds are present near the C-terminus. However, in Pimpla hypochondriaca (a parasitoid wasp), each PPO contains one disulfide bond. We thus questioned whether the formation of two sulfide bonds in insect PPOs improved protein stability and/or increased insect innate immunity over time. Using Drosophila melanogaster PPO1 as a model, one or two disulfide bonds were deleted to evaluate the importance of disulfide bonds in insect immunity. rPPO1 and mutants lacking disulfide bonds could be expressed and showed PO activity. However, the PO activities of mutants lacking one or two disulfide bonds significantly decreased. Deletion of disulfide bonds also reduced PPO thermostability. Furthermore, antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis significantly decreased when disulfide bonds were deleted. Therefore, the formation of two disulfide bond(s) in insect PPO enhances antibacterial activity by increasing PO activity and stability.

  17. Nickel-catalyzed Csp2-Csp3 bond formation by carbon-fluorine activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alex D; Leung, Kaylyn; Restivo, Anita D; LaBerge, Nicole A; Takasaki, Harumi; Love, Jennifer A

    2014-03-10

    We report herein a general catalytic method for Csp(2)-Csp(3) bond formation through C-F activation. The process uses an inexpensive nickel complex with either diorganozinc or alkylzinc halide reagents, including those with β-hydrogen atoms. A variety of fluorine substitution patterns and functional groups can be readily incorporated. Sequential reactions involving different precatalysts and coupling partners permit the synthesis of densely functionalized fluorinated building blocks.

  18. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  19. Influence of simplified silica coating method on the bonding strength of resin cement to dental alloy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomonaga; Ino, Satoshi; Okada, Shusaku; Katsumata, Yuki; Hamano, Naho; Hojo, Satoru; Teranaka, Toshio; Toyodo, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a simplified silica coating method (CoJet System) on the bonding strength of resin cements to dental alloy. Bonding strength of the specimens treated with metal primer after alumina sandblasting was compared with those treated with silica coating and silane coupling agent after alumina sandblasting. Furthermore, the influence of silane coupling agent on bonding strength was compared between one-liquid and two-liquid silane coupling agents. Measurement of shear bond strength before and after thermal cycling revealed that the group treated with silica coating in one step without alumina sandblasting yielded high bonding strength. As for the influence of silane coupling agent, treatment with two-liquid silane coupling agent achieved higher mean shear bond strength than with one-liquid silane coupling agent. Findings in this study indicated that silicatization by means of this simplified silica coating method was effective in improving the bonding strength to dental alloy.

  20. Nondestructive tests of regenerative chambers. [evaluating nondestructive methods of determining metal bond integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Vecchies, L.; Wood, R.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of nondestructive evaluation methods were studied to detect and locate bond deficiencies in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers for rocket engines. Flat test panels and a cylinder were produced to simulate regeneratively cooled thrust chamber walls. Planned defects with various bond integrities were produced in the panels to evaluate the sensitivity, accuracy, and limitations of nondestructive methods to define and locate bond anomalies. Holography, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic scan were found to yield sufficient data to discern bond quality when used in combination and in selected sequences. Bonding techniques included electroforming and brazing. Materials of construction included electroformed nickel bonded to Nickel 200 and OFHC copper, electroformed copper bonded to OFHC copper, and 300 series stainless steel brazed to OFHC copper. Variations in outer wall strength, wall thickness, and defect size were evaluated for nondestructive test response.

  1. Halogen bonding-enhanced electrochemical halide anion sensing by redox-active ferrocene receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The first examples of halogen bonding redox-active ferrocene receptors and their anion electrochemical sensing properties are reported. Halogen bonding was found to significantly amplify the magnitude of the receptor's metallocene redox-couple's voltammetric responses for halide sensing compared to their hydrogen bonding analogues in both acetonitrile and aqueous-acetonitrile solvent media.

  2. Halogen bonding-enhanced electrochemical halide anion sensing by redox-active ferrocene receptors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The first examples of halogen bonding redox-active ferrocene receptors and their anion electrochemical sensing properties are reported. Halogen bonding was found to significantly amplify the magnitude of the receptor's metallocene redox-couple's voltammetric responses for halide sensing compared to their hydrogen bonding analogues in both acetonitrile and aqueous-acetonitrile solvent media. PMID:26289779

  3. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  4. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  5. Methods and system for controlled laser-driven explosive bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon

    2015-11-19

    A technique for bonding two dissimilar materials includes positioning a second material over a first material at an oblique angle and applying a tamping layer over the second martial. A laser beam is directed at the second material that generates a plasma at the location of impact on the second material. The plasma generates pressure that accelerates a portion of the second material to a very high velocity and towards the first material. The second material impacts the first material causing bonding of the two materials.

  6. Formation of Silicon-Gold Eutectic Bond Using Localized Heating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liwei; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Najafi, Khalil

    1998-11-01

    A new bonding technique is proposed by using localized heating to supplythe bonding energy.Heating is achieved by applying a dc current through micromachined heaters made of gold which serves as both the heating and bonding material.At the interface of silicon and gold, the formation of eutectic bond takes place in about 5 minutes.Assembly of two substrates in microfabrication processescan be achieved by using this method.In this paper the following important results are obtained:1) Gold diffuses into silicon to form a strong eutectic bond by means of localized heating.2) The bonding strength reaches the fracture toughness of the bulk silicon.3) This bonding technique greatly simplifies device fabrication andassembly processes.

  7. Novel carboxyl-amine bonding methods for poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based devices.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Eric; Yang, Cheng Wei T; Lin, Tao; Yang, Lee Ling; Lagally, Eric T

    2010-07-20

    We present a novel bonding technique for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based devices employing chemical surface modifications at room temperature. PDMS surfaces were functionalized to present primary amine groups, and glass or gold substrates were functionalized to present carboxylic acid groups. Irreversible bonding was achieved by bringing the two surfaces in contact and reacting at room temperature to form peptide bonds between the substrates. Shear tests reveal the bond strengths achieved to be comparable to values obtained using conventional bonding methods. We also describe the use of carboxyl-terminated silanes on gold surfaces to bond amine-modified PDMS devices. Water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the conjugation, a novel result that expands the variety of surface chemistries available for such bonding.

  8. Mild Catalytic methods for Alkyl-Alkyl Bond Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicic, David A

    2009-08-10

    Overview of Research Goals and Accomplishments for the Period 07/01/06 – 06/30/07: Our overall research goal is to transform the rapidly emerging synthetic chemistry involving alkyl-alkyl cross-couplings into more of a mechanism-based field so that that new, rationally-designed catalysts can be performed under energy efficient conditions. Our specific objectives for the previous year were 1) to obtain a proper electronic description of an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and 2) to determine the effect of ligand structure on the rate, scope, selectivity, and functional group compatibility of C(sp3)-C(sp3) cross-coupling catalysis. We have completed both of these initial objectives and established a firm base for further studies. The specific significant achievements of the current grant period include: 1) we have performed magnetic and computational studies on (terpyridine)NiMe, an active catalyst for alkyl-alkyl cross couplings, and have discovered that the unpaired electron resides heavily on the terpyridine ligand and that the proper electronic description of this nickel complex is a Ni(II)-methyl cation bound to a reduced terpyridine ligand; 2) we have for the first time shown that alkyl halide reduction by terpyridyl nickel catalysts is substantially ligand based; 3) we have shown by isotopic labeling studies that the active catalyst (terpyridine)NiMe is not produced via a mechanism that involves the formation of methyl radicals when (TMEDA)NiMe2 is used as the catalyst precursor; 4) we have performed an extensive ligand survey for the alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions and have found that electronic factors only moderately influence reactivity in the terpyridine-based catalysis and that the most dramatic effects arise from steric and solubility factors; 5) we have found that the use of bis(dialkylphosphino)methanes as ligands for nickel does not produce active catalysts for cross-coupling but rather leads to bridging hydride

  9. 78 FR 75576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60-day... Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Number: CBP Forms 301 and 5297. Abstract: Bonds are used to...

  10. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: 60-Day... concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Importation Bond Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Numbers: 301 and 5297. Abstract:...

  11. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  12. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2005-11-01

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  13. Method of preparation of bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2011-04-26

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  14. Photodiodes integration on a suspended ridge structure VOA using 2-step flip-chip bonding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon Hoon; Kim, Tae Un; Ki, Hyun Chul; Kim, Doo Gun; Kim, Hwe Jong; Lim, Jung Woon; Lee, Dong Yeol; Park, Chul Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this works, we have demonstrated a VOA integrated with mPDs, based on silica-on-silicon PLC and flip-chip bonding technologies. The suspended ridge structure was applied to reduce the power consumption. It achieves the attenuation of 30dB in open loop operation with the power consumption of below 30W. We have applied two-step flipchip bonding method using passive alignment to perform high density multi-chip integration on a VOA with eutectic AuSn solder bumps. The average bonding strength of the two-step flip-chip bonding method was about 90gf.

  15. Method of bonding silver to glass and mirrors produced according to this method

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.; Thomas, Terence M.; Czanderna, Alvin W.

    1985-01-01

    A method for adhering silver to a glass substrate for producing mirrors includes attaining a silicon enriched substrate surface by reducing the oxygen therein in a vacuum and then vacuum depositing a silver layer onto the silicon enriched surface. The silicon enrichment can be attained by electron beam bombardment, ion beam bombardment, or neutral beam bombardment. It can also be attained by depositing a metal, such as aluminum, on the substrate surface, allowing the metal to oxidize by pulling oxygen from the substrate surface, thereby leaving a silicon enriched surface, and then etching or eroding the metal oxide layer away to expose the silicon enriched surface. Ultraviolet rays can be used to maintain dangling silicon bonds on the enriched surface until covalent bonding with the silver can occur. This disclosure also includes encapsulated mirrors with diffusion layers built therein. One of these mirrors is assembled on a polymer substrate.

  16. Method of bonding silver to glass and mirrors produced according to this method

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Thomas, T.M.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1984-07-31

    A method for adhering silver to a glass substrate for producing mirrors includes attaining a silicon enriched substrate surface by reducing the oxygen therein in a vacuum and then vacuum depositing a silver layer onto the silicon enriched surface. The silicon enrichment can be attained by electron beam bombardment, ion beam bombardment, or neutral beam bombardment. It can also be attained by depositing a metal, such as aluminum, on the substrate surface, allowing the metal to oxidize by pulling oxygen from the substrate surface, thereby leaving a silicon enriched surface, and then etching or eroding the metal oxide layer away to expose the silicon enriched surface. Ultraviolet rays can be used to maintain dangling silicon bonds on the enriched surface until covalent bonding with the silver can occur. This disclosure also includes encapsulated mirrors with diffusion layers built therein. One of these mirrors is assembled on a polymer substrate.

  17. Method and device for secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon

    DOEpatents

    Wertsching, Alan Kevin; Trantor, Troy Joseph; Ebner, Matthias Anthony; Norby, Brad Curtis

    2016-04-05

    A method and device for producing secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon. A substrate comprising carbon is provided. A precursor is intercalated between carbon in the substrate. The precursor intercalated in the substrate is irradiated until at least a portion of the precursor, preferably a majority of the precursor, is transmutated into tritium and bonds with carbon of the substrate forming bonded tritium. The resulting bonded tritium, tritium bonded with carbon, produces electrons via beta decay. The substrate is preferably a substrate from the list of substrates consisting of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite, carbon fibers, carbon nanotunes, buckministerfullerenes, and combinations thereof. The precursor is preferably boron-10, more preferably lithium-6. Preferably, thermal neutrons are used to irradiate the precursor. The resulting bonded tritium is preferably used to generate electricity either directly or indirectly.

  18. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-3T - Private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Private activity bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-3T Section 1.103(n)-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY....103(n)-3T Private activity bond limit (temporary). Q-1: What is the “State ceiling”? A-1: In...

  19. In vitro evaluation of an alternative method to bond molar tubes

    PubMed Central

    PINZAN-VERCELINO, Célia Regina Maio; PINZAN, Arnaldo; GURGEL, Júlio de Araújo; BRAMANTE, Fausto Silva; PINZAN, Luciana Maio

    2011-01-01

    Despite the advances in bonding materials, many clinicians today still prefer to place bands on molar teeth. Molar bonding procedures need improvement to be widely accepted clinically. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength when an additional adhesive layer was applied on the occlusal tooth/tube interface to provide reinforcement to molar tubes. Material and methods Sixty third molars were selected and allocated to the 3 groups: group 1 received a conventional direct bond followed by the application of an additional layer of adhesive on the occlusal tooth/tube interface, group 2 received a conventional direct bond, and group 3 received a conventional direct bond and an additional cure time of 10 s. The specimens were debonded in a universal testing machine. The results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results Group 1 had a significantly higher (p<0.05) shear bond strength compared to groups 2 and 3. No difference was detected between groups 2 and 3 (p>0.05). Conclusions The present in vitro findings indicate that the application of an additional layer of adhesive on the tooth/tube interface increased the shear bond strength of the bonded molar tubes. PMID:21437468

  20. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  1. Method of making bonded or sintered permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1995-11-28

    An isotropic permanent magnet is made by mixing a thermally responsive, low viscosity binder and atomized rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) alloy powder having a carbon-bearing (e.g., graphite) layer thereon that facilitates wetting and bonding of the powder particles by the binder. Prior to mixing with the binder, the atomized alloy powder may be sized or classified to provide a particular particle size fraction having a grain size within a given relatively narrow range. A selected particle size fraction is mixed with the binder and the mixture is molded to a desired complex magnet shape. A molded isotropic permanent magnet is thereby formed. A sintered isotropic permanent magnet can be formed by removing the binder from the molded mixture and thereafter sintering to full density. 14 figs.

  2. Method of making bonded or sintered permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Dennis, Kevin W.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1995-11-28

    An isotropic permanent magnet is made by mixing a thermally responsive, low viscosity binder and atomized rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) alloy powder having a carbon-bearing (e.g., graphite) layer thereon that facilitates wetting and bonding of the powder particles by the binder. Prior to mixing with the binder, the atomized alloy powder may be sized or classified to provide a particular particle size fraction having a grain size within a given relatively narrow range. A selected particle size fraction is mixed with the binder and the mixture is molded to a desired complex magnet shape. A molded isotropic permanent magnet is thereby formed. A sintered isotropic permanent magnet can be formed by removing the binder from the molded mixture and thereafter sintering to full density.

  3. Method of making bonded or sintered permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-08-31

    An isotropic permanent magnet is made by mixing a thermally responsive, low viscosity binder and atomized rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) alloy powder having a carbon-bearing (e.g., graphite) layer thereon that facilitates wetting and bonding of the powder particles by the binder. Prior to mixing with the binder, the atomized alloy powder may be sized or classified to provide a particular particle size fraction having a grain size within a given relatively narrow range. A selected particle size fraction is mixed with the binder and the mixture is molded to a desired complex magnet shape. A molded isotropic permanent magnet is thereby formed. A sintered isotropic permanent magnet can be formed by removing the binder from the molded mixture and thereafter sintering to full density.

  4. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen. PMID:25902034

  5. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  6. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 50772) on August 17, 2010... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-day notice... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importation Bond Structure. This is...

  7. Repeatable mechanochemical activation of dynamic covalent bonds in thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Imato, Keiichi; Kanehara, Takeshi; Nojima, Shiki; Ohishi, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Yuji; Takahara, Atsushi; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-18

    Repeated mechanical scission and recombination of dynamic covalent bonds incorporated in segmented polyurethane elastomers are demonstrated by utilizing a diarylbibenzofuranone-based mechanophore and by the design of the segmented polymer structures. The repeated mechanochemical reactions can accompany clear colouration and simultaneous fading.

  8. Repeatable mechanochemical activation of dynamic covalent bonds in thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Imato, Keiichi; Kanehara, Takeshi; Nojima, Shiki; Ohishi, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Yuji; Takahara, Atsushi; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-18

    Repeated mechanical scission and recombination of dynamic covalent bonds incorporated in segmented polyurethane elastomers are demonstrated by utilizing a diarylbibenzofuranone-based mechanophore and by the design of the segmented polymer structures. The repeated mechanochemical reactions can accompany clear colouration and simultaneous fading. PMID:27424868

  9. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05). G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently. PMID:26957789

  10. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hung-An

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Deaminative Phenanthridinone Synthesis from Aniline via C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Yedage, Subhash L; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-05-20

    This work reports palladium-catalyzed phenanthridinone synthesis using the coupling of aniline and amide by formation of C-C and C-N bonds in a one-pot fashion via dual C-H bond activation. It involves simultaneous cleavage of four bonds and the formation of two new bonds. The present protocol is ligand-free, takes place under mild reaction conditions, and is environmentally benign as nitrogen gas and water are the only side products. This transformation demonstrates a broad range of aniline and amide substrates with different functional groups and has been scaled up to gram level. PMID:27088815

  12. Palladium-Catalyzed Deaminative Phenanthridinone Synthesis from Aniline via C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Yedage, Subhash L; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-05-20

    This work reports palladium-catalyzed phenanthridinone synthesis using the coupling of aniline and amide by formation of C-C and C-N bonds in a one-pot fashion via dual C-H bond activation. It involves simultaneous cleavage of four bonds and the formation of two new bonds. The present protocol is ligand-free, takes place under mild reaction conditions, and is environmentally benign as nitrogen gas and water are the only side products. This transformation demonstrates a broad range of aniline and amide substrates with different functional groups and has been scaled up to gram level.

  13. Electrochemical reduction of carbon fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile Mechanistic analysis employing Marcus Hush quadratic activation-driving force relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, A.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2007-10-01

    The reduction of carbon-fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile as the solvent, is analyzed using convolution potential sweep voltammetry and the dependence of the transfer coefficient on potential is investigated within the framework of Marcus-Hush quadratic activation-driving force theory. The validity of stepwise mechanism is inferred from solvent reorganization energy estimates as well as bond length calculations using B3LYP/6-31g(d) method. A novel method of estimating the standard reduction potential of the 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile is proposed.

  14. Merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis: activation of carbon-carbon triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruiwen; Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Wangsheng; Xu, Dawen; Li, Yawei; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate that merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis provides a fundamentally new activation mode of C-C triple bonds, to achieve the bond-forming reaction of alkynes with weak nucleophiles. Using a synergistic merger of Eosin Y and Cu(OTf)2, a highly efficient cyclization reaction of arene-ynes was developed. PMID:27432542

  15. 77 FR 26024 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 6814) on February 9, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission (CBP...

  16. Thermally-Activated Metal-to-Glass Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.

    1986-01-01

    Hermetic seals formed easily by use of metallo-organic film. Metallo-organic film thermally bonded to glass and soldered or welded to form hermetic seal. Film applied as ink consisting of silver neodecanoate in xylene. Relative amounts of ingredients selected to obtain desired viscosity. Material applied by printing or even by scribing with pen. Sealing technique useful in making solar-cell modules, microelectronic packages, and other hermetic silicon devices.

  17. Bond strength evaluation in adhesive joints using NDE and DIC methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Anish

    Adhesive bonding of graphite epoxy composite laminates to itself or traditional metal alloys in modern aerospace and aircraft structural applications offers an excellent opportunity to use the most efficient and intelligent combination of materials available thus providing an attractive package for efficient structural designs. However, one of the major issues of adhesive bonding is the occasional formation of interfacial defects such as kissing or weak bonds in the bondline interface. Also, there are shortcomings of existing non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to non-destructively detect/characterize these interfacial defects and reliably predicting the bond shear strength. As a result, adhesive bonding technology is still not solely implemented in primary structures of an aircraft. Therefore, there is a greater demand for a novel NDE tool that can meet the existing aerospace requirement for adhesive bondline characterization. This research implemented a novel Acoustography ultrasonic imaging and digital image correlation (DIC) technique to detect and characterize interfacial defects in the bondline and determine bond shear strength in adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. Adhesively bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate and 2024-T3 Aluminum single lap shear panels subjected to various implanted kissing/weak bond defects were the primary focus of this study. Kissing/weak bonds were prepared by controlled surface contamination in the composite bonding surface and also by improperly mixing the adhesive constituent. SEM analyses were also conducted to understand the surface morphology of substrates and their interaction with the contaminants. Morphological changes were observed in the microscopic scale and the chemical analysis confirmed the stability of the contaminant at or very close to the interface. In addition, it was also demonstrated that contaminants migrated during the curing of the adhesive from CFRP substrate which caused a

  18. A theoretical view on CrO2+-mediated C-H bond activation in ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, YongChun; Zhang, XiaoYong; Wang, QingYun; Xu, XinJian; Wang, YongCheng

    2015-06-01

    The gas-phase reaction of C-H bond activation in ethane by CrO2+ has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) at the UB3LYP/6-311G(2d,p) level. Our results reveal that the activation process is actually a spin-forbidden reaction. The involved crossing point between the doublet and quartet potential energy surfaces (PES) has been discussed by two well-known methods, i.e., intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) approach for crossing point (CP) and Harvey's algorithm for minimum energy crossing point (MECP). The obtained single ( P1ISC = 2.48 × 10-3) and double ( P1ISC = 4.95 × 10-3) passes estimated at MECP show that the intersystem crossing (ISC) occurs with a little probability. The C-H bond activation processes should proceed to be endothermic by 73.16 kJ/mol on the doublet surface without any spin change.

  19. Improved Method for the Diimide Reduction of Multiple Bonds on Solid-Supported Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buszek, Keith R.; Brown, Neil

    2009-01-01

    A mild and improved method for reducing multiple bonds on various resins with diimide is described. The simple procedure readily generates diimide from 2-nitrobenzenesulfonohydrazide and triethylamine at room temperature. A number of representative multiple bonds in various steric and electronic environments were examined, including polar double bonds such as carbonyl and azo, for ease and selectivity of reduction. A general trend of reactivity was identified which revealed, inter alia, that terminal olefins, 1,2-disubstituted olefins, electron-poor olefins, and terminal alkynes were the most easily reduced. PMID:17367188

  20. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-1T - Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activity bonds (temporary). 1.103(n)-1T Section 1.103(n)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-1T Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary). Q-1: What does section 103(n) provide? A-1: Interest on an issue of private activity bonds...

  1. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-1T - Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity bonds (temporary). 1.103(n)-1T Section 1.103(n)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-1T Limitation on aggregrate amount of private activity bonds (temporary). Q-1: What does section 103(n) provide? A-1: Interest on an issue of private activity bonds...

  2. Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; DeWald, A. Bruce; Ju, Chien-Ping; Rigsbee, James M.

    1993-01-01

    A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

  3. Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; DeWald, A.P.; Chienping Ju; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1993-01-05

    A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

  4. Metal-activated histidine carbon donor hydrogen bonds contribute to metalloprotein folding and function.

    PubMed

    Schmiedekamp, Ann; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    Carbon donor hydrogen bonds are typically weak interactions that contribute less than 2 kcal/mol, and provide only modest stabilization in proteins. One exception is the class of hydrogen bonds donated by heterocyclic side chain carbons. Histidine is capable of particularly strong interactions through the Cepsilon(1) and Cdelta(2) carbons when the imidazole is protonated or bound to metal. Given the frequent occurrence of metal-bound histidines in metalloproteins, we characterized the energies of these interactions through DFT calculations on model compounds. Imidazole-water hydrogen bonding could vary from -11.0 to -17.0 kcal/mol, depending on the metal identity and oxidation state. A geometric search of metalloprotein structures in the PDB identified a number of candidate His C-H...O hydrogen bonds which may be important for folding or function. DFT calculations on model complexes of superoxide reductase show a carbon donor hydrogen bond positioning a water molecule above the active site.

  5. Method of waste stabilization via chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep; Jeong, Seung-Young

    1998-01-01

    A method for regulating the reaction temperature of a ceramic formulation process is provided comprising supplying a solution containing a monovalent alkali metal; mixing said solution with an oxide powder to create a binder; contacting said binder with bulk material to form a slurry; and allowing the slurry to cure. A highly crystalline waste form is also provided consisting of a binder containing potassium and waste substrate encapsulated by the binder.

  6. Method of waste stabilization via chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1998-11-03

    A method for regulating the reaction temperature of a ceramic formulation process is provided comprising supplying a solution containing a monovalent alkali metal; mixing said solution with an oxide powder to create a binder; contacting said binder with bulk material to form a slurry; and allowing the slurry to cure. A highly crystalline waste form is also provided consisting of a binder containing potassium and waste substrate encapsulated by the binder. 3 figs.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, light cure unit, universal testing machine, digital camera and sandblasting unit. Results: From the result of ANOVA test we observed the test is significant (F = 20.79, P < 0.01) and the test is rejected. When the Tukey’s t-test result was applied it was seen that the mean shear bond strength of all groups of brackets is as follows: Group I (5.31 Megapascals [Mpa]) < Group II (7.37 Mpa) < Group III (8.96 Mpa) < Group IV (5.56 Mpa) < Control group (9.24 Mpa). Alternatively we can say that shear bond strength of following bracket groups can be arranged as Group I < Group IV < Group II < Group III. Conclusion: From this study we conclude that Group III, which was recycled with an ultrasonic cleaner with electropolisher and silane coupling agent in place of primer, showed the highest shear bond strength. PMID:25395785

  8. Automated Modeling and Simulation Using the Bond Graph Method for the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granda, Jose J.; Montgomery, Raymond C.

    2003-01-01

    Bond graph modeling was originally developed in the late 1950s by the late Prof. Henry M. Paynter of M.I.T. Prof. Paynter acted well before his time as the main advantage of his creation, other than the modeling insight that it provides and the ability of effectively dealing with Mechatronics, came into fruition only with the recent advent of modern computer technology and the tools derived as a result of it, including symbolic manipulation, MATLAB, and SIMULINK and the Computer Aided Modeling Program (CAMPG). Thus, only recently have these tools been available allowing one to fully utilize the advantages that the bond graph method has to offer. The purpose of this paper is to help fill the knowledge void concerning its use of bond graphs in the aerospace industry. The paper first presents simple examples to serve as a tutorial on bond graphs for those not familiar with the technique. The reader is given the basic understanding needed to appreciate the applications that follow. After that, several aerospace applications are developed such as modeling of an arresting system for aircraft carrier landings, suspension models used for landing gears and multibody dynamics. The paper presents also an update on NASA's progress in modeling the International Space Station (ISS) using bond graph techniques, and an advanced actuation system utilizing shape memory alloys. The later covers the Mechatronics advantages of the bond graph method, applications that simultaneously involves mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, and electrical subsystem modeling.

  9. Active site structure in cytochrome c peroxidase and myoglobin mutants: effects of altered hydrogen bonding to the proximal histidine.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, R; Hallam, S; Chen, M; Chance, B; Powers, L

    1996-11-26

    The globins and peroxidases, while performing completely different chemistry, share features of the iron heme active site: a protoporphyrin IX prosthetic group is linked to the protein by the proximal histidine residue. X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides a method to determine the local structure of iron heme active sites in proteins. Our previous studies using X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed a significant difference in the Fe-N epsilon bond length between the peroxidases and the globins [for a review, see Powers, L. (1994) Molecular Electronics and Molecular Electronic Devices, Vol. 3, p 211 CRC Press Inc., Boca Raton, FL]. Globins typically have an Fe-N epsilon distance close to 2.1 A while the Fe-N epsilon distance in the peroxidases is closer to 1.9 A. We have proposed [Sinclair, R., Powers, L., Bumpus, J., Albo, A., & Brock, B. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4892] that strong hydrogen bonding to the proximal histidine is responsible for the shorter bond length in the peroxidases. Here we use site-specific mutagenesis to eliminate the strong proximal hydrogen bonding in cytochrome c peroxidase and to introduce strong proximal hydrogen bonding in myoglobin. Consistent with our hypothesis, elimination of the Asp235-His175 hydrogen bond in CcP results in elongation of Fe-N epsilon from approximately 1.9 to approximately 2.1 A. Conversely, introduction of a similar strong proximal hydrogen bond in myoglobin shortens Fe-N epsilon from approximately 2.1 to approximately 1.9 A. These results correlate well with other biochemical data.

  10. Two dimensional PMMA nanofluidic device fabricated by hot embossing and oxygen plasma assisted thermal bonding methods.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Sun, Lei; Zou, Helin; Cheng, E

    2015-05-29

    A method for obtaining a low-cost and high-replication precision two-dimensional (2D) nanofluidic device with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheet is proposed. To improve the replication precision of the 2D PMMA nanochannels during the hot embossing process, the deformation of the PMMA sheet was analyzed by a numerical simulation method. The constants of the generalized Maxwell model used in the numerical simulation were calculated by experimental compressive creep curves based on previously established fitting formula. With optimized process parameters, 176 nm-wide and 180 nm-deep nanochannels were successfully replicated into the PMMA sheet with a replication precision of 98.2%. To thermal bond the 2D PMMA nanochannels with high bonding strength and low dimensional loss, the parameters of the oxygen plasma treatment and thermal bonding process were optimized. In order to measure the dimensional loss of 2D nanochannels after thermal bonding, a dimension loss evaluating method based on the nanoindentation experiments was proposed. According to the dimension loss evaluating method, the total dimensional loss of 2D nanochannels was 6 nm and 21 nm in width and depth, respectively. The tensile bonding strength of the 2D PMMA nanofluidic device was 0.57 MPa. The fluorescence images demonstrate that there was no blocking or leakage over the entire microchannels and nanochannels. PMID:25946991

  11. Weaving and bonding method to prevent warp and fill distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method to prevent fiber distortion in textile materials employed in a modified weaving process. In a first embodiment, a tacifier in powder form is applied to the yarn and melted while on the fabric. Cool air is then supplied after the tacifier has melted to expedite the solidification of the tacifier. In a second embodiment, a solution form of a tacifier is used by dissolving the tacifier into a solvent that has a high evaporation rate. The solution is then sprayed onto the fabric or fill yarn as each fill yarn is inserted into a shed of the fabric. A third embodiment applies the tacifier in a liquid form that has not been dissolved in a solvent. That is, the tacifier is melted and is sprayed as a liquid onto the fabric or fill yarn as it is being extracted from a fill yarn spool prior to the fill yarn being inserted into the shed of the fabric. A fourth embodiment employs adhesive yarns contained as an integral part of the warp or fill yarn. Additional tacifier material is not required because a matrix is used as the tacifier. The matrix is then locally melted using heating elements on clamping bars or take-up rollers, is cooled, if necessary, and solidified.

  12. Low-cost bump bonding activities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähänen, S.; Tick, T.; Campbell, M.

    2010-11-01

    Conventional bumping processes used in the fabrication of hybrid pixel detectors for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments use electroplating for Under Bump Metallization (UBM) and solder bump deposition. This process is laborious, involves time consuming photolithography and can only be performed using whole wafers. Electroplating has been found to be expensive when used for the low volumes which are typical of HEP experiments. In the low-cost bump bonding development work, electroless deposition technology of UBM is studied as an alternative to the electroplating process in the bump size / pitch window beginning from 20 μm / 50 μm. Electroless UBM deposition used in combination with solder transfer techniques has the potential to significantly lower the cost of wafer bumping without requiring increased wafer volumes. A test vehicle design of sensor and readout chip, having daisy chains and Kelvin bump structures, was created to characterize the flip chip process with electroless UBM. Two batches of test vehicle wafers were manufactured with different bump pad metallization. Batch #1 had AlSi(1%) metallization, which is similar to the one used on sensor wafers, and Batch #2 had AlSi(2%)Cu(1%) metallization, which is very similar to the one used on readout wafers. Electroless UBMs were deposited on both wafer batches. In addition, electroplated Ni UBM and SnPb solder bumps were grown on the test sensor wafers. Test assemblies were made by flip chip bonding the solder-bumped test sensors against the test readout chips with electroless UBMs. Electrical yields and individual joint resistances were measured from assemblies, and the results were compared to a well known reference technique based on electroplated solder bumps structures on both chips. The electroless UBMs deposited on AlSi(2%)Cu(1%) metallization showed excellent electrical yields and small tolerances in individual joint resistance. The results from the UBMs deposited on AlSi(1%) metallization were non

  13. Method of bonding functional surface materials to substrates and applications in microtechnology and antifouling

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Liang, Liang

    1999-01-01

    A simple and effective method to bond a thin coating of poly(N-isopropylacylamide) (NIPAAm) on a glass surface by UV photopolymerization, and the use of such a coated surface in nano and micro technology applications. A silane coupling agent with a dithiocarbamate group is provided as a photosensitizer, preferably, (N,N'-diethylamine)dithiocarbamoylpropyl-(trimethoxy)silane (DATMS). The thiocarbamate group of the sensitizer is then bonded to the glass surface by coupling the silane agent with the hydroxyl groups on the glass surface. The modified surface is then exposed to a solution of NIPAAm and a crosslinking agent which may be any organic molecule having an acrylamide group and at least two double bonds in its structure, such as N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, and a polar solvent which may be any polar liquid which will dissolve the monomer and the crosslinking agent such as acetone, water, ethanol, or combinations thereof. By exposing the glass surface to a UV light, free radicals are generated in the thiocarbamate group which then bonds to the crosslinking agent and the NIPAAm. Upon bonding, the crosslinking agent and the NIPAAm polymerize to form a thin coating of PNIPAAm bonded to the glass. Depending upon the particular configuration of the glass, the properties of the PNIPAAm allow applications in micro and nano technology.

  14. Method of bonding functional surface materials to substrates and applications in microtechnology and anti-fouling

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Liang, Liang

    2001-01-01

    A simple and effective method to bond a thin coating of poly(N-isopropylacylamide) (NIPAAm) on a glass surface by UV photopolymerization, and the use of such a coated surface in nano and micro technology applications. A silane coupling agent with a dithiocarbamate group is provided as a photosensitizer preferably, (N,N'-diethylamine) dithiocarbamoylpropyl-(trimethoxy) silane (DATMS). The thiocarbamate group of the sensitizer is then bonded to the glass surface by coupling the silane agent with the hydroxyl groups on the glass surface. The modified surface is then exposed to a solution of NIPAAm and a crosslinking agent which may be any organic molecule having an acrylamide group and at least two double bonds in its structure, such as N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide, and a polar solvent which may be any polar liquid which will dissolve the monomer and the crosslinking agent such as acetone, water, ethanol, or combinations thereof. By exposing the glass surface to a UV light, free radicals are generated in the thiocarbamate group which then bonds to the crosslinking agent and the NIPAAm. Upon bonding, the crosslinking agent and the NIPAAm polymerize to form a thin coating of PNIPAAm bonded to the glass. Depending upon the particular configuration of the glass, the properties of the PNIPAAm allow applications in micro and nano technology.

  15. Oxygen activation and intramolecular C-H bond activation by an amidate-bridged diiron(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew B; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hagen, Karl S; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-07-18

    A diiron(II) complex containing two μ-1,3-(κN:κO)-amidate linkages has been synthesized using the 2,2',2''-tris(isobutyrylamido)triphenylamine (H(3)L(iPr)) ligand. The resulting diiron complex, 1, reacts with dioxygen (or iodosylbenzene) to effect intramolecular C-H bond activation at the methine position of the ligand isopropyl group. The ligand-activated product, 2, has been isolated and characterized by a variety of methods including X-ray crystallography. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy of 2 prepared from(18)O(2) was used to confirm that the oxygen atom incorporated into the ligand framework is derived from molecular oxygen.

