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Sample records for activated c-jun n-terminal

  1. Activation of c-Jun transcription factor by substitution of a charged residue in its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, W K; Levinson, A D; Bauer, E A

    1994-01-01

    C-Jun is a cellular transcription factor that can control gene expression in response to treatment of cells with phorbol esters, growth factors, and expression of some oncogenes. The ability of c-Jun to catalyze the transcription of certain genes is controlled, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation state of specific amino acids in c-Jun. One of the major sites that is phosphorylated during signal response is Ser73. Here we show that substitution of a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at 73 constitutively increased transcriptional activity of c-Jun. The Asp73 substitution also enhanced its availability to bind to DNA in a whole cell extract without altering its intrinsic DNA binding activity since the intrinsic activity was unaltered for the c-Jun mutant proteins expressed in a bacterial system. The negatively charged Asp substitution may mimic the negative charge of a phosphorylated serine at 73. The substitution of an uncharged alanine at 73 resulted in lowered activities. The N-terminal end of c-Jun containing these substitutions was fused to the DNA-binding region of the bovine papilloma virus E2 protein, and was able to confer the same activation properties to the fusion protein at the heterologous E2 DNA-binding site. Ser73 lies in a region of c-Jun previously proposed to bind an uncharacterized inhibitor, perhaps related to a protein of approximately 17.5 kD that coprecipitates along with our c-Jun or the JunE2 fusion products. Images PMID:8165146

  2. cJun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation of serine 36 is critical for p66Shc activation

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Sana; Drasche, Astrid; Thurner, Marco; Hermann, Martin; Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Fresser, Friedrich; Baier, Gottfried; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert; Troppmair, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    p66Shc-dependent ROS production contributes to many pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) during solid organ transplantation. Inhibiting p66Shc activation may provide a novel therapeutic approach to prevent damage, which is poorly managed by antioxidants in vivo. Previous work suggested that pro-oxidant and a pro-apoptotic function of p66Shc required mitochondrial import, which depended on serine 36 phosphorylation. PKCß has been proposed as S36 kinase but cJun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) may also phosphorylate this residue. To simulate the early stages of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) we either used H2O2 treatment or hypoxia/reoxygenation (HR). As during reperfusion in vivo, we observed increased JNK and p38 activity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and HL-1 cardiomyocytes along with significantly increased p66ShcS36 phosphorylation, ROS production and cell damage. Application of specific inhibitors caused a pronounced decrease in p66ShcS36 phosphorylation only in the case of JNK1/2. Moreover, S36 phosphorylation of recombinant p66Shc by JNK1 but not PKCß was demonstrated. We further confirmed JNK1/2-dependent regulation of p66ShcS36 phosphorylation, ROS production and cell death using JNK1/2 deficient MEFs. Finally, the low ROS phenotype of JNK1/2 knockout MEFs was reversed by the phosphomimetic p66ShcS36E mutant. Inhibiting JNK1/2-regulated p66Shc activation may thus provide a therapeutic approach for the prevention of oxidative damage. PMID:26868434

  3. Heroin activates ATF3 and CytC via c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways to mediate neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hongwei; Wang, Xuemei; Su, Liping; Ma, Chuang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xiao; Li, Xiujuan; Wang, Hua; Liu, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Jianlong

    2015-04-07

    BACKGROUND Drug abuse and addiction has become a major public health problem that impacts all societies. The use of heroin may cause spongiform leukoencephalopathy (SLE). MATERIAL AND METHODS Cerebellar granule cells were derived from 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups. Neurons were dissociated from freshly dissected cerebella by mechanical disruption in the presence of 0.125% trypsin and DNaseI and then seeded at a density of 4×10^6 cells/ml in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/nutrient mixture F-12 ham's containing 10% fetal bovine serum and Arc-C(sigma) at concentrations to inhibit glial cell growth inoculated into 6-well plates and a small dish. RESULTS We found that heroin induces the apoptosis of primary cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCS) and that the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway was activated under heroin treatment and stimulated obvious increases in the levels of C-jun, Cytc, and ATF3mRNA. CYTC and ATF3 were identified as candidate targets of the JNK/c-Jun pathway in this process because the specificity inhibitors SP600125 of JNK/C-jun pathways reduced the levels of C-jun, Cytc, and ATF3mRNA. The results suggested that SP600125 of JNK/C-jun can inhibit heroin-induced apoptosis of neurons. CONCLUSIONS The present study analyzes our understanding of the critical role of the JNK pathway in the process of neuronal apoptosis induced by heroin, and suggests a new and effective strategy to treat SLE.