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. Objectives: This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Results: Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P < 0.001); and also between groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the other groups. Conclusions: The bleaching procedures using 20% carbamide peroxide and 45% carbamide peroxide and diode laser significantly decreased shear bond strength of brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups. PMID:26734481

  17. On the Relative Merits of Non-Orthogonal and Orthogonal Valence Bond Methods Illustrated on the Hydrogen Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Valence bond (VB) is one of the cornerstone theories of quantum chemistry. Even if in practical applications the molecular orbital (MO) approach has obtained more attention, some basic chemical concepts (such as the nature of the chemical bond and the failure of the single determinant-based MO methods in describing the bond cleavage) are normally…

  18. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  19. Antibacterial activity and bonding ability of an adhesive incorporating an antibacterial monomer DMAE-CB.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Hong; Ma, Sai; Chen, Ji-Hua; Chai, Zhi-Guo; Li, Fang; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial effect and microtensile bond strength of a resin-based adhesive containing an antibacterial monomer DMAE-CB (methacryloxylethyl cetyl dimethyl ammonium chloride). Cured specimens of 1, 2, and 3% DMAE-CB-containing Single Bond 2 (crosslinking monomer: Bis-GMA, dimethacrylates; functional monomer: HEMA) were prepared, and their antibacterial effects on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were investigated. Antibacterial property after 0, 30, 90, and 180 days of aging was also tested. Bonding ability of the experimental adhesive incorporating 3% DMAE-CB was evaluated by microtensile bond strength test. The cured experimental adhesive exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth, and the adhesive containing 3% DMAE-CB showed higher antibacterial efficiency compared with those incorporating 1 or 2% anibacterial monomer. Antibacterial activities of the specimens lasted for at least 180 days. Microtensile bond strength test revealed that the bonding ability of the experimental adhesive was not significantly adversely affected by the incorporation of DMAE-CB. Therefore, dental adhesives with strong and long-lasting bacteriostatic property could be achieved by incorporating DMAE-CB without negatively influencing bonding ability.

  20. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    PubMed Central

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  1. Computational study on the mechanism and selectivity of C-H bond activation and dehydrogenative functionalization in the synthesis of rhazinilam.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Corey S; Ess, Daniel H

    2011-09-01

    The key platinum mediated C-H bond activation and functionalization steps in the synthesis of (-)-rhazinilam (Johnson, J. A.; Li, N.; Sames, D. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 6900) were investigated using the M06 and B3LYP density functional approximation methods. This computational study reveals that ethyl group dehydrogenation begins with activation of a primary C-H bond in preference to a secondary C-H bond in an insertion/methane elimination pathway. The C-H activation step is found to be reversible while the methane elimination (reductive elimination) transition state controls rate and diastereoselectivity. The chiral oxazolinyl ligand induces ethyl group selectivity through stabilizing weak interactions between its phenyl group (or cyclohexyl group) and the carboxylate group. After C-H activation and methane elimination steps, Pt-C bond functionalization occurs through β-hydride elimination to give the alkene platinum hydride complex. PMID:21812492

  2. A Highly Reactive Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex That Can Activate the Strong C-H Bonds of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Davis, Katherine M; Lee, Yong-Min; Chen, Junying; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Pushkar, Yulia N; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-03-15

    A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex has been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The Mn(IV)-oxo complex shows high reactivity in oxidation reactions, such as C-H bond activation, oxidations of olefins, alcohols, sulfides, and aromatic compounds, and N-dealkylation. In C-H bond activation, the Mn(IV)-oxo complex can activate C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane. It is proposed that C-H bond activation by the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex does not occur via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The electrophilic character of the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex is demonstrated by a large negative ρ value of ~4.4 in the oxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles.

  3. Synthesis and Applications of Rhodacyclopentanones Derived From C-C Bond Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Megan H.; Bower, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodacyclopentanones, an “sp3-rich” class of metallacycle, underpin an emerging range of catalytic methodologies for the direct generation of complex scaffolds. This review highlights strategies for accessing rhodacyclopentanones (and related species) by C-C bond activation of cyclobutanones or cyclopropanes. The scope and mechanism of methodologies that exploit these activation modes is outlined. PMID:27385089

  4. Hormonal changes and couple bonding in consensual sadomasochistic activity.

    PubMed

    Sagarin, Brad J; Cutler, Bert; Cutler, Nadine; Lawler-Sagarin, Kimberly A; Matuszewich, Leslie

    2009-04-01

    In two studies, 58 sadomasochistic (SM) practitioners provided physiological measures of salivary cortisol and testosterone (hormones associated with stress and dominance, respectively) and psychological measures of relationship closeness before and after participating in SM activities. Observed activities included bondage, sensory deprivation, a variety of painful and pleasurable stimulation, verbal and non-verbal communication, and expressions of caring and affection. During the scenes, cortisol rose significantly for participants who were bound, receiving stimulation, and following orders, but not for participants who were providing stimulation, orders, or structure. Female participants who were bound, receiving stimulation, and following orders also showed increases in testosterone during the scenes. Thereafter, participants who reported that their SM activities went well showed reductions in physiological stress (cortisol) and increases in relationship closeness. Among participants who reported that their SM activities went poorly, some showed decreases in relationship closeness whereas others showed increases. The increases in relationship closeness combined with the displays of caring and affection observed as part of the SM activities offer support for the modern view that SM, when performed consensually, has the potential to increase intimacy between participants. PMID:18563549

  5. Modeling habit forms of sapphire crystals using the principles of periodic-bond-chain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakholdin, S. I.; Maslov, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    The potential of the periodic-bond-chain method for calculating the sequence of manifestation of faces of corundum single crystals is considered. The leading role of the faces of the pinacoid, high rhombohedron, and hexagonal prism is demonstrated. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data on faceting the lateral surface of cylindrical sapphire single crystals grown by the Stepanov method and with the faceting data for crystals grown by the flux method and natural crystals.

  6. Consequences of metal-oxide interconversion for C-H bond activation during CH4 reactions on Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ya-Huei Cathy; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-10-16

    Mechanistic assessments based on kinetic and isotopic methods combined with density functional theory are used to probe the diverse pathways by which C-H bonds in CH4 react on bare Pd clusters, Pd cluster surfaces saturated with chemisorbed oxygen (O*), and PdO clusters. C-H activation routes change from oxidative addition to H-abstraction and then to σ-bond metathesis with increasing O-content, as active sites evolve from metal atom pairs (*-*) to oxygen atom (O*-O*) pairs and ultimately to Pd cation-lattice oxygen pairs (Pd(2+)-O(2-)) in PdO. The charges in the CH3 and H moieties along the reaction coordinate depend on the accessibility and chemical state of the Pd and O centers involved. Homolytic C-H dissociation prevails on bare (*-*) and O*-covered surfaces (O*-O*), while C-H bonds cleave heterolytically on Pd(2+)-O(2-) pairs at PdO surfaces. On bare surfaces, C-H bonds cleave via oxidative addition, involving Pd atom insertion into the C-H bond with electron backdonation from Pd to C-H antibonding states and the formation of tight three-center (H3C···Pd···H)(‡) transition states. On O*-saturated Pd surfaces, C-H bonds cleave homolytically on O*-O* pairs to form radical-like CH3 species and nearly formed O-H bonds at a transition state (O*···CH3(•)···*OH)(‡) that is looser and higher in enthalpy than on bare Pd surfaces. On PdO surfaces, site pairs consisting of exposed Pd(2+) and vicinal O(2-), Pd(ox)-O(ox), cleave C-H bonds heterolytically via σ-bond metathesis, with Pd(2+) adding to the C-H bond, while O(2-) abstracts the H-atom to form a four-center (H3C(δ-)···Pd(ox)···H(δ+)···O(ox))(‡) transition state without detectable Pd(ox) reduction. The latter is much more stable than transition states on *-* and O*-O* pairs and give rise to a large increase in CH4 oxidation turnover rates at oxygen chemical potentials leading to Pd to PdO transitions. These distinct mechanistic pathways for C-H bond activation, inferred from theory

  7. Consequences of Metal–Oxide Interconversion for C–H Bond Activation during CH₄ Reactions on Pd Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Ya-Huei; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    Mechanistic assessments based on kinetic and isotopic methods combined with density functional theory are used to probe the diverse pathways by which C-H bonds in CH₄ react on bare Pd clusters, Pd cluster surfaces saturated with chemisorbed oxygen (O*), and PdO clusters. C-H activation routes change from oxidative addition to Habstraction and then to σ-bond metathesis with increasing O-content, as active sites evolve from metal atom pairs (*-*) to oxygen atom (O*-O*) pairs and ultimately to Pd cationlattice oxygen pairs (Pd2+-O2-) in PdO. The charges in the CH₃ and H moieties along the reaction coordinate depend on the accessibility and chemical state of the Pd and O centers involved. Homolytic C-H dissociation prevails on bare (*-*) and O*- covered surfaces (O*-O*), while C-H bonds cleave heterolytically on Pd2+-O2- pairs at PdO surfaces. On bare surfaces, C-H bonds cleave via oxidative addition, involving Pd atom insertion into the C-H bond with electron backdonation from Pd to C-H antibonding states and the formation of tight three-center (H₃C···Pd···H)‡ transition states. On O*-saturated Pd surfaces, C-H bonds cleave homolytically on O*-O* pairs to form radical-like CH3 species and nearly formed O-H bonds at a transition state (O*···CH3 •···*OH)‡ that is looser and higher in enthalpy than on bare Pd surfaces. On PdO surfaces, site pairs consisting of exposed Pd2+ and vicinal O2-, Pdox-Oox, cleave C-H bonds heterolytically via σ-bond metathesis, with Pd2+ adding to the C-H bond, while O2- abstracts the H-atom to form a four-center (H3Cδ-···Pdox···Hδ+···Oox) transition state without detectable Pdox reduction. The latter is much more stable than transition states on *-* and O*-O* pairs and give rise to a large increase in CH₄ oxidation turnover rates at oxygen chemical

  8. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  9. Method of making cascaded die mountings with springs-loaded contact-bond options

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Adams, Donald J.; Su, Gui-Jia; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.; Coomer, Chester

    2007-06-19

    A cascaded die mounting device and method using spring contacts for die attachment, with or without metallic bonds between the contacts and the dies, is disclosed. One embodiment is for the direct refrigerant cooling of an inverter/converter carrying higher power levels than most of the low power circuits previously taught, and does not require using a heat sink.

  10. C-H bond activation by metal-superoxo species: what drives high reactivity?

    PubMed

    Ansari, Azaj; Jayapal, Prabha; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-01-01

    Metal-superoxo species are ubiquitous in metalloenzymes and bioinorganic chemistry and are known for their high reactivity and their ability to activate inert C-H bonds. The comparative oxidative abilities of M-O2(.-) species (M = Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III), and Cu(II)) towards C-H bond activation reaction are presented. These superoxo species generated by oxygen activation are found to be aggressive oxidants compared to their high-valent metal-oxo counterparts generated by O⋅⋅⋅O bond cleavage. Our calculations illustrate the superior oxidative abilities of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-superoxo species compared to the others and suggest that the reactivity may be correlated to the magnetic exchange parameter.

  11. Novel method for the prediction of an interface bonding species at alumina/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Michiko Yagyu, Shinjiro; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2014-03-15

    Interface bonding between alumina and various metals is discussed from the viewpoint of chemical thermodynamics. A method to predict the interface bonding species at an alumina/metal interface under equilibrium conditions is proposed by using the concept of chemical equilibrium for interface termination. The originality of this method is in the way a simple estimation of the interface binding energy, which is generally applicable to most metals, is developed. The effectiveness of this method is confirmed by careful examination of the experimental results. Comparison of the predicted and experimentally observed interface terminations reveals that the proposed method agrees well with the reported results. The method uses only basic quantities of pure elements and the formation enthalpy of oxides. Therefore, it can be applied to most metals in the periodic table and is useful for screening materials in the quest to develop interfaces with particular functions.

  12. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  13. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  14. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  15. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  16. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  17. Bonding brackets on white spot lesions pretreated by means of two methods

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Julia Sotero; Marquezan, Mariana; Lau, Thiago Chon Leon; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to demineralized enamel pretreated with low viscosity Icon Infiltrant resin (DMG) and glass ionomer cement (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M Unitek) with and without aging. Methods: A total of 75 bovine enamel specimens were allocated into five groups (n = 15). Group 1 was the control group in which the enamel surface was not demineralized. In the other four groups, the surfaces were submitted to cariogenic challenge and white spot lesions were treated. Groups 2 and 3 were treated with Icon Infiltrant resin; Groups 4 and 5, with Clinpro XT Varnish. After treatment, Groups 3 and 5 were artificially aged. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT adhesive system and SBS was evaluated by means of a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey post-hoc test. Results: All groups tested presented shear bond strengths similar to or higher than the control group. Specimens of Group 4 had significantly higher shear bond strength values (p < 0.05) than the others. Conclusion: Pretreatment of white spot lesions, with or without aging, did not decrease the SBS of brackets. PMID:27275613

  18. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  19. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H2 on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C2H2 on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  20. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H2 on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C2H2 on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems. PMID:26001445

  1. A periodic energy decomposition analysis method for the investigation of chemical bonding in extended systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Marc; Tonner, Ralf

    2015-05-21

    The development and first applications of a new periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) scheme for extended systems based on the Kohn-Sham approach to density functional theory are described. The pEDA decomposes the bonding energy between two fragments (e.g., the adsorption energy of a molecule on a surface) into several well-defined terms: preparation, electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital relaxation energies. This is complemented by consideration of dispersion interactions via a pairwise scheme. One major extension toward a previous implementation [Philipsen and Baerends, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 12470 (2006)] lies in the separate discussion of electrostatic and Pauli and the addition of a dispersion term. The pEDA presented here for an implementation based on atomic orbitals can handle restricted and unrestricted fragments for 0D to 3D systems considering periodic boundary conditions with and without the determination of fragment occupations. For the latter case, reciprocal space sampling is enabled. The new method gives comparable results to established schemes for molecular systems and shows good convergence with respect to the basis set (TZ2P), the integration accuracy, and k-space sampling. Four typical bonding scenarios for surface-adsorbate complexes were chosen to highlight the performance of the method representing insulating (CO on MgO(001)), metallic (H{sub 2} on M(001), M = Pd, Cu), and semiconducting (CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} on Si(001)) substrates. These examples cover diverse substrates as well as bonding scenarios ranging from weakly interacting to covalent (shared electron and donor acceptor) bonding. The results presented lend confidence that the pEDA will be a powerful tool for the analysis of surface-adsorbate bonding in the future, enabling the transfer of concepts like ionic and covalent bonding, donor-acceptor interaction, steric repulsion, and others to extended systems.

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed Decarbonylative Borylation of Amides: Evidence for Acyl C-N Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiefeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Yemin; Shi, Zhuangzhi

    2016-07-18

    A nickel/N-heterocyclic carbene catalytic system has been established for decarbonylative borylation of amides with B2 nep2 by C-N bond activation. This transformation shows good functional-group compatibility and can serve as a powerful synthetic tool for late-stage borylation of amide groups in complex compounds. More importantly, as a key intermediate, the structure of an acyl nickel complex was first confirmed by X-ray analysis. Furthermore, the decarbonylative process was also observed. These findings confirm the key mechanistic features of the acyl C-N bond activation process. PMID:27258597

  3. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C[sub 60] to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C[sub 70] in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of [eta][sup 3]- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of [eta][sup 3]-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  4. Development of Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn functionally gradient material produced by eutectic bonding method

    SciTech Connect

    Kirihara, S.; Takeda, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1996-07-15

    Although many materials which have a single function have been developed, future needs are anticipated to include materials which have various functions. A functionally gradient material (FGM) which has characteristics of two different materials is a promising candidate for multi-functional material. The present methods for production of FGM, however, are very complicated and costly. In this study the authors answer the serious problem of high production cost by fabricating the FGM by a eutectic bonding method. This fabrication method includes structural control of FGM by changing the cooling process. They describe Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn FGM obtained by the eutectic bonding method, and tell how the structure of its composition gradient part is changed by controlling the cooling process.

  5. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p < 0.001), and the PFC types (p < 0.0001) on the shear bond strength values. Significant differences were observed in bond strength values between the acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  6. Functionalized alkynyl-chlorogermanes: hydrometallation, Ge-Cl bond activation, Ge-H bond formation and chlorine-tert-butyl exchange via a transient germyl cation.

    PubMed

    Honacker, Christian; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Tannert, Jens; Layh, Marcus; Hepp, Alexander; Grimme, Stefan; Uhl, Werner

    2016-04-14

    Treatment of alkynyl-arylchlorogermanes ArylnGe(Cl)(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)3-n (n = 1, 2) with HM(t)Bu2 (M = Al, Ga) yielded mixed Al or Ga alkenyl-alkynylchlorogermanes via hydrometallation reactions. Intramolecular interactions between the Lewis-basic Cl atoms and the Lewis-acidic Al or Ga atoms afforded MCGeCl heterocycles. The endocyclic M-Cl distances were significantly lengthened compared to the starting compounds and indicated Ge-Cl bond activation. Dual hydrometallation succeeded only with HGa(t)Bu2. One Ga atom of the product was involved in a Ga-Cl bond, while the second one had an interaction to a C-H bond of a phenyl group. In two cases treatment of chlorogermanes with two equivalents of HAl(t)Bu2 resulted in hydroalumination of one alkynyl group and formation of unprecedented Ge-H functionalized germanes, Aryl-Ge(H)(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C(Al(t)Bu2)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu] (Aryl = mesityl, triisopropylphenyl). The Al atoms of these compounds interacted with the α-C atoms of the alkynyl groups. Ph(Cl)Ge(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C(Al(t)Bu2}[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu] reacted in an unusual Cl/(t)Bu exchange to yield the tert-butylgermane Ph((t)Bu)Ge(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-(t)Bu)[C{Al((t)Bu)(Cl)}[double bond, length as m-dash]C(H)-(t)Bu]. Quantum chemical calculations suggested the formation of a germyl cation as a transient intermediate.

  7. A new simple and fast thermally-solvent assisted method to bond PMMA–PMMA in micro-fluidics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamshad, Arshya; Nikfarjam, Alireza; Khaleghi, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A rapid and simple thermally-solvent assisted method of bonding was introduced for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microfluidic substrates. The technique is a low-temperature (68 {}^\\circ \\text{C} ), and rapid (15 \\min ) bonding technique; in addition, only a fan-assisted oven with some paper clamps are used. Two different solvents (ethanol and isopropyl alcohol) with two different methods of cooling (one-step and three steps) were employed to determine the best solvent and method of cooling (residual stresses may be released in different cooling methods) by considering bonding strength and quality. In this bonding technique, a thin film of solvent between two PMMA sheets disperses tends to dissolve a thin film of PMMA sheet surface, then evaporate, and finally reconnect monomers of the PMMA sheets at the specific operating temperature. The operating temperature of this method comes from the coincidence of the solubility parameter graph of PMMA with the solubility parameter graph of the solvents. Different tests such as tensile strength test, deformation test, leakage tests, and surface characteristics tests were performed to find the optimum conditions for this bonding strategy. The best bonding quality and the highest bonding strength (28.47 \\text{MPa} ) occurred when 70% isopropyl alcohol solution was employed with the one-step cooling method. Furthermore, the bonding reversibility was taken into account and critical percentages for irreversible bonding were obtained for both of the solvents and methods. This method provides a perfect bonding quality for PMMA substrates, and can be used in laboratories without needing any expensive and special instruments, because of its merits such as lower bonding time, lower-cost, and higher strength etc in comparison with the majority of other common bonding techniques.

  8. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  9. Cross-Couplings Using Aryl Ethers via C-O Bond Activation Enabled by Nickel Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tobisu, Mamoru; Chatani, Naoto

    2015-06-16

    Arene synthesis has been revolutionized by the invention of catalytic cross-coupling reactions, wherein aryl halides can be coupled with organometallic and organic nucleophiles. Although the replacement of aryl halides with phenol derivatives would lead to more economical and ecological methods, success has been primarily limited to activated phenol derivatives such as triflates. Aryl ethers arguably represent one of the most ideal substrates in terms of availability, cost, safety, and atom efficiency. However, the robust nature of the C(aryl)-O bonds of aryl ethers renders it extremely difficult to use them in catalytic reactions among the phenol derivatives. In 1979, Wenkert reported a seminal work on the nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of aryl ethers with Grignard reagents. However, it was not until 2004 that the unique ability of a low-valent nickel species to activate otherwise unreactive C(aryl)-O bonds was appreciated with Dankwardt's identification of the Ni(0)/PCy3 system, which significantly expanded the efficiency of the Wenkert reaction. Application of the nickel catalyst to cross-couplings with other nucleophiles was first accomplished in 2008 by our group using organoboron reagents. Later on, several other nucleophiles, including organozinc reagents, amines, hydrosilane, and hydrogen were shown to be coupled with aryl ethers under nickel catalysis. Despite these advances, progress in this field is relatively slow because of the low reactivity of benzene derivatives (e.g., anisole) compared with polyaromatic substrates (e.g., methoxynaphthalene), particularly when less reactive and synthetically useful nucleophiles are used. The "naphthalene problem" has been overcome by the use of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands bearing bulky N-alkyl substituents, which enables a wide range of aryl ethers to be coupled with organoboron nucleophiles. Moreover, the use of N-alkyl-substituted NHC ligands allows the use of alkynylmagnesium reagents, thereby realizing

  10. Synthesis of a tricyclic mescaline analogue by catalytic C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Ahrendt, Kateri A; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2003-04-17

    [reaction: see text] A tetrahydrobis(benzofuran) mescaline analogue has been prepared in six steps and 38% overall yield from (4'-O-methyl)methyl gallate. The key step in this synthesis is a tandem cyclization reaction via directed C[bond]H activation followed by olefin insertion.

  11. 77 FR 6814 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Proprietor's Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... of other forms of information technology; and (e) the annual cost burden to respondents or record... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse.... ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing collection of...

  12. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-3T - Private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Authority M has no private activity bond limit for 1987. Example 2. Under the laws of State U, only the... governmental unit that— (i) Enacts a specific law (e.g., a provision of a State constitution, charter, or... ceiling? A-11: A State, by law enacted at any time, may provide a different formula for allocating...

  13. A simple method to determine bond lengths and excited state surfaces from electronic-vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Y.; Lai, Choy-Heng

    1990-03-01

    A fast and efficient method using the spectral moments of an electronic—vibrational spectrum is described to determine the harmonic and Morse potential fits to the excited state potential in the Franck—Condon region. Some of the drawbacks of the Franck—Condon least-squares fitting procedure are overcome by the moment method. The method is applied to some diatomics of current interest, spanning a wide range of bond length change in the electronic transition. The accuracy of the results suggests that the spectral moment method can be a replacement for the traditional and still popular Franck—Condon analysis.

  14. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Aghili, Hossein Agha; Davari, Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium surfaces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and the remaining three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1W, and 2W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD for multiple comparisons. Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa) followed in a descending order by 2W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa), 1W laser group (6.87±0.92 MPa) and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa). The differences between the study groups were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1W and 2W can be considered more appropriate alternatives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding. PMID:26622283

  15. Bond activation with an apparently benign ethynyl dithiocarbamate Ar-C≡C-S-C(S)NR2.

    PubMed

    Ung, Gaël; Frey, Guido D; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Bertrand, Guy

    2011-10-10

    The hedgehog molecule: A simple ethynyl dithiocarbamate [Ar-C≡C-S-C(S)NR(2)] is able to cleave a broad range of enthalpically strong σ bonds and to activate carbon dioxide and elemental sulfur. Depending on the substrate, the bond activation process involves either the existence of an equilibrium with the nonobservable mesoionic carbene isomer or the cooperation of the nucleophilic carbon-carbon triple bond and the electrophilic CS carbon atom. PMID:23210141

  16. Bond of acrylic teeth to different denture base resins after various surface-conditioning methods.

    PubMed

    Lang, Reinhold; Kolbeck, Carola; Bergmann, Rainer; Handel, Gerhard; Rosentritt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    The study examined the bond between different denture base resins and highly cross-linked acrylic denture teeth with different base surface-conditioning methods. One hundred fifty highly cross-linked resin denture teeth (SR-Antaris, No. 11, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) were divided into five groups with different surface-conditioning methods of the base surfaces of the teeth (C = control, no surface conditioning, MM = application of methyl methacrylate monomer, SB = sand blasting, SBB = sand blasting + bonding agent, TSS = tribochemical silica coating + silanization). Teeth were bonded to either a cold-cured denture base resin (ProBase Cold, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) or heat-cured denture base resins (SR Ivocap Plus, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL and Lucitone 199, Dentsply, USA). After 24 h of storage in distilled water, compressive load was applied at 90° on the palatal surface of each tooth until fracture. Median failure load ranged between 103 and 257 N for Probase Cold groups, 91 to 261 N for Lucitone 199, and 149 to 320 N for SR Ivocap Plus. For Probase Cold, significant highest failure loads resulted when teeth were treated with SB, SBB, or TSS. For Lucitone 199, significant highest failure loads has been found with MM and TSS treatment. For SR Ivocap Plus, highest failure loads resulted using SBB and TSS. Conditioning of the base surfaces of the teeth prior to denture base processing is highly recommended. Tooth bond is significantly affected by the surface-conditioning method and applied denture base resin. Tribochemical silica coating + silanization method can be recommended for pre-treatment of teeth applying either heat-cured or cold-cured denture base resin.

  17. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  18. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles via Rh-catalyzed C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jared C; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes our work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. We initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2 alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. We then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, we discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh- N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. We then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy 3)2] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazoline, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy 3) 2 fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid cocatalysts accelerate the alkylation, we developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  19. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs. PMID:14632451

  20. Assessment of experimental bond dissociation energies using composite ab initio methods and evaluation of the performances of density functional methods in the calculation of bond dissociation energies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jin-Ti; Huang, Hao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2003-01-01

    Composite ab initio CBS-Q and G3 methods were used to calculate the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of over 200 compounds listed in CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (2002 ed.). It was found that these two methods agree with each other excellently in the calculation of BDEs, and they can predict BDEs within 10 kJ/mol of the experimental values. Using these two methods, it was found that among the examined compounds 161 experimental BDEs are valid because the standard deviation between the experimental and theoretical values for them is only 8.6 kJ/mol. Nevertheless, 40 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be highly inaccurate as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 20 kJ/mol. Furthermore, 11 BDEs listed in the Handbook may be seriously flawed as the experimental and theoretical values for them differ by over 40 kJ/mol. Using the 161 cautiously validated experimental BDEs, we then assessed the performances of the standard density functional (DFT) methods including B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91, and BH&HLYP in the calculation of BDEs. It was found that the BH&HLYP method performed poorly for the BDE calculations. B3LYP, B3P86, and B3PW91, however, performed reasonably well for the calculation of BDEs with standard deviations of about 12.1-18.0 kJ/mol. Nonetheless, all the DFT methods underestimated the BDEs by 4-17 kJ/mol in average. Sometimes, the underestimation by the DFT methods could be as high as 40-60 kJ/mol. Therefore, the DFT methods were more reliable for relative BDE calculations than for absolute BDE calculations. Finally, it was observed that the basis set effects on the BDEs calculated by the DFT methods were usually small except for the heteroatom-hydrogen BDEs.

  1. Systems, Apparatuses, and Methods for Using Durable Adhesively Bonded Joints for Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, III, Stanley S. (Inventor); Lundgren, Eric C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems, methods, and apparatus for increasing durability of adhesively bonded joints in a sandwich structure. Such systems, methods, and apparatus includes an first face sheet and an second face sheet as well as an insert structure, the insert structure having a first insert face sheet, a second insert face sheet, and an insert core material. In addition, sandwich core material is arranged between the first face sheet and the second face sheet. A primary bondline may be coupled to the face sheet(s) and the splice. Further, systems, methods, and apparatus of the present disclosure advantageously reduce the load, provide a redundant path, reduce structural fatigue, and/or increase fatigue life.

  2. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  3. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  4. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  5. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from being issued pursuant to such carryforward election. In addition, where a carryforward election is... unused private activity bond limit in order to provide a sports facility described in section 103(b)(4)(B). In addition, a governmental unit may elect to carry forward its unused private activity bond limit...

  6. Chitosan-Copper (II) complex as antibacterial agent: synthesis, characterization and coordinating bond- activity correlation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekahlia, S.; Bouzid, B.

    2009-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan is unstable and sensitive to many factors such as molecular weight. Recent investigations showed that low molecular weight chitosan exhibited strong bactericidal activities compared to chitosan with high molecular weight. Since chitosan degradation can be caused by the coordinating bond, we attempt to synthesize and characterize the chitosan-Cu (II) complex, and thereafter study the coordinating bond effect on its antibacterial activity against Salmonella enteritidis. Seven chitosan-copper complexes with different copper contents were prepared and characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis, XRD and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Results indicated that for chitosan-Cu (II) complexes with molar ratio close to 1:1, the inhibition rate reached 100%.

  7. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation.

  8. Chromoselective Photocatalysis: Controlled Bond Activation through Light-Color Regulation of Redox Potentials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; König, Burkhard

    2016-06-27

    Catalysts that can be regulated in terms of activity and selectivity by external stimuli may allow the efficient multistep synthesis of complex molecules and pharmaceuticals. Herein, we report the light-color regulation of the redox potential of a photocatalyst to control the activation of chemical bonds. Light-color control of the redox power of a photocatalyst introduces a new selectivity parameter to photoredox catalysis: Instead of changing the catalyst or ligand, alteration of the color of the visible-light irradiation adjusts the selectivity in catalytic transformations. By using this principle, the selective activation of aryl-halide bonds for C-H arylation and the sequential conversion of functional groups with different reduction potentials is possible by simply applying different colors of light for excitation of the photocatalyst.

  9. Three critical hydrogen bonds determine the catalytic activity of the Diels–Alderase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Kraut, Stefanie; Bebenroth, Dirk; Nierth, Alexander; Kobitski, Andrei Y.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Jäschke, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Compared to protein enzymes, our knowledge about how RNA accelerates chemical reactions is rather limited. The crystal structures of a ribozyme that catalyzes Diels–Alder reactions suggest a rich tertiary architecture responsible for catalysis. In this study, we systematically probe the relevance of crystallographically observed ground-state interactions for catalytic function using atomic mutagenesis in combination with various analytical techniques. The largest energetic contribution apparently arises from the precise shape complementarity between transition state and catalytic pocket: A single point mutant that folds correctly into the tertiary structure but lacks one H-bond that normally stabilizes the pocket is completely inactive. In the rate-limiting chemical step, the dienophile is furthermore activated by two weak H-bonds that contribute ∼7–8 kJ/mol to transition state stabilization, as indicated by the 25-fold slower reaction rates of deletion mutants. These H-bonds are also responsible for the tight binding of the Diels–Alder product by the ribozyme that causes product inhibition. For high catalytic activity, the ribozyme requires a fine-tuned balance between rigidity and flexibility that is determined by the combined action of one inter-strand H-bond and one magnesium ion. A sharp 360° turn reminiscent of the T-loop motif observed in tRNA is found to be important for catalytic function. PMID:21976731

  10. Prediction of bond failure of FRP layers and concrete interface using a finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Holley L.

    Fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) have become very popular for strengthening and reinforcing concrete civil structures such as columns, masonry walls, and bridges; for repairing deteriorating and damaged structures; and for strengthening wood structures. It has been proven through multiple experiments and analyses that bonding FRP sheets to the face of a concrete or a wooden structure can increase the structure's strength. However, in many instances, the structure strengthened with the FRP suffered a premature debonding failure between the FRP and the concrete substrate before the concrete element had reached its increased strength potential. A number of parameters that contribute to the debonding have been identified in the literature and several analytical models have been developed that attempt to predict the bond failure. The purpose of this research is to build a FRP strengthened reinforced concrete simply supported beam with finite element methods (FEMs) using ANSYS FEM software. The best approach for modeling the reinforced concrete beam with finite elements will be determined. A simple and efficient method for modeling the bond layer between the concrete and the FRP layers will also be determined. The finite element (FE) models will then be analyzed with nonlinear analyses and the results will be evaluated. The debond failure or fiber rupture mode of failure will be predicted based on the FEM results. The effects of the epoxy's parameters will be investigated. The validity of the models will be compared to various empirical model results and experimental results.

  11. Accurate predictions of C-SO2R bond dissociation enthalpies using density functional theory methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Zhu; Fu, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Fu, Yao; Dang, Zhi-Min; Shi, Jing

    2014-10-14

    The dissociation of the C-SO2R bond is frequently involved in organic and bio-organic reactions, and the C-SO2R bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) are potentially important for understanding the related mechanisms. The primary goal of the present study is to provide a reliable calculation method to predict the different C-SO2R bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs). Comparing the accuracies of 13 different density functional theory (DFT) methods (such as B3LYP, TPSS, and M05 etc.), and different basis sets (such as 6-31G(d) and 6-311++G(2df,2p)), we found that M06-2X/6-31G(d) gives the best performance in reproducing the various C-S BDEs (and especially the C-SO2R BDEs). As an example for understanding the mechanisms with the aid of C-SO2R BDEs, some primary mechanistic studies were carried out on the chemoselective coupling (in the presence of a Cu-catalyst) or desulfinative coupling reactions (in the presence of a Pd-catalyst) between sulfinic acid salts and boryl/sulfinic acid salts.

  12. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:27688410

  13. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances.

  14. Chemical methods and approaches to the regioselective formation of multiple disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Shigeru; Katayama, Hidekazu; Okumura, Masaki; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide-bond formation plays an important role in the stabilization of the native conformation of peptides and proteins. In the case of multidisulfide-containing peptides and proteins, numerous folding intermediates are produced, including molecules that contain non-native and native disulfide bonds during in vitro folding. These intermediates can frequently be trapped covalently during folding and subsequently analyzed. The structural characterization of these kinetically trapped disulfide intermediates provides a clue to understanding the oxidative folding pathway. To investigate the folding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, in this unit, chemical methods are described for regulating regioselective disulfide formation (1) by using a combination of several types of thiol protecting groups, (2) by incorporating unique SeCys residues into a protein or peptide molecule, and (3) by combining with post-translational modification.

  15. Method for applying a high-temperature bond coat on a metal substrate, and related compositions and articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Sangeeta, D

    2006-04-18

    A method for applying a bond coat on a metal-based substrate is described. A slurry which contains braze material and a volatile component is deposited on the substrate. The slurry can also include bond coat material. Alternatively, the bond coat material can be applied afterward, in solid form or in the form of a second slurry. The slurry and bond coat are then dried and fused to the substrate. A repair technique using this slurry is also described, along with related compositions and articles.

  16. Method for applying a high-temperature bond coat on a metal substrate, and related compositions and articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Sangeeta, D

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying a bond coat on a metal-based substrate is described. A slurry which contains braze material and a volatile component is deposited on the substrate. The slurry can also include bond coat material. Alternatively, the bond coat material can be applied afterward, in solid form or in the form of a second slurry. The slurry and bond coat are then dried and fused to the substrate. A repair technique using this slurry is also described, along with related compositions and articles.

  17. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOEpatents

    Hasz, Wayne Charles; Borom, Marcus Preston

    2002-01-01

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  18. Halogen bonded supramolecular capsules: a challenging test case for quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Recently, Diederich et al. synthesized the first supramolecular capsule with a well-defined four-point halogen bonding interaction [Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 12339]. This interesting system comprising about 400 atoms represents a challenging test case for accurate quantum chemical methods. We investigate it with our new density functional based composite method for structures and noncovalent interactions (PBEh-3c) as well as our standard protocol for supramolecular thermochemistry and give predictions for chemical modifications to improve the binding strength. PMID:27416814

  19. Photochemistry of hydrogen bonded heterocycles probed by photodissociation experiments and ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2011-07-14

    In this perspective article, we focus on the photochemistry of five-membered nitrogen containing heterocycles (pyrrole, imidazole and pyrazole) in clusters. These heterocycles represent paradigmatic structures for larger biologically active heterocyclic molecules and complexes. The dimers of the three molecules are also archetypes of different bonding patterns: N-H···π interaction, N-H···N hydrogen bond and double hydrogen bond. We briefly review available data on photochemistry of the title molecules in the gas phase, but primarily we focus on the new reaction channels opened upon the complexation with other heterocycles or solvent molecules. Based on ab initio calculations we discuss various possible reactions in the excited states of the clusters: (1) hydrogen dissociation, (2) hydrogen transfer between the heterocyclic units, (3) molecular ring distortion, and (4) coupled electron-proton transfer. The increasing photostability with complexity of the system can be inferred from experiments with photodissociation in these clusters. A unified view on photoinduced processes in five-membered N-heterocycles is provided. We show that even though different deactivation channels are energetically possible for the complexed heterocycles, in most cases the major result is a fast reconstruction of the ground state. The complexed or solvated heterocycles are thus inherently photostable although the stability can in principle be achieved via different reaction routes.

  20. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  1. Wafer-level-scale package of MEMS device by eutectic bonding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Ma, Hong; Chen, Mingxiang; Xiong, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Yi, Xinjian

    2003-12-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results for an on-going program in wafer-level MEMS package. In this particular paper, three closed-loop microheaters of 5μm, 7μm and 9μm width were designed. By reactive ion sputtering technique, two classes of samples were presented. The first one was first co-sputtered with nickel / chromium (Ni/Cr) alloy and then sputtered with gold(Au) metal as heating material; the second one was sputtered with Cr, tin (Sn) and Au respectively as heating material. The bonding of the former sample based on the Ni/Cr and Au heating material failed. The eutectic bonding experiment of the later sample based on the Cr, Sn and Au heating material by global heating method was completed in annealing oven at temperature of about 400 for 20 minutes. The SEM testing result showed the eutectic bonding of Au-Sn by global heating was successful. More results will be reported in future.

  2. Wafer-level scale package of MEMS device by eutectic bonding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Ma, Hong; Chen, Mingxiang; Xiong, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Yi, Xinjian

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results for an on-going program in wafer-level MEMS package. In this particular paper, three closed-loop microheaters of 5μm, 7μm and 9μm width were designed. By reactive ion sputtering technique, two classes of samples were presented. The first one was first co-sputtered with nickel / chromium (Ni/Cr) alloy and then sputtered with gold(Au) metal as heating material; the second one was sputtered with Cr, tin (Sn) and Au respectively as heating material. The bonding of the former sample based on the Ni/Cr and Au heating material failed. The eutectic bonding experiment of the later sample based on the Cr, Sn and Au heating material by global heating method was completed in annealing oven at temperature of about 400 deg. C. for 20 minutes. The SEM testing result showed the eutectic bonding of Au-Sn by global heating was successful. More results will be reported in future.

  3. A Novel Bonding Method of Pure Aluminum and SUS304 Stainless Steel Using Barrel Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jung Hyun; Okumiya, Masahiro; Tsunekawa, Yoshiki; Yun, Ky Youl; Kim, Sang Gweon; Yoshida, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    A great deal of research is being carried out on welding or bonding methods between iron and aluminum. However, it is not so easy to make Fe-Al bonding materials with both high strength and light weight. Recently, a new nitriding process has been proposed to produce aluminum nitride on an aluminum surface using a barrel. This study proposes a new concept in the production of a multilayer which has an AlN and Fe-Al intermetallic compound layer between the aluminum and steel using a barrel nitriding process. The bonding process was carried out from 893 K to 913 K (620 °C to 640 °C) for 18, 25.2, and 36 ks with Al2O3 powder and Al-Mg alloy powder. After the process, an aluminum nitride (AlN) layer and a Fe-Al intermetallic compound (Fe2Al5.4) layer were formed at the interface between the pure aluminum and SUS304 austenitic stainless steel. The thicknesses of the AlN layer and the intermetallic compound layer increased with increasing treatment temperature and time. The maximum hardnesses of the AlN layer and Fe2Al5.4 layers were found to be 377HV and 910HV, respectively, after barrel nitriding at 893 K (620 °C) for 18 ks.

  4. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  5. [Transition metal activation and functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds]. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    A method was developed for synthesizing a new complex for studying C-H activation, (HBPz*{sub 3})Rh(CNCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3})(PhN=C=NCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3}). This complex loses the carbodiimide ligand, thereby serving as a precursor for a 16-electron Rh(I) fragment which activates (via oxidative addition) a wide range of aromatic and aliphatic C-H bonds. Mechanism of activation of benzene by this fragment was studied. Reaction of [Tp`Rh(CNR)] fragment with aliphatic hydrocarbons was also studied. A study of C-H bond activation by the complex MnH{sub 3}(dmpe){sub 2} was completed. Reactions of [Ru(dmpe){sub 2}] with several small molecules were also investigated. Effects of fluorine substituents on aromatic ring on C-H activation were looked at. Studies of {eta}{sup 2}-arene coordination with [(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})] were completed; studies of reaction of this complex with 1,3-disubstituted benzenes are in progress.

  6. Palladium-Catalyzed Dearomative Cyclocarbonylation by C-N Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Guoying; Huang, Hanmin

    2015-09-01

    A fundamentally novel approach to bioactive quinolizinones is based on the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular cyclocarbonylation of allylamines. [Pd(Xantphos)I2 ], which features a very large bite angle, has been found to facilitate the rapid carbonylation of azaarene-substituted allylamines into bioactive quinolizinones in good to excellent yields. This transformation represents the first dearomative carbonylation and is proposed to proceed by palladium-catalyzed CN bond activation, dearomatization, CO insertion, and a Heck reaction.

  7. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  8. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Siu, Bernard K.

    1996-01-01

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method.

  9. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Telschow, K.L.; Siu, B.K.

    1996-07-09

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: (a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; (b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; (c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; (d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; (e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; (f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and (g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method. 13 figs.

  10. Active and Passive Application of the Phosphoric Acid on the Bond Strength of Lithium Disilicate.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Tatiana Cardona; Villada, Vanessa Roldan; Castillo, Mauricio Peña; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Dominguez, John Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of passive or active phosphoric acid (PA) application after hydrofluoric acid (HA) treatment on the microshear bond strength of lithium disilicate. Thirty ceramic discs were made with IPS Emax 2 (10 mm thick and 10 mm diameter). The specimens were divided into 3 groups, A: 9.6% HA application; AF: 9.6% HA application + cleaning with 37% PA in passive mode and AFF: 9.6% HA application + cleaning with 37% PA in active mode. For the microshear test, four tygons (0.9 mm diameter and 0.2 mm high) were filled with resin cement (RelyX Ultimate) and placed on the ceramic disks. After testing, the fracture modes were examined under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post test (α=0.05). The bond strength values were significantly higher in Group AFF (11.0±2.5 MPa) compared with group A (8.1±2.6 MPa) (p<0.002). AF group was not statistically different (9.4±2.5 MPa) from Group A. It was concluded that the active application of 37% PA after 9.6% HA increases the microshear bond strength values between the resin cement and lithium disilicate ceramic.

  11. Silylations of Arenes with Hydrosilanes: From Transition-Metal-Catalyzed C¢X Bond Cleavage to Environmentally Benign Transition-Metal-Free C¢H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Xu, Li-Wen

    2015-07-01

    The construction of carbon-silicon bonds is highlighted as an exciting achievement in the field of organosilicon chemistry and green chemistry. Recent developments in this area will enable the sustainable chemical conversion of silicon resources into synthetically useful compounds. Especially, the catalytic silylation through C¢H bond activation without directing groups and hydrogen acceptors is one of the most challenging topics in organic chemistry and green chemistry. These remarkable findings on catalytic silylation can pave the way to a more environmentally benign utilization of earth-abundant silicon-based resources in synthetic chemistry. PMID:26073645

  12. Charge-dependent non-bonded interaction methods for use in quantum mechanical modeling of condensed phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.

    Molecular modeling and computer simulation techniques can provide detailed insight into biochemical phenomena. This dissertation describes the development, implementation and parameterization of two methods for the accurate modeling of chemical reactions in aqueous environments, with a concerted scientific effort towards the inclusion of charge-dependent non-bonded non-electrostatic interactions into currently used computational frameworks. The first of these models, QXD, modifies interactions in a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular (QM/MM) mechanical framework to overcome the current limitations of 'atom typing' QM atoms; an inaccurate and non-intuitive practice for chemically active species as these static atom types are dictated by the local bonding and electrostatic environment of the atoms they represent, which will change over the course of the simulation. The efficacy QXD model is demonstrated using a specific reaction parameterization (SRP) of the Austin Model 1 (AM1) Hamiltonian by simultaneously capturing the reaction barrier for chloride ion attack on methylchloride in solution and the solvation free energies of a series of compounds including the reagents of the reaction. The second, VRSCOSMO, is an implicit solvation model for use with the DFTB3/3OB Hamiltonian for biochemical reactions; allowing for accurate modeling of ionic compound solvation properties while overcoming the discontinuous nature of conventional PCM models when chemical reaction coordinates. The VRSCOSMO model is shown to accurately model the solvation properties of over 200 chemical compounds while also providing smooth, continuous reaction surfaces for a series of biologically motivated phosphoryl transesterification reactions. Both of these methods incorporate charge-dependent behavior into the non-bonded interactions variationally, allowing the 'size' of atoms to change in meaningful ways with respect to changes in local charge state, as to provide an accurate, predictive and

  13. B-H activation and H-H formation: two consecutive heterolytic processes on an osmium-hydrogensulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Mora, Malka; Oñate, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    Heterolytic B-H activation and H-H formation on an Os-SH bond give borylthiolate-dihydrogen derivatives. These species exchange borylthiol by borane to afford σ-borane derivatives or release H2 and undergo a hydride-boryl exchange to yield boryl-hydrogensulfide complexes depending on the boryl group bonded to the sulfur atom.

  14. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects)....

  15. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects)....

  16. Direct Dehydroxylative Coupling Reaction of Alcohols with Organosilanes through Si-X Bond Activation by Halogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masato; Tsuji, Nobuya; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Takemoto, Yoshiji

    2015-06-19

    The combined use of a halogen bond (XB) donor with trimethylsilyl halide was found to be an efficient cocatalytic system for the direct dehydroxylative coupling reaction of alcohol with various nucleophiles, such as allyltrimethylsilane and trimethylcyanide, to give the corresponding adduct in moderate to excellent yields. Detailed control experiments and mechanistic studies revealed that the XB interaction was crucial for the reaction. The application of this coupling reaction is also described.

  17. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Davis, Daniel L.

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  18. In vitro anti-staphylococcal activity of heparinized biomaterials bonded with combinations of rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Fallgren, C; Utt, M; Petersson, A C; Ljungh, A; Wadström, T

    1998-01-01

    Biomaterial implants in various human body tissues are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization. We report here on the coating of heparinized biomaterials with heparin binding extracellular matrix proteins giving special regard to the efficient adsorption and slow release of antibiotics. Heparin was partially degraded and the resulting fragments were covalently end-point attached to 0.5 cm long silicone biomaterial surface. Collagen type I was immobilized on the heparinized biomaterials and then cross-linked with acyl-azide or carbodiimide. Finally, the resulting biosurfaces were exposed to antibiotics, i.e. rifampicin in combination with cefuroxime, fusidic acid, ofloxacin or vancomycin, respectively. The antibiotic bonded biomaterials were evaluated for their anti-staphylococcal activity after elution in NaCl, serum or blood by measuring the zones of inhibition for S. epidermidis strain RP12. Furthermore, we examined the in-vitro colonization resistance to S. epidermidis RP12 for these combinations of rifampicin-bonded biomaterials by an ATP bioluminescence assay. The ATP measurements showed that initially adherent bacteria were eradicated from the polymer surface, for at least 24 or 48 h (fusidic acid > cefuroxime > vancomycin > ofloxacin). The anti-staphylococcal activity of rifampicin-fusidic acid bonded heparinized biomaterials seems of sufficient duration and efficacy to merit testing in an animal model.

  19. In vitro anti-staphylococcal activity of heparinized biomaterials bonded with combinations of rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Fallgren, C; Utt, M; Petersson, A C; Ljungh, A; Wadström, T

    1998-01-01

    Biomaterial implants in various human body tissues are highly susceptible to bacterial colonization. We report here on the coating of heparinized biomaterials with heparin binding extracellular matrix proteins giving special regard to the efficient adsorption and slow release of antibiotics. Heparin was partially degraded and the resulting fragments were covalently end-point attached to 0.5 cm long silicone biomaterial surface. Collagen type I was immobilized on the heparinized biomaterials and then cross-linked with acyl-azide or carbodiimide. Finally, the resulting biosurfaces were exposed to antibiotics, i.e. rifampicin in combination with cefuroxime, fusidic acid, ofloxacin or vancomycin, respectively. The antibiotic bonded biomaterials were evaluated for their anti-staphylococcal activity after elution in NaCl, serum or blood by measuring the zones of inhibition for S. epidermidis strain RP12. Furthermore, we examined the in-vitro colonization resistance to S. epidermidis RP12 for these combinations of rifampicin-bonded biomaterials by an ATP bioluminescence assay. The ATP measurements showed that initially adherent bacteria were eradicated from the polymer surface, for at least 24 or 48 h (fusidic acid > cefuroxime > vancomycin > ofloxacin). The anti-staphylococcal activity of rifampicin-fusidic acid bonded heparinized biomaterials seems of sufficient duration and efficacy to merit testing in an animal model. PMID:9532261

  20. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  1. Mercury Detoxification by Bacteria: Simulations of Transcription Activation and Mercury-Carbon Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hao-Bo; Parks, Jerry M; Johs, Alexander; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize recent work from our laboratory and provide new perspective on two important aspects of bacterial mercury resistance: the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MerR, and the enzymatic cleavage of the Hg-C bond in methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase, MerB. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of MerR reveal an opening-and-closing dynamics, which may be involved in initiating transcription of mercury resistance genes upon Hg(II) binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on an active-site model of the enzyme reveal how MerB catalyzes the Hg-C bond cleavage using cysteine coordination and acid-base chemistry. These studies provide insight into the detailed mechanisms of microbial gene regulation and defense against mercury toxicity.

  2. Full CI benchmark calculations on N2, NO, and O2 - A comparison of methods for describing multiple bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Full configuration interaction (CI) calculations on the ground states of N2, NO, and O2 using a DZP Gaussian basis are compared with single-reference SDCI and coupled pair approaches (CPF), as well as with CASSCF multireference CI approaches. The CASSCF/MRCI technique is found to describe multiple bonds as well as single bonds. Although the coupled pair functional approach gave chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol) for bonds involving hydrogen, larger errors occur in the CPF approach for the multiple bonded systems considered here. CI studies on the 1Sigma(g +) state of N2, including all single, double, triple, and quadruple excitations show that triple excitations are very important for the multiple bond case, and accounts for most of the deficiency in the coupled pair functional methods.

  3. Novel method for concentrating and drying polymeric nanoparticles: hydrogen bonding coacervate precipitation.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Kafka, Concepcion; Akbulut, Mustafa; Beattie, Patrick; Saad, Walid; Herrera, Margarita; Kennedy, Michael T; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2010-04-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential in therapeutic applications to improve the bioavailability and efficacy of active drug compounds. However, the retention of nanometer sizes during concentrating or drying steps presents a significant problem. We report on a new concentrating and drying process for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) stabilized nanoparticles, which relies upon the unique pH sensitive hydrogen bonding interaction between PEG and polyacid species. In the hydrogen bonding coacervate precipitation (HBCP) process, PEG protected nanoparticles rapidly aggregate into an easily filterable precipitate upon the addition various polyacids. When the resulting solid is neutralized, the ionization of the acid groups eliminates the hydrogen bonded structure and the approximately 100 nm particles redisperse back to within 10% of their original size when poly(acrylic acid) and citric acid are used and 45% when poly(aspartic acid) is used. While polyacid concentrations of 1-5 wt % were used to form the precipitates, the incorporation of the acid into the PEG layer is approximately 1:1 (acid residue):(ethylene oxide unit) in the final dried precipitate. The redispersion of dried beta-carotene nanoparticles protected with PEG-b-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymers dried by HBCP was compared with the redispersion of particles dried by freeze-drying with sucrose as a cryprotectant, spray freeze-drying, and normal drying. Freeze-drying with 0, 2, and 12 wt % sucrose solutions resulted in size increases of 350%, 50%, and 6%, respectively. Spray freeze-drying resulted in particles with increased sizes of 50%, but no cryoprotectant and only moderate redispersion energy was required. Conventional drying resulted in solids that could not be redispersed back to nanometer size. The new HBCP process offers a promising and efficient way to concentrate or convert nanoparticle dispersions into a stable dry powder form.

  4. An activated triple bond linker enables ‘click’ attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides on solid support

    PubMed Central

    Wenska, Malgorzata; Alvira, Margarita; Steunenberg, Peter; Stenberg, Åsa; Murtola, Merita; Strömberg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    A general procedure, based on a new activated alkyne linker, for the preparation of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) on solid support has been developed. With this linker, conjugation is effective at room temperature (RT) in millimolar concentration and submicromolar amounts. This is made possible since the use of a readily attachable activated triple bond linker enhances the Cu(I) catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (‘click’ reaction). The preferred scheme for conjugate preparation involves sequential conjugation to oligonucleotides on solid support of (i) an H-phosphonate-based aminolinker; (ii) the triple bond donor p-(N-propynoylamino)toluic acid (PATA); and (iii) azido-functionalized peptides. The method gives conversion of oligonucleotide to the POC on solid support, and only involves a single purification step after complete assembly. The synthesis is flexible and can be carried out without the need for specific automated synthesizers since it has been designed to utilize commercially available oligonucleotide and peptide derivatives on solid support or in solution. Methodology for the ready conversion of peptides into ‘clickable’ azidopeptides with the possibility of selecting either N-terminus or C-terminus connection also adds to the flexibility and usability of the method. Examples of synthesis of POCs include conjugates of oligonucleotides with peptides known to be membrane penetrating and nuclear localization signals. PMID:21795380

  5. Bile salt-induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-02-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal-sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207-C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt-dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation.

  6. Ultrafast studies of organometallic photochemistry: The mechanism of carbon-hydrogen bond activation in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    When certain organometallic compounds are photoexcited in room temperature alkane solution, they are able to break or activate the C-H bonds of the solvent. Understanding this potentially practical reaction requires a detailed knowledge of the entire reaction mechanism. Because of the dynamic nature of chemical reactions, time-resolved spectroscopy is commonly employed to follow the important events that take place as reactants are converted to products. For the organometallic reactions examined here, the electronic/structural characteristics of the chemical systems along with the time scales for the key steps in the reaction make ultrafast UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy along with nanosecond Step-Scan FTIR spectroscopy the ideal techniques to use for this study. An initial study of the photophysics of (non-activating) model metal carbonyls centering on the photodissociation of M(CO){sub 6} (M = Cr, W, Mo) was carried out in alkane solutions using ultrafast IR spectroscopy. Next, picosecond UV/vis studies of the C-H bond activation reaction of Cp{sup *}M(CO){sub 2} (M = Rh, Ir), conducted in room temperature alkane solution, are described in an effort to investigate the origin of the low quantum yield for bond cleavage ({approximately}1%). To monitor the chemistry that takes place in the reaction after CO is lost, a system with higher quantum yield is required. The reaction of Tp{sup *}Rh(CO){sub 2} (Tp{sup *} = HB-Pz{sub 3}{sup *}, Pz{sup *} = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) in alkanes has a quantum yield of {approximately}30%, making time resolved spectroscopic measurements possible. From ultrafast IR experiments, two subsequently formed intermediates were observed. The nature of these intermediates are discussed and the first comprehensive reaction mechanism for a photochemical C-H activating organometallic complex is presented.

  7. Transparent and electrically conductive GaSb/Si direct wafer bonding at low temperatures by argon-beam surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predan, F.; Reinwand, D.; Klinger, V.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-10-01

    Direct wafer bonds of the material system n-GaSb/n-Si have been achieved by means of a low-temperature direct wafer bonding process, enabling an optical transparency of the bonds along with a high electrical conductivity of the boundary layer. In the used technique, the surfaces are activated by sputter-etching with an argon fast-atom-beam (FAB) and bonded in ultra-high vacuum. The bonds were annealed at temperatures between 300 and 400 °C, followed by an optical, mechanical and electrical characterization of the interface. Additionally, the influence of the sputtering on the surface topography of the GaSb was explicitly investigated. Fully bonded wafer pairs with high bonding strengths were found, as no blade could be inserted into the bonds without destroying the samples. The interfacial resistivities of the bonded wafers were significantly reduced by optimizing the process parameters, by which Ohmic interfacial resistivities of less than 5 mΩ cm2 were reached reproducibly. These promising results make the monolithic integration of GaSb on Si attractive for various applications.

  8. Active site remodeling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogs at 2.45 Å and 2.6 Å, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP·Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodeling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the cross-over and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses suggest these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s. PMID:20164921

  9. Active site remodelling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-03-30

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogues at 2.45 and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP-Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodelling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the crossover and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s.

  10. C-H Bond Activation by Early Transition Metal Carbide Cluster Anion MoC3 (-).

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Yu; Hu, Lianrui; Liu, Qing-Yu; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui; Yao, Jiannian

    2015-12-01

    Although early transition metal (ETM) carbides can activate CH bonds in condensed-phase systems, the electronic-level mechanism is unclear. Atomic clusters are ideal model systems for understanding the mechanisms of bond activation. For the first time, CH activation of a simple alkane (ethane) by an ETM carbide cluster anion (MoC3 (-) ) under thermal-collision conditions has been identified by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, and high-level quantum chemical calculations. Dehydrogenation and ethene elimination were observed in the reaction of MoC3 (-) with C2 H6 . The CH activation follows a mechanism of oxidative addition that is much more favorable in the carbon-stabilized low-spin ground electronic state than in the high-spin excited state. The reaction efficiency between the MoC3 (-) anion and C2 H6 is low (0.23±0.05) %. A comparison between the anionic and a highly efficient cationic reaction system (Pt(+) +C2 H6 ) was made. It turned out that the potential-energy surfaces for the entrance channels of the anionic and cationic reaction systems can be very different. PMID:26490554

  11. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel. PMID:24512107

  12. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives. PMID:26293346

  13. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Leão, Paulo A G C; Piazzetta, Maria H O; Monteiro, Alessandra M; Shiroma, Leandro Y; Gobbi, Angelo L; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-21

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  14. Sacrificial adhesive bonding: a powerful method for fabrication of glass microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Renato S.; Leão, Paulo A. G. C.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Monteiro, Alessandra M.; Shiroma, Leandro Y.; Gobbi, Angelo L.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    A new protocol for fabrication of glass microchips is addressed in this research paper. Initially, the method involves the use of an uncured SU-8 intermediate to seal two glass slides irreversibly as in conventional adhesive bonding-based approaches. Subsequently, an additional step removes the adhesive layer from the channels. This step relies on a selective development to remove the SU-8 only inside the microchannel, generating glass-like surface properties as demonstrated by specific tests. Named sacrificial adhesive layer (SAB), the protocol meets the requirements of an ideal microfabrication technique such as throughput, relatively low cost, feasibility for ultra large-scale integration (ULSI), and high adhesion strength, supporting pressures on the order of 5 MPa. Furthermore, SAB eliminates the use of high temperature, pressure, or potential, enabling the deposition of thin films for electrical or electrochemical experiments. Finally, the SAB protocol is an improvement on SU-8-based bondings described in the literature. Aspects such as substrate/resist adherence, formation of bubbles, and thermal stress were effectively solved by using simple and inexpensive alternatives.

  15. The dual bonding technique: a modified method to improve adhesive luting procedures.

    PubMed

    Paul, S J; Schärer, P

    1997-12-01

    Indirect restorative procedures usually require temporary restorations for protection of the pulp and for restoring the patients esthetic and functional needs. The use of temporary cements, either with or without eugenol, however, considerably decreases the adhesion of the bond on dentin if--according to the conventional technique--such dentin bonding systems are applied once at the moment of final cementation. With a dual application of the dentin bonding agents a considerable increase in bond strength values was discovered. This article presents a modified luting procedure called the "dual bonding technique."

  16. Enantioselective Rh-Catalyzed Carboacylation of C═N Bonds via C-C Activation of Benzocyclobutenones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Xu, Tao; Li, Hongbo; Dong, Guangbin

    2016-01-13

    Herein we describe the first enantioselective Rh-catalyzed carboacylation of oximes (imines) via C-C activation. In this transformation, the benzocyclobutenone C1-C2 bond is selectively activated by a low valent rhodium catalyst and subsequently the resulting two Rh-C bonds add across a C═N bond, which provides a unique approach to access chiral lactams. A range of polycyclic nitrogen-containing scaffolds were obtained in good yields with excellent enantioselectivity. Further derivatization of the lactam products led to a rapid entry to various novel fused heterocycles.

  17. Enantioselective Rh-Catalyzed Carboacylation of C═N Bonds via C-C Activation of Benzocyclobutenones.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Xu, Tao; Li, Hongbo; Dong, Guangbin

    2016-01-13

    Herein we describe the first enantioselective Rh-catalyzed carboacylation of oximes (imines) via C-C activation. In this transformation, the benzocyclobutenone C1-C2 bond is selectively activated by a low valent rhodium catalyst and subsequently the resulting two Rh-C bonds add across a C═N bond, which provides a unique approach to access chiral lactams. A range of polycyclic nitrogen-containing scaffolds were obtained in good yields with excellent enantioselectivity. Further derivatization of the lactam products led to a rapid entry to various novel fused heterocycles. PMID:26674855

  18. Synthesis of new class of alkyl azarene pyridinium zwitterions via iodine mediated sp3 C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Gupta, Garima; Srivastava, Suman

    2011-12-16

    An efficient and conceptually different approach toward C-H bond activation by using iodine mediated sp(3) C-H functionalization for the synthesis of alkyl azaarene pyridinium zwitterions is described. This work has the interesting distinction of being the first synthesis of a new class of alkyl azaarene pyridinium zwitterion via transition-metal-free sp(3) C-H bond activation of an alkyl azaarene.

  19. Highly Active Gold(I)-Silver(I) Oxo Cluster Activating sp³ C-H Bonds of Methyl Ketones under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiao-Li; Yang, Yang; Lei, Zhen; Chang, Shan-Shan; Guan, Zong-Jie; Wan, Xian-Kai; Wen, Ting-Bin; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2015-04-29

    The activation of C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, due to their high bond dissociation energy, low proton acidity, and highly nonpolar character. Herein we report a unique gold(I)-silver(I) oxo cluster protected by hemilabile phosphine ligands [OAu3Ag3(PPhpy2)3](BF4)4 (1), which can activate C(sp(3))-H bonds under mild conditions for a broad scope of methyl ketones (RCOCH3, R = methyl, phenyl, 2-methylphenyl, 2-aminophenyl, 2-hydroxylphenyl, 2-pyridyl, 2-thiazolyl, tert-butyl, ethyl, isopropyl). Activation happens via triple deprotonation of the methyl group, leading to formation of heterometallic Au(I)-Ag(I) clusters with formula RCOCAu4Ag4(PPhpy2)4(BF4)5 (PPhpy2 = bis(2-pyridyl)phenylphosphine). Cluster 1 can be generated in situ via the reaction of [OAu3Ag(PPhpy2)3](BF4)2 with 2 equiv of AgBF4. The oxo ion and the metal centers are found to be essential in the cleavage of sp(3) C-H bonds of methyl ketones. Interestingly, cluster 1 selectively activates the C-H bonds in -CH3 rather than the N-H bonds in -NH2 or the O-H bond in -OH which is traditionally thought to be more reactive than C-H bonds. Control experiments with butanone, 3-methylbutanone, and cyclopentanone as substrates show that the auration of the C-H bond of the terminal methyl group is preferred over secondary or tertiary sp(3) C-H bonds; in other words, the C-H bond activation is influenced by steric effect. This work highlights the powerful reactivity of metal clusters toward C-H activation and sheds new light on gold(I)-mediated catalysis.

  20. An adhesive bond state classification method for a composite skin-to-spar joint using chaotic insonification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.

    2010-07-01

    The combination of chaotically amplitude-modulated ultrasonic waves and time series prediction algorithms has shown the ability to locate and classify various bond state damage conditions of a composite bonded joint. This study examines the ability of a new two-part supervised learning classification scheme not only to classify disbond size but also to classify whether a bond for which there is no baseline data is undamaged or has some form of disbond. This classification is performed using data from a similarly configured composite bond for which baseline data are available. The test structures are analogous to a wing skin-to-spar bonded joint. An active excitation signal is imparted to the structure through a macro fiber composite (MFC) patch on one side of the bonded joint and sensed using an equivalent MFC patch on the opposite side of the joint. There is an MFC actuator/sensor pair for each bond condition to be identified. The classification approach compares features derived from an autoregressive (AR) model coefficient vector cross-assurance criterion.

  1. Evaluating interaction energies of weakly bonded systems using the Buckingham-Hirshfeld method

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtal, A.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Geerlings, P.

    2014-05-14

    We present the finalized Buckingham-Hirshfeld method (BHD-DFT) for the evaluation of interaction energies of non-bonded dimers with Density Functional Theory (DFT). In the method, dispersion energies are evaluated from static multipole polarizabilities, obtained on-the-fly from Coupled Perturbed Kohn-Sham calculations and partitioned into diatomic contributions using the iterative Hirshfeld partitioning method. The dispersion energy expression is distributed over four atoms and has therefore a higher delocalized character compared to the standard pairwise expressions. Additionally, full multipolar polarizability tensors are used as opposed to effective polarizabilities, allowing to retain the anisotropic character at no additional computational cost. A density dependent damping function for the BLYP, PBE, BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0 functionals has been implemented, containing two global parameters which were fitted to interaction energies and geometries of a selected number of dimers using a bi-variate RMS fit. The method is benchmarked against the S22 and S66 data sets for equilibrium geometries and the S22x5 and S66x8 data sets for interaction energies around the equilibrium geometry. Best results are achieved using the B3LYP functional with mean average deviation values of 0.30 and 0.24 kcal/mol for the S22 and S66 data sets, respectively. This situates the BHD-DFT method among the best performing dispersion inclusive DFT methods. Effect of counterpoise correction on DFT energies is discussed.

  2. Annulation of aromatic imines via directed C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; Ahrendt, Kateri A; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2005-08-19

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh3)3RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  3. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  4. Cyclometallation of arylimines and nitrogen-containing heterocycles via room-temperature C-H bond activation with arene ruthenium(II) acetate complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Roisnel, Thierry; Darcel, Christophe; Dixneuf, Pierre H

    2012-08-28

    The reaction of [RuCl(2)(p-cymene)](2) with arylimines and 4 equiv. of KOAc in methanol at room temperature produces stable (N^C)-cyclometallated ruthenium(II) complexes via C-H bond activation/deprotonation. This method can be applied also to nitrogen-containing molecules: N-phenylpyrazole, 2-phenyl-2-oxazoline and benzo[h]quinoline. N-Phenyl-pyrazole, [RuCl(2)(p-cymene)](2) and diphenylacetylene directly lead to alkyne insertion into the metallacycle C-Ru bond. PMID:22890507

  5. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-01

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran.

  6. A DFT and ab initio benchmarking study of metal-alkane interactions and the activation of carbon-hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Flener-Lovitt, Charity; Woon, David E; Dunning, Thom H; Girolami, Gregory S

    2010-02-01

    Density functional theory and ab initio methods have been used to calculate the structures and energies of minima and transition states for the reactions of methane coordinated to a transition metal. The reactions studied are reversible C-H bond activation of the coordinated methane ligand to form a transition metal methyl hydride complex and dissociation of the coordinated methane ligand. The reaction sequence can be summarized as L(x)M(CH(3))H <==> L(x)M(CH(4)) <==> L(x)M + CH(4), where L(x)M is the osmium-containing fragment (C(5)H(5))Os(R(2)PCH(2)PR(2))(+) and R is H or CH(3). Three-center metal-carbon-hydrogen interactions play an important role in this system. Both basis sets and functionals have been benchmarked in this work, including new correlation consistent basis sets for a third transition series element, osmium. Double zeta quality correlation consistent basis sets yield energies close to those from calculations with quadruple-zeta basis sets, with variations that are smaller than the differences between functionals. The energies of important species on the potential energy surface, calculated by using 10 DFT functionals, are compared both to experimental values and to CCSD(T) single point calculations. Kohn-Sham natural bond orbital descriptions are used to understand the differences between functionals. Older functionals favor electrostatic interactions over weak donor-acceptor interactions and, therefore, are not particularly well suited for describing systems--such as sigma-complexes--in which the latter are dominant. Newer kinetic and dispersion-corrected functionals such as MPW1K and M05-2X provide significantly better descriptions of the bonding interactions, as judged by their ability to predict energies closer to CCSD(T) values. Kohn-Sham and natural bond orbitals are used to differentiate between bonding descriptions. Our evaluations of these basis sets and DFT functionals lead us to recommend the use of dispersion corrected functionals in

  7. The Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to the Fluorosed Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Moshkelgosha, Vahid; Khanchemehr, Atefeh; Alizade, Akram; Mokhtar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Some studies have reported the bond strength to be significantly lower in fluorotic enamels than the non-fluorosed. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond streongth of metallic brackets to non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth after different enamel conditioning. Materials and Method A total of 176 freshly extracted human premolars (88 non-fluorosed and 88 fluorosed teeth) were used in this study for bonding the metallic brackets. Teeth with moderate fluorosis were used according to Thylstrup and Fejereskov index (TFI). Eighty non-fluorosed and 80 fluorosed teeth (TFI=4-6) were randomly divided into 8 equal groups of 20 teeth each. The remaining 16 teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy observation. The enamel surface was conditioned by 4 methods: acid etching  for 30 sec, acid etching for 120 sec, air abrasion followed by acid etching, and Er: YAG laser etching followed by acid etching. The morphology of etching patterns in different groups was studied under scanning electron microscope. Results The shear bond strength of fluorosed teeth to the brackets was significantly lower than non-fluorosed ones (p= 0.003). The shear bond strength of laser-acid groups in both non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth was significantly lower than other groups (p< 0.001). Weibull analysis indicated that the chance of failure under the applied force was different between fluorosed and non-fluorosed group. The scanning electron microscope observations revealed that the fluorosed teeth treated with phosphoric acid had fewer irregularities compared to non-fluorosed teeth. The most irregularities were detected in the teeth conditioned with phosphoric acid for 120 seconds. Conclusion Fluorotic enamel adversely affects the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. None of the conditioning methods tested in this study could significantly improve shear bond strength of metallic brackets. Er: YAG laser conditioning followed by acid further

  8. Mechanistic insights into the C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by chromium(IV) oxo and chromium(III) superoxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Kang, Hyeona; Woo, Jaeyoung; Park, Young Jun; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Jaeheung; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by a nonheme chromium(IV) oxo complex bearing an N-methylated tetraazamacrocyclic cyclam (TMC) ligand, [Cr(IV)(O)(TMC)(Cl)](+) (2), has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. In experimental studies, reaction rates of 2 with substrates having weak C-H bonds were found to depend on the concentration and bond dissociation energies of the substrates. A large kinetic isotope effect value of 60 was determined in the oxidation of dihydroanthracene (DHA) and deuterated DHA by 2. These results led us to propose that the C-H bond activation reaction occurs via a H-atom abstraction mechanism, in which H-atom abstraction of substrates by 2 is the rate-determining step. In addition, formation of a chromium(III) hydroxo complex, [Cr(III)(OH)(TMC)(Cl)](+) (3), was observed as a decomposed product of 2 in the C-H bond activation reaction. The Cr(III)OH product was characterized unambiguously with various spectroscopic methods and X-ray crystallography. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support the experimental observations that the C-H bond activation by 2 does not occur via the conventional H-atom-abstraction/oxygen-rebound mechanism and that 3 is the product formed in this C-H bond activation reaction. DFT calculations also propose that 2 may have some Cr(III)O(•-) character. The oxidizing power of 2 was then compared with that of a chromium(III) superoxo complex bearing the identical TMC ligand, [Cr(III)(O2)(TMC)(Cl)](+) (1), in the C-H bond activation reaction. By performing reactions of 1 and 2 with substrates under identical conditions, we were able to demonstrate that the reactivity of 2 is slightly greater than that of 1. DFT calculations again support this experimental observation, showing that the rate-limiting barrier for the reaction with 2 is slightly lower than that of 1.