  4. Requirement of JIP1-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation for obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Standen, Claire L; Jung, Dae Young; Gray, Susan; Ong, Helena; Flavell, Richard A; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2010-10-01

    The c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) interacting protein 1 (JIP1) has been proposed to act as a scaffold protein that mediates JNK activation. However, recent studies have implicated JIP1 in multiple biochemical processes. Physiological roles of JIP1 that are related to the JNK scaffold function of JIP1 are therefore unclear. To test the role of JIP1 in JNK activation, we created mice with a germ line point mutation in the Jip1 gene (Thr(103) replaced with Ala) that selectively blocks JIP1-mediated JNK activation. These mutant mice exhibit a severe defect in JNK activation caused by feeding of a high-fat diet. The loss of JIP1-mediated JNK activation protected the mutant mice against obesity-induced insulin resistance. We conclude that JIP1-mediated JNK activation plays a critical role in metabolic stress regulation of the JNK signaling pathway.

  5. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and apoptosis in endothelial cells mediated by endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Anup; Moellering, Douglas; Go, Young-Mi; Shiva, Sruti; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Jo, Hanjoong; Patel, Rakesh P.; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the activation of signal transduction pathways. However, extracellular addition of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) often requires concentrations that cannot be readily achieved under physiological conditions to activate biological responses such as apoptosis. Explanations for this discrepancy have included increased metabolism of H2O2 in the extracellular environment and compartmentalization within the cell. We have addressed this issue experimentally by examining the induction of apoptosis of endothelial cells induced by exogenous addition of H2O2 and by a redox cycling agent, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, that generates H2O2 in cells. Here we show that low nanomolar steady-state concentrations (0.1-0.5 nmol x min(-1) x 10(6) cells) of H2O2 generated intracellularly activate c-Jun N terminal kinase and initiate apoptosis in endothelial cells. A comparison with bolus hydrogen peroxide suggests that the low rate of intracellular formation of this reactive oxygen species results in a similar profile of activation for both c-Jun N terminal kinase and the initiation of apoptosis. However, a detailed analysis reveals important differences in both the duration and profile for activation of these signaling pathways.

  6. Neurotrophin 3 activation of TrkC induces Schwann cell migration through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Shooter, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    During development and nerve injury, complex interactions between glial cells and neurons are essential for establishing proper nerve function. Neurotrophins play multiple roles in the developing nervous system, including cell survival, growth, and differentiation. Here we show that migration of Schwann cells, isolated from sciatic nerves, is significantly enhanced by neurotrophin 3, but not by nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The neurotrophin-3-induced cell migration was also observed in Schwann cells isolated from sciatic nerves of p75NTR-/- mice, indicating that neurotrophin 3 enhances cell migration through TrkC. This effect was blocked by K252a, an inhibitor of the Trk receptor family. Additionally, the neurotrophin-3-induced cell migration depended on Rho GTPases (Rac1 and Cdc42) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. We obtained the same results with Cos-7 cells expressing TrkC. Taken together, these results suggest that neurotrophin 3 activation of TrkC induces Schwann cell migration through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. PMID:14614136

  7. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  8. Low concentrations of trichosanthin induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Li, Qing; Liu, Fei; Chou, Kuang-Yen; Tao, Lei; Lu, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a type I ribosome--inactivating protein, which inhibits cell viability in human epithelial type 2 (HEp-2) and AMC-HN-8 human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma cells. Although TCS is a potential chemotherapeutic agent, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. In the present study, HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells were treated with different concentrations of TCS combined with or without cisplatin. After 5 days of successive treatment, different experimental groups were detected using a cell counting kit-8 and the collected supernatants were analyzed using a lactate dehydrogenase kit. Flow cytometric assays were performed to detect apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the levels of p27, p21WAF and western blot analysis was performed to detect changes in c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK)/phosphorylated (phospho)-JNK, p38/phospho-p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/phospho-ERK, caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cancer cells. TCS significantly inhibited the cell viability of the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells, independently of necrosis. TCS induced apoptosis and increased the percentage of HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In addition, the JNK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was activated by TCS in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells. Low concentrations of TCS also induced apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells. The antitumor effects of TCS may be associated with JNK/MAPK activation.