  9. Density function theoretical study on the complex involved in Th atom-activated C–C bond in C2H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Qing, Wang; Peng, Li; Tao, Gao; Hong-Yan, Wang; Bing-Yun, Ao

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the reactivity of Th atom toward ethane C–C bond activation. A comprehensive description of the reaction mechanisms leading to two different reaction products is presented. We report a complete exploration of the potential energy surfaces by taking into consideration different spin states. In addition, the intermediate and transition states along the reaction paths are characterized. Total, partial, and overlap population density of state diagrams and analyses are also presented. Furthermore, the natures of the chemical bonding of intermediate and transition states are studied by using topological method combined with electron localization function (ELF) and Mayer bond order. Infrared spectrum (IR) is obtained and further discussed based on the optimized geometries. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21371160, 21401173, and 11364023).

  10. Catalytic Ring-Opening of Cyclic Alcohols Enabled by PCET Activation of Strong O-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Yayla, Hatice G; Wang, Huaiju; Tarantino, Kyle T; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-31

    We report a new photocatalytic protocol for the redox-neutral isomerization of cyclic alcohols to linear ketones via C-C bond scission. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that key alkoxy radical intermediates in this reaction are generated via the direct homolytic activation of alcohol O-H bonds in an unusual intramolecular PCET process, wherein the electron travels to a proximal radical cation in concert with proton transfer to a weak Brønsted base. Effective bond strength considerations are shown to accurately forecast the feasibility of alkoxy radical generation with a given oxidant/base pair. PMID:27515494

  11. Gold/Palladium Alloy for Carbon-Halogen Bond Activation: An Unprecedented Halide Dependence.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Raghu Nath; Bobuatong, Karan; Ehara, Masahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro

    2015-12-01

    New catalytic activity of gold/palladium alloy nanoclusters (NCs) for carbon-halogen bond activation is demonstrated. In the case of an aryl chloride, the inclusion of gold in a bimetallic catalyst is indispensable to achieve the coupling reactions. Gold has the unique effect of stabilizing palladium, such that Pd(2+) leached from clusters by means of spillover of chloride during oxidative addition. The thus-formed spillover intermediate further reacts heterogeneously in both Ullmann and Suzuki-type coupling reactions through a new type of mechanism. In the case of an aryl bromide, Ullmann coupling occurs through the spillover of bromide, similar to that of aryl chloride. However, a significant fraction of palladium also leached, which diminished the Ullmann coupling activity of the aryl bromide and, as a result, the order of reactivity was ArCl>ArBr. With regard to the activation of the C-Br bond towards a Suzuki-type reaction, the inclusion of a higher gold content in gold/palladium clusters stabilized palladium to prevent the leaching of Pd(2+) from the clusters by means of spillover of bromide. The spillover intermediate reacts heterogeneously with PhB(OH)2, palladium-rich gold/palladium, or pure palladium clusters; the oxidative addition of ArBr favors the extraction of palladium from the clusters, yielding Pd(2+) intermediates. The extracted intermediates react homogenously (Pd(2+/)Pd(0) catalysis) with PhB(OH)2, which results in the higher selectivity of the cross-coupling product. An initial step to observe such unprecedented halide dependency, together with the dynamic behavior of palladium on the surface of gold is the oxidative addition of Ar-X. A detailed insight into the first oxidative addition process was also examined by quantum chemical calculations.

  12. Activation of A-H bonds (A = B, C, N, O, Si) by using monovalent phosphorus complexes [RP→M].

    PubMed

    Mathey, Francois; Duan, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The available data on the activation of A-H sigma bonds by electrophilic terminal phosphinidene complexes are reviewed. Theoretical computations allow us to rationalize the experimental results. It appears that a successful insertion needs an initial interaction between the phosphinidene and the A-H bond, such as a donor-acceptor complex with a lone pair, a Coulombic interaction due to a negative charge on A or H, or a proximity effect.

  13. 75 FR 47608 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Exportation of Articles under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. This request for...: Title: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. OMB Number: 1651-0004. Form...

  14. 78 FR 49761 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... information collection requirement concerning the Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond... Articles Under Special Bond. OMB Number: 1651-0004. Form Number: CBP Form 3495. Abstract: CBP Form...

  15. 75 FR 61162 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... Exportation of Articles under Special Bond (CBP Form 3495). This is a proposed extension of an information... Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. OMB Number: 1651-0004. Form Number: Form 3495. Abstract:...

  16. 78 FR 66038 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Exportation of Articles Under Special Bond AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... Exportation of Articles under Special Bond (CBP Form 3495). This is a proposed extension of an information.... Title: Application for Exportation of Articles under Special Bond. OMB Number: 1651-0004. Form...

  17. Bond dissociation free energy as a general parameter for flavonoid radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Stepanić, Višnja; Gall Trošelj, Koraljka; Lučić, Bono; Marković, Zoran; Amić, Dragan

    2013-11-15

    Notwithstanding multiple mechanisms of radical scavenging (RS), measured RS activities (RSA) of flavonoids are usually related to O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). For 12 flavonoids the reaction free energies were calculated for: (1) HAT, (2) single electron transfer-proton transfer (SET-PT) and (3) sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) in gas and aqueous phases. Aqueous free energies, like bond dissociation (BDFEaq), ionisation (IFEaq) and deprotonation (ΔGdeprot,aq) free energies were estimated using thermochemical cycles. While in gas HAT is a RS mechanism (BDFEg

  18. The Effect of Artificial Aging on The Bond Strength of Heat-activated Acrylic Resin to Surface-treated Nickel-chromium-beryllium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Zinelis, Spiros; Al Taweel, Sara M.; Nagy, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The debonding load of heat-activated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin material to a nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloy conditioned by three different surface treatments and utilizing two different commercial bonding systems was investigated. Materials and Methods Denture resin (Lucitone-199) was bonded to Ni-Cr-Be alloy specimens treated with Metal Primer II, the Rocatec system with opaquer and the Rocatec system without opaquer. Denture base resin specimens bonded to non-treated sandblasted Ni-Cr-Be alloy were used as controls. Twenty samples for each treatment condition (80 specimens) were tested. The 80 specimens were divided into two categories, thermocycled and non-thermocycled, containing four groups of ten specimens each. The non-thermocycled specimens were tested after 48 hours’ storage in room temperature water. The thermocycled specimens were tested after 2,000 cycles in 4°C and 55°C water baths. The debonding load was calculated in Newtons (N), and collected data were subjected by non parametric test Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance on Ranks and Dunn’s post hoc test at the α = 0.05. Results The Metal Primer II and Rocatec system without opaquer groups produced significantly higher bond strengths (119.9 and 67.6 N), respectively, than did the sandblasted and Rocatec system with opaquer groups, where the bond strengths were 2.6 N and 0 N, respectively. The Metal Primer II was significantly different from all other groups (P<0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly decreased (P<0.05) after thermocycling. Conclusions Although thermocycling had a detrimental effect on the debonding load of all surface treatments tested, the Metal Primer II system provided higher values among all bonding systems tested, before and after thermocycling. PMID:27335613

  19. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinthika, S.; Kumar, E. Mathan; Surya, V. J.; Kawazoe, Y.; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K.; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level.

  20. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study.

    PubMed

    Sinthika, S; Kumar, E Mathan; Surya, V J; Kawazoe, Y; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level.

  1. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study.

    PubMed

    Sinthika, S; Kumar, E Mathan; Surya, V J; Kawazoe, Y; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level. PMID:26626147

  2. Non-bonded interactions and its contribution to the NLO activity of Glycine Sodium Nitrate A vibrational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, T.; Hubert Joe, I.; Reghunadhan Nair, C. P.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2008-04-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis of the novel nonlinear optical (NLO) material, Glycine Sodium Nitrate (GSN) is carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, supported by Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) computations to derive equilibrium geometry, vibrational wave numbers and first hyperpolarizability. The reasonable NLO efficiency, predicted for the first time in this novel compound, has been confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder SHG experiments. The influence of Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) caused by the strong ionic ground state hydrogen bonding between charged species making GSN crystal to have the non-centrosymmetric structure has been discussed. The shortening of C sbnd H bond lengths, blue-shifting of the stretching frequencies and intensity variation indicating the existence of 'blue-shift or improper' C sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonding. The intense low wavenumber H-bond Raman vibrations due to electron-phonon coupling and non-bonded interactions in making the molecule NLO active have been analyzed based on the vibrational spectral features. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the occurrence of a strong intra- and intermolecular N sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  3. Activation of CO and CO2 on homonuclear boron bonds of fullerene-like BN cages: first principles study

    PubMed Central

    Sinthika, S.; Kumar, E. Mathan; Surya, V. J.; Kawazoe, Y.; Park, Noejung; Iyakutti, K.; Thapa, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory we investigate the electronic and atomic structure of fullerene-like boron nitride cage structures. The pentagonal ring leads to the formation of homonuclear bonds. The homonuclear bonds are also found in other BN structures having pentagon line defect. The calculated thermodynamics and vibrational spectra indicated that, among various stable configurations of BN-60 cages, the higher number of homonuclear N-N bonds and lower B:N ratio can result in the more stable structure. The homonuclear bonds bestow the system with salient catalytic properties that can be tuned by modifying the B atom bonding environment. We show that homonuclear B-B (B2) bonds can anchor both oxygen and CO molecules making the cage to be potential candidates as catalyst for CO oxidation via Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. Moreover, the B-B-B (B3) bonds are reactive enough to capture, activate and hydrogenate CO2 molecules to formic acid. The observed trend in reactivity, viz B3 > B2 > B1 is explained in terms of the position of the boron defect state relative to the Fermi level. PMID:26626147

  4. Transition metal activation and functionalization of C-H bonds. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1986-11-01

    This project has been directed towards the investigation of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers. The major accomplishments of this past three years have been: (1) to identify a new transition metal complex capable of activating both arene and alkane C-H bonds, (2) to quantitatively evaluate the stability of the hydrido aryl and hydrido alkyl complexes towards reductive elimination, (3) to measure the kinetic selectivity of the reactive intermediate towards alkane and arene C-H bonds, (4) to quantitatively determine the thermodynamics of alkane and arene oxidative addition, (5) to demonstrate that arenes are activated by way of formation of an eta/sup 2/-arene complex, (6) to quantitatively determine the kinetic and thermodynamic preference for intra vs intermolecular activation of arene and alkane C-H bonds, (7) to measure isotope effects for the oxidative addition/reductive elimination pathways as a means of confirming the proposed mechanism of reaction, and (8) to formulate a unified theory of C-H bond activation that applies to other transition metal complexes. The specific complexes involved in these studies are derivatives of the formulation (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)Rh(PMe/sub 3/)(R)H and (C/sub 5/Me/sub 5/)Rh(PMe/sub 2/R) (R)H.

  5. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Material and Methods Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). Results There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (P<0.001). Rinsing protocol and cement type resulted in similar variations in the mean bond strength in all tests (P>0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Key words:Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium

  6. Rhodium-catalysed C(sp2)–C(sp2) bond formation via C–H/C–F activation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Panpan; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroalkenes represent a class of privileged structural motifs, which found widespread use in medicinal chemistry. However, the synthetic access to fluoroalkenes was much underdeveloped with previous reported methods suffering from either low step economy or harsh reaction conditions. Here we present a RhIII-catalysed tandem C–H/C–F activation for the synthesis of (hetero)arylated monofluoroalkenes. The use of readily available gem-difluoroalkenes as electrophiles provides a highly efficient and operationally simple method for the introduction of α-fluoroalkenyl motifs onto (hetero)arenes under oxidant-free conditions. Furthermore, the employment of alcoholic solvent and the in-situ generated hydrogen fluoride are found to be beneficial in this transformation, indicating the possibility of the involvement of hydrogen bond activation mode with regards to the C–F bond cleavage step. PMID:26081837

  7. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future.

  8. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Takuto Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-09-15

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi{sub 2}.

  9. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future. PMID:27268136

  10. An internal disulfide bond acts as a switch for intein activity

    PubMed Central

    Nicastri, Michael C.; Xega, Kristina; Li, Lingyun; Xie, Jian; Wang, Chunyu; Linhardt, Robert J.; Reitter, Julie N.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    Inteins are intervening polypeptides that catalyze their own removal from flanking exteins, concomitant to the ligation of the exteins. The intein that interrupts the DP2 (large) subunit of DNA Polymerase II from Methanoculleus marisnigri (Mma) can promote protein splicing. However, protein splicing can be prevented or reduced by over-expression under non-reducing conditions, due to the formation of a disulfide bond between two internal intein Cys residues. This redox sensitivity leads to differential activity in different strains of E. coli as well as in different cell compartments. The redox-dependent control of in vivo protein splicing in an intein derived from an anaerobe that can occupy multiple environments hints at a possible physiological role for protein splicing. PMID:23906287

  11. A C–H bond activation-based catalytic approach to tetrasubstituted chiral allenes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shangze; Huang, Xin; Wu, Wangteng; Li, Pengbin; Fu, Chunling; Ma, Shengming

    2015-01-01

    Enantioselective synthesis of fully substituted allenes has been a challenge due to the non-rigid nature of the axial chirality, which spreads over three carbon atoms. Here we show the commercially available simple Rh complex may catalyse the CMD (concerted metalation/deprotonation)-based reaction of the readily available arenes with sterically congested tertiary propargylic carbonates at ambient temperature affording fully substituted allenes. It is confirmed that the excellent designed regioselectivity for the C–C triple bond insertion is induced by the coordination of the carbonyl group in the directing carbonate group as well as the steric effect of the tertiary O-linked carbon atom. When an optically active carbonate was used, surprisingly high efficiency of chirality transfer was realized, affording fully substituted allenes in excellent enantiomeric excess (ee). PMID:26246391

  12. Metal Nanoparticles Catalyzed Selective Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation in the Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rong; Yuan, Bing; Zhao, Jie; Ralston, Walter T; Wu, Chung-Yeh; Unel Barin, Ebru; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the C-C bond activation mechanism is essential for developing the selective production of hydrocarbons in the petroleum industry and for selective polymer decomposition. In this work, ring-opening reactions of cyclopropane derivatives under hydrogen catalyzed by metal nanoparticles (NPs) in the liquid phase were studied. 40-atom rhodium (Rh) NPs, encapsulated by dendrimer molecules and supported in mesoporous silica, catalyzed the ring opening of cyclopropylbenzene at room temperature under hydrogen in benzene, and the turnover frequency (TOF) was higher than other metals or the Rh homogeneous catalyst counterparts. Comparison of reactants with various substitution groups showed that electron donation on the three-membered ring boosted the TOF of ring opening. The linear products formed with 100% selectivity for ring opening of all reactants catalyzed by the Rh NP. Surface Rh(0) acted as the active site in the NP. The capping agent played an important role in the ring-opening reaction kinetics. Larger particle size tended to show higher TOF and smaller reaction activation energy for Rh NPs encapsulated in either dendrimer or poly(vinylpyrrolidone). The generation/size of dendrimer and surface group also affected the reaction rate and activation energy. PMID:27322570

  13. Bond-detach lithography: a method for micro/nanolithography by precision PDMS patterning.

    PubMed

    Thangawng, Abel L; Swartz, Melody A; Glucksberg, Matthew R; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2007-01-01

    We have discovered a micro/nanopatterning technique based on the patterning of a PDMS membrane/film, which involves bonding a PDMS structure/stamp (that has the desired patterns) to a PDMS film. The technique, which we call "bond-detach lithography", was demonstrated (in conjunction with other microfabrication techniques) by transferring several micro- and nanoscale patterns onto a variety of substrates. Bond-detach lithography is a parallel process technique in which a master mold can be used many times, and is particularly simple and inexpensive.

  14. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmage, Petra; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Herrmann, Wolfram; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2003-05-01

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface conditioning methods: fine diamond bur, sandblasting, 5% hydrofluoric acid, and silica coating for bonding metal brackets to ceramic surfaces of feldspathic porcelain. Sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid were further tested after silane application. A total of 120 ceramic disc samples were produced, and 50 were used for surface roughness measurements. The glazed ceramic surfaces were used as controls. Metal brackets were bonded to the ceramic substrates with a self-curing composite. The samples were stored in 0.9% NaCl solution for 24 hours and then thermocycled (5000 times, 5 degrees C to 55 degrees C, 30 seconds). Shear bond tests were performed with a universal testing device, and the results were statistically analyzed. Chemical surface conditioning with either hydrofluoric acid (4.3 microm) or silicatization (4.4 microm) resulted in significantly lower surface roughness than mechanical conditioning (9.3 microm, diamond bur; 9.7 microm, sandblasting) (P <.001). The surface roughness values reflect the mean peak-and-valley distances. The bond strengths of the brackets bonded to the ceramic surfaces treated by hydrofluoric acid with and without silane (12.2 and 14.7 MPa, respectively), silicatization (14.9 MPa), and sandblasting with silane (15.8 MPa) were significantly higher (P <.001) than those treated by mechanical roughening with fine diamond burs (1.6 MPa) or sandblasting (2.8 MPa). The highest bond strength values were obtained with sandblasting and silicatization with silane or hydrofluoric acid without silane; these fulfilled the required threshold. The use of silane after hydrofluoric acid etching did not increase the bond strength. Diamond roughening and

  15. Human Defensin 5 Disulfide Array Mutants: Disulfide Bond Deletion Attenuates Antibacterial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Wan, Andrea; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5, HD5ox to specify the oxidized and disulfide linked form) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide, expressed and released by small intestinal Paneth cells, that exhibits antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and –positive bacterial strains. To ascertain the contributions of its disulfide array to structure, antimicrobial activity, and proteolytic stability, a series of HD5 double mutant peptides where pairs of cysteine residues corresponding to native disulfide linkages (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, Cys10—Cys30) were mutated to Ser or Ala residues were overexpressed in E. coli, purified and characterized. A hexa mutant peptide, HD5[Serhexa], where all six native Cys residues are replaced by Ser residues was also evaluated. Removal of a single native S—S linkage influences oxidative folding and regioisomerization, antibacterial activity, Gram-negative bacterial membrane permeabilization, and proteolytic stability. Whereas the majority of the HD5 mutant peptides show low-micromolar activity against Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 in colony counting assays, the wild-type disulfide array is essential for low-micromolar activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. Removal of a single disulfide bond attenuates the activity observed for HD5ox against this Gram-positive bacterial strain. This observation supports the notion that the HD5ox mechanism of antibacterial action differs for Gram-negative and Gram-positive species (Wei, G.; de Leeuw, E., Pazgier, M., Yuan, W., Zou, G., Wang, J., Ericksen, B., Lu, W.-Y.; Lehrer, R. I.; Lu, W. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 29180-29192), and that the native disulfide array is a requirement for its activity against S. aureus. PMID:21861459

  16. Modeling shock responses of plastic bonded explosives using material point method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hailin; Zhao, Feng; Fu, Hua

    2015-06-01

    Shock responses of plastic bonded explosives are modeled using material point method as implemented in the Uintah Computational Framework. The two-dimensional geometrical model was established based on the micrograph of PBX9501. Shock loading for this explosive was performed by a piston moving at a constant velocity. Simulation results indicate that under shock loading there forms some stress localizations on the grain boundary of HMX explosive. These stress localizations lead to some serious plastic deformation. Simultaneously, the plastic strain energy transforms to thermal energy, causing the temperature to rise rapidly and form some hot spots on grain boundary areas. There are also some micro cracks appear at early time of the shock loading. But after some time these cracks begin to close, forming a few hot spots. The influence of shock strength on the responses of explosive was also investigated by increasing the piston velocity. And the results show that with increasing shock strength, the distribution of plastic strain and temperature does not have significant change, but their values increase obviously. Namely, the higher the shock strength is, the higher the hot spot temperature will be. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11272296).

  17. Method and device for determining bond separation strength using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes an induction heating gun which includes a housing, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart opposite ends defining a gap there between, the U-shaped pole piece being mounted in one end of the housing, and a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil. A power source is connected to the tank circuit. A pull test machine is provided having a stationary chuck and a movable chuck, the two chucks holding two test pieces bonded together at a bond region. The heating gun is mounted on the pull test machine in close proximity to the bond region of the two test pieces, whereby when the tank circuit is energized, the two test pieces are heated by induction heating while a tension load is applied to the two test pieces by the pull test machine to determine separation strength of the bond region.

  18. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

    1985-05-20

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  19. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Four Surface Conditioning Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Bracket to Porcelain Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Torkan, Sepideh; Yousefipour, Bahareh; Salehi, Raha

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the effect of superpulse CO2 laser irradiation and deglazing of porcelain surfaces on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal orthodontic brackets, and compared it with two conventional etching techniques. Methods: Forty-eight Feldspathic porcelain fused to metal specimens embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin tubes were fabricated, and all the specimens were divided into four groups. In Group 1, the specimens were roughened with a diamond bur and etched with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) gel for 4 min. In Group 2, the specimens were roughened with a bur and irradiated by a CO2 laser with a 2 W power setting for 20 sec. In Group 3, the specimens were only irradiated by a CO2 laser. In Group 4, the porcelain surface was sandblasted with 50 μm aluminum oxide. Before bonding, the bracket silane was applied on the porcelain surfaces. SBS was evaluated by a Universal testing machine (Zwickroll, Germany). The remaining adhesive after the bond failure was evaluated using an adhesive remnant index (ARI). Statistical analysis was conducted by analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey, and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Results: ANOVA revealed significant differences in SBS among the four groups (p<0.001). Group 1 demonstrated significantly higher bond strength (13.13±2.47) when compared with the other groups. Group 2 showed higher bond strength (9.60±1.91) when compared with group 4 (6.40±1.67) (p=0.016). Group 1 displayed the highest ARI scores among the groups. Conclusions: Deglazing combined with HFA etching produced the highest bond strength, but CO2 laser irradiation provided adequate bond strength and allowed for elimination of the HFA step. Deglazing is not recommended as a preliminary step before CO2 laser conditioning. PMID:25455957

  1. Reliability of bond dissociation enthalpy calculated by the PM6 method and experimental TEAC values in antiradical QSAR of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Amić, Dragan; Lucić, Bono

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of the newly developed RM1 and PM6 methods implemented in the semiempirical quantum chemistry mopac2009 software package in modeling free radical scavenging activity of flavonoids was examined. Bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of OH groups could be calculated much faster than with DFT method but with similar quality. Despite the known shortcomings of the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay, we show that taking into account the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism of free radical scavenging of flavonoids encoded by minimal BDE values (BDE(min)) and the number of OH groups (nOH), as well as experimental data, reasonable QSAR models could be developed. For TEAC values of 38 flavonoids measured by the ABTS free radical, a model based on BDE(min) and nOH was developed, having very good statistical parameters (r=0.983, r(cv)=0.976). The applicability of this model to three different data sets of flavonoids and reliability of TEAC values measured in distinct laboratories were discussed. Finally, a reasonably good model of experimental vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity (VCEAC) of 36 flavonoids was obtained (r=0.954, r(cv)=0.947), involving BDE(min) and nOH as descriptors. Additionally, all presented models have comparable fit and cross-validated statistical parameters, as well as significant regression coefficients.

  2. A Review of Chemical Bonding Studies: Needs, Aims, Methods of Exploring Students' Conceptions, General Knowledge Claims and Students' Alternative Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper presents a detailed thematic review of chemical bonding studies. To achieve this, a matrix is developed to summarize and present the findings by focusing on insights derived from the related studies. The matrix incorporates the following themes: needs, aims, methods of exploring students' conceptions, general knowledge claims,…

  3. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules. PMID:24756162

  4. GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator hybrid laser with ring-resonator-type reflector fabricated by N2 plasma-activated bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Junichi; Inoue, Satoshi; Tanvir Hasan, Shovon Muhammad; Kuno, Yuki; Itoh, Kazuto; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    III-V/Si hybrid integration with direct bonding is an attractive method of realizing an electrophotonic convergence router with a small size and a low power consumption. Plasma-activated bonding (PAB) is an effective approach for reducing thermal stress during the bonding process because PAB achieves a high bonding strength with low-temperature annealing. This time, the fabrication of a GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator (SOI) hybrid laser with Si ring-resonator-type reflectors was demonstrated by N2 PAB. By measuring the lasing spectra, we confirmed the reflective characteristics resulting from the cascaded Si ring resonators. We also investigated kink characteristics, which occur around the threshold current, of the current-light output (I-L) characteristics, and successfully approximated the kink characteristics by considering saturable absorption occurring at the III-V/Si taper tip. The taper structure was investigated in terms of a passive device as well as an active device, and a structure for eliminating saturable absorption was proposed.

  5. GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator hybrid laser with ring-resonator-type reflector fabricated by N2 plasma-activated bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Junichi; Inoue, Satoshi; Tanvir Hasan, Shovon Muhammad; Kuno, Yuki; Itoh, Kazuto; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    III–V/Si hybrid integration with direct bonding is an attractive method of realizing an electrophotonic convergence router with a small size and a low power consumption. Plasma-activated bonding (PAB) is an effective approach for reducing thermal stress during the bonding process because PAB achieves a high bonding strength with low-temperature annealing. This time, the fabrication of a GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator (SOI) hybrid laser with Si ring-resonator-type reflectors was demonstrated by N2 PAB. By measuring the lasing spectra, we confirmed the reflective characteristics resulting from the cascaded Si ring resonators. We also investigated kink characteristics, which occur around the threshold current, of the current–light output (I–L) characteristics, and successfully approximated the kink characteristics by considering saturable absorption occurring at the III–V/Si taper tip. The taper structure was investigated in terms of a passive device as well as an active device, and a structure for eliminating saturable absorption was proposed.

  6. Activation of amide N-H bonds by organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schaad, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    This research was aimed at developing new homogeneous transition metal hydroamination catalysts, specifically for hydroamination reactions involving the addition of amides to olefins. New iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were formed via amide N-H bond activation reactions to zerovalent and divalent organotransition metal complexes. Complexes of the general formula trans-MW(amido) (diphosphine)[sub 2] were synthesized by reaction of amides with FeH(C[sub 6]H[sub 4]PPhCH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]PPh[sub 2]) (dppe) and cis-RuHNp(dmpe)[sub 2]. Photolysis of cis-FeH[sub 2](dmpe)[sub 2] or Pt(C[sub 2]O[sub 4] (PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] in the presence of amides yielded trans-FeH(amido)(dmple)[sub 2] and trans-PtH (amido) IPEt[sub 3]) products. Reactions of amides with cis-M(PEtt[sub 3])[sub 2]Me[sub 2] yielded compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(PEt[sub 3])[sub 2] (M = Pd, Pt). The reaction of M(diphosphine)Me[sub 2] complexes with amides produced compounds with the general formula M(amido)Me(diphosphine) (M = Pd, Pt). Reaction of amides with PtMe[sub 2](COD) yielded complexes with the general formula PtMe(amido)(COD). The compounds were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. The reactions were proposed to occur by two routes: oxidative addition of the amid eN-H bond to the metal complex or direct protonation of the metal complex by the N-H bond of the amide. The rate of formation and the stability of the metal-amido products depended on the nature of the metal complex and the amide employed. Only acidic amides reacted with the iron complexes. For the thermal reactions of amides with the metal complexes, the reactions proceeded to completion faster as the acidity of the amide was increased. The new iron-, ruthenium-, palladium- and platinum-amido complexes were inert to further reaction.

  7. Plastic-PDMS bonding for high pressure hydrolytically stable active microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin S; Ram, Rajeev J

    2009-06-01

    We explore the application of organofunctional silanes for bonding plastic substrates to PDMS membranes. Such devices would enable actuated membrane microfluidics in plastic devices. Bond strength degradation in aqueous environments can be reduced by using bis-silanes with larger alkoxy end groups to promote organofunctional bond formation with the plastic substrate. Hydrolytic failure can also result from low silane crosslink density or interface hydrophilicity. A test device consisting of three-valve peristaltic pumps is fabricated out of polycarbonate (PC) and bonded to PDMS through isopropoxy modified bis-trimethoxy-silyl-propyl-amine. Valves operated up to 60 psi in aqueous environments without failure. Solutions of DI water and 1 M HCl were also pumped through the device via peristaltic actuation at 18 psi for 2 weeks without bond failure. 1 M NaOH was also tested but resulted in bond failure after 115 hours.

  8. Mechanochemical C-H bond activation: rapid and regioselective double cyclopalladation monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juribašić, Marina; Užarević, Krunoslav; Gracin, Davor; Ćurić, Manda

    2014-09-14

    The first direct mechanochemical transition-metal-mediated activation of strong phenyl C-H bonds is reported. The mechanochemical procedure, resulting in cyclopalladated complexes, is quantitative and significantly faster than solution synthesis and allows highly regioselective activation of two C-H bonds by palladium(II) acetate in asymmetrically substituted azobenzene. Milling is monitored by in situ solid-state Raman spectroscopy which in combination with quantum-chemical calculations enabled characterization of involved reaction species, direct insight into the dynamics and reaction pathways, as well as the optimization of a milling process.

  9. Bond strength of acrylic teeth to denture base resin after various surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco A; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the durability of adhesion between acrylic teeth and denture base acrylic resin. The base surfaces of 24 acrylic teeth were flatted and submitted to 4 surface treatment methods: SM1 (control): No SM; SM2: application of a methyl methacrylate-based bonding agent (Vitacol); SM3: air abrasion with 30-microm silicone oxide plus silane; SM4: SM3 plus SM2. A heat-polymerized acrylic resin was applied to the teeth. Thereafter, bar specimens were produced for the microtensile test at dry and thermocyled conditions (60 days water storage followed by 12,000 cycles). The results showed that bond strength was significantly affected by the SM (P < .0001) (SM4 = SM2 > SM3 > SM1) and storage regimens (P < .0001) (dry > thermocycled). The methyl methacrylate-based adhesive showed the highest bond strength. PMID:17455445

  10. Estimate bond angle dependence of superconducting transition temperature in NaFeAs with the first principle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tieyu; Huang, Haitao; Peng, Biaolin; Zheng, Renkui; Lam, Chi-Hang; Tang, Tao; Wang, Yu

    2016-11-01

    The change of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) with bond angle in iron-pnictides was investigated by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory. A Green's function method was adopted to estimate the maximum eigenvalue of Eliashberg equation (an indicator of Tc) for NaFeAs with different bond angles. Through calculations the band structure of NaFeAs was obtained. It was found that hole pockets could form at the center of the first Brillion zone in the band structure, which confirmed the existence of superconductivity in NaFeAs. The upper limit of the Fe-As-Fe bond angle for superconductivity was found to be 121° and the highest Tc would occur at the angle of 108°.

  11. Discovery of amide (peptide) bond synthetic activity in Acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Hosaka, Hideaki; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2008-04-25

    Acyl-CoA synthetase, which is one of the acid-thiol ligases (EC 6.2.1), plays key roles in metabolic and regulatory processes. This enzyme forms a carbon-sulfur bond in the presence of ATP and Mg(2+), yielding acyl-CoA thioesters from the corresponding free acids and CoA. This enzyme belongs to the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, whose three-dimensional structures are analogous to one another. We here discovered a new reaction while studying the short-chain acyl-CoA synthetase that we recently reported (Hashimoto, Y., Hosaka, H., Oinuma, K., Goda, M., Higashibata, H., and Kobayashi, M. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 8660-8667). When l-cysteine was used as a substrate instead of CoA, N-acyl-l-cysteine was surprisingly detected as a reaction product. This finding demonstrated that the enzyme formed a carbon-nitrogen bond (EC 6.3.1 acid-ammonia (or amide) ligase (amide synthase); EC 6.3.2 acid-amino acid ligase (peptide synthase)) comprising the amino group of the cysteine and the carboxyl group of the acid. N-Acyl-d-cysteine, N-acyl-dl-homocysteine, and N-acyl-l-cysteine methyl ester were also synthesized from the corresponding cysteine analog substrates by the enzyme. Furthermore, this unexpected enzyme activity was also observed for acetyl-CoA synthetase and firefly luciferase, indicating the generality of the new reaction in the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes.

  12. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, D. L.

    1987-12-01

    Results are reported in the following areas: fundamental principles of ionization energy/bond energy relationships; relative strengths of early transition metal M-H and M-C bonds in substituted niobocenes and tantalocenes. Thermodynamic trends and electronic factors of olefin insertion into a metal-hydride bond; additivity of ligand electronic effects. Complete phosphine substitution of Group VI metal hexacarbonyls; organometallic methylene-bridged metal dimers; delocalization of metal electron density in metallacycle formation; metal-heteroatom and metal-alkylidyne multiple bonds; the electronic factors favoring intermediates in acetylene metathesis and polymerization; improvements in an electron energy analyzer.

  13. Effect of three adhesive primers on the bond strengths of four light-activated opaque resins to noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Taira, Y; Atsuta, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of commercial adhesive primers for noble metals on the bond strength of light-activated opaque resin has not been determined. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesive primers on the shear bond strengths of each of the four light-activated opaque resins to silver--palladium--copper--gold (Ag--Pd--Cu--Au) alloy. The adhesive primers Alloy Primer (AP), Metal Primer II (MPII) and Metaltite(MT) were used. Four commercial light-activated opaque resins (Axis (AX), Cesead II (CEII), Dentacolor(DE) and Solidex (SO) were used to bond a light-activated resin-veneered composite to Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then immersed alternatively in water baths at 4 and 60 degrees C for 1 min each for up to 20,000 thermal cycles before shear mode testing at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). All the primers examined improved the shear bond strength between opaque resin and Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy compared with non-primed specimens prior to thermal cycling. After 20,000 thermal cycles, the bond strengths of combined use of AP and DE and that of MT and each of AX, CE or DE were significantly greater than any other groups. Significant difference was observed between the bond strengths at thermal cycles 0 and 20,000, with the combined use of MT and DE. With the combination of appropriate adhesive metal primers and light-activated opaque resins, complicated surface preparations of metal frameworks of resin-veneered prostheses that are composed of casting Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy may be negligible.

  14. Effect of various surface treatment methods on the bond strength of the heat-pressed ceramic samples.

    PubMed

    Saraçoğlu, A; Cura, C; Cötert, H S

    2004-08-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the interaction between the shear bond strength and the surface treatment method for a commercial dental ceramic. Ninety bonded ceramic units were manufactured for this study. Each unit was made by luting two cylinder-shaped ceramic samples to each other with a resin-composite luting agent. The units were then divided into nine groups, containing 10 units in each group. Samples from each group were treated with one of the following: etching with 4.9% hydrofluoric acid for 10, 20 and 40 s, 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 10, 20 and 40 s, 40% orthophosphoric acid for 40 s, air abrasion with alumina in 50-microm particles, and grinding with a high-speed diamond bur. The treated samples were then silanated and luted with a resin-composite luting agent. The luted units were then loaded to failure. Two samples from each group were neither silanated nor luted after the surface treatment procedure, and morphological changes obtained by various surface treatment regimens were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. A statistically significant difference was observed among the mean shear bond strengths of the groups prepared with different surface treatment techniques (P = 0.00). Hydrofluoric acid appeared to be the most suitable chemical medium to produce a reliable ceramic bond. Etching time and concentration of the acidic medium were also observed as important prognostic variates. Orthophosphoric acid treatment was observed to be the least effective surface treatment method on the heat-pressed ceramic samples. Physical applications such as bur grinding and air blasting maintained stronger bonds than the orthophosphoric acid, while producing weaker bonds than surfaces treated with hydrofluoric acid in all concentrations and etching periods. The effect of the silane priming agent was not considered in this study.