  9. TNF-α increases the expression and activity of vitamin D receptor in keratinocytes: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Ester; Koren, Ruth; Zahalka, Muayad A; Ravid, Amiram

    2016-01-01

    Several inflammatory mediators increase calcitriol production by epidermal keratinocytes. In turn calcitriol attenuates the keratinocyte inflammatory response. Since the effect of the in-situ generated calcitriol depends also on the sensitivity to the hormone we studied the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the response of HaCaT human keratinocytes to calcitriol by examining the expression and transcriptional activity of VDR. Treatment with TNF, but not with IL-1β or interferon γ, increased VDR protein level, while decreasing the level of its heterodimerization partner RXRα. This was associated with increased VDR mRNA levels. c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but not P38 MAPK or NFκB, was found to participate in the upregulation of VDR by TNF. The functional significance of the modulation of VDR and RXRα levels by TNF is manifested by increased induction of VDR target gene CYP24A1 by calcitriol. Calcitriol, in turn, inhibited the enhanced expression of VDR by TNF. In conclusion, the inflammatory cytokine TNF increases the response of keratinocytes to calcitriol through upregulation of its receptor VDR, which in turn is subject to negative feedback by the hormone accelerating the return of the keratinocyte vitamin D system to its basal activity. We surmise that the increased generation and sensitivity to calcitriol in keratinocytes play a role in the resolution of epidermal inflammation. PMID:27195054

  10. A novel human STE20-related protein kinase, HGK, that specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Zhou, G; Wang, X S; Brown, A; Diener, K; Gan, H; Tan, T H

    1999-01-22

    The yeast serine/threonine kinase STE20 activates a signaling cascade that includes STE11 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase), STE7 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), and FUS3/KSS1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to signals from both Cdc42 and the heterotrimeric G proteins associated with transmembrane pheromone receptors. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction, we have isolated a human cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to STE20. This protein kinase, designated HPK/GCK-like kinase (HGK), has nucleotide sequences that encode an open reading frame of 1165 amino acids with 11 kinase subdomains. HGK was a serine/threonine protein kinase that specifically activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway when transfected into 293T cells, but it did not stimulate either the extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 kinase pathway. HGK also increased AP-1-mediated transcriptional activity in vivo. HGK-induced JNK activation was inhibited by the dominant-negative MKK4 and MKK7 mutants. The dominant-negative mutant of TAK1, but not MEKK1 or MAPK upstream kinase (MUK), strongly inhibited HGK-induced JNK activation. TNF-alpha activated HGK in 293T cells, as well as the dominant-negative HGK mutants, inhibited TNF-alpha-induced JNK activation. These results indicate that HGK, a novel activator of the JNK pathway, may function through TAK1, and that the HGK --> TAK1 --> MKK4, MKK7 --> JNK kinase cascade may mediate the TNF-alpha signaling pathway. PMID:9890973

  11. Deamidation of Cdc42 and Rac by Escherichia coli Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1: Activation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lerm, M.; Selzer, J.; Hoffmeyer, A.; Rapp, U. R.; Aktories, K.; Schmidt, G.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) was shown to activate the low-molecular-mass GTPase RhoA by deamidation of Gln63, thereby inhibiting intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-stimulated GTPase activities (G. Schmidt, P. Sehr, M. Wilm, J. Selzer, M. Mann, and K. Aktories, Nature 387:725–729, 1997; G. Flatau, E. Lemichez, M. Gauthier, P. Chardin, S. Paris, C. Fiorentini, and P. Boquet, Nature 387:729–733, 1997). Here we report that in addition to RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac also are targets for CNF1 in vitro and in intact cells. Treatment of HeLa cells with CNF1 induced a transient formation of microspikes and formation of membrane ruffles. CNF1 caused a transient 10- to 50-fold increase in the activity of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Tryptic peptides of Cdc42 obtained from CNF1-treated cells by immunoprecipitation exhibited an increase in mass of 1 Da compared to control peptides, indicating the deamidation of glutamine 61 by the toxin. The same increase in mass was observed with the respective peptides obtained from CNF1-modified recombinant Cdc42 and Rac1. Modification of recombinant Cdc42 and Rac1 by CNF1 inhibited intrinsic and GAP-stimulated GTPase activities and retarded binding of 2′(3′)-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl)GDP. The data suggest that recombinant as well as cellular Cdc42 and Rac are substrates for CNF1. PMID:9916051

  12. Resveratrol reduces prostaglandin E1-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts: suppression of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohiro; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Kainuma, Shingo; Nakakami, Akira; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol mainly existing in red grapes and berries, possesses beneficial effects on human being. We have previously reported that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) but not p44/p42 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the PGE1-effect on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis and the effect of resveratrol on the synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. PGE1 induced the expression levels of OPG mRNA and stimulated the OPG release. Resveratrol significantly reduced the PGE1-induced OPG release and the mRNA expression. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, suppressed the release of OPG. The protein levels of SIRT1 were not up-regulated by resveratrol with or without PGE1. Both SB203580 and SP600125, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor and a specific SAPK/JNK inhibitor, respectively, but not PD98059, a specific MEK inhibitor, reduced the PGE1-stimulated OPG release. Resveratrol or SRT1720 failed to affect the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. On the contrary, PGE1-induced phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK was significantly attenuated by both resveratrol and SRT1720. Our results strongly suggest that resveratrol inhibits PGE1-stimulated OPG synthesis via suppressing SAPK/JNK but not p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

  13. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Heart Dysfunction by Restoring Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Mitigating C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bingdong; Liu, Lidan; Wang, Ni; Tong, Dongyi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is common in intensive care units (ICU) and is associated with high mortality. Cardiac dysfunction complicating sepsis is one of the most important causes of this mortality. This dysfunction is due to myocardial inflammation and reduced production of energy by the heart. A number of studies have shown that hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a beneficial effect on sepsis. Therefore, we tested whether HRS prevents cardiac dysfunction by increasing cardiac energy. Four groups of rats received intraperitoneal injections of one of the following solutions: normal saline (NS), HRS, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and LPS plus HRS. Cardiac function was measured by echocardiography 8 h after the injections. Gene and protein expression related to fatty acid oxidation (FAO) were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis. The injection of LPS compromised heart function through decreased fractional shortening (FS) and increased left ventricular diameter (LVD). The addition of HRS increased FS, palmitate triphosphate, and the ratio of phosphocreatinine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as decreasing LVD. The LPS challenge reduced the expression of genes related to FAO, including perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα), and their downstream targets, in mRNA and protein level, which were attenuated by HRS. However, HRS had little effect on glucose metabolism. Furthermore, HRS inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the rat heart. Inhibition of JNK by HRS showed beneficial effects on LPS-challenged rats, at least in part, by restoring cardiac FAO.

  14. c-Jun N-Terminal Phosphorylation: Biomarker for Cellular Stress Rather than Cell Death in the Injured Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, Tommi; Herranen, Anni; Virkkala, Jussi; Kirjavainen, Anna; Elomaa, Pinja; Laos, Maarja; Liang, Xingqun; Ylikoski, Jukka; Behrens, Axel; Pirvola, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of auditory hair cell death offers therapeutic potential to rescue hearing. Pharmacological blockade of JNK/c-Jun signaling attenuates injury-induced hair cell loss, but with unsolved mechanisms. We have characterized the c-Jun stress response in the mouse cochlea challenged with acoustic overstimulation and ototoxins, by studying the dynamics of c-Jun N-terminal phosphorylation. It occurred acutely in glial-like supporting cells, inner hair cells, and the cells of the cochlear ion trafficking route, and was rapidly downregulated after exposures. Notably, death-prone outer hair cells lacked c-Jun phosphorylation. As phosphorylation was triggered also by nontraumatic noise levels and none of the cells showing this activation were lost, c-Jun phosphorylation is a biomarker for cochlear stress rather than an indicator of a death-prone fate of hair cells. Preconditioning with a mild noise exposure before a stronger traumatizing noise exposure attenuated the cochlear c-Jun stress response, suggesting that the known protective effect of sound preconditioning on hearing is linked to suppression of c-Jun activation. Finally, mice with mutations in the c-Jun N-terminal phosphoacceptor sites showed partial, but significant, hair cell protection. These data identify the c-Jun stress response as a paracrine mechanism that mediates outer hair cell death. PMID:27257624

  15. c-Jun N-Terminal Phosphorylation: Biomarker for Cellular Stress Rather than Cell Death in the Injured Cochlea123