  15. Measurement of Adhesion Strength of Solid-State Diffusion Bonding Between Nickel and Copper by Means of Laser Shock Spallation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, M.; Akamatsu, H.; Hasegawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    Coating and bonding techniques between different materials are essential to the field of technology. Bond mechanism is of interest from scientific point of view. A well-established method to make bonding between unalloyed nickel and copper was utilized, that was solid-state diffusion bonding at elevated temperatures. Irradiation by Nd:YAG laser with 7ns-pulse width created shock wave that caused tensile stress after reflection at free surface. The adhesion strength was determined by the critical laser power that caused exfoliation of the bonding interface.

  16. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  17. Theoretical study of optical activity of 1:1 hydrogen bond complexes of water with S-warfarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadsetani, Mehrdad; Abdolmaleki, Ahmad; Zabardasti, Abedin

    2016-11-01

    The molecular interaction between S-warfarin (SW) and a single water molecule was investigated using the B3LYP method at 6-311 ++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra of the optimized complexes have been investigated for stabilization checking. Quantum theories of atoms in molecules, natural bond orbitals, molecular electrostatic potentials and energy decomposition analysis methods have been applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The intermolecular charge transfer in the most stable complex is in the opposite direction from those in the other complexes. The optical spectra and the hyperpolarizabilities of SW-water hydrogen bond complexes have been computed.

  18. Theoretical study of optical activity of 1:1 hydrogen bond complexes of water with S-warfarin.

    PubMed

    Dadsetani, Mehrdad; Abdolmaleki, Ahmad; Zabardasti, Abedin

    2016-11-01

    The molecular interaction between S-warfarin (SW) and a single water molecule was investigated using the B3LYP method at 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra of the optimized complexes have been investigated for stabilization checking. Quantum theories of atoms in molecules, natural bond orbitals, molecular electrostatic potentials and energy decomposition analysis methods have been applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The intermolecular charge transfer in the most stable complex is in the opposite direction from those in the other complexes. The optical spectra and the hyperpolarizabilities of SW-water hydrogen bond complexes have been computed. PMID:27294546

  19. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  20. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi; Moghaddam, Majid Erfani

    2009-12-11

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  1. Systems and methods for using a boehmite bond-coat with polyimide membranes for gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Polishchuk, Kimberly Ann

    2013-03-05

    The subject matter disclosed herein relates to gas separation membranes and, more specifically, to polyimide gas separation membranes. In an embodiment, a gas separation membrane includes a porous substrate, a substantially continuous polyimide membrane layer, and one or more layers of boehmite nanoparticles disposed between the porous substrate and the polyimide membrane layer to form a bond-coat layer. The bond-coat layer is configured to improve the adhesion of the polyimide membrane layer to the porous substrate, and the polyimide membrane layer has a thickness approximately 100 nm or less.

  2. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  3. The Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Methacryloxydodecyl Pyridinium Bromide and Non-methacryloxydodecyl Pyridinium Bromide Dentin Bonding Systems Using Two Different Techniques: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Prashanth; Nainan, Mohan Thomas; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Shivanna, Vasundhara; Ravi, Ramkrishna; Prashanth, B R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adhesive systems have enabled clinicians to preserve more tooth structure by changing cavity designs. However, because of the polymerization shrinkage adhesive systems are not capable of totally prohibiting the gap formation between the cavity and restorative material of composite resin leading to colonization of oral microorganisms from saliva. One possible solution for this serious problem is to use dental materials with antibacterial properties. So the development of such agents has initiated for successful restorations. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare the antibacterial activities of two dentin bonding systems: Clearfil protect bond (CPB) and prime & bond NT using agar well technique and tooth cavity model. Materials and Methods: CPB and prime and bond NT (PBNT) were evaluated in this study using agar well technique and tooth cavity model. In the agar well technique, the materials were filled in the wells of Muller-Hinton agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449M and the diameter of inhibition zones produced around the materials were measured after 24 h of incubation. For the tooth cavity model test, 3 cavities (of diameter - 1 mm and depth - 2 mm) were prepared in the flat occlusal dentin of human extracted molar. After sterilization, the teeth were left in the culture of broth of S. mutans at 37°C for 72 h for allowing bacteria to invade the cavity for 72 h. The dentin bonding systems were applied separately to each of the two infected cavities, and the third cavity was not applied and used as control. After sealing the occlusal surfaces, the teeth were kept in sterile physiological saline at 37°C for 72 h. The standardized amounts of dentin chips (120 + 5 mg) were obtained from the cavity walls, and the numbers of bacteria recovered were determined. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney’s U-tests. Results: The primer of CPB and PBNT produced similar inhibition

  4. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative arylalkylation of activated alkenes: dual C-H bond cleavage of an arene and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mu, Xin; Liu, Guosheng

    2011-12-23

    Not one but two: The title reaction proceeds through the dual C-H bond cleavage of both aniline and acetonitrile. The reaction affords a variety of cyano-bearing indolinones in excellent yield. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that this reaction involves a fast arylation of the olefin and a rate-determining C-H activation of the acetonitrile.

  5. Neutral redox-active hydrogen- and halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes for the electrochemical sensing of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-12-14

    The first examples of redox-active ferrocene-functionalised neutral [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via chloride anion templation. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that these [2]rotaxane host systems recognize chloride selectively over other halides and oxoanions in highly-competitive aqueous media. By replacing the hydrogen bonding prototriazole units of the rotaxane axle component with iodotriazole halogen bond-donor groups, the degree of chloride selectivity of the [2]rotaxanes is modulated. Electrochemical voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the rotaxanes can sense chloride via cathodic perturbations of the respective rotaxanes' ferrocene-ferrocenium redox-couple upon anion addition.

  6. Activation of electroplated-Cu surface via plasma pretreatment for low temperature Cu-Sn bonding in 3D interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junqiang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Ziyu; Wu, Zijian; Cai, Jian; Wang, Dejun

    2016-10-01

    The pretreatment with Ar mixed 5% H2 plasma was applied to improve surface properties of electroplated Cu for low temperature Cu-Sn bonding in 3D interconnection. Measurement results revealed that the Ar(5% H2) plasma effectively increased the surface activity by reducing oxygen content of the Cu surface. Lower surface roughness obtained by optimizing the pretreatment condition could help to suppress oxygen adsorption. Relationships between surface energy and surface oxygen content, surface oxygen content and surface roughness were also established. Evaluation of low temperature (200 °C) Cu-Sn bonding with optimal plasma pretreatment exhibited a defect-free interface and high shear strength.

  7. B-H, C-H, and B-C bond activation: the role of two adjacent agostic interactions.

    PubMed

    Cassen, Audrey; Gloaguen, Yann; Vendier, Laure; Duhayon, Carine; Poblador-Bahamonde, Amalia; Raynaud, Christophe; Clot, Eric; Alcaraz, Gilles; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane

    2014-07-14

    Tuning the nature of the linker in a L~BHR phosphinoborane compound led to the isolation of a ruthenium complex stabilized by two adjacent, δ-C-H and ε-B(sp2)-H, agostic interactions. Such a unique coordination mode stabilizes a 14-electron "RuH2P2" fragment through connected σ-bonds of different polarity, and affords selective B-H, C-H, and B-C bond activation as illustrated by reactivity studies with H2 and boranes. PMID:24990456

  8. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  9. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  10. Coordination and activation of Al-H and Ga-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Joseph A B; Riddlestone, Ian M; Turner, Joshua; Kaufman, Paul A; Tirfoin, Remi; Phillips, Nicholas; Aldridge, Simon

    2014-12-22

    The modes of interaction of donor-stabilized Group 13 hydrides (E=Al, Ga) were investigated towards 14- and 16-electron transition-metal fragments. More electron-rich N-heterocyclic carbene-stabilized alanes/gallanes of the type NHC⋅EH3 (E=Al or Ga) exclusively generate κ(2) complexes of the type [M(CO)4 (κ(2)-H3 E⋅NHC)] with [M(CO)4 (COD)] (M=Cr, Mo), including the first κ(2) σ-gallane complexes. β-Diketiminato ('nacnac')-stabilized systems, {HC(MeCNDipp)2 }EH2 , show more diverse reactivity towards Group 6 carbonyl reagents. For {HC(MeCNDipp)2 }AlH2, both κ(1) and κ(2) complexes were isolated, while [Cr(CO)4 (κ(2)-H2 Ga{(NDippCMe)2 CH})] is the only simple κ(2) adduct of the nacnac-stabilized gallane which can be trapped, albeit as a co-crystallite with the (dehydrogenated) gallylene system [Cr(CO)5 (Ga{(NDippCMe)2 CH})]. Reaction of [Co2 (CO)8] with {HC(MeCDippN)2 }AlH2 generates [(OC)3 Co(μ-H)2 Al{(NdippCme)2 CH}][Co(CO)4] (12), which while retaining direct AlH interactions, features a hitherto unprecedented degree of bond activation in a σ-alane complex. PMID:25358970

  11. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  12. Role of P225 and the C136-C201 disulfide bond in tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Vindigni, A.; Di Cera, E.

    1998-01-01

    The protease domain of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a key fibrinolytic enzyme, was expressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 1 mg per liter of media. The recombinant protein was titrated with the Erythrina caraffa trypsin inhibitor (ETI) and characterized in its interaction with plasminogen and the natural inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Analysis of the catalytic properties of tPA using a library of chromogenic substrates carrying substitutions at P1, P2, and P3 reveals a strong preference for Arg over Lys at P1, unmatched by other serine proteases like thrombin or trypsin. In contrast to these proteases and plasmin, tPA shows little or no preference for Pro over Gly at P2. A specific inhibition of tPA by Cu2+ was discovered. The divalent cation presumably binds to H188 near D189 in the primary specificity pocket and inhibits substrate binding in a competitive manner with a Kd = 19 microM. In an attempt to engineer Na+ binding and enhanced catalytic activity in tPA, P225 was replaced with Tyr, the residue present in Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases. The P225Y mutation did not result in cation binding, but caused a significant loss of specificity (up to 100-fold) toward chromogenic substrates and plasminogen and considerably reduced the inhibition by PAI-1 and ETI. Interestingly, the P225Y substitution enhanced the ability of Cu2+ to inhibit the enzyme. Elimination of the C136-C201 disulfide bond, that is absent in all Na+-dependent allosteric serine proteases, significantly enhanced the yield (5 mg per liter of media) of expression in E. coli, but caused no changes in the properties of the enzyme whether residue 225 was Pro or Tyr. These findings point out an unanticipated crucial role for residue 225 in controlling the catalytic activity of tPA, and suggest that engineering of a Na+-dependent allosteric enhancement of catalytic activity in this enzyme, must involve substantial changes in the region homologous to the Na

  13. C-H fluorination: U can fluorinate unactivated bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Constanze N.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    Introducing C-F bonds into organic molecules is a challenging task, particularly through C-H activation methods. Now, a uranium-based photocatalyst turns traditional selectivity rules on their heads and fluorinates unfunctionalized alkane Csp3-H bonds, even in the presence of C-H bonds that are typically more reactive.

  14. ALS (acidic lithium sulphate) decomposition method (part iv) Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen in heterocyclic ring compounds containing nitrogennitrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Yoshikuni, N

    1994-01-01

    Heterocyclic ring compounds containing nitrogennitrogen bonds such as 1H-1,2,4 triazole, 2,4,6 trimethylbenzenesulfonyltriazolide and pyridazine can be completely decomposed in the molten state with mixtures of various ratios of concentrated sulphuric acid and lithium sulphate (molten ALS) flux containing a catalyst such as silver sulphate. The quantitative recovery of nitrogen in the above three compounds with the molten ALS flux decomposition system can be obtained by the Kjeldahl method.

  15. Method of bonding metals with a radio-opaque adhesive/sealant for void detection and product made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermansen, Ralph D. (Inventor); Sutherland, Thomas H. (Inventor); Predmore, Roamer (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and structure for providing radio-opaque polymer compounds for use in metal bonding and sealing. A powder filler comprising a high atomic number metal or compound thereof is incorporated into a polymer compound to render it more radio-opaque than the surrounding metal structures. Voids or other discontinuities in the radio-opaque polymer compound can then be detected by x-ray inspection or other non-destructive radiographic procedure.

  16. Metal-organic cooperative catalysis in C-H and C-C bond activation and its concurrent recovery.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Jun; Park, Jung-Woo; Jun, Chul-Ho

    2008-02-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic activation (cleavage) system for C-H and C-C bonds is an important challenge in organic synthesis, because these bonds comprise a variety of organic molecules such as natural products, petroleum oils, and polymers on the earth. Among many elegant approaches utilizing transition metals to activate C-H and C-C bonds facilely, chelation-assisted protocols based on the coordinating ability of an organic moiety have attracted great attention, though they have often suffered from the need for an intact coordinating group in a substrate. In this Account, we describe our entire efforts to activate C-H or C-C bonds adjacent to carbonyl groups by employing a new concept of metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC), which enables the temporal installation of a 2-aminopyridyl group into common aldehydes or ketones in a catalytic way. Consequently, a series of new catalytic reactions such as alcohol hydroacylation, oxo-ester synthesis, C-C triple bond cleavage, hydrative dimerization of alkynes, and skeletal rearrangements of cyclic ketones was realized through MOCC. In particular, in the quest for an optimized MOCC system composed of a Wilkinson's catalyst (Ph 3P) 3RhCl and an organic catalyst (2-amino-3-picoline), surprising efficiency enhancements could be achieved when benzoic acid and aniline were introduced as promoters for the aldimine formation process. Furthermore, a notable accomplishment of C-C bond activation has been made using 2-amino-3-picoline as a temporary chelating auxiliary in the reactions of unstrained ketones with various terminal olefins and Wilkinson's catalyst. In the case of seven-membered cyclic ketones, an interesting ring contraction to five- or six-membered ones takes place through skeletal rearrangements initiated by the C-C bond activation of MOCC. On the other hand, the fundamental advances of these catalytic systems into recyclable processes could be achieved by immobilizing both metal and organic

  17. Bond Activation by Metal-Carbene Complexes in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-03-15

    "Bare" metal-carbene complexes, when generated in the gas phase and exposed to thermal reactions under (near) single-collision conditions, exhibit rather unique reactivities in addition to the well-known metathesis and cyclopropanation processes. For example, at room temperature the unligated [AuCH2](+) complex brings about efficient C-C coupling with methane to produce C2Hx (x = 4, 6), and the couple [TaCH2](+)/CO2 gives rise to the generation of the acetic acid equivalent CH2═C═O. Entirely unprecedented is the thermal extrusion of a carbon atom from halobenzenes (X = F, Cl, Br, I) by [MCH2](+) (M = La, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and its coupling with the methylene ligand to deliver C2H2 and [M(X)(C5H5)](+). Among the many noteworthy C-N bond-forming processes, the formation of CH3NH2 from [RhCH2](+)/NH3, the generation of CH2═NH2(+) from [MCH2](+)/NH3 (M = Pt, Au), and the production of [PtCH═NH2](+) from [PtCH2](+)/NH3 are of particular interest. The latter species are likely to be involved as intermediates in the platinum-mediated large-scale production of HCN from CH4/NH3 (the DEGUSSA process). In this context, a few examples are presented that point to the operation of co-operative effects even at a molecular level. For instance, in the coupling of CH4 with NH3 by the heteronuclear clusters [MPt](+) (M = coinage metal), platinum is crucial for the activation of methane, while the coinage metal M controls the branching ratio between the C-N bond-forming step and unwanted soot formation. For most of the gas-phase reactions described in this Account, detailed mechanistic insight has been derived from extensive computational work in conjunction with time-honored labeling and advanced mass-spectrometry-based experiments, and often a coherent description of the experimental findings has been achieved. As for some transition metals, in particular those from the third row, the metal-carbene complexes can be formed directly from methane, coupling of the so

  18. Methandiide as a non-innocent ligand in carbene complexes: from the electronic structure to bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julia; Modl, Tanja; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of a ruthenium carbene complex based on a sulfonyl-substituted methandiide and its application in bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis is reported. In the complex, the metal-carbon interaction can be tuned between a Ru-C single bond with additional electrostatic interactions and a Ru=C double bond, thus allowing the control of the stability and reactivity of the complex. Hence, activation of polar and non-polar bonds (O-H, H-H) as well as dehydrogenation reactions become possible. In these reactions the carbene acts as a non-innocent ligand supporting the bond activation as nucleophilic center in the 1,2-addition across the metal-carbon double bond. This metal-ligand cooperativity can be applied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation for the reduction of ketones. This concept opens new ways for the application of carbene complexes in catalysis. PMID:25047390

  19. Methandiide as a non-innocent ligand in carbene complexes: from the electronic structure to bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julia; Modl, Tanja; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of a ruthenium carbene complex based on a sulfonyl-substituted methandiide and its application in bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis is reported. In the complex, the metal-carbon interaction can be tuned between a Ru-C single bond with additional electrostatic interactions and a Ru=C double bond, thus allowing the control of the stability and reactivity of the complex. Hence, activation of polar and non-polar bonds (O-H, H-H) as well as dehydrogenation reactions become possible. In these reactions the carbene acts as a non-innocent ligand supporting the bond activation as nucleophilic center in the 1,2-addition across the metal-carbon double bond. This metal-ligand cooperativity can be applied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation for the reduction of ketones. This concept opens new ways for the application of carbene complexes in catalysis.

  20. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  1. Apparatus and method for explosive bonding to edge of flyer plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Kushnick, Anne C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and a process for the explosive joining of a flyer plate and a base plate. The apparatus consists of a flyer plate positioned over a base plate. The flyer plate has a notch containing a filler material in intimate contact with the flyer plate. An adhesive means holds a ribbon explosive partially overlapping the notch in the flyer plate. A detonating means initiates the ribbon explosive that drives the flyer plate to accomplish a high velocity, angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and effacing bonding, resulting in electron sharing linkups between the plates. An unbonded tab fractures at a base of the notch leaving a bond to an edge of the attached flyer plate.

  2. An admittance function of active piezoelectric elements bonded on a cracked beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, You-Di; Li, Guo-Qing; Chen, Chuan-Yao

    2006-11-01

    The electric admittance function of the piezoelectric patches bonded on a beam with an open crack is presented, for the purpose of theoretically evaluating the health conditions of the cracked beam. At first, a sandwich beam with two layers of piezoelectric actuators is regarded as a piezoelectric bimorph, and the dynamics of the bimorph is represented by a 5×5 piezoelectric impedance matrix. Secondly, the dynamics of the elastic beam is also represented by a 4×4 impedance matrix, which is a degenerative form of piezoelectric impedance. Thirdly, the open crack is modeled as rotational massless spring and an expression of the equivalent stiffness is adopted, then the spring is used to connect the adjacent elastic beam segments. Furthermore, the cracked beam is represented by three elastic beam segments and one piezoelectric bimorph segment together with one spring. The admittance function of the piezoelectric elements is obtained by solving the linear impedance equations considering the mechanical-electric boundary conditions and the continuum conditions between the beam segments and the spring. Lastly, the effects of the crack depth and location on the admittance are examined in two numeric examples. It is found that the frequency changes and the admittance amplitude changes of the beam due to the crack can be predicted by the piezoelectric admittance function, and the modal frequencies calculated by the proposed method are accord with the results obtained by experiments and other methods. The possible application of the admittance function to detect the crack on the beam is discussed at the end of the paper as well.

  3. Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation in Hydridotris(pyrazolyl)borate Platinum(IV) Complexes:  Comparison of Density Functionals, Basis Sets, and Bonding Patterns.

    PubMed

    Vastine, Benjamin Alan; Webster, Charles Edwin; Hall, Michael B

    2007-11-01

    The reaction mechanism for the cycle beginning with the reductive elimination (RE) of methane from κ(3)-TpPt(IV)(CH3)2H (1) (Tp = hydridotris(pyrazolyl)borate) and subsequent oxidative addition (OA) of benzene to form finally κ(3)-TpPt(IV)(Ph)2H (19) was investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Two mechanistic steps are of particular interest, namely the barrier to C-H coupling (barrier 1 - Ba1) and the barrier to methane release (barrier 2 - Ba2). For 31 density functionals, the calculated values for Ba1 and Ba2 were benchmarked against the experimentally reported values of 26 (Ba1) and 35 (Ba2) kcal·mol(-1), respectively. Specifically, the values for Ba1 and Ba2, calculated at the B3LYP/double-ζ plus polarization level of theory, are 24.6 and 34.3 kcal·mol(-1), respectively. Overall, the best performing functional was BPW91 where the mae associated with the calculated values of the two barriers is 0.68 kcal·mol(-1). The calculated B3LYP values of Ba1 ranged between 20 and 26 kcal·mol(-1) for 12 effective core potential basis sets for platinum and 29 all-electron basis sets for the first row elements. Polarization functions for the first row elements were important for accurate values, but the addition of diffuse functions to non-hydrogen (+) and hydrogen atoms (++) had little effect on the calculated values. Basis set saturation was achieved with APNO basis sets utilized for first-row atoms. Bader's "Atoms in Molecules" was used to analyze the electron density of several complexes, and the electron density at the Pt-Nax bond critical point (trans to the active site for C-H coupling) varied over a wider range than any of the other Pt-N bonds.

  4. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  5. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}X)Rh(CO){sub 2} complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C{sub 60} molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C{sub 60} reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs.

  6. Exploration of earth-abundant transition metals (Fe, Co, and Ni) as catalysts in unreactive chemical bond activations.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo; Cao, Zhi-Chao; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2015-03-17

    Activation of inert chemical bonds, such as C-H, C-O, C-C, and so on, is a very important area, to which has been drawn much attention by chemists for a long time and which is viewed as one of the most ideal ways to produce valuable chemicals. Under modern chemical bond activation logic, many conventionally viewed "inert" chemical bonds that were intact under traditional conditions can be reconsidered as novel functionalities, which not only avoids the tedious synthetic procedures for prefunctionalizations and the emission of undesirable wastes but also inspires chemists to create novel synthetic strategies in completely different manners. Although activation of "inert" chemical bonds using stoichiometric amounts of transition metals has been reported in the past, much more attractive and challenging catalytic transformations began to blossom decades ago. Compared with the broad application of late and noble transition metals in this field, the earth-abundant first-row transition-metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni, have become much more attractive, due to their obvious advantages, including high abundance on earth, low price, low or no toxicity, and unique catalytic characteristics. In this Account, we summarize our recent efforts toward Fe, Co, and Ni catalyzed "inert" chemical bond activation. Our research first unveiled the unique catalytic ability of iron catalysts in C-O bond activation of both carboxylates and benzyl alcohols in the presence of Grignard reagents. The benzylic C-H functionalization was also developed via Fe catalysis with different nucleophiles, including both electron-rich arenes and 1-aryl-vinyl acetates. Cobalt catalysts also showed their uniqueness in both aromatic C-H activation and C-O activation in the presence of Grignard reagents. We reported the first cobalt-catalyzed sp(2) C-H activation/arylation and alkylation of benzo[h]quinoline and phenylpyridine, in which a new catalytic pathway via an oxidative addition process was demonstrated

  7. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets photo-activated with light-emitting diode (LED) at different exposure times.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, Emanuel Braga; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE) and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek). Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek) was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek) were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15). In Group I (Control), halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa) were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05). Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets. PMID:19089170

  8. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF METALLIC BRACKETS PHOTO-ACTIVATED WITH LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE (LED) AT DIFFERENT EXPOSURE TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Emanuel Braga; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE) and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek). Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek) was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek) were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15). In Group I (Control), halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa) were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05). Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets. PMID:19089170

  9. C-O and O-H Bond Activation of Methanole by Lanthanum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ruchira; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between methanol (CH_3OH) molecules and laser-vaporized La atoms resulted in the cleavage of C-O and O-H bonds and the formation of three major products, LaH_2O_2, LaCH_4O_2 and LaC_2H_6O_2, in a supersonic molecular beam. These products were identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and their electronic spectra were obtained using mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. From the MATI spectra, adiabatic ionization energies of the three complexes were measured to be 40136 (5), 39366 (5) and 38685 (5) cm-1 for LaH_2O_2, LaCH_4O_2 and LaC_2H_6O_2, respectively. The ionization energies of these complexes decrease as the size of the coordinated organic fragments increases. The most active vibrational transitions of all three complexes were observed to be the M-O stretches in the ionic state. A metal-ligand bending mode with a frequency of 127 cm-1 was also observed for [LaH_2O_2]^+. However, the spectra of the other two complexes were less resolved, due to the existence of a large number of low frequency modes, which could be thermally excited even in the supersonic molecular beams, and of multiple rotational isomers formed by the free rotation of the methyl group in these systems. The electronic transitions responsible for the observed spectra were identified as ^1A_1 (C2v) ← ^2A_1 (C2v) for LaH_2O_2 and ^1A (C_1) ← ^2A (C_1) for LaCH_4O_2 and LaC_2H_6O_2.

  10. Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation. Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-10-29

    The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal-ligand-mediated alkane C-H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7-9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d8, d6, d4, and d0), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal-ligand fragment and the coordinated C-H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C-H bond allows classification of C-H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, σ-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C-H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C-H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d6 Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe3)Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C-H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in

  11. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  12. Quantitative evaluation on activated property-tunable bulk liquid water with reduced hydrogen bonds using deconvoluted Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Yang, Kuang-Hsuan; Chen, Liang-Yih; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Interesting properties of water with distinguishable hydrogen-bonding structure on interfacial phase or in confined environment have drawn wide attentions. However, these unique properties of water are only found within the interfacial phase and confined environment, thus, their applications are limited. In addition, quantitative evaluation on these unique properties associating with the enhancement of water's physical and chemical activities represents a notable challenge. Here we report a practicable production of free-standing liquid water at room temperature with weak hydrogen-bonded structure naming Au nanoparticles (NPs)-treated (AuNT) water via treating by plasmon-induced hot electron transfer occurred on resonantly illuminated gold NPs (AuNPs). Compared to well-known untreated bulk water (deionized water), the prepared AuNT water exhibits many distinct activities in generally physical and chemical reactions, such as high solubilities to NaCl and O2. Also, reducing interaction energy within water molecules provides lower overpotential and higher efficiency in electrolytic hydrogen production. In addition, these enhanced catalytic activities of AuNT water are tunable by mixing with deionized water. Also, most of these tunable activities are linearly proportional to its degree of nonhydrogen-bonded structure (DNHBS), which is derived from the O-H stretching in deconvoluted Raman spectrum. PMID:25471522

  13. Quantitative evaluation on activated property-tunable bulk liquid water with reduced hydrogen bonds using deconvoluted Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Yang, Kuang-Hsuan; Chen, Liang-Yih; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Interesting properties of water with distinguishable hydrogen-bonding structure on interfacial phase or in confined environment have drawn wide attentions. However, these unique properties of water are only found within the interfacial phase and confined environment, thus, their applications are limited. In addition, quantitative evaluation on these unique properties associating with the enhancement of water's physical and chemical activities represents a notable challenge. Here we report a practicable production of free-standing liquid water at room temperature with weak hydrogen-bonded structure naming Au nanoparticles (NPs)-treated (AuNT) water via treating by plasmon-induced hot electron transfer occurred on resonantly illuminated gold NPs (AuNPs). Compared to well-known untreated bulk water (deionized water), the prepared AuNT water exhibits many distinct activities in generally physical and chemical reactions, such as high solubilities to NaCl and O2. Also, reducing interaction energy within water molecules provides lower overpotential and higher efficiency in electrolytic hydrogen production. In addition, these enhanced catalytic activities of AuNT water are tunable by mixing with deionized water. Also, most of these tunable activities are linearly proportional to its degree of nonhydrogen-bonded structure (DNHBS), which is derived from the O-H stretching in deconvoluted Raman spectrum.

  14. Tautomerization lowers the activation barriers for N-glycosidic bond cleavage of protonated uridine and 2'-deoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2016-09-21

    The gas-phase conformations of protonated uridine, [Urd+H](+), and its 2'-deoxy form, protonated 2'-deoxyuridine, [dUrd+H](+), have been examined in detail previously by infrared multiple photon dissociation action spectroscopy techniques. Both 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers and O4 protonated conformers of [Urd+H](+) and [dUrd+H](+) were found to coexist in the experiments with the 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers dominating the population. In the present study, the kinetic energy dependence of the collision-induced dissociation behavior of [Urd+H](+) and [dUrd+H](+) are examined using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer to probe the mechanisms and energetics for activated dissociation of these protonated nucleosides. The primary dissociation pathways observed involve N-glycosidic bond cleavage leading to competitive elimination of protonated or neutral uracil. The potential energy surfaces (PESs) for these N-glycosidic bond cleavage pathways are mapped out via electronic structure calculations for the mixture of 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers and O4 protonated conformers of [Urd+H](+) and [dUrd+H](+) populated in the experiments. The calculated activation energies (AEs) and heats of reaction (ΔHrxns) for N-glycosidic bond cleavage at both the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory are compared to the measured values. The agreement between experiment and theory indicates that B3LYP provides better estimates of the energetics of the species along the PESs for N-glycosidic bond cleavage than MP2, and that the 2,4-dihydroxy tautomers, which are stabilized by strong hydrogen-bonding interactions, predominantly influence the observed threshold dissociation behavior of [Urd+H](+) and [dUrd+H](+). PMID:27536972

  15. Study of comparative transmission capacity of C-N bond by /sup 19/F NMR method

    SciTech Connect

    Pombrik, S.I.; Polunkin, E.V.; Peregudov, A.S.; Kravtsov, D.N.; Fedin, E.I.

    1982-04-20

    A study was made of the /sup 19/F NMR spectra of a number of free and N-substituted benzylanilines ArCH/sub 2/NHC/sub 6/H/sub 4/F-4 and ArCH/sub 2/N(SO/sub 2/Ph)C/sub 6/H/sub 4/F, respectively. Results indicated that the binuclear bridge grouping CH/sub 2/-N has a high transmission capacity (TC). The addition of an acidic grouping the nitrogen atom has no effect on the TC of the C-N bond.

  16. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS. PMID:22616925

  17. The effect of prophylaxis method on microtensile bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin.

    PubMed

    Soares, C J; Pereira, J C; Souza, S J B; Menezes, M S; Armstrong, S R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different materials used for dentin prophylaxis on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of adhesively cemented indirect composite restorations. Sixty bovine incisors had the buccal surface ground with wet #600-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper to obtain a flat exposed superficial dentin and were submitted to different prophylaxis protocols, as follows: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HydP); 0.12% chlorhexidine (Chlo); sodium bicarbonate jet (SodB); 50-μm aluminum oxide air abrasion (AirA); pumice paste (PumP), and control group-water spray (Cont). After prophylaxis protocols a resin composite block (3.0 mm × 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm) was adhesively cemented using dual resin cement (Rely X ARC). After 24 hours of water storage, specimens were serially sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 1-mm-thick slices. Each specimen was trimmed with a diamond bur to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1.0 mm(2) at the bonded area. Specimens were tested (μTBS) at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the effects of prophylaxis techniques on dentin. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and failure mode by Fisher test (α=0.05). μTBS data, means (SD), were (different superscripted letters indicate statistically significant differences): AirA, 25.2 (7.2)(a); PumP, 24.1 (7.8)(a); Chlo, 21.5 (5.6)(a); Cont, 20.6 (8.1)(a); HydP(,) 15.5 (7.6)(b); and SodB(,) 11.5 (4.4)(c). The use of aluminum oxide air abrasion, pumice paste, and chlorhexidine before acid etching did not significantly affect μTBS to dentin; however, the use of hydrogen peroxide and sodium bicarbonate jet significantly reduced μTBS.

  18. Chemically Non-Innocent Cyclic (Alkyl)(Amino)Carbenes: Ligand Rearrangement, C-H and C-F Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Zoë R

    2016-08-01

    A cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC) was found to undergo unprecedented rearrangements and transformations of its core structure in the presence of Group 1 and 2 metals. Although the carbene was also found to be prone to intramolecular C-H activation, it was competent for intermolecular activation of a variety of sp-, sp(2) -, and sp(3) -hybridized C-H bonds. Double C-F activation of hexafluorobenzene was also observed in this work. These processes all hold relevance to the role of these carbenes in catalysis, as well as to their use in the synthesis of new and unusual main group or transition metal complexes. PMID:27363588

  19. Conversion of Amides to Esters by the Nickel-Catalyzed Activation of Amide C–N Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been well studied for more than a century.1 They serve as the key building blocks of proteins and are present in an broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to resonance stability of the amide bond.1,2 Whereas Nature can easily cleave amides through the action of enzymes, such as proteases,3 the ability to selectively break the C–N bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry is quite difficult. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that amide C–N bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We have used this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of this unusual transformation. Our results provide a new strategy to harness amide functional groups as synthons and are expected fuel the further use of amides for the construction of carbon–heteroatom or carbon–carbon bonds using non-precious metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  20. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds.

    PubMed

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F; Shah, Tejas K; Baker, Emma L; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Garg, Neil K

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis. PMID:26200342

  1. Conversion of amides to esters by the nickel-catalysed activation of amide C-N bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hie, Liana; Fine Nathel, Noah F.; Shah, Tejas K.; Baker, Emma L.; Hong, Xin; Yang, Yun-Fang; Liu, Peng; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-08-01

    Amides are common functional groups that have been studied for more than a century. They are the key building blocks of proteins and are present in a broad range of other natural and synthetic compounds. Amides are known to be poor electrophiles, which is typically attributed to the resonance stability of the amide bond. Although amides can readily be cleaved by enzymes such as proteases, it is difficult to selectively break the carbon-nitrogen bond of an amide using synthetic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that amide carbon-nitrogen bonds can be activated and cleaved using nickel catalysts. We use this methodology to convert amides to esters, which is a challenging and underdeveloped transformation. The reaction methodology proceeds under exceptionally mild reaction conditions, and avoids the use of a large excess of an alcohol nucleophile. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the thermodynamics and catalytic cycle of the amide-to-ester transformation. Our results provide a way to harness amide functional groups as synthetic building blocks and are expected to lead to the further use of amides in the construction of carbon-heteroatom or carbon-carbon bonds using non-precious-metal catalysis.

  2. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  3. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the NH2-terminus of the extracellular domain of the sperm receptor is rich in cysteine residues. Studies with cross-linking agents of various length and hydrophobicity suggest that no other major protein is tightly associated with the receptor. Given the multimeric structure of the receptor, we investigated the effect of disulfide bond reduction on its biological activity. Because in quantitative bioassays fertilization was found to be inhibited by treatment of eggs with 5 mM dithiothreitol, we undertook more direct studies of the effect of reduction on properties of the receptor. First, we studied the effect of addition of isolated, pure receptor on fertilization. Whereas the non-reduced, native receptor complex inhibited fertilization in a dose- dependent manner, the reduced and alkylated receptor was inactive. Second, we tested the ability of the isolated receptor to mediate binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to polystyrene beads. Whereas beads coated with native receptor bound sperm, those containing reduced and alkylated receptor did not. Thus, these results demonstrate that the biologically active form of the sea urchin sperm receptor consists only of 350 kD subunits and that these must be linked as a multimer via disulfide bonds to produce a complex that is functional in sperm recognition and binding. PMID:8188748

  4. Method of bonding a conductive layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, J.C.; Singh, P.

    1989-08-29

    A dense, electronically conductive interconnection layer is bonded onto a porous, tubular, electronically conductive air electrode structure, optionally supported by a ceramic support, by (A) providing an air electrode surface, (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, without the use of pressure, particles of LaCrO[sub 3] doped with an element selected from the group consisting of Sr, Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, and mixtures thereof, where the particles have a deposit on their surface comprising calcium oxide and chromium oxide; (C) heating the particles with the oxide surface deposit in an oxidizing atmosphere at from 1,300 C to 1,550 C, without the application of pressure, to provide a dense, sintered, interconnection material bonded to the air electrode, where calcium and chromium from the surface deposit are incorporated into the structure of the LaCrO[sub 3]. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the uncovered portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell. 4 figs.