    PubMed Central

    Anttonen, Tommi; Herranen, Anni; Virkkala, Jussi; Kirjavainen, Anna; Elomaa, Pinja; Laos, Maarja; Liang, Xingqun; Ylikoski, Jukka; Behrens, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of auditory hair cell death offers therapeutic potential to rescue hearing. Pharmacological blockade of JNK/c-Jun signaling attenuates injury-induced hair cell loss, but with unsolved mechanisms. We have characterized the c-Jun stress response in the mouse cochlea challenged with acoustic overstimulation and ototoxins, by studying the dynamics of c-Jun N-terminal phosphorylation. It occurred acutely in glial-like supporting cells, inner hair cells, and the cells of the cochlear ion trafficking route, and was rapidly downregulated after exposures. Notably, death-prone outer hair cells lacked c-Jun phosphorylation. As phosphorylation was triggered also by nontraumatic noise levels and none of the cells showing this activation were lost, c-Jun phosphorylation is a biomarker for cochlear stress rather than an indicator of a death-prone fate of hair cells. Preconditioning with a mild noise exposure before a stronger traumatizing noise exposure attenuated the cochlear c-Jun stress response, suggesting that the known protective effect of sound preconditioning on hearing is linked to suppression of c-Jun activation. Finally, mice with mutations in the c-Jun N-terminal phosphoacceptor sites showed partial, but significant, hair cell protection. These data identify the c-Jun stress response as a paracrine mechanism that mediates outer hair cell death. PMID:27257624

  16. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  17. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is activated in human interstitial cystitis (IC) and rat protamine sulfate induced cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wang, Liang; Dong, Xingyou; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Long; Liu, Qina; Song, Bo; Wu, Qingjian; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is currently unclear. However, inflammation has been suggested to play an important role in BPS/IC. JNK downstream signaling plays an important role in numerous chronic inflammatory diseases. However, studies of the JNK pathway in BPS/IC are limited. In this study, we investigated the role of the JNK pathway in human BPS/IC and rat protamine sulfate (PS)-induced cystitis and examined the effect of the selective JNK inhibitor SP600125 on rat bladder cystitis. In our study, we demonstrated that the JNK signaling pathway was activated (the expression of JNK, c-Jun, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increasing in BPS/IC compared to the non-BPS/IC patients) and resulted in inflammation in human BPS/IC. Further animal models showed that the JNK pathway played an important role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. JNK inhibitors, SP600125, effectively inhibited the expression of p-JNK, p-c-Jun, IL-6 and TNF-α. The inhibition of these pathways had a protective effect on PS-induced rat cystitis by significantly decreasing histological score and mast cell count and improving bladder micturition function (micturition frequency significantly decreasing and bladder capacity significantly increasing). Therefore, JNK inhibition could be used as a potential treatment for BPS/IC. PMID:26883396

  18. Ketamine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6 gene expressions in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages through suppression of toll-like receptor 4-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and activator protein-1 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.-J.; Chen, T.-L.; Ueng, Y.-F.; Chen, R.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Our previous study showed that ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic agent, has anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we further evaluated the effects of ketamine on the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) gene expressions and its possible signal-transducing mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. Exposure of macrophages to 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M ketamine, 100 ng/ml LPS, or a combination of ketamine and LPS for 1, 6, and 24 h was not cytotoxic to macrophages. A concentration of 1000 {mu}M of ketamine alone or in combined treatment with LPS caused significant cell death. Administration of LPS increased cellular TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 protein levels in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, treatment with ketamine concentration- and time-dependently alleviated the enhanced effects. LPS induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA syntheses. Administration of ketamine at a therapeutic concentration (100 {mu}M) significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 mRNA expressions. Application of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small interfering (si)RNA into macrophages decreased cellular TLR4 levels. Co-treatment of macrophages with ketamine and TLR4 siRNA decreased the LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 productions more than alone administration of TLR4 siRNA. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos from the cytoplasm to nuclei. However, administration of ketamine significantly decreased LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and translocation of c-Jun and c-Fos. LPS increased the binding of nuclear extracts to activator protein-1 consensus DNA oligonucleotides. Administration of ketamine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced DNA binding activity of activator protein-1. Therefore, a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine can inhibit TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 gene expressions in LPS-activated macrophages. The suppressive mechanisms

  19. Correlation between spina bifida manifesta in fetal rats and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling★

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yinghuan; Bao, Yongxin; Li, Chenghao; Jiao, Fubin; Xin, Hongjie; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2012-01-01

    Fetal rat models with neural tube defects were established by injection with retinoic acid at 10 days after conception. The immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the number of caspase-3 positive cells in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta was increased. There was also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation level was positively correlated with caspase-3 expression in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta. Experimental findings indicate that abnormal apoptosis is involved in retinoic acid-induced dominant spina bifida formation in fetal rats, and may be associated with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:25337099

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression requires Rac1/Cdc42, mixed lineage kinase 3, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Liao, Po-Lin; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Liu, Chen-Wei; Kao, Chen-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2012-03-01

    The explosive development of nanotechnology has caused an increase in unintended biohazards in humans and in the ecosystem. Similar to particulate matter, nanoparticles (NPs) are strongly correlated with the increase in incidences of cardiovascular diseases, yet the mechanisms behind this correlation remain unclear. Within the testing concentrations of 0.1-10 μg/ml, which did not cause a marked drop in cell viability, zinc oxide NPs (ZnO-NPs) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) messenger RNA, and protein expression in both concentration- and time-dependent manner in treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). ZnO-NPs treatment cause the activation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) and protein accumulation of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), followed by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and transcription factor c-Jun activation. Induction of ICAM-1 and phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun could be inhibited by either JNK inhibitor SP600125 or Rac guanosine triphosphatase inhibitor NSC23766 pretreatment. In addition, pretreatment with NSC23766 significantly reduced MLK3 accumulation, suggesting the involvement of Rac1/Cdc42-MLK3-JNK-c-Jun signaling in the regulation of ZnO-NPs-induced ICAM-1 expression, whereas these signaling factors were not activated in zinc oxide microparticles (ZnO-MPs)-treated HUVECs. The increase of ICAM-1 expression on ZnO-NPs-treated HUVECs enables leukocytes to adhere and has been identified as an indicator of vascular inflammation. Our data are essential for safety evaluation of the clinical usage of ZnO-NPs in daily supplements, cosmetics, and biomedicines.

  1. Highly Oxygenated Sesquiterpene Lactones from Cousinia aitchisonii and their Cytotoxic Properties: Rhaserolide Induces Apoptosis in Human T Lymphocyte (Jurkat) Cells via the Activation of c-Jun n-terminal Kinase Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Iranshahy, Milad; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra; Kasaian, Jamal; Ghandadi, Morteza; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Asili, Javad; Chandran, Jima N; Schneider, Bernd; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-02-01

    Infrared-guided chromatographic fractionation of sesquiterpene lactones from the extracts of Cousinia aitchisonii and Cousinia concolor led to the isolation of five pure compounds. A new sesquiterpene lactone, namely, aitchisonolide, and two known sesquiterpene lactones (desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide) were isolated from C. aitchisonii and two known lignans (arctiin and arctigenin) from C. concolor. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, as well as high-resolution mass spectrometry. The purified and characterized compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity assay. The sesquiterpene lactones desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide showed significant cytotoxic activities against five different cancer cell lines and the normal human embryonic kidney cell line. Rhaserolide was chosen to evaluate the possible mechanism of action. Western blot analysis revealed that rhaserolide could induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via the activation of c-Jun n-terminal kinase phosphorylation.

  2. Highly Oxygenated Sesquiterpene Lactones from Cousinia aitchisonii and their Cytotoxic Properties: Rhaserolide Induces Apoptosis in Human T Lymphocyte (Jurkat) Cells via the Activation of c-Jun n-terminal Kinase Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Iranshahy, Milad; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra; Kasaian, Jamal; Ghandadi, Morteza; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Asili, Javad; Chandran, Jima N; Schneider, Bernd; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-02-01

    Infrared-guided chromatographic fractionation of sesquiterpene lactones from the extracts of Cousinia aitchisonii and Cousinia concolor led to the isolation of five pure compounds. A new sesquiterpene lactone, namely, aitchisonolide, and two known sesquiterpene lactones (desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide) were isolated from C. aitchisonii and two known lignans (arctiin and arctigenin) from C. concolor. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, as well as high-resolution mass spectrometry. The purified and characterized compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity assay. The sesquiterpene lactones desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide showed significant cytotoxic activities against five different cancer cell lines and the normal human embryonic kidney cell line. Rhaserolide was chosen to evaluate the possible mechanism of action. Western blot analysis revealed that rhaserolide could induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via the activation of c-Jun n-terminal kinase phosphorylation. PMID:26581585