  5. Method of bonding a conductive layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    1989-01-01

    A dense, electronically conductive interconnection layer 26 is bonded onto a porous, tubular, electronically conductive air electrode structure 16, optionally supported by a ceramic support 22, by (A) providing an air electrode surface, (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface 24, without the use of pressure, particles of LaCrO.sub.3 doped with an element selected from the group consisting of Sr, Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, and mixtures thereof, where the particles have a deposit on their surface comprising calcium oxide and chromium oxide; (C) heating the particles with the oxide surface deposit in an oxidizing atmosphere at from 1,300.degree. C. to 1,550.degree. C., without the application of pressure, to provide a dense, sintered, interconnection material 26 bonded to the air electrode 16, where calcium and chromium from the surface deposit are incorporated into the structure of the LaCrO.sub.3. A solid electrolyte layer 18 can be applied to the uncovered portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode 20 can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell 10.

  6. [The influence of the difference of caries detective methods on the bond strength for caries affected root canal dentin].

    PubMed

    Otake, Shiho

    2010-03-01

    Firm adhesion of composite resin and dentin is the basic premise for building up resin composite cores successfully. To assess the efficacy of several caries detective methods (stained with Caries Detector and probing with sharp probe) for caries affected root canal dentin, microtensile bond strengths of resin composite to caries-affected root canal dentin and failure mode distribution were analyzed in this study. Color and hardness were used for assessment of root caries as follows: Dye stain group (pale pink stained with Caries Detector), Probing group (probing with sharp probe) and Sound dentin group (Control). The bond strengths (mean +/- standard deviation) of the Probing group (64.6 +/- 11.9 MPa) and the Sound dentin group (68.7 +/- 11.1 MPa) were significantly higher than those of the Dye stain group (46.9 +/- 7.9 MPa, p<0.05). However, there is no significant difference in fracture mode between the Dye stain group and the Probing group (p<0.05). This could be attributed to that the thick smear layer caused a loss of hybrid layer strength. In conclusion, the caries removal technique of the root canal dentin affected the bond strength of the resin composite.

  7. 77 FR 15378 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Withdrawal of Bonded Stores for Fishing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 1497) on January 10, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment... permission of the CBP port director for the withdrawal and lading of bonded merchandise (especially alcoholic beverages) for use on board fishing vessels involved in international trade. The applicant must certify...

  8. Bond strength of Epiphany™ Sealer combined with different adhesive systems photo-activated with LED and QTH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, A. M. P.; Bandéca, M. C.; Borges, A. H.; Nadalin, M. R.; Thomé, L. H. C.

    2009-08-01

    The Epiphany™ Sealer is a new dual-curing resin-based sealer and has been introduced as an alternative to gutta-percha and traditional root canal sealers. The canal filling is claimed to create a seal with the dentinal tubules within the root canal system producing a ‘monoblock’ effect between the sealer and dentinal tubules. Therefore, considering the possibility to incorporate the others adhesive systems, it is important to study the bond strength of the resulting cement. Forty-eight root mandibular canines were sectioned 8-mm below CEJ. The dentine discs were prepared using a tapered diamond bur and irrigated with 1% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Previous the application Epiphany™ Sealer, the Epiphany™ Primer, AdheSE, and One Up Bond F were applied to the root canal walls. The LED and QTH (Quartz Tungsten Halogen) were used to photo-activation during 45 s with power density of 400 and 720 mW/cm2, respectively. The specimens were performed on a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until bond failure occurred. The force was recorded and the debonding values were used to calculate Push-out bond strength. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences ( P < 0.05) to Epiphany™ Sealer/Epiphany™ Primer/QTH and EpiphanyTM Sealer/AdheSE/QTH, which had the highest mean values of bond strength. The efficiency of resin-based filling materials are dependent the type of light curing unit used including the power density, the polymerization characteristics of these resin-based filling materials, depending on the primer/adhesive used.

  9. Estimation of avidin activity by two methods.

    PubMed

    Borza, B; Marcheş, F; Repanovici, R; Burducea, O; Popa, L M

    1991-01-01

    The biological activity of avidin was estimated by two different methods. The spectrophotometric method used the avidin titration with biotin in the presence of 4 hydroxiazobenzen-2'carboxilic acid as indicator. In the radioisotopic determination the titration with tritiated biotin was accomplished. Both methods led to the same results, but the spectrophotometric one is less avidin expensive and more rapid, being more convenient.

  10. Review of the Subliminal Psychodynamic Activation Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Janice Sue

    The subliminal psychodynamic activation method (SPA), used in testing psychoanalytic propositions, has been subject to recent criticisms regarding methodological weaknesses. A review of the literature relating to this method can be helpful in determining the validity of these criticisms and the potential usefulness of the SPA method in testing…

  11. Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Lewis, Jr., John

    1989-01-01

    Ultralight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0.04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0.03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

  12. Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Abbatiello, L.A.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1987-06-17

    The invention is directed to the fabrication of ultralight carbon- bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0. 04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter. The composites are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0. 03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of a mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

  13. Substituted naphthalenes: Stability, conformational flexibility and description of bonding based on ETS-NOCV method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanković, B.; Ostojić, B. D.; Gruden, M.; Popović, A.; Đorđević, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    For all dimethylnaphthalenes (DMNs) the transition from a planar ring conformation to a nonplanar one results in energy increase in the range 1.7-2.4 kcal/mol. There is a linear relationship between averaged rigidity constant and relative energy of DMNs. The relative stability of DMNs does not follow the aromatic stabilization based on NICS values. The ETS-NOCV analysis shows that more efficient bonding in the π-electron system is the origin of enhanced stability in laterally substituted (CH3, Cl and NO2) naphthalenes. The results for Caryl-CH3 system indicate more steric repulsion in going from 2,7-DMN to 1,8-DMN following the increase of relative energies.

  14. Method for producing chemically bonded phosphate ceramics and for stabilizing contaminants encapsulated therein utilizing reducing agents

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2000-01-01

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions are stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  15. Method for Producing Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics and for Stabilizing Contaminants Encapsulated therein Utilizing Reducing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    1999-05-05

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions is stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  16. A germanium isocyanide complex featuring (n → π*) back-bonding and its conversion to a hydride/cyanide product via C-H bond activation under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Zachary D; Vasko, Petra; Fettinger, James C; Tuononen, Heikki M; Power, Philip P

    2012-03-01

    Reaction of the diarylgermylene Ge(Ar(Me(6)))(2) [Ar(Me(6)) = C(6)H(3)-2,6-(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-(CH(3))(3))(2)] with tert-butyl isocyanide gave the Lewis adduct species (Ar(Me(6)))(2)GeCNBu(t), in which the isocyanide ligand displays a decreased C-N stretching frequency consistent with an n → π* back-bonding interaction. Density functional theory confirmed that the HOMO is a Ge-C bonding combination between the lone pair of electrons on the germanium atom and the C-N π* orbital of the isocyanide ligand. The complex undergoes facile C-H bond activation to produce a new diarylgermanium hydride/cyanide species and isobutene via heterolytic cleavage of the N-Bu(t) bond.

  17. Low-valent niobium-mediated double activation of C-F/C-H bonds: fluorene synthesis from o-arylated alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluorotoluene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fuchibe, Kohei; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2006-02-01

    By the treatment of 0.3 molar amount of NbCl5 and LiAlH4, o-arylated alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluorotoluenes afforded fluorene derivatives in good yields. C-F bonds of the CF3 group and the neighboring ortho C-H bond were doubly activated to give the coupling products. PMID:16448098

  18. Exploring the Nature of the H[subscript 2] Bond. 1. Using Spreadsheet Calculations to Examine the Valence Bond and Molecular Orbital Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Glendening, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    A three-part project for students in physical chemistry, computational chemistry, or independent study is described in which they explore applications of valence bond (VB) and molecular orbital-configuration interaction (MO-CI) treatments of H[subscript 2]. Using a scientific spreadsheet, students construct potential-energy (PE) curves for several…

  19. Interfacial chemical bonding effect on the photocatalytic activity of TiO2-SiO2 nanocoupling systems.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Musashi; Takatori, Hiroaki; Tada, Hiroaki

    2011-09-15

    TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on the surfaces of SiO(2) microspheres with a mesoporous structure prepared by a hydrolysis-controlled sol-gel technique. The TiO(2) NPs were firmly combined on the surfaces of SiO(2) microspheres through the interfacial Si-O-Ti bonds. The coupling causes the bandgap widening up to 3.37 eV, enhancing the photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of acetaldehyde under illumination of UV-light (330 < λ < 400 nm). Density functional theory calculations for model clusters suggested that the observed results are derived from the lowering in the valence band edge energy with the interfacial bond formation.

  20. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method: PM6-D3H+.

    PubMed

    Kromann, Jimmy C; Christensen, Anders S; Steinmann, Casper; Korth, Martin; Jensen, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction energy of PM6-D3H+ is very similar to PM6-DH2 and PM6-DH+, with RMSD and MAD values within 0.02 kcal/mol of one another. The main difference is that the geometry optimizations of 88 complexes result in 82, 6, 0, and 0 geometries with 0, 1, 2, and 3 or more imaginary frequencies using PM6-D3H+ implemented in GAMESS, while the corresponding numbers for PM6-DH+ implemented in MOPAC are 54, 17, 15, and 2. The PM6-D3H+ method as implemented in GAMESS offers an attractive alternative to PM6-DH+ in MOPAC in cases where the LBFGS optimizer must be used and a vibrational analysis is needed, e.g., when computing vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible. PMID:25024918

  1. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  2. Comparative evaluation of effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber post and composite core

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei Yazdi, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Debonding of a composite resin core of the fiber post often occurs at the interface between these two materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different surface treatment methods on bond strength between fiber posts and composite core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-four fiber posts were picked in two groups (Hetco and Exacto). Each group was further divided into four subgroups using different surface treatments: 1) silanization; 2) sandblasting; 3) Treatment with 24% H2O2, and 4) no treatment (control group). A cylindrical plexiglass matrix was placed around the post and filled with the core resin composite. Specimens were stored in 5000 thermal cycles between 5℃ and 55℃. Tensile bond strength (TBS) test and evaluation using stereomicroscope were performed on the specimen and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, Post Hoc Scheffe tests and Fisher's Exact Test (α=.05). RESULTS There was a significant difference between the effect of different surface treatments on TBS (P<.001) but different brands of post (P=.743) and interaction between the brand of post and surface treatment (P=.922) had no significant effect on TBS. Both silanization and sandblasting improved the bonding strength of fiber posts to composite resin core, but there were not any significant differences between these groups and control group. CONCLUSION There was not any significant difference between two brands of fiber posts that had been used in this study. Although silanization and sandblasting can improve the TBS, there was not any significant differences between surface treatments used. PMID:22737316

  3. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  4. [Methods for determination of cholinesterase activity].

    PubMed

    Dingová, D; Hrabovská, A

    2015-01-01

    Cholinesterases hydrolyze acetylcholine and thus they play a key role in a process of cholinergic neurotransmission. Changes in their activities are linked to many diseases (e.g Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, lipid disorders). Thus, it is important to determine their activity in a fast, simply and precise way. In this review, different approaches of studying cholinesterase activities (e.g pH-dependent, spectrophotometric, radiometric, histochemical methods or biosensors) are discussed. Comparisons, advantages or disadvantages of selected methods (e.g most widely used Ellman's assay, extremely sensitive Johnson Russell method or modern technique with golden nanoparticles) are presented. This review enables one to choose a suitable method for determination of cholinesterase activities with respect to laboratory equipment, type of analysis, pH, temperature scale or special conditions. PMID:26852525

  5. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  6. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  7. Measurement of adhesion strength of solid-state diffusion bonding between nickel and copper by means of laser shock spallation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Manabu; Akamatsu, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Coating and bonding techniques between different materials are essential to the field of technology. Bonding mechanism is of interest from scientific points of view. Several works concerning to the strength such bonding have been revealed that the strength depended on crystallographic orientations, differences of thermal expansion and chemical affinity and so on. The methods adopted for those measurements had uncertainties due to plastic deformation near the interface. A laser shock spallation method was utilized to measure adhesion strength of the bonding in this paper to minimize the deformation outside of the interface. A well-established method to make bonding between unalloyed nickel and copper was utilized, that was solid-state diffusion bonding at elevated temperatures. Irradiation by Nd:YAG laser with 7ns-pulse width created shock wave that caused tensile stress after reflection at free surface. The stress depended on laser power and was estimated by surface velocity profile measured by a laser interferometer. The adhesion strength was determined by the critical laser power that caused exfoliation of the bonding interface.

  8. New Insights into Mechanism of Molybdenum(VI)-Dioxo Complex Catalyzed Hydrosilylation of Carbonyls: An Alternative Model for Activating Si-H Bond.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Jiandi; Wei, Haiyan

    2016-06-23

    Recently, a series of oxo/nitrido-Re(V)/Mo(VI)/Ru(VI)/Mn(V) complexes were demonstrated to be efficient catalysts in activating silanes and catalyzing hydrosilylations of unsaturated organic substrates. In the present study, the high-valent molybdenum(VI)-dioxo complex MoO2Cl2 catalyzed hydrosilylations of carbonyls was reinvestigated using density functional theory method. Previous experimental and theoretical investigations suggested a [2 + 2] addition pathway for MoO2Cl2 catalyzed hydrosilylations of ketones. In the present study, we propose an ionic outer-sphere mechanistic pathway to be the most favorable pathway. The key step in the ionic outer-sphere pathway is oxygen atom of C═O bonds nucleophilically attacking the silicon atom in an η(1)-silane molybdenum adduct. The Si-H bond is then cleaved heterolytically. This process features a novel SN2@Si transition state, which then generates a loosely bound ion pair: anionic molybdenum hydride paired with silylcarbenium ion ([MoO2Cl2H](-) [SiR3(OCR'R″)](+)) in solvent. The last step is silylcarbenium ion abstracting the hydride on molybdenum hydride to yield silyl ether. The calculated activation free energy barrier of the rate-determing step was 24.1 kcal/mol for diphenylketone (PhC═OPh) and silane of PhMe2SiH. Furthermore, the ionic outer-sphere pathway is calculated to be ∼10.0 kcal/mol lower than the previously proposed [2 + 2] addition pathway for a variety of silanes and aldehyde/ketone substrates. This preference arises from stronger electrophilicity of the high-valent molybdenum(VI) metal center toward a hydride. Here, we emphasize MoO2Cl2 behaves similar to Lewis acidic trispentafluorophenyl borane B(C6F5)3 in activating Si-H bond. PMID:27243271

  9. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  10. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  11. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  12. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  13. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  14. The Stereoselective Formation of Bicyclic Enamines with Bridgehead Unsaturation via Tandem C-H Bond Activation/Alkenylation/Electrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Ellman, Jonathan A.; Yotphan, Sirilata; Bergman, Robert

    2007-12-10

    Rhodium-catalyzed intermolecular C-H activation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated imines in the presence of alkynes leads to a tandem process in which coupling to the alkyne occurs at the {beta}-C-H bond of the imine, followed by electrocyclization of the resulting azatriene intermediates to give dihydropyridines (eq 1). Consideration of the intramolecular version of this overall transformation (Scheme 1) raises interesting regiochemical issues. For example in a compound such as 1, where the nitrogen and alkyne are connected by a 4-carbon tether, the presumed first-formed hydrido(vinyl)rhodium function can add to the triple bond in a 1,2-fashion, producing complex 2 with a new endocyclic double bond. Alternatively, addition might occur in a 2,1-fashion, leading to product 4 with an exocyclic double bond. We now wish to report that this intramolecular cyclization occurs smoothly at 100 C, and the exocyclic double bond route is exclusively followed. Remarkably, products such as 4 do not resist further cyclization. Even though both the transition state for this process and the resulting product are presumably strained, the overall transformation leads to good yields of unusual bridgehead doubly-bonded enamines such as 5. The unique chemistry of conjugated enamine 5 is consistent with the increased strain of this molecule as well as with inhibited conjugation between the nitrogen lone pair and the adjacent double bond (vida infra). We began our investigation into the C-H activation/cyclization of alkyne-tethered imine 1 by extensive screening of transition metal catalysts for this process. Rhodium-based catalysts were found to be the most efficient (Table 1), leading exclusively to the bridgehead dienamine; none of the catalysts that were employed in the screening led to quinolizidine 3 or to the product of intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction. The optimized reaction conditions employ the electron-rich monophosphine ligand (p-NMe{sub 2})PhPEt{sub 2} in 1:1 ratio relative

  15. A major peroxiredoxin-induced activation of Yap1 transcription factor is mediated by reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and reveals a low level of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shoko; Murayama, Asako; Naganuma, Akira; Nomoto, Akio; Kuge, Shusuke

    2009-02-13

    Redox reactions involving cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange are crucial for the intracellular monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Yap1, the master transcription factor for the oxidative stress response in budding yeast, is activated by the formation of disulfide bonds in response to H(2)O(2). Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase-like protein 3) acts as a receptor for H(2)O(2), and Ybp1 (Yap1-binding protein 1) is crucial for Gpx3-dependent disulfide bond formation in Yap1. We previously reported that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin in yeast cells, is required for activation of Yap1 in a widely used yeast strain, W303-1b, carrying the ybp1-1 mutant allele encoding a truncated Ybp1 protein. In the present study, we show that Tsa1 can interact with Yap1 via disulfide linkages and induce the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in Yap1 in ybp1-1 cells. The results provide evidence that Prx can have intrinsic activity as an H(2)O(2) receptor and can relay H(2)O(2) as a signal to the Prx target proteins in terms of formation of disulfide linkage. Furthermore, our data reveal that there is more of the reduction-resistant active form of Yap1 (i.e. Yap1 (oxII)) when it is partnered with Gpx3 than with Tsa1. These data support our hypothesis that changes in the redox status of Yap1 to reduction-resistant forms by multiple disulfide bond formation are important for determining the level and duration of Yap1 activity in the dynamic equilibrium of redox reactions in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). PMID:19106090

  16. Ce-PROMOTED Bond Activation of Propene Probed by Mass-Analyzed Threshold Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Kumari, Sudesh; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of Ce + propene (CH2=CH-CH3) was carried out in a laser-ablation supersonic molecular beam source. CeC_2H_2, CeC_3H_4, CeC_3H_6, CeC_4H_6, CeC_6H10, and CeC_6H12 were identified by photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric measurements, and their structures and electronic states were investigated with mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The metal complexes containing two or three carbon atoms were formed by the C-C bond breakage (CeC_2H_2), dehydrogenation (CeC_3H_4), or metal insertion into a C-H bond (CeC_3H_6) of a propene molecule. The larger complexes with four to six carbons are formed through secondary reactions involving C-C bond coupling and dehydrogenation. The ground electronic states of the neutral CeC_2H_2, CeC_3H_4, CeC_3H_6, and CeC_4H_6 complexes are triplets with a 4f16s1 electron configuration on the Ce center, and those of the corresponding ions are doublet with a 4f1 configuration. Their MATI spectra are much more complex than those of the corresponding La species formed in the La + propene reaction previously observed by our group. The spectral complexity arises from possibly multiple electronic transitions due to the existence of a 4f electron of the Ce atom which could be located in any one of the seven f-atomic orbitals or involved in considerable spin-orbit interactions.

  17. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  18. Wafer level vacuum packaging of scanning micro-mirrors using glass-frit and anodic bonding methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langa, S.; Drabe, C.; Kunath, C.; Dreyhaupt, A.; Schenk, H.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper the authors report about the six inch wafer level vacuum packaging of electro-statically driven two dimensional micro-mirrors. The packaging was done by means of two types of wafer bonding methods: anodic and glass frit. The resulting chips after dicing are 4 mm wide, 6 mm long and 1.6 mm high and the residual pressure inside the package after dicing was estimated to be between 2 and 20 mbar. This allowed us to reduce the driving voltage of the micro-mirrors by more than 40% compared to the driving voltage without vacuum packaging. The vacuum stability after 5 months was verified by measurement using the so called "membrane method". Persistence of the vacuum was proven. No getter materials were used for packaging.

  19. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P.A.

    2008-10-31

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121}, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132}, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143}) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with M{sub r} of 6.5, 21 and 24 kDa were observed from lysates of HB-EGF and each HB-EGF disulfide analogue. HB-EGF immunohistochemical analyses of each HB-EGF stable cell line demonstrated ubiquitous protein expression except HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} stable cell lines which exhibited accumulated expression immediately outside the nucleus. rHB-EGF, HB-EGF, and HB-EGF{sub 134/143} proteins competed with {sup 125}I-EGF in an A431 competitive binding assay, whereas HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} failed to compete. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue lacked the ability to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the 170 kDa EGFR. These results suggest that HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143} antagonizes EGFRs.

  20. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  1. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  2. Rationale of the effects from dopants on C-H bond activation for sp2 hybridized nanostructured carbon catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shanjun; Sun, Xiaoying; Li, Bo; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Doping has become an effective way to tune the catalytic properties of nanostructured carbon catalysts. Taking C-H activation as an example, first-principles calculations propose that the relative energy level and the BEP rule might be applicable to explain the observed doping effects. Moreover, boron doping is proposed as an effective way to enhance the catalytic performance.Doping has become an effective way to tune the catalytic properties of nanostructured carbon catalysts. Taking C-H activation as an example, first-principles calculations propose that the relative energy level and the BEP rule might be applicable to explain the observed doping effects. Moreover, boron doping is proposed as an effective way to enhance the catalytic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The computational setup, the doping positions for B, N and S doping, the definition of the binding energy and dissociation energy for C2H5 and C2H6 respectively, the transition state and dissociation state structures for the C-H bond activation of C2H6 in the undoped case, and the lengths of the C-H bond of C2H6 at the transition states for both the undoped and doped cases. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05759k

  3. Comparison of carbon-sulfur and carbon-amine bond in therapeutic drug: 4β-S-aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives display antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Long; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Chen; Zhang, Ya-Xuan; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Herein is a first effort to systematically study the significance of carbon-sulfur (C-S) and carbon-amine (C-NH) bonds on the antitumor proliferation activity of podophyllum derivatives and their precise mechanism of apoptosis. Compared with the derivative modified by a C-NH bond, the derivative modified by a C-S bond exhibited superior antitumor activity, the inhibition activity of target proteins tubulin or Topo II, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis induction. Antitumor mechanistic studies showed that the death receptor and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathways were simultaneously activated by the C-S bond modified aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives with a higher cellular uptake percentage of 60–90% and induction of a higher level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Only the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was activated by the C-NH bond modified aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives, with a lower cellular uptake percentage of 40–50%. This study provided insight into effects of the C-S and C-NH bond modification on the improvement of the antitumor activity of Podophyllum derivatives. PMID:26443888

  4. Comparison of carbon-sulfur and carbon-amine bond in therapeutic drug: 4β-S-aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives display antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Long; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Chen; Zhang, Ya-Xuan; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2015-10-07

    Herein is a first effort to systematically study the significance of carbon-sulfur (C-S) and carbon-amine (C-NH) bonds on the antitumor proliferation activity of podophyllum derivatives and their precise mechanism of apoptosis. Compared with the derivative modified by a C-NH bond, the derivative modified by a C-S bond exhibited superior antitumor activity, the inhibition activity of target proteins tubulin or Topo II, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis induction. Antitumor mechanistic studies showed that the death receptor and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathways were simultaneously activated by the C-S bond modified aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives with a higher cellular uptake percentage of 60-90% and induction of a higher level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Only the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was activated by the C-NH bond modified aromatic heterocyclic podophyllum derivatives, with a lower cellular uptake percentage of 40-50%. This study provided insight into effects of the C-S and C-NH bond modification on the improvement of the antitumor activity of Podophyllum derivatives.

  5. Transesterification of PHA to Oligomers Covalently Bonded with (Bio)Active Compounds Containing Either Carboxyl or Hydroxyl Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Adamus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents the synthesis and structural characterisation of novel biodegradable polymeric controlled-release systems of pesticides with potentially higher resistance to weather conditions in comparison to conventional forms of pesticides. Two methods for the preparation of pesticide-oligomer conjugates using the transesterification reaction were developed. The first method of obtaining conjugates, which consist of bioactive compounds with the carboxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) oligomers, is "one-pot" transesterification. In the second method, conjugates of bioactive compounds with hydroxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates oligomers were obtained in two-step method, through cyclic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) oligomers. The obtained pesticide-PHA conjugates were comprehensively characterised using GPC, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. The structural characterisation of the obtained products at the molecular level with the aid of mass spectrometry confirmed that both of the synthetic strategies employed led to the formation of conjugates in which selected pesticides were covalently bonded to PHA oligomers via a hydrolysable ester bond. PMID:25781908

  6. C-H bond activation of benzene by unsaturated η2-cyclopropene and η2-benzyne complexes of niobium.

    PubMed

    Boulho, Cédric; Oulié, Pascal; Vendier, Laure; Etienne, Michel; Pimienta, Véronique; Locati, Abel; Bessac, Fabienne; Maseras, Feliu; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; McGrady, John E

    2010-10-13

    We report the synthesis of a niobium cyclopropyl complex, Tp(Me2)NbMe(c-C(3)H(5))(MeCCMe), and show that thermal loss of methane from this compound generates an intermediate that is capable of activating both aliphatic and aromatic C-H bonds. Isotopic labeling, trapping studies, a detailed kinetic analysis, and density functional theory all suggest that the active intermediate is an η(2)-cyclopropene complex formed via β-hydrogen abstraction rather than an isomeric cyclopropylidene species. C-H activation chemistry of this type represents a rather unusual reactivity pattern for η(2)-alkene complexes but is favored in this case by the strain in the C(3) ring which prevents the decomposition of the key intermediate via loss of cyclopropene.

  7. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  8. Methods of measuring Protein Disulfide Isomerase activity: a critical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Monica; Laurindo, Francisco; Fernandes, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase is an essential redox chaperone from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is responsible for correct disulfide bond formation in nascent proteins. PDI is also found in other cellular locations in the cell, particularly the cell surface. Overall, PDI contributes to ER and global cell redox homeostasis and signaling. The knowledge about PDI structure and function progressed substantially based on in vitro studies using recombinant PDI and chimeric proteins. In these experimental scenarios, PDI reductase and chaperone activities are readily approachable. In contrast, assays to measure PDI isomerase activity, the hallmark of PDI family, are more complex. Assessment of PDI roles in cells and tissues mainly relies on gain- or loss-of-function studies. However, there is limited information regarding correlation of experimental readouts with the distinct types of PDI activities. In this mini-review, we evaluate the main methods described for measuring the different kinds of PDI activity: thiol reductase, thiol oxidase, thiol isomerase and chaperone. We emphasize the need to use appropriate controls and the role of critical interferents (e.g., detergent, presence of reducing agents). We also discuss the translation of results from in vitro studies with purified recombinant PDI to cellular and tissue samples, with critical comments on the interpretation of results.

  9. Method and apparatus for forming a carbon-silicon bond in a silane

    DOEpatents

    Schattenmann, Florian Johannes

    2002-01-01

    A method for forming at least one product silane, comprising reacting a transition metal hydride with a starting silane in a presence of a catalyst and at a temperature that exceeds a threshold temperature associated with said reacting.

  10. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay with a triazole-bonded column for evaluation of d-amino acid oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Megumi; Kashiwaguma, Yoshiyuki; Nagashima, Chihiro; Izumi, Mao; Uekusa, Ayano; Iwasa, Sumiko; Onozato, Mayu; Ichiba, Hideaki; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Elution profiles of kynurenic acid (KYNA) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (Cl-KYNA) were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a triazole-bonded stationary phase column (Cosmosil® HILIC) under isocratic elution of a mobile phase consisting of CH3 CN-aqueous 10 mm ammonium formate between pH 3.0 and 6.0. The capacity factors of KYNA and Cl-KYNA varied with both the CH3 CN content and the pH of the mobile phase. The elution order of KYNA and Cl-KYNA was reversed between the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, suggesting that hydrophilic interactions and anion-exchange interactions caused retention of KYNA and Cl-KYNA in the CH3 CN- and H2 O-rich mobile phases, respectively. The present HPLC method using a triazole-bonded column and fluorescence detection (excitation 250 nm, emission 398 nm) was applied to monitor in vitro production of KYNA from d-kynurenine (d-KYN) by d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) using Cl-KYNA as an internal standard. A single KYNA peak was clearly observed after enzymatic reaction of d-KYN with DAO. Production of KYNA from d-KYN was suppressed by the addition of commercial DAO inhibitors. The present HPLC method can be used to evaluate DAO activity and DAO inhibitory effects in candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  11. Complementary MS Methods Assist Conformational Characterization of Antibodies with Altered S-S Bonding Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lisa M.; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Kumar, Sandeep; Sperry, Justin B.; Carroll, James A.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-06-01

    As therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) become a major focus in biotechnology and a source of the next-generation drugs, new analytical methods or combination methods are needed for monitoring changes in higher order structure and effects of post-translational modifications. The complexity of these molecules and their vulnerability to structural change provide a serious challenge. We describe here the use of complementary mass spectrometry methods that not only characterize mutant mAbs but also may provide a general framework for characterizing higher order structure of other protein therapeutics and biosimilars. To frame the challenge, we selected members of the IgG2 subclass that have distinct disulfide isomeric structures as a model to evaluate an overall approach that uses ion mobility, top-down MS sequencing, and protein footprinting in the form of fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP). These three methods are rapid, sensitive, respond to subtle changes in conformation of Cys → Ser mutants of an IgG2, each representing a single disulfide isoform, and may be used in series to probe higher order structure. The outcome suggests that this approach of using various methods in combination can assist the development and quality control of protein therapeutics.

  12. Metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization: a new paradigm in bond activation and "green" catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Milstein, David

    2011-08-16

    In view of global concerns regarding the environment and sustainable energy resources, there is a strong need for the discovery of new, green catalytic reactions. For this purpose, fresh approaches to catalytic design are desirable. In recent years, complexes based on "cooperating" ligands have exhibited remarkable catalytic activity. These ligands cooperate with the metal center by undergoing reversible structural changes in the processes of substrate activation and product formation. We have discovered a new mode of metal-ligand cooperation, involving aromatization-dearomatization of ligands. Pincer-type ligands based on pyridine or acridine exhibit such cooperation, leading to unusual bond activation processes and to novel, environmentally benign catalysis. Bond activation takes place with no formal change in the metal oxidation state, and so far the activation of H-H, C-H (sp(2) and sp(3)), O-H, and N-H bonds has been demonstrated. Using this approach, we have demonstrated a unique water splitting process, which involves consecutive thermal liberation of H(2) and light-induced liberation of O(2), using no sacrificial reagents, promoted by a pyridine-based pincer ruthenium complex. An acridine pincer complex displays unique "long-range" metal-ligand cooperation in the activation of H(2) and in reaction with ammonia. In this Account, we begin by providing an overview of the metal-ligand cooperation based on aromatization-dearomatization processes. We then describe a range of novel catalytic reactions that we developed guided by these new modes of metal-ligand cooperation. These reactions include the following: (1) acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols to ketones, (2) acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters, (3) acylation of secondary alcohols by esters with dihydrogen liberation, (4) direct coupling of alcohols and amines to form amides and polyamides with liberation of dihydrogen, (5) coupling of esters and amines to form amides

  13. Methods of making non-covalently bonded carbon-titania nanocomposite thin films and applications of the same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Yu Teng; Vijayan, Baiju K.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-07-19

    In one aspect, a method of making non-covalently bonded carbon-titania nanocomposite thin films includes: forming a carbon-based ink; forming a titania (TiO.sub.2) solution; blade-coating a mechanical mixture of the carbon-based ink and the titania solution onto a substrate; and annealing the blade-coated substrate at a first temperature for a first period of time to obtain the carbon-based titania nanocomposite thin films. In certain embodiments, the carbon-based titania nanocomposite thin films may include solvent-exfoliated graphene titania (SEG-TiO.sub.2) nanocomposite thin films, or single walled carbon nanotube titania (SWCNT-TiO.sub.2) nanocomposite thin films.

  14. Heat treatment of bovine alpha-lactalbumin results in partially folded, disulfide bond shuffled states with enhanced surface activity.

    PubMed

    Wijesinha-Bettoni, Ramani; Gao, Chunli; Jenkins, John A; Mackie, Alan R; Wilde, Peter J; Mills, E N Clare; Smith, Lorna J

    2007-08-28

    Prolonged heating of holo bovine alpha-lactalbumin (BLA) at 80 degrees C in pH 7 phosphate buffer in the absence of a thiol initiator improves the surface activity of the protein at the air:water interface, as determined by surface tension measurements. Samples after 30, 60, and 120 min of heating were analyzed on cooling to room temperature. Size-exclusion chromatography shows sample heterogeneity that increases with the length of heating. After 120 min of heating monomeric, dimeric, and oligomeric forms of BLA are present, with aggregates formed from disulfide bond linked hydrolyzed protein fragments. NMR characterization at pH 7 in the presence of Ca2+ of the monomer species isolated from the sample heated for 120 min showed that it consisted of a mixture of refolded native protein and partially folded protein and that the partially folded protein species had spectral characteristics similar to those of the pH 2 molten globule state of the protein. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the non-native species had approximately 40% of the alpha-helical content of the native state, but lacked persistent tertiary interactions. Proteomic analysis using thermolysin digestion of three predominant non-native monomeric forms isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography indicated the presence of disulfide shuffled isomers, containing the non-native 61-73 disulfide bond. These partially folded, disulfide shuffled species are largely responsible for the pronounced improvement in surface activity of the protein on heating.