  3. Activation of estrogen receptor α by raloxifene through an activating protein-1-dependent tethering mechanism in human cervical epithelial cancer cells: a role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Matulis, Christina K; Kraus, W Lee

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) regulates target gene expression in response to ligands through two distinct mechanisms: direct binding to DNA and indirect tethering through other DNA-bound transcription factors, such as AP-1. In the studies described herein, we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of ERα in the AP-1 tethering pathway by the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene (Ral). Our results with the MMP1 and PRUNE genes indicate that the c-Fos component of the AP-1 tethering factor and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) are constitutively bound at the promoter regions prior to Ral exposure. Ral then promotes the binding of ERα at the promoter in a c-Fos-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that JNK1 enzymatic activity is required for Ral-dependent gene activation through ERα. Our results suggest that one role for Ral-dependent recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 binding site is to stimulate JNK1 enzymatic activity. Alternatively, Ral-occupied ERα might recruit protein substrates to promoter-bound JNK1 without any change in JNK1 activity. Collectively, our studies have revealed a new role for JNK1 in determining gene regulatory outcomes by ERα.

  4. Activation of Estrogen Receptor α by Raloxifene Through an Activating Protein-1-Dependent Tethering Mechanism in Human Cervical Epithelial Cancer Cells: A Role for c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Matulis, Christina K.; Kraus, W. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) regulates target gene expression in response to ligands through two distinct mechanisms: direct binding to DNA and indirect tethering through other DNA-bound transcription factors, such as AP-1. In the studies described herein, we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of ERα in the AP-1 tethering pathway by the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene (Ral). Our results with the MMP1 and PRUNE genes indicate that the c-Fos component of the AP-1 tethering factor and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) are constitutively bound at the promoter regions prior to Ral exposure. Ral then promotes the binding of ERα at the promoter in a c-Fos-dependent manner. Interestingly, we found that JNK1 enzymatic activity is required for Ral-dependent gene activation through ERα. Our results suggest that one role for Ral-dependent recruitment of ERα to the AP-1 binding site is to stimulate JNK1 enzymatic activity. Alternatively, Ral-occupied ERα might recruit protein substrates to promoter-bound JNK1 without any change in JNK1 activity. Collectively, our studies have revealed a new role for JNK1 in determining gene regulatory outcomes by ERα. PMID:21964465

  5. Activation of c-jun N-Terminal Kinase upon Influenza A Virus (IAV) Infection Is Independent of Pathogen-Related Receptors but Dependent on Amino Acid Sequence Variations of IAV NS1

    PubMed Central

    Nacken, Wolfgang; Anhlan, Darisuren; Hrincius, Eike R.; Mostafa, Ahmed; Wolff, Thorsten; Sadewasser, Anne; Pleschka, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark cell response to influenza A virus (IAV) infections is the phosphorylation and activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, so far it is not fully clear which molecules are involved in the activation of JNK upon IAV infection. Here, we report that the transfection of influenza viral-RNA induces JNK in a retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-dependent manner. However, neither RIG-I-like receptors nor MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptors were found to be involved in the activation of JNK upon IAV infection. Viral JNK activation may be blocked by addition of cycloheximide and heat shock protein inhibitors during infection, suggesting that the expression of an IAV-encoded protein is responsible for JNK activation. Indeed, the overexpression of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of certain IAV subtypes activated JNK, whereas those of some other subtypes failed to activate JNK. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments using NS1 of the IAV H7N7, H5N1, and H3N2 subtypes identified the amino acid residue phenylalanine (F) at position 103 to be decisive for JNK activation. Cleavage- and polyadenylation-specific factor 30 (CPSF30), whose binding to NS1 is stabilized by the amino acids F103 and M106, is not involved in JNK activation. Conclusively, subtype-specific sequence variations in the IAV NS1 protein result in subtype-specific differences in JNK signaling upon IAV infection. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) infection leads to the activation or modulation of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a long-known stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, is activated by RIG-I when cells are treated with IAV RNA. However, at the same time, nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of IAV has an intrinsic JNK-activating property that is dependent on IAV subtype-specific amino acid variations around position 103. Our findings identify two different and independent pathways that