  15. Subsurface defect detection in first layer of pavement structure and reinforced civil engineering structure by FRP bonding using active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Ibos, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In many countries road network ages while road traffic and maintenance costs increase. Nowadays, thousand and thousand kilometers of roads are each year submitted to surface distress survey. They generally lean on pavement surface imaging measurement techniques, mainly in the visible spectrum, coupled with visual inspection or image processing detection of emergent distresses. Nevertheless, optimisation of maintenance works and costs requires an early detection of defects within the pavement structure when they still are hidden from surface. Accordingly, alternative measurement techniques for pavement monitoring are currently under investigation (seismic methods, step frequency radar). On the other hand, strengthening or retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures by externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) systems is now a commonly accepted and widespread technique. However, the use of bonding techniques always implies following rigorous installing procedures. To ensure the durability and long-term performance of the FRP reinforcements, conformance checking through an in situ auscultation of the bonded FRP systems is then highly suitable. The quality-control program should involve a set of adequate inspections and tests. Visual inspection and acoustic sounding (hammer tap) are commonly used to detect delaminations (disbonds) but are unable to provide sufficient information about the depth (in case of multilayered composite) and width of debonded areas. Consequently, rapid and efficient inspection methods are also required. Among the non destructive methods under study, active infrared thermography was investigated both for pavement and civil engineering structures through experiments in laboratory and numerical simulations, because of its ability to be also used on field. Pulse Thermography (PT), Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) approaches have been tested onto pavement samples and CFRP bonding on concrete

  16. Interactively Applying the Variational Method to the Dihydrogen Molecule: Exploring Bonding and Antibonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruzeiro, Vinícius Wilian D.; Roitberg, Adrian; Polfer, Nicolas C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we are going to present how an interactive platform can be used as a powerful tool to allow students to better explore a foundational problem in quantum chemistry: the application of the variational method to the dihydrogen molecule using simple Gaussian trial functions. The theoretical approach for the hydrogen atom is quite…

  17. Reactivity of oxygen radical anions bound to scandia nanoparticles in the gas phase: C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Hua; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ma, Tong-Mei

    2014-01-20

    The activation of C-H bonds in alkanes is currently a hot research topic in chemistry. The atomic oxygen radical anion (O(-·)) is an important species in C-H activation. The mechanistic details of C-H activation by O(-·) radicals can be well understood by studying the reactions between O(-·) containing transition metal oxide clusters and alkanes. Here the reactivity of scandium oxide cluster anions toward n-butane was studied by using a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a fast flow reactor. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from n-butane by (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters was observed. The reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters is significantly sizedependent and the highest reactivity was observed for N=4 (Sc8O13(-)) and 12 (Sc24O37(-)). Larger (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) clusters generally have higher reactivity than the smaller ones. Density functional theory calculations were performed to interpret the reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-5) clusters, which were found to contain the O(-·) radicals as the active sites. The local charge environment around the O(-·) radicals was demonstrated to control the experimentally observed size-dependent reactivity. This work is among the first to report HAA reactivity of cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize toward alkane molecules. The anionic O(-·) containing scandium oxide clusters are found to be more reactive than the corresponding cationic ones in the C-H bond activation. PMID:24338790

  18. Methods for using polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity

    DOEpatents

    Morant, Marc D; Harris, Paul

    2016-08-23

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Intermolecular activation of hydrocarbon C-H bonds under ambient conditions by 16-electron neopentylidene and benzyne complexes of molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kenji; Pamplin, Craig B; Legzdins, Peter; Patrick, Brian O; Tsyba, Irina; Bau, Robert

    2003-06-11

    CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(2) (1), a complex with alpha-agostic C-H.Mo interactions, evolves neopentane in neat hydrocarbon solutions at room temperature and forms the transient 16-electron alkylidene complex, CpMo(NO)(=CHCMe(3)), which subsequently activates solvent C-H bonds. Thus, it reacts with tetramethylsilane or mesitylene to form CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(CH(2)SiMe(3)) (2) or CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(eta(2)-CH(2)C(6)H(3)-3,5-Me(2)) (3), respectively, in nearly quantitative yields. Under identical conditions, 1 in p-xylene generates a mixture of sp(2) and sp(3) C-H bond activation products, namely CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(C(6)H(3)-2,5-Me(2)) (4, 73%) and CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(eta(2)-CH(2)C(6)H(4)-4-Me) (5, 27%). In benzene at room temperature, 1 transforms to a mixture of CpMo(NO)(CH(2)CMe(3))(C(6)H(5)) (6) and CpMo(NO)(C(6)H(5))(2) (7) in a sequential manner. Most interestingly, the thermal activation of 6 at ambient temperatures gives rise to two parallel modes of reactivity involving either the elimination of benzene and formation of CpMo(NO)(=CHCMe(3)) or the elimination of neopentane and formation of the benzyne complex, CpMo(NO)(eta(2)-C(6)H(4)). In pyridine, these intermediates are trapped as the isolable 18-electron adducts, CpMo(NO)(=CHCMe(3))(NC(5)H(5)) (8) and CpMo(NO)(eta(2)-C(6)H(4))(NC(5)H(5)) (9), and, in hydrocarbon solvents, they effect the intermolecular activation of aliphatic C-H bonds at room temperature to generate mixtures of neopentyl- and phenyl-containing derivatives. However, the distribution of products resulting from the hydrocarbon activations is dependent on the nature of the solvent, probably due to solvation effects and the presence of sigma- or pi-hydrocarbon complexes on the reaction coordinates of the alkylidene and the benzyne intermediates. The results of DFT calculations on these processes in the gas phase support the existence of such hydrocarbon complexes and indicate that better agreement with experimental observations is obtained

  20. Computational methods for the description of pharmacologically relevant platinum complexes--molecular structure and bond dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kokoschka, Malte; Galgonek, Jakub; Vondrasek, Jiri; Hobza, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is after cardiovascular disease the most frequent cause of death in Europe. In 28 of 53 countries considered in this area it is already the leading cause of death and expected to gain even more importance until the year 2020. Amongst the large arsenal of different anti-cancer drugs, platinum drugs belong to the first developed anticancer drugs and still have a large impact on cancer therapy. Nevertheless therapy with platinum-anticancer drugs is accompanied by severe adverse effects caused by frequent interactions with the amino acids of different human proteins. Computational chemistry offers methods to study such interactions and even those of not yet synthesized drugs in silico. For such studies a profound knowledge of the prediction quality of various computational methods towards platinum-drug-like complexes is necessary. By this article we are aiming on delivering important accuracy information of the frequently used computational methods. Most important findings are the high performance of the double hybrid functional B2PLYP for the calculation of geometries, even in small basis sets, followed by BP86 and PBE and the still acceptable performance of the semi-empirical Method PM6-D3H4X for extremely large systems. To follow absolute energies of the dissociation process, LPNO-CEPA and B3LYP-D3 can be suggested while SCS-MP2 shows an extremely narrow standard deviation and a low maximum error, which make it an ideal candidate for relative energy calculations in the exploration of reaction mechanisms. PMID:26777459

  1. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO3(2-) and DCCM/SeO3(2-) complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation. PMID:26635113

  2. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-12-04

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO3(2-) and DCCM/SeO3(2-) complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation.

  3. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32- and DCCM/SeO32- complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation.

  4. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32− and DCCM/SeO32− complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation. PMID:26635113

  5. Detection of a water molecule in the active-site of bacteriorhodopsin: hydrogen bonding changes during the primary photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W B; Sonar, S; Marti, T; Khorana, H G; Rothschild, K J

    1994-11-01

    FTIR-difference spectroscopy in combination with site-directed mutagenesis has been used to investigate the role of water during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. At least one water molecule is detected which undergoes an increase in H-bonding during the primary bR-->K phototransition. Bands due to water appear in the OH stretch region of the bR-->K FTIR-difference spectrum which downshift by approximately 12 cm-1 when the sample is hydrated with H2(18)O. In contrast to 2H2O, the H2(18)O-induced shift is not complete, even after 24 h of hydration. This indicates that even though water is still able to exchange protons with the outside medium, it is partially trapped in the interior of the protein. In the mutant Y57D, these bands are absent while a new set of bands appear at much lower frequencies which undergo H2(18)O-induced shifts. It is concluded that the water molecule we detect is located inside the bR active-site and may interact with Tyr-57. The change in its hydrogen-bonding strength is most likely due to the photoinduced all-trans-->13-cis isomerization of the retinal chromophore and the associated movement of the positively charged Schiff base during the bR-->K transition. In contrast, a second water molecule, whose infrared difference bands are not affected by the Y57D mutation, appears to undergo a decrease in hydrogen bonding during the K-->L and L-->M transitions.

  6. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  7. Dynamic modeling and analysis of the PZT-bonded composite Timoshenko beams: Spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Usik; Kim, Daehwan; Park, Ilwook

    2013-03-01

    The health of thin laminated composite beams is often monitored using the ultrasonic guided waves excited by wafer-type piezoelectric transducers (PZTs). Thus, for the smart composite beams which consist of a laminated composite base beam and PZT layers, it is very important to develop a very reliable mathematical model and to use a very accurate computational method to predict accurate dynamic characteristics at very high ultrasonic frequency. In this paper, the axial-bending-shear-lateral contraction coupled differential equations of motion are derived first by the Hamilton's principle with Lagrange multipliers. The smart composite beam is represented by a Timoshenko beam model by adopting the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) for the laminated composite base beam. The axial deformation of smart composite beam is improved by taking into account the effects of lateral contraction by adopting the concept of Mindlin-Herrmann rod theory. The spectral element model is then formulated by the variation approach from coupled differential equations of motion transformed into the frequency domain via the discrete Fourier transform. The high accuracy of the present spectral element model is verified by comparing with other solution methods: the finite element model developed in this paper and the commercial FEA package ANSYS. Finally the dynamics and wave characteristics of some example smart composite beams are investigated through the numerical studies.

  8. Investigation of hydrogen bonds properties in the terephthalic acid crystal, using molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Ewa; Boczar, Marek; Wójcik, Marek J

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to perform calculations using the method of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, leading to the optimized geometry of the molecules of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (terephthalic acid) in crystals, for the hydrogen form and three variants of substitution of deuterium atoms inside a carboxyl group. Based on the results, trajectories and dipole moments were calculated, what makes possible to simulate vibrations in different systems, and to make calculation of theoretical infrared spectra and atomic power spectra. Theoretical results were compared with the experimental spectra, which verifies the correctness of the method and also was compared with the results obtained by quantum-mechanical calculations using DFT for the isolated dimer. Comparison of the spectra of different forms, allowed for in-depth analysis of the effect of isotopic substitution on the frequency of vibrations and shapes of bands, and confirm the presence of possible coupling effects and intra- and intermolecular interactions. Comparison with the DFT results for the dimer show influence of the crystal structure on the spectra.

  9. Defluorination of perfluoroolefins by divalent lanthanoid reagents: Activating C-F bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.L.; Tulip, T.H.; Williams, I. )

    1990-07-01

    Divalent lanthanoid complexes MCp*{sub 2} {times} L (M = Yb, Eu, Sm; L = diethyl ether or THF; Cp* = {eta}{sup 5}-pentamethylcyclopetadienyl) and YbCp{prime}{sub 2} {times} L (Cp{prime} = {eta}{sup 5}-methylcyclopentadienyl; L = tetrahydrofuran) rapidly abstract fluorine atoms from a variety of perfluoroolefins including perfluoro-2,4-dimethyl-3-ethylpent-2-ene, perfluoro-2,3-dimethylpent-2-ene, and perfluorocyclohexene. Qualitative observation shows that the relative fluorine abstraction reactivity of the four lanthanoid complexes increases with increasingly negative reduction potential for reasonably unhindered fluoroolefin substrates. The Yb(III)/Yb(II) reduction potential of YbCp{prime}{sub 2} solvated in acetonitrile is determined here to be {minus}1.65 V (relative to ferrocene) by cyclic voltammetry. The fully characterized organometallic products from the fluorine atom abstraction reactions are solvated trivalent lanthanoid fluorides MCp*{sub 2}F {times} L (M = Yb, Eu, Sm; L = diethyl ether or THF) and YbCp{prime}{sub 2}F {times} THF. The molecular structures of YbCp*{sub 2}F {times} OEt{sub 2} and YbCp*{sub 2}F {times} THF determined by X-ray crystallography reveal the first terminal lanthanoid-fluoride bonds.

  10. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  11. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  12. An inertia-capacitance beam substructure formulation based on the bond graph method with application to rotating beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yihan; Pedersen, Eilif; Moan, Torgeir

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a novel inertia-capacitance (IC) beam substructure formulation based on the IC-field presentation from the bond graph method is developed. The IC beam provides a modular, systematic and graphical approach to beam modeling. These features allow the modeler to focus more on the modeling and less on the mathematics. As such, the IC beam is proposed as an alternative to the many existing types of beam models available in the literature. The IC beam is formulated in the center of mass body fixed coordinate system allowing for easy interfacing in a multibody system setting. This floating frame approach is also computationally cheap. Elastic deformations in the IC beam are assumed to be small and described by modal superposition. The formulation couples rigid body and elastic deformations in a nonlinear fashion. The formulation is also compact and efficient. Detailed derivations for a two-dimensional planar IC beam with bending modes are presented. A modal acceleration method based on the decoupling of bending modes is proposed for use in the IC beam. The rotating beam spin-up maneuver problem is solved. The Karnopp-Margolis method is applied to ensure complete integral causality for an efficient numerical system. Geometric substructuring technique is applied to model large deflections. The IC beam is shown to be capable of solving the rotating beam problem accurately and efficiently.

  13. Selectivity of Chemisorbed Oxygen in C–H Bond Activation and CO Oxidation and Kinetic Consequences for CH₄–O₂ Catalysis on Pt and Rh Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Ya-Huei; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-10-06

    Rate measurements, density functional theory (DFT) within the framework of transition state theory, and ensemble-averaging methods are used to probe oxygen selectivities, defined as the reaction probability ratios for O* reactions with CO and CH₄, during CH₄–O₂ catalysis on Pt and Rh clusters. CO₂ and H₂O are the predominant products, but small amounts of CO form as chemisorbed oxygen atoms (O*) are depleted from cluster surfaces. Oxygen selectivities, measured using ¹²CO–¹³CH₄–O₂ reactants, increase with O₂/ CO ratio and O* coverage and are much larger than unity at all conditions on Pt clusters. These results suggest that O* reacts much faster with CO than with CH₄, causing any CO that forms and desorbs from metal cluster surfaces to react along the reactor bed with other O* to produce CO₂ at any residence time required for detectable extents of CH₄ conversion. O* selectivities were also calculated by averaging DFTderived activation barriers for CO and CH₄ oxidation reactions over all distinct surface sites on cubo-octahedral Pt clusters (1.8 nm diameter, 201 Pt atoms) at low O* coverages, which are prevalent at low O₂ pressures during catalysis. CO oxidation involves non-activated molecular CO adsorption as the kinetically relevant step on exposed Pt atoms vicinal of chemisorbed O* atoms (on *–O* site pairs). CH₄ oxidation occurs via kinetically relevant C–H bond activation on *–* site pairs involving oxidative insertion of a Pt atom into one of the C–H bonds in CH₄, forming a three-centered HC₃–Pt–H transition state. C–H bond activation barriers reflect the strength of Pt–CH₃ and Pt–H interactions at the transition state, which correlates, in turn, with the Pt coordination and with CH₃ * binding energies. Ensemble-averaged O* selectivities increase linearly with O₂/CO ratios, which define the O* coverages, via a proportionality constant. The proportionality constant is given by the ratio of rate

  14. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon–Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon–carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon–carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon–carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  15. Intermolecular disulfide bonds are not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, E; Gironès, N; Davis, R J

    1989-01-01

    The human transferrin receptor is expressed as a disulfide-linked dimer at the cell surface. The sites of intermolecular disulfide bonds are Cys-89 and Cys-98. We have examined the functional significance of the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor by substitution of Cys-89 and Cys-98 with serine residues. Wild-type and mutated transferrin receptors were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (clone TF-) that lack detectable endogenous transferrin receptors. The rates of receptor endocytosis and recycling were measured and the accumulation of iron by cells incubated with [59Fe]diferric transferrin was investigated. No significant differences between these rates were observed when cells expressing wild-type and mutated receptors were compared. The structure of the mutant receptor lacking intermolecular disulfide bonds was investigated. The presence of a population of mutant receptors with a non-covalent dimeric structure was indicated by cross-linking studies using diferric [125I]transferrin and the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberimidate. However, sucrose density gradient sedimentation analysis of Triton X-100 solubilized transferrin receptors demonstrated that the mutant receptor existed as a monomer in the absence of diferric transferrin and as an apparent dimer in the presence of this receptor ligand. We conclude that the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor is not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the receptor. Images PMID:2507316

  16. Structure-activity relationships derived by machine learning: the use of atoms and their bond connectivities to predict mutagenicity by inductive logic programming.

    PubMed Central

    King, R D; Muggleton, S H; Srinivasan, A; Sternberg, M J

    1996-01-01

    We present a general approach to forming structure-activity relationships (SARs). This approach is based on representing chemical structure by atoms and their bond connectivities in combination with the inductive logic programming (ILP) algorithm PROGOL. Existing SAR methods describe chemical structure by using attributes which are general properties of an object. It is not possible to map chemical structure directly to attribute-based descriptions, as such descriptions have no internal organization. A more natural and general way to describe chemical structure is to use a relational description, where the internal construction of the description maps that of the object described. Our atom and bond connectivities representation is a relational description. ILP algorithms can form SARs with relational descriptions. We have tested the relational approach by investigating the SARs of 230 aromatic and heteroaromatic nitro compounds. These compounds had been split previously into two subsets, 188 compounds that were amenable to regression and 42 that were not. For the 188 compounds, a SAR was found that was as accurate as the best statistical or neural network-generated SARs. The PROGOL SAR has the advantages that it did not need the use of any indicator variables handcrafted by an expert, and the generated rules were easily comprehensible. For the 42 compounds, PROGOL formed a SAR that was significantly (P < 0.025) more accurate than linear regression, quadratic regression, and back-propagation. This SAR is based on an automatically generated structural alert for mutagenicity. PMID:8552655

  17. Perturbative treatment of anharmonic vibrational effects on bond distances: an extended Langevin dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tonghao; Su, Neil Qiang; Wu, Anan; Xu, Xin

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we first review the perturbative treatment of an oscillator with cubic anharmonicity. It is shown that there is a quantum-classical correspondence in terms of mean displacement, mean-squared displacement, and the corresponding variance in the first-order perturbation theory, provided that the amplitude of the classical oscillator is fixed at the zeroth-order energy of quantum mechanics EQM (0). This correspondence condition is realized by proposing the extended Langevin dynamics (XLD), where the key is to construct a proper driving force. It is assumed that the driving force adopts a simple harmonic form with its amplitude chosen according to EQM (0), while the driving frequency chosen as the harmonic frequency. The latter can be improved by using the natural frequency of the system in response to the potential if its anharmonicity is strong. By comparing to the accurate numeric results from discrete variable representation calculations for a set of diatomic species, it is shown that the present method is able to capture the large part of anharmonicity, being competitive with the wave function-based vibrational second-order perturbation theory, for the whole frequency range from ∼4400 cm(-1) (H2 ) to ∼160 cm(-1) (Na2 ). XLD shows a substantial improvement over the classical molecular dynamics which ceases to work for hard mode when zero-point energy effects are significant. PMID:24375394

  18. A method of coupling the Paternò-Büchi reaction with direct infusion ESI-MS/MS for locating the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond in glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with soft ionization is established as an essential platform for lipid analysis; however, determining high order structural information, such as the carbon-carbon double bond (C[double bond, length as m-dash]C) location, remains challenging. Recently, our group demonstrated a method for sensitive and confident lipid C[double bond, length as m-dash]C location determination by coupling online the Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction with nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and MS/MS. Herein, we aimed to expand the scope of the PB reaction for lipid analysis by enabling the reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS at much higher flow rates than demonstrated in the nanoESI setup (∼20 nL min(-1)). In the new design, the PB reaction was effected in a fused silica capillary solution transfer line, which also served as a microflow UV reactor, prior to ESI. This setup allowed PB reaction optimization and kinetics studies. Under optimized conditions, a maximum of 50% PB reaction yield could be achieved for a standard glycerophosphocholine (PC) within 6 s of UV exposure over a wide flow rate range (0.1-10 μL min(-1)). A solvent composition of 7 : 3 acetone : H2O (with 1% acid or base modifier) allowed the highest PB yields and good lipid ionization, while lower yields were obtained with an addition of a variety of organic solvents. Radical induced lipid peroxidation was identified to induce undesirable side reactions, which could be effectively suppressed by eliminating trace oxygen in the solution via N2 purge. Finally, the utility of coupling the PB reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS was demonstrated by analyzing a yeast polar lipid extract where C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond locations were revealed for 35 glycerophospholipids (GPs).

  19. N-Methylphthalimide-substituted benzimidazolium salts and PEPPSI Pd-NHC complexes: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity in carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Akkoç, Senem; Gök, Yetkin; İlhan, İlhan Özer; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel benzimidazolium salts (1-4) and their pyridine enhanced precatalyst preparation stabilization and initiation (PEPPSI) themed palladium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes [PdCl2(NHC)(Py)] (5-8), where NHC = 1-(N-methylphthalimide)-3-alkylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene and Py = 3-chloropyridine, were synthesized and characterized by means of (1)H and (13)C{(1)H} NMR, UV-vis (for 5-8), ESI-FTICR-MS (for 2, 4, 6-8) and FTIR spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were tested in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling (for 1-8) and arylation (for 5-8) reactions. As catalysts, they demonstrated a highly efficient route for the formation of asymmetric biaryl compounds even though they were used in very low loading. For example, all compounds displayed good catalytic activity for the C-C bond formation of 4-tert-butylphenylboronic acid with 4-chlorotoluene. PMID:26877810

  20. Effects of Peptide Backbone Amide-to-Ester Bond Substitution on the Cleavage Frequency in Electron Capture Dissociation and Collision-Activated Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2011-08-01

    Probing the mechanism of electron capture dissociation on variously modified model peptide polycations has resulted in discovering many ways to prevent or reduce {{N}} - {{{C}}_α } bond fragmentation. Here we report on a rare finding of how to increase the backbone bond dissociation rate. In a number of model peptides, amide-to-ester backbone bond substitution increased the frequency of {{O}} - {{{C}}_α } bond cleavage (an analogue of {{N}} - {{{C}}_α } bonds in normal peptides) by several times, at the expense of reduced frequency of cleavages of the neighboring {{N}} - {{{C}}_α } bonds. In contrast, the ester linkage was only marginally broken in collisional dissociation. These results further highlight the complementarity of the reaction mechanisms in electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-activated dissociation (CAD). It is proposed that the effects of amide-to-ester bond substitution on fragmentation are mainly due to the differences in product ion stability (ECD, CAD) as well as proton affinity (CAD). This proposal is substantiated by calculations using density functional theory. The implications of these results in relation to the current understanding of the mechanisms of electron capture dissociation and electron transfer dissociation are discussed.

  1. A theoretical study of the structures and chemical bonds of neptunium (III) molecules by a density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Peng; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Du, Lei-Qiang; Wu, Fang-Xian; Ding, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, equilibrium structures and chemical bond characteristics of neptunium trihalide molecules NpX3 (X = F, Cl, Br and I) have been investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The influences of the size of the relativistic effective core potential (RECP) have been examined on the molecular structures. The chemical bond characteristics have also been systematically studied by calculating the density of states (DOS), bond length differences and electronic charge distributions. We have determined that the chemical bonds are mainly ionic in those molecules, and the covalency is enhancing while ionicity decreases from NpF3 to NpI3. The calculated bond energies show that the interaction strength in NpX3 molecules becomes weaker as the halogen atoms becoming heavier.

  2. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  3. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  4. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  5. Solventless adhesive bonding using reactive polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; McClelland, Arthur A; Chen, Zhan; Lahann, Joerg

    2008-06-01

    A novel solventless adhesive bonding (SAB) process is reported, which is applicable to a wide range of materials including, but not limited to, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The bonding is achieved through reactions between two complementary polymer coatings, poly(4-aminomethyl-p-xylylene-co-p-xylylene) and poly(4-formyl-p-xylylene-co-p-xylylene), which are prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization of the corresponding [2.2]paracyclophanes and can be deposited on complementary microfluidic units to be bonded. These CVD-based polymer films form well-adherent coatings on a range of different substrate materials including polymers, glass, silicon, metals, or paper and can be stored for extended periods prior to bonding without losing their bonding capability. Tensile stress data are measured on PDMS with various substrates and compared favorably to current methods such as oxygen plasma and UV/ozone. Sum frequency generation (SFG) has been used to probe the presence of amine and aldehyde groups on the surface after CVD polymerization and their conversion during bonding. In addition to bonding, unreacted functional groups present on the luminal surface of microfluidic channels provide free chemical groups for further surface modification. Fluorescently labeled molecules including rhodamine-conjugated streptavidin and atto-655 NHS ester were used to verify the presence of active functional groups on the luminal surfaces after bonding.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC) Conformal Shields Composite Bond Structure Qualification Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yew, Calinda; Stephens, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The JWST IEC conformal shields are mounted onto a composite frame structure that must undergo qualification testing to satisfy mission assurance requirements. The composite frame segments are bonded together at the joints using epoxy, EA 9394. The development of a test method to verify the integrity of the bonded structure at its operating environment introduces challenges in terms of requirements definition and the attainment of success criteria. Even though protoflight thermal requirements were not achieved, the first attempt in exposing the structure to cryogenic operating conditions in a thermal vacuum environment resulted in approximately 1 bonded joints failure during mechanical pull tests performed at 1.25 times the flight loads. Failure analysis concluded that the failure mode was due to adhesive cracks that formed and propagated along stress concentrated fillets as a result of poor bond squeeze-out control during fabrication. Bond repairs were made and the structures successfully re-tested with an improved LN2 immersion test method to achieve protoflight thermal requirements.

  7. Comparison of standard methods and gas chromatography method in determination of formaldehyde emission from MDF bonded with formaldehyde-based resins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2005-09-01

    Formaldehyde emissions from MDF bonded with urea-formaldehyde resin (UF), melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) and the co-polycondensation resin of urea-melamine-formaldehyde (UMF) and melamine-formaldehyde, measured by the Japanese standard method of determining formaldehyde emission with a desiccator (JIS A 5908) and the DIN EN 120 (European Committee For Standardization, 1991) method using the perforator value, were used as the typical standard methods. While the UF resin showed a desiccator value of 7.05 ppm and a perforator value of 12.1 mg/100 g panel, the MF resin exhibited a desiccator value of 0.6 ppm and a perforator value of 2.88 mg/100 g panel. According to the Japanese industrial standard and the European standard, the formaldehyde emission level of the MDF panels made with UF resin in this study was E(2) grade. The formaldehyde emission level was dramatically reduced by the addition of MF resin. This is because the addition of formaldehyde to melamine occurs more easily and completely than its addition to urea, even though the condensation reaction of melamine with formaldehyde is similar to that between urea and formaldehyde. These two methods, the desiccator method and the perforator method, produced proportionally equivalent results. Gas chromatography, a more sensitive and advanced method, was also used. The samples used for gas chromatography were gathered during the experiment involving the perforator method. The formaldehyde emission levels obtained from gas chromatography were similar to those obtained from the perforator method. The formaldehyde contents measured by gas chromatography were directly proportional to the perforator values.

  8. Double hybrid functionals and the Π-system bond length alternation challenge: rivaling accuracy of post-HF methods.

    PubMed

    Wykes, Michael; Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin; Adamo, Carlo; Sancho-García, Juan-Carlos

    2015-02-10

    Predicting accurate bond length alternations (BLAs) in long conjugated oligomers has been a significant challenge for electronic-structure methods for many decades, made particularly important by the close relationships between BLA and the rich optoelectronic properties of π-delocalized systems. Here, we test the accuracy of recently developed, and increasingly popular, double hybrid (DH) functionals, positioned at the top of Jacobs Ladder of DFT methods of increasing sophistication, computational cost, and accuracy, due to incorporation of MP2 correlation energy. Our test systems comprise oligomeric series of polyacetylene, polymethineimine, and polysilaacetylene up to six units long. MP2 calculations reveal a pronounced shift in BLAs between the 6-31G(d) basis set used in many studies of BLA to date and the larger cc-pVTZ basis set, but only modest shifts between cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ results. We hence perform new reference CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ calculations for all three series of oligomers against which we assess the performance of several families of DH functionals based on BLYP, PBE, and TPSS, along with lower-rung relatives including global- and range-separated hybrids. Our results show that DH functionals systematically improve the accuracy of BLAs relative to single hybrid functionals. xDH-PBE0 (N(4) scaling using SOS-MP2) emerges as a DH functional rivaling the BLA accuracy of SCS-MP2 (N(5) scaling), which was found to offer the best compromise between computational cost and accuracy the last time the BLA accuracy of DFT- and wave function-based methods was systematically investigated. Interestingly, xDH-PBE0 (XYG3), which differs to other DHs in that its MP2 term uses PBE0 (B3LYP) orbitals that are not self-consistent with the DH functional, is an outlier of trends of decreasing average BLA errors with increasing fractions of MP2 correlation and HF exchange. PMID:26579607

  9. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  10. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series.

  11. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  12. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  13. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  14. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  15. Organo- and Organometallic-Catalytic Intramolecular [1,5]-Hydride Transfer/Cyclization Process through C(sp(3) )-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Su Jin; Kim, Dae Young

    2016-06-01

    The direct functionalization of C(sp(3) )-H bonds is one of the most synthetically powerful research areas in current organic synthesis. Organocatalytic C(sp(3) )-H bond activation reactions have recently been developed in addition to the traditional metal-catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H activation reactions. In this review, we aim to give a brief overview of organo- and organometallic internal redox cascade reactions with respect to the mechanism, the reactivity of hydrogen donors and acceptors, and the migration modes of hydrogen. PMID:27062480

  16. Access to novel fluorovinylidene ligands via exploitation of outer-sphere electrophilic fluorination: new insights into C-F bond formation and activation.

    PubMed

    Milner, Lucy M; Hall, Lewis M; Pridmore, Natalie E; Skeats, Matthew K; Whitwood, Adrian C; Lynam, Jason M; Slattery, John M

    2016-01-28

    Metal vinylidene complexes are widely encountered, or postulated, as intermediates in a range of important metal-mediated transformations of alkynes. However, fluorovinylidene complexes have rarely been described and their reactivity is largely unexplored. By making use of the novel outer-sphere electrophilic fluorination (OSEF) strategy we have developed a rapid, robust and convenient method for the preparation of fluorovinylidene and trifluoromethylvinylidene ruthenium complexes from non-fluorinated alkynes. Spectroscopic investigations (NMR and UV/Vis), coupled with TD-DFT studies, show that fluorine incorporation results in significant changes to the electronic structure of the vinylidene ligand. The reactivity of fluorovinylidene complexes shows many similarities to non-fluorinated analogues, but also some interesting differences, including a propensity to undergo unexpected C-F bond cleavage reactions. Heating fluorovinylidene complex [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(PPh3)2(C[double bond, length as m-dash]C{F}R)][BF4] led to C-H activation of a PPh3 ligand to form an orthometallated fluorovinylphosphonium ligand. Reaction with pyridine led to nucleophilic attack at the metal-bound carbon atom of the vinylidene to form a vinyl pyridinium species, which undergoes both C-H and C-F activation to give a novel pyridylidene complex. Addition of water, in the presence of chloride, leads to anti-Markovnikov hydration of a fluorovinylidene complex to form an α-fluoroaldehyde, which slowly rearranges to its acyl fluoride isomer. Therefore, fluorovinylidenes ligands may be viewed as synthetic equivalents of 1-fluoroalkynes providing access to reactivity not possible by other routes. PMID:26701305

  17. Access to novel fluorovinylidene ligands via exploitation of outer-sphere electrophilic fluorination: new insights into C-F bond formation and activation.

    PubMed

    Milner, Lucy M; Hall, Lewis M; Pridmore, Natalie E; Skeats, Matthew K; Whitwood, Adrian C; Lynam, Jason M; Slattery, John M

    2016-01-28

    Metal vinylidene complexes are widely encountered, or postulated, as intermediates in a range of important metal-mediated transformations of alkynes. However, fluorovinylidene complexes have rarely been described and their reactivity is largely unexplored. By making use of the novel outer-sphere electrophilic fluorination (OSEF) strategy we have developed a rapid, robust and convenient method for the preparation of fluorovinylidene and trifluoromethylvinylidene ruthenium complexes from non-fluorinated alkynes. Spectroscopic investigations (NMR and UV/Vis), coupled with TD-DFT studies, show that fluorine incorporation results in significant changes to the electronic structure of the vinylidene ligand. The reactivity of fluorovinylidene complexes shows many similarities to non-fluorinated analogues, but also some interesting differences, including a propensity to undergo unexpected C-F bond cleavage reactions. Heating fluorovinylidene complex [Ru(η(5)-C5H5)(PPh3)2(C[double bond, length as m-dash]C{F}R)][BF4] led to C-H activation of a PPh3 ligand to form an orthometallated fluorovinylphosphonium ligand. Reaction with pyridine led to nucleophilic attack at the metal-bound carbon atom of the vinylidene to form a vinyl pyridinium species, which undergoes both C-H and C-F activation to give a novel pyridylidene complex. Addition of water, in the presence of chloride, leads to anti-Markovnikov hydration of a fluorovinylidene complex to form an α-fluoroaldehyde, which slowly rearranges to its acyl fluoride isomer. Therefore, fluorovinylidenes ligands may be viewed as synthetic equivalents of 1-fluoroalkynes providing access to reactivity not possible by other routes.

  18. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  19. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers.

    PubMed

    Kanavarioti, A; Rosenbach, M T

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles). PMID:11538282

  20. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  1. Bridge-bonded formate: active intermediate or spectator species in formic acid oxidation on a Pt film electrode?

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-X; Heinen, M; Jusys, Z; Behm, R J

    2006-12-01

    We present and discuss the results of an in situ IR study on the mechanism and kinetics of formic acid oxidation on a Pt film/Si electrode, performed in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) flow cell configuration under controlled mass transport conditions, which specifically aimed at elucidating the role of the adsorbed bridge-bonded formates in this reaction. Potentiodynamic measurements show a complex interplay between formation and desorption/oxidation of COad and formate species and the total Faradaic current. The notably faster increase of the Faradaic current compared to the coverage of bridge-bonded formate in transient measurements at constant potential, but with different formic acid concentrations, reveals that adsorbed formate decomposition is not rate-limiting in the dominant reaction pathway. If being reactive intermediate at all, the contribution of formate adsorption/decomposition to the reaction current decreases with increasing formic acid concentration, accounting for at most 15% for 0.2 M DCOOH at 0.7 VRHE. The rapid build-up/removal of the formate adlayer and its similarity with acetate or (bi-)sulfate adsorption/desorption indicate that the formate adlayer coverage is dominated by a fast dynamic adsorption-desorption equilibrium with the electrolyte, and that formate desorption is much faster than its decomposition. The results corroborate the proposal of a triple pathway reaction mechanism including an indirect pathway, a formate pathway, and a dominant direct pathway, as presented previously (Chen, Y. X.; et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 981), in which adsorbed formates act as a site-blocking spectator in the dominant pathway rather than as an active intermediate.

  2. Synthesis of a Benzodiazepine-derived Rhodium NHC Complex by C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Roberg G.; Gribble, Jr., Michael W.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-30

    The synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I)-NHC complex generated by C-H activation of 1,4-benzodiazepine heterocycle are reported. This complex constitutes a rare example of a carbene tautomer of a 1,4-benzodiazepine aldimine stabilized by transition metal coordination and demonstrates the ability of the catalytically relevant RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment to induce NHC-forming tautomerization of heterocycles possessing a single carbene-stabilizing heteroatom. Implications for the synthesis of benzodiazepines and related pharmacophores via C-H functionalization are discussed.

  3. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding. Progress report, March 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C{sub 60} to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C{sub 70} in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of {eta}{sup 3}- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of {eta}{sup 3}-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  4. A Systematic Study of Structure and E-H Bond Activation Chemistry by Sterically Encumbered Germylene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Usher, Matthew; Protchenko, Andrey V; Rit, Arnab; Campos, Jesús; Kolychev, Eugene L; Tirfoin, Rémi; Aldridge, Simon

    2016-08-01

    A series of new germylene compounds has been synthesized offering systematic variation in the σ- and π-capabilities of the α-substituent and differing levels of reactivity towards E-H bond activation (E=H, B, C, N, Si, Ge). Chloride metathesis utilizing [(terphenyl)GeCl] proves to be an effective synthetic route to complexes of the type [(terphenyl)Ge(ERn )] (1-6: ERn =NHDipp, CH(SiMe3 )2 , P(SiMe3 )2 , Si(SiMe3 )3 or B(NDippCH)2 ; terphenyl=C6 H3 Mes2 -2,6=Ar(Mes) or C6 H3 Dipp2 -2,6=Ar(Dipp) ; Dipp=C6 H3 iPr2 -2,6, Mes=C6 H2 Me3 -2,4,6), while the related complex [{(Me3 Si)2 N}Ge{B(NDippCH)2 }] (8) can be accessed by an amide/boryl exchange route. Metrical parameters have been probed by X-ray crystallography, and are consistent with widening angles at the metal centre as more bulky and/or more electropositive substituents are employed. Thus, the widest germylene units (θ>110°) are found to be associated with strongly σ-donating boryl or silyl ancillary donors. HOMO-LUMO gaps for the new germylene complexes have been appraised by DFT calculations. The aryl(boryl)-germylene system [Ar(Mes) Ge{B(NDippCH)2 }] (6-Mes), which features a wide C-Ge-B angle (110.4(1)°) and (albeit relatively weak) ancillary π-acceptor capabilities, has the smallest HOMO-LUMO gap (119 kJ mol(-1) ). These features result in 6-Mes being remarkably reactive, undergoing facile intramolecular C-H activation involving one of the mesityl ortho-methyl groups. The related aryl(silyl)-germylene system, [Ar(Mes) Ge{Si(SiMe3 )3 }] (5-Mes) has a marginally wider HOMO-LUMO gap (134 kJ mol(-1) ), rendering it less labile towards decomposition, yet reactive enough to oxidatively cleave H2 and NH3 to give the corresponding dihydride and (amido)hydride. Mixed aryl/alkyl, aryl/amido and aryl/phosphido complexes are unreactive, but amido/boryl complex 8 is competent for the activation of E-H bonds (E=H, B, Si) to give hydrido, boryl and silyl products. The results of these reactivity studies

  5. A Systematic Study of Structure and E-H Bond Activation Chemistry by Sterically Encumbered Germylene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Usher, Matthew; Protchenko, Andrey V; Rit, Arnab; Campos, Jesús; Kolychev, Eugene L; Tirfoin, Rémi; Aldridge, Simon

    2016-08-01

    A series of new germylene compounds has been synthesized offering systematic variation in the σ- and π-capabilities of the α-substituent and differing levels of reactivity towards E-H bond activation (E=H, B, C, N, Si, Ge). Chloride metathesis utilizing [(terphenyl)GeCl] proves to be an effective synthetic route to complexes of the type [(terphenyl)Ge(ERn )] (1-6: ERn =NHDipp, CH(SiMe3 )2 , P(SiMe3 )2 , Si(SiMe3 )3 or B(NDippCH)2 ; terphenyl=C6 H3 Mes2 -2,6=Ar(Mes) or C6 H3 Dipp2 -2,6=Ar(Dipp) ; Dipp=C6 H3 iPr2 -2,6, Mes=C6 H2 Me3 -2,4,6), while the related complex [{(Me3 Si)2 N}Ge{B(NDippCH)2 }] (8) can be accessed by an amide/boryl exchange route. Metrical parameters have been probed by X-ray crystallography, and are consistent with widening angles at the metal centre as more bulky and/or more electropositive substituents are employed. Thus, the widest germylene units (θ>110°) are found to be associated with strongly σ-donating boryl or silyl ancillary donors. HOMO-LUMO gaps for the new germylene complexes have been appraised by DFT calculations. The aryl(boryl)-germylene system [Ar(Mes) Ge{B(NDippCH)2 }] (6-Mes), which features a wide C-Ge-B angle (110.4(1)°) and (albeit relatively weak) ancillary π-acceptor capabilities, has the smallest HOMO-LUMO gap (119 kJ mol(-1) ). These features result in 6-Mes being remarkably reactive, undergoing facile intramolecular C-H activation involving one of the mesityl ortho-methyl groups. The related aryl(silyl)-germylene system, [Ar(Mes) Ge{Si(SiMe3 )3 }] (5-Mes) has a marginally wider HOMO-LUMO gap (134 kJ mol(-1) ), rendering it less labile towards decomposition, yet reactive enough to oxidatively cleave H2 and NH3 to give the corresponding dihydride and (amido)hydride. Mixed aryl/alkyl, aryl/amido and aryl/phosphido complexes are unreactive, but amido/boryl complex 8 is competent for the activation of E-H bonds (E=H, B, Si) to give hydrido, boryl and silyl products. The results of these reactivity studies

  6. Oxidative addition of the Cα-Cβ bond in β-O-4 linkage of lignin to transition metals using a relativistic pseudopotential-based ccCA-ONIOM method.

    PubMed

    Oyedepo, Gbenga A; Wilson, Angela K

    2011-12-01

    A multi-level multi-layer QM/QM method, the relativistic pseudopotential correlation-consistent composite approach within an ONIOM framework (rp-ccCA-ONIOM), was applied to study the oxidative addition of the C(α)-C(β) bond in an archetypal arylglycerol β-aryl ether (β-O-4 linkage) substructure of lignin to Ni, Cu, Pd and Pt transition metal atoms. The chemically active high-level layer is treated using the relativistic pseudopotential correlation-consistent composite approach (rp-ccCA), an efficient methodology designed to reproduce an accuracy that would be obtained using the more computationally demanding CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCV∞Z-PP, albeit at a significantly reduced computational cost, while the low-level layer is computed using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ. The thermodynamic and kinetic feasibilities of the model reactions are reported in terms of enthalpies of reactions at 298 K (ΔH°(298)) and activation energies (ΔH-act). The results obtained from the rp-ccCA:B3LYP hybrid method are compared to the corresponding values using CCSD(T) and several density functionals including B3LYP, M06, M06 L, B2PLYP, mPWPLYP and B2GP-PLYP. The energetics of the oxidative addition of CC bond in ethane to Ni, Cu, Pd and Pt atoms are also reported to demonstrate that the rp-ccCA method effectively reproduces the accuracy of the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCV∞Z method. Our results show that in the catalytic activation of the C(α)-C(β) bond of β-O-4, the use of platinum metal catalysts will lead to the most thermodynamically favored reaction with the lowest activation barrier. PMID:22144374

  7. One-Pot Amide Bond Formation from Aldehydes and Amines via a Photoorganocatalytic Activation of Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Giorgos N; Kokotos, Christoforos G

    2016-08-19

    A mild, one-pot, and environmentally friendly synthesis of amides from aldehydes and amines is described. Initially, a photoorganocatalytic reaction of aldehydes with di-isopropyl azodicarboxylate leads to an intermediate carbonyl imide, which can react with a variety of amines to afford the desired amides. The initial visible light-mediated activation of a variety of monosubstituted or disubstituted aldehydes is usually fast, occurring in a few hours. Following the photocatalytic reaction, addition of the primary amine at room temperature or the secondary amine at elevated temperatures leads to the corresponding amide from moderate to excellent yields without epimerization. This methodology was applied in the synthesis of Moclobemide, a drug against depression and social anxiety. PMID:27227271

  8. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝intensityn, with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  9. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  10. Asymmetric Desymmetrization via Metal-Free C-F Bond Activation: Synthesis of 3,5-Diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones with Quaternary Carbon Centers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junki; Suzuki, Satoru; Tokunaga, Etsuko; Haufe, Günter; Shibata, Norio

    2016-08-01

    We disclose the first asymmetric activation of a non-activated aliphatic C-F bond in which a conceptually new desymmetrization of 1,3-difluorides by silicon-induced selective C-F bond scission is a key step. The combination of a cinchona alkaloid based chiral ammonium bifluoride catalyst and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetoamide (BSA) as the silicon reagent enabled the efficient catalytic cycle of asymmetric Csp3 -F bond cleavage under mild conditions with high enantioselectivities. The ortho effect of the aryl group at the prostereogenic center is remarkable. This concept was applied for the asymmetric synthesis of promising agrochemical compounds, 3,5-diaryl-5-fluoromethyloxazolidin-2-ones bearing a quaternary carbon center.

  11. The C-H bond activation in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate-copper(II) acetate-water-air (dioxygen) systems.

    PubMed

    Shtyrlin, Valery G; Serov, Nikita Yu; Islamov, Daut R; Konkin, Alexander L; Bukharov, Mikhail S; Gnezdilov, Oleg I; Krivolapov, Dmitry B; Kataeva, Ol'ga N; Nazmutdinova, Gulnara A; Wendler, Frank

    2014-01-14

    Ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [C2C1im][AcO])-copper(ii) diacetate monohydrate-water-air (O2) systems have been investigated by (13)C NMR, EPR, spectrophotometry, HPLC, and synthetic chemistry methods at different temperatures. The C-H bond activation of [C2C1im](+) with the formation of the unusual dication 1,1'-diethyl-3,3'-dimethyl-2,2'-biimidazolium ([(C2C1im)2](2+)) at 50 °C and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-1H-imidazol-2(3H)-one (C2C1imO) at 50-85 °C was revealed. Two new complexes with the above compounds, [(C2C1im)2][Cu(AcO)4] and Cu2(AcO)4(C2C1imO)2, were isolated from the systems and characterized by X-ray structural analysis. Catalytic cycles with the participation of copper(ii) acetate and dioxygen and the production of [(C2C1im)2](2+) and C2C1imO have been proposed. The catalysis presumably includes the formation of the Cu(II)(O2)Cu(II) active centre with μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxide bridging in analogy with tyrosinase and catechol oxidase activity. PMID:24154681

  12. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    convergence to a single phase is expected and predictable from thermodynamics at a given temperature and sulfur chemical potential, metastability of two phases can exist. We demonstrate, through extensive characterization and kinetic evidence, such behaviors exist in Re, where structural disparities between its phases lead to kinetic hurdles that prevent interconversions between layered ReSx nanostructures and sulfur-covered Re metal clusters. Such features allowed, for the first time, direct comparisons of reaction rates at identical conditions on two disparate phases of the same transition metal identity. Rigorous assessments of kinetic and selectivity data indicated that more universal mechanistic features persist across all catalysts studied, suggesting that differences in their catalytic activity were the result of different densities of HDS sites, which appeared to correlate with their respective metal-sulfur bond energies. Kinetic responses and product distributions indicated that the consumption of thiophene proceeds by the formation of a partially-hydrogenated surface intermediate, which subsequently produces tetrahydrothiophene (THT) and butene/butane (C4) via primary routes on similar types of sites. These sites are formed from desorption of weakly-bound sulfur adatoms on sulfur-covered metal surfaces, which can occur when the heat of sulfur adsorption is sufficiently low at high sulfur coverage as a result of increased sulfur-sulfur repulsive interactions. Relative stabilities and differences in the molecularity of the respective transition states that form THT and C4 dictate product distributions. THT desulfurization to form C4 occurs via readsorption and subsequent dehydrogenation, evidenced by secondary rates that exhibited negative H2 dependences. These behaviors suggest that C-S bond activation occurs on a partially (un)saturated intermediate, analogous to behaviors observed in C-C bond scission reactions of linear and cycloalkanes on hydrogen-covered metal

  13. Detecting Defective Solder Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R.; Barney, J.; Decker, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Method is noncontact and nondestructive. Technique detects solder bonds in solar array of other large circuit board, using thermal-imaging camera. Board placed between heat lamp and camera. Poor joints indiated by "cold" spots on the infrared image.

  14. Propane σ-Complexes on PdO(101): Spectroscopic Evidence of the Selective Coordination and Activation of Primary C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Pan, Li; Choi, Juhee; Mehar, Vikram; Diulus, John T; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F

    2015-11-16

    Achieving selective C-H bond cleavage is critical for developing catalytic processes that transform small alkanes to value-added products. The present study clarifies the molecular-level origin for an exceptionally strong preference for propane to dissociate on the crystalline PdO(101) surface via primary C-H bond cleavage. Using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that adsorbed propane σ-complexes preferentially adopt geometries on PdO(101) in which only primary C-H bonds datively interact with the surface Pd atoms at low propane coverages and are thus activated under typical catalytic reaction conditions. We show that a propane molecule achieves maximum stability on PdO(101) by adopting a bidentate geometry in which a H-Pd dative bond forms at each CH3 group. These results demonstrate that structural registry between the molecule and surface can strongly influence the selectivity of a metal oxide surface in activating alkane C-H bonds. PMID:26420576

  15. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined ().

  16. Palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides by carbon-nitrogen cleavage: general strategy for amide N-C bond activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-15

    The first palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of amides with boronic acids for the synthesis of ketones by sterically-controlled N-C bond activation is reported. The transformation is characterized by operational simplicity using bench-stable, commercial reagents and catalysts, and a broad substrate scope, including substrates with electron-donating and withdrawing groups on both coupling partners, steric-hindrance, heterocycles, halides, esters and ketones. The scope and limitations are presented in the synthesis of >60 functionalized ketones. Mechanistic studies provide insight into the catalytic cycle of the cross-coupling, including the first experimental evidence for Pd insertion into the amide N-C bond. The synthetic utility is showcased by a gram-scale cross-coupling and cross-coupling at room temperature. Most importantly, this process provides a blueprint for the development of a plethora of metal catalyzed reactions of typically inert amide bonds via acyl-metal intermediates. A unified strategy for amide bond activation to enable metal insertion into N-C amide bond is outlined (). PMID:26864384

  17. Structure, bonding, and catalytic activity of monodisperse, transition-metal-substituted CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elias, Joseph S; Risch, Marcel; Giordano, Livia; Mansour, Azzam N; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-12-10

    We present a simple and generalizable synthetic route toward phase-pure, monodisperse transition-metal-substituted ceria nanoparticles (M0.1Ce0.9O2-x, M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). The solution-based pyrolysis of a series of heterobimetallic Schiff base complexes ensures a rigorous control of the size, morphology and composition of 3 nm M0.1Ce0.9O2-x crystallites for CO oxidation catalysis and other applications. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirms the dispersion of aliovalent (M(3+) and M(2+)) transition metal ions into the ceria matrix without the formation of any bulk transition metal oxide phases, while steady-state CO oxidation catalysis reveals an order of magnitude increase in catalytic activity with copper substitution. Density functional calculations of model slabs of these compounds confirm the stabilization of M(3+) and M(2+) in the lattice of CeO2. These results highlight the role of the host CeO2 lattice in stabilizing high oxidation states of aliovalent transition metal dopants that ordinarily would be intractable, such as Cu(3+), as well as demonstrating a rational approach to catalyst design. The current work demonstrates, for the first time, a generalizable approach for the preparation of transition-metal-substituted CeO2 for a broad range of transition metals with unparalleled synthetic control and illustrates that Cu(3+) is implicated in the mechanism for CO oxidation on CuO-CeO2 catalysts. PMID:25406101

  18. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  19. Metal-free nitro-carbocyclization of activated alkenes: a direct approach to synthesize oxindoles by cascade C-N and C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Yuan, Yizhi; Jiao, Ning

    2014-01-18

    A novel and direct metal-free nitro-carbocyclization of activated alkenes leading to valuable nitro-containing oxindoles via cascade C-N and C-C bond formation has been developed. The mechanistic study indicates that the initial NO and NO2 radical addition and the following C-H functionalization processes are involved in this transformation.

  20. Catalytic C-H bond activation at nanoscale Lewis acidic aluminium fluorides: H/D exchange reactions at aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, Martin H G; Teltewskoi, Michael; Dimitrov, Anton; Kemnitz, Erhard; Braun, Thomas

    2011-12-16

    Nanoscopic amorphous Lewis acidic aluminium fluorides, such as aluminium chlorofluoride (ACF) and high-surface aluminium fluoride (HS-AlF(3)), are capable of activating C-H bonds of aliphatic hydrocarbons. H/D exchange reactions are catalysed under mild conditions (40 °C).

  1. Energy-efficient green catalysis: supported gold nanoparticle-catalyzed aminolysis of esters with inert tertiary amines by C-O and C-N bond activations.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yong-Sheng; Baiyin, Menghe; Agula, Bao; Jia, Meilin; Zhaorigetu, Bao

    2014-07-18

    Catalyzed by supported gold nanoparticles, an aminolysis reaction between various aryl esters and inert tertiary amines by C-O and C-N bond activations has been developed for the selective synthesis of tertiary amides. Comparison studies indicated that the gold nanoparticles could perform energy-efficient green catalysis at room temperature, whereas Pd(OAc)2 could not.

  2. Implementation and Evaluation of Web-Based Learning Activities on Bonding and the Structure of Matter for 10-th Grade Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailich, Marcel

    This study deals with the development, implementation, and evaluation of web-based activities associated with the topic of chemical bonding , as taught in 10th grade chemistry. A website was developed entitled: "Chemistry and the Chemical Industry in the Service of Mankind", its URL is: http://stwww.weizmann.ac.il/g-chem/learnchem (Kesner, Frailich, & Hofstein, 2003). The main goal of this study was to assess the educational effectiveness of website activities dealing with the chemical bonding concept. These activities include visualization tools, as well as topics relevant to daily life and industrial applications. The study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment regarding the understanding of chemical bonding concepts, students' perceptions of the classroom learning environment, their attitudes regarding the relevance of learning chemistry to everyday life, and their interest in chemistry studies. As mentioned before, in the present study we focused on activities (from the website), all of which deal with chemical bonding concept. The following are the reasons for the decision to focus on this topic: (1) Chemical bonding is a key concept that is taught in 10th grade chemistry in high school. It provides the basis for many other chemistry topics that are taught later, and (2) Chemical bonding is a difficult for students using existing tools (e. g., static models in books, ball-and- stick models), which are insufficient to demonstrate the abstract nature phenomena associated with this topic. The four activities developed for this study are (1) models of the atomic structure, (2) metals -- structure and properties, (3) ionic substances in everyday life and in industry, and (4) molecular substances -- structure, properties, and uses. The study analyzed both quantitative and qualitative research. The quantitative tools of the study included: A Semantic Differential questionnaire and a Chemistry Classroom Web-Based Learning Environment

  3. An Alternative Method for Analyzing Active Multiplicity Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors have developed a novel method for analyzing active neutron multiplicity data. The conventional method was derived from the standard passive multiplicity equations known as the point model. The approach was to substitute a term consisting of the product of the interrogation source strength, the coupling coefficient, and the sample mass for the product term of the sample mass and the fission rate: I{kappa}{sub c}m {yields} F{sub 0}m, where I is the source strength, {kappa}{sub c} is the coupling coefficient, m is the sample mass and F is the fission rate. Note that the sample mass, m, refers to the fissile material (e.g. {sup 235}U) in the active case and fertile material (e.g. {sup 240}Pu{sub eff}) in the passive case. In addition, the spontaneous fission multiplicity coefficients, {nu}{sub s}, were replaced with the induced fission multiplicity coefficients, {nu}{sub i}. This model has several drawbacks. The most significant is that the coupling coefficient, {kappa}{sub c}, varies significantly with the multiplication. As a consequence, there is not a clear linear relationship between the doubles rate and the sample mass, nor is there a clear linear relationship between the multiplication-corrected doubles rate and the sample mass. This problem has limited the application of active neutron multiplicity counting. They propose here a novel approach to deriving the multiplicity equations. A different substitution is made in the point model equations. The value of alpha is replaced with a new term, alpha-prime: {alpha} {yields} {alpha}{prime} {triple_bond} {alpha} + {kappa}{sub p}I/Fm{sub 0}{nu}{sub s1}. There are several benefits to this approach, but most significant is that the new coupling coefficient, {kappa}{sub p}, remains constant. In this paper they will establish the general physics justification why this different substitution is appropriate. They will derive the new point model equations for active neutron multiplicity starting from the original

  4. Geometric and Electronic Structure of [{Cu(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2(O22−))]2+ with an Unusually Long O–O Bond: O–O Bond Weakening vs Activation for Reductive Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Young; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Woertink, Julia; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A.; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with particularly low υO–O (710–730 cm−1) have been found in equilibrium with their bis-μ-oxo dicopper(III) isomer. An issue is whether such side-on peroxo bridges are further activated for O–O cleavage. In a previous study (Liang, H.-C., et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4170–4171), we showed that oxygenation of the three-coordinate complex [CuI(MeAN)]+ (MeAN=N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) leads to a low-temperature stable [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ peroxo species with low υO–O (721 cm−1), as characterized by UV-Vis absorption and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopies. Here, this complex has been crystallized as its SbF6− salt and an X-ray structure indicates the presence of an unusually long O–O bond (1.540(5) Å) consistent with the low υO–O. EXAFS and rR spectroscopic and reactivity studies indicate the exclusive formation of [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ without any bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) isomer present. This is the first structure of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with a significantly long and weak O–O bond. DFT calculations show that the weak O–O bond results from strong σ donation from the MeAN ligand to Cu that is compensated by a decrease in the extent of peroxo to Cu charge transfer. Importantly, the weak O–O bond does not reflect an increase in backbonding into the σ* orbital of the peroxide. Thus, although the O–O bond is unusually weak, this structure is not further activated for reductive cleavage to form a reactive bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) species. These results highlight the necessity of understanding electronic structure changes associated with spectral changes for correlations to reactivity. PMID:22571744

  5. Synthesis of the proteinase inhibitor LEKTI domain 6 by the fragment condensation method and regioselective disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas K; Gatos, Dimitrios; Adermann, Knut; Deraison, Celine; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are of high pharmaceutical interest and are drug candidates for a variety of indications. Specific kallikrein inhibitors are important for their antitumor activity and their potential application to the treatment of skin diseases. In this study we describe the synthesis of domain 6 of the kallikrein inhibitor Lympho-Epithilial Kazal-Type Inhibitor (LEKTI) by the fragment condensation method and site-directed cystine bridge formation. To obtain the linear LEKTI precursor, the condensation was best performed in solution, coupling the protected fragment 1-22 to 23-68. This method yielded LEKTI domain 6 of high purity and equipotent to the recombinantly produced peptide. PMID:20069636

  6. Oxidative Addition of Carbon–Carbon Bonds with a Redox-Active Bis(imino)pyridine Iron Complex

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Jonathan M.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Sylvester, Kevin T.; Fernández, Ignacio; Lobkovsky, Emil; Semproni, Scott P.; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl; DeBeer, Serena; Chirik, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Addition of biphenylene to the bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complexes, (iPrPDI)Fe(N2)2 and [(MePDI)Fe(N2)]2(μ2-N2) (RPDI = 2,6-(2,6-R2—C6H3— N=CMe)2C5H3N; R = Me, iPr), resulted in oxidative addition of a C—C bond at ambient temperature to yield the corresponding iron biphenyl compounds, (RPDI)Fe-(biphenyl). The molecular structures of the resulting bis-(imino)pyridine iron metallacycles were established by X-ray diffraction and revealed idealized square pyramidal geometries. The electronic structures of the compounds were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, magnetochemistry, and X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. The experimental data, in combination with broken-symmetry density functional theory calculations, established spin crossover (low to intermediate spin) ferric compounds antiferromagnetically coupled to bis(imino)pyridine radical anions. Thus, the overall oxidation reaction involves cooperative electron loss from both the iron center and the redox-active bis(imino)pyridine ligand. PMID:23043331

  7. Supramolecular hydrogen-bonding patterns of co-crystals containing the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) phloroglucinol and N-heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovski, Aleksandar; Bertolasi, Valerio; Ferretti, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    The active pharmaceutical ingredient phloroglucinol (PHL) has been taken as an illustrative molecule to explore the intermolecular interactions which can be established with other molecular entities to build PHL pharmaceutical co-crystals. The crystal structures of five newly synthesized co-crystals are reported, where PHL is crystallized with N-heterocycles, namely 2-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine (1), 2,4-dimethyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (2), 4-phenylpyridine (3), 2-hydroxypyridine (4) and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (5). The structural characteristics of these co-crystals, as far as the hydrogen-bonding networks and the crystalline architectures are concerned, are strongly dependent on the chemical features of the coformer molecules, as well as on their size and shape. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interactions established in all the PHL co-crystals of known structures has allowed the recognition of some regularities in the packing modes that can be useful in the design of new supramolecular adducts forming predictable structural motifs.

  8. Supramolecular hydrogen-bonding patterns of co-crystals containing the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) phloroglucinol and N-heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovski, Aleksandar; Bertolasi, Valerio; Ferretti, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    The active pharmaceutical ingredient phloroglucinol (PHL) has been taken as an illustrative molecule to explore the intermolecular interactions which can be established with other molecular entities to build PHL pharmaceutical co-crystals. The crystal structures of five newly synthesized co-crystals are reported, where PHL is crystallized with N-heterocycles, namely 2-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine (1), 2,4-dimethyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (2), 4-phenylpyridine (3), 2-hydroxypyridine (4) and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (5). The structural characteristics of these co-crystals, as far as the hydrogen-bonding networks and the crystalline architectures are concerned, are strongly dependent on the chemical features of the coformer molecules, as well as on their size and shape. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interactions established in all the PHL co-crystals of known structures has allowed the recognition of some regularities in the packing modes that can be useful in the design of new supramolecular adducts forming predictable structural motifs. PMID:27240764

  9. Iridium-mediated Bond Activation and Water Oxidation as an Exemplary Case of CARISMA, A European Network for the Development of Catalytic Routines for Small Molecule Activation.

    PubMed

    Licini, Giulia; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    CARISMA is a currently running COST Action that pools leading European experts in computational and experimental chemistry to foster synergies for developing new catalytic processes for the transformation of abundant small molecules such as water, carbon dioxide, or ammonia into high-value chemicals and energy-relevant products. CARISMA promotes new collaborations, exchange of knowledge and skills, frontier training to young as well as established researchers, and a platform for the advancement of theoretical and experimental research in an iterative process, comprised of expertise in various connate domains including synthesis, catalysis, spectroscopy, kinetics, and computational chemistry. These interactions stimulate the discovery of new and efficient catalytic processes, illustrated in the second part of this contribution with the collaborative development of powerful iridium-based complexes for bond activation and water oxidation catalysis.

  10. Cuprous Oxide Catalyzed Oxidative C-C Bond Cleavage for C-N Bond Formation: Synthesis of Cyclic Imides from Ketones and Amines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Lu, Jianmin; Ma, Jiping; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Feng

    2015-11-16

    Selective oxidative cleavage of a C-C bond offers a straightforward method to functionalize organic skeletons. Reported herein is the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of ketone for C-N bond formation over a cuprous oxide catalyst with molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A wide range of ketones and amines are converted into cyclic imides with moderate to excellent yields. In-depth studies show that both α-C-H and β-C-H bonds adjacent to the carbonyl groups are indispensable for the C-C bond cleavage. DFT calculations indicate the reaction is initiated with the oxidation of the α-C-H bond. Amines lower the activation energy of the C-C bond cleavage, and thus promote the reaction. New insight into the C-C bond cleavage mechanism is presented. PMID:26494312

  11. Prevalence of Bimolecular Routes in the Activation of Diatomic Molecules with Strong Chemical Bonds (O2, NO, CO, N2) on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, David; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-05-19

    Dissociation of the strong bonds in O2, NO, CO, and N2 often involves large activation barriers on low-index planes of metal particles used as catalysts. These kinetic hurdles reflect the noble nature of some metals (O2 activation on Au), the high coverages of co-reactants (O2 activation during CO oxidation on Pt), or the strength of the chemical bonds (NO on Pt, CO and N2 on Ru). High barriers for direct dissociations from density functional theory (DFT) have led to a consensus that "defects", consisting of low-coordination exposed atoms, are required to cleave such bonds, as calculated by theory and experiments for model surfaces at low coverages. Such sites, however, bind intermediates strongly, rendering them unreactive at the high coverages prevalent during catalysis. Such site requirements are also at odds with turnover rates that often depend weakly on cluster size or are actually higher on larger clusters, even though defects, such as corners and edges, are most abundant on small clusters. This Account illustrates how these apparent inconsistencies are resolved through activations of strong bonds assisted by co-adsorbates on crowded low-index surfaces. Catalytic oxidations occur on Au clusters at low temperatures in spite of large activation barriers for O2 dissociation on Au(111) surfaces, leading to proposals that O2 activation requires low-coordination Au atoms or Au-support interfaces. When H2O is present, however, O2 dissociation proceeds with low barriers on Au(111) because chemisorbed peroxides (*OOH* and *HOOH*) form and weaken O-O bonds before cleavage, thus allowing activation on low-index planes. DFT-derived O2 dissociation barriers are much lower on bare Pt surfaces, but such surfaces are nearly saturated with CO* during CO oxidation. A dearth of vacant sites causes O2* to react with CO* to form *OOCO* intermediates that undergo O-O cleavage. NO-H2 reactions occur on Pt clusters saturated with NO* and H*; direct NO* dissociation requires vacant

  12. Method and apparatus for producing active coke

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.

    1980-12-30

    At least a portion of coke produced in a hearth-type furnace is fed into an activation reactor, and at least a portion of the waste gas from the hearth-type furnace is fed to the activation reactor to act as a heating gas and/or an activation gas for the coke feed. Hot waste gas from the activation reactor is passed to a waste-heat boiler. Active coke which has at least partially lost its adsorption capacity may be fed into the furnace in mixture with the coal or alone, or it may be fed directly into the activation reactor for re-activation of the coke.

  13. Iron-Carbonyl-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral [4+2] Annulation of N-H Imines and Internal Alkynes by C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Teng; Zhao, Chongyang; He, Ruoyu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Congyang

    2016-04-18

    Stoichiometric C-H bond activation of arenes mediated by iron carbonyls was reported by Pauson as early as in 1965, yet the catalytic C-H transformations have not been developed. Herein, an iron-catalyzed annulation of N-H imines and internal alkynes to furnish cis-3,4-dihydroisoquinolines is described, and represents the first iron-carbonyl-catalyzed C-H activation reaction of arenes. Remarkablely, this is also the first redox-neutral [4+2] annulation of imines and alkynes proceeding by C-H activation. The reaction also features only cis stereoselectivity and excellent atom economy as neither base, nor external ligand, nor additive is required. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal an oxidative addition mechanism for C-H bond activation to afford a dinuclear ferracycle and a synergetic diiron-promoted H-transfer to the alkyne as the turnover-determining step.

  14. Improvement in Ti-porcelain bonding by SiO(2) modification of titanium surface through cast method.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanhua; Zhang, Zutai; Ding, Ning; Zheng, Dongxiang; Li, Hui; Liu, Xu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to improve Ti-porcelain bonding strength through SiO2 modifications. Wax patterns were coated with SiO2 mixed with tetraethoxy silane (group C), patterns without coating were used as controls and subdivided into sandblasting group (group S) and polishing group (group P). Castingsurfaces were analyzed with XRD, while Ti-ceramic interfaces were characterized using SEM/EDS. Metal-ceramic specimens were tested in three point bending, and characterizations were also analyzed with SEM/EDS of porcelain debonding surfaces. In group C, SiO2 and Ti5Si3 phases were observed; SEM micrograph showed that Ti-porcelain had a compacted interface, and EDS maps of the interface illustrated the diffusion of Si, Al, and Sn to Ti, and cohesive fracture within the bonding agent. The bond strength of group C was 39.04±5.0 MPa, which was 15% higher than that of group S and 32% higher than that of group P. SiO2 coating could improve Ti-porcelain bond strength. PMID:23903637

  15. Simple fabrication of hydrophilic nanochannels using the chemical bonding between activated ultrathin PDMS layer and cover glass by oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Hyun; Cui, Yidan; Lee, Min Jung; Nam, Seong-Won; Oh, Doori; Kang, Seong Ho; Kim, Youn Sang; Park, Sungsu

    2011-01-21

    This study describes a simple and low cost method for fabricating enclosed transparent hydrophilic nanochannels by coating low-viscosity PDMS (monoglycidyl ether-terminated polydimethylsiloxane) as an adhesion layer onto the surface of the nanotrenches that are molded with a urethane-based UV-curable polymer, Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA 63). In detail, the nanotrenches made of NOA 63 were replicated from a Si master mold and coated with 6 nm thick layer of PDMS. These nanotrenches underwent an oxygen plasma treatment and finally were bound to a cover glass by chemical bonding between silanol and hydroxyl groups. Hydrophobic recovery that is observed in the bulk PDMS was not observed in the thin film of PDMS on the mold and the PDMS-coated nanochannel maintained its surface hydrophilicity for at least one month. The potentials of the nanochannels for bioapplications were demonstrated by stretching λ-DNA (48,502 bp) in the channels. Therefore, this fabrication approach provides a practical solution for the simple fabrication of the nanochannels for bioapplications.

  16. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  17. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  18. Activation of carbon dioxide by a terminal uranium-nitrogen bond in the gas-phase: a demonstration of the principle of microscopic reversibility.

    PubMed

    Dau, Phuong D; Armentrout, P B; Michelini, Maria C; Gibson, John K

    2016-03-14

    Activation of CO2 is demonstrated by its spontaneous dissociative reaction with the gas-phase anion complex NUOCl2(-), which can be considered as NUO(+) coordinated by two chloride anion ligands. This reaction was previously predicted by density functional theory to occur exothermically, without barriers above the reactant energy. The present results demonstrate the validity of the prediction of microscopic reversibility, and provide a rare case of spontaneous dissociative addition of CO2 to a gas-phase complex. The activation of CO2 by NUOCl2(-) proceeds by conversion of a U[triple bond, length as m-dash]N bond to a U[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond and creation of an isocyanate ligand to yield the complex UO2(NCO)Cl2(-), in which uranyl, UO2(2+), is coordinated by one isocyanate and two chloride anion ligands. This activation of CO2 by a uranium(vi) nitride complex is distinctive from previous reports of oxidative insertion of CO2 into lower oxidation state U(iii) or U(iv) solid complexes, during which both C-O bonds remain intact. This unusual observation of spontaneous addition and activation of CO2 by NUOCl2(-) is a result of the high oxophilicity of uranium. If the computed Gibbs free energy of the reaction pathway, rather than the energy, is considered, there are barriers above the reactant asymptotes such that the observed reaction should not proceed under thermal conditions. This result provides a demonstration that energy rather than Gibbs free energy determines reactivity under low-pressure bimolecular conditions. PMID:26898535

  19. Distinctive activation and functionalization of hydrocarbon C-H bonds initiated by Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Rhett A; Legzdins, Peter

    2014-02-18

    Converting hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added chemicals continues to offer challenges to contemporary preparative chemists. A particularly important remaining challenge is the selective activation and functionalization of the C(sp(3))-H linkages of alkanes, which are relatively abundant but chemically inert. This Account outlines the discovery and development of C-H bond functionalization mediated by a family of tungsten organometallic nitrosyl complexes. Specifically, it describes how gentle thermolyses of any of four 18-electron Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5; η(3)-allyl = η(3)-H2CCHCHMe, η(3)-H2CCHCHSiMe3, η(3)-H2CCHCHPh, or η(3)-H2CCHCMe2) results in the loss of neopentane and the transient formation of a 16-electron intermediate species, Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-allene) and/or Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-diene). We have never detected any of these species spectroscopically, but we infer their existence based on trapping experiments with trimethylphosphine (PMe3) and labeling experiments using deuterated hydrocarbon substrates. This Account first summarizes the syntheses and properties of the four chiral Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes. It then outlines the various types of C-H activations we have effected with each of the 16-electron (η(2)-allene) or (η(2)-diene) intermediate nitrosyl complexes, and presents the results of mechanistic investigations of some of these processes. It next describes the characteristic chemical properties of the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(η(1)-hydrocarbyl) compounds formed by the single activations of C(sp(3))-H bonds, with particular emphasis on those reactions that result in the selective functionalization of the original hydrocarbon substrate. We are continuing development of methods to release the acyl ligands from the metal centers while keeping the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl) fragments intact, with the ultimate aim of achieving these distinctive conversions of alkanes into functionalized organics in a

  20. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si- xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-06-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si- xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.