  6. Pregnane X Receptor Activation Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Expression and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1/2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditya; Zhao, Angela; Erickson, Sarah L; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Lau, Aik Jiang; Alston, Laurie; Chang, Thomas K H; Mani, Sridhar; Hirota, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders with a complex etiology. IBD is thought to arise in genetically susceptible individuals in the context of aberrant interactions with the intestinal microbiota and other environmental risk factors. Recently, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) was identified as a sensor for microbial metabolites, whose activation can regulate the intestinal epithelial barrier. Mutations in NR1I2, the gene that encodes the PXR, have been linked to IBD, and in animal models, PXR deletion leads to barrier dysfunction. In the current study, we sought to assess the mechanism(s) through which the PXR regulates barrier function during inflammation. In Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell monolayers, tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ exposure disrupted the barrier and triggered zonula occludens-1 relocalization, increased expression of myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Activation of the PXR [rifaximin and [[3,5-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]ethenylidene]bis-phosphonic acid tetraethyl ester (SR12813); 10 μM] protected the barrier, an effect that was associated with attenuated MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. In vivo, activation of the PXR [pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN)] attenuated barrier disruption induced by toll-like receptor 4 activation in wild-type, but not Pxr-/-, mice. Furthermore, PCN treatment protected the barrier in the dextran-sulfate sodium model of experimental colitis, an effect that was associated with reduced expression of mucosal MLCK and phosphorylated JNK1/2. Together, our data suggest that the PXR regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation by modulating cytokine-induced MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. Thus, targeting the PXR may prove beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated barrier disruption in the context of IBD. PMID:27440420

  7. Pregnane X Receptor Activation Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Expression and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1/2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aditya; Zhao, Angela; Erickson, Sarah L; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Lau, Aik Jiang; Alston, Laurie; Chang, Thomas K H; Mani, Sridhar; Hirota, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders with a complex etiology. IBD is thought to arise in genetically susceptible individuals in the context of aberrant interactions with the intestinal microbiota and other environmental risk factors. Recently, the pregnane X receptor (PXR) was identified as a sensor for microbial metabolites, whose activation can regulate the intestinal epithelial barrier. Mutations in NR1I2, the gene that encodes the PXR, have been linked to IBD, and in animal models, PXR deletion leads to barrier dysfunction. In the current study, we sought to assess the mechanism(s) through which the PXR regulates barrier function during inflammation. In Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell monolayers, tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ exposure disrupted the barrier and triggered zonula occludens-1 relocalization, increased expression of myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2). Activation of the PXR [rifaximin and [[3,5-Bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]ethenylidene]bis-phosphonic acid tetraethyl ester (SR12813); 10 μM] protected the barrier, an effect that was associated with attenuated MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. In vivo, activation of the PXR [pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN)] attenuated barrier disruption induced by toll-like receptor 4 activation in wild-type, but not Pxr-/-, mice. Furthermore, PCN treatment protected the barrier in the dextran-sulfate sodium model of experimental colitis, an effect that was associated with reduced expression of mucosal MLCK and phosphorylated JNK1/2. Together, our data suggest that the PXR regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier during inflammation by modulating cytokine-induced MLCK expression and JNK1/2 activation. Thus, targeting the PXR may prove beneficial for the treatment of inflammation-associated barrier disruption in the context of IBD.

  8. 6-Dehydrogingerdione, an active constituent of dietary ginger, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through reactive oxygen species/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Chung-Yi; Hou, Ming-Feng; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Hung, Chih-Hsing; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2010-09-01

    This study is the first to investigate the anticancer effect of 6-dehydrogingerdione (DGE), an active constituent of dietary ginger, in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. DGE exhibited effective cell growth inhibition by inducing cancer cells to undergo G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Blockade of cell cycle was associated with increased levels of p21, and reduced amounts of cyclin B1, cyclin A, Cdc2 and Cdc25C. DGE also enhanced the levels of inactivated phosphorylated Cdc2 and Cdc25C. DGE triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway indicated by a change in Bax/Bcl-2 ratios, resulting in caspase-9 activation. We also found the generation of reactive oxygen species is a critical mediator in DGE-induced cell growth inhibition. DGE clearly increased the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38. In addition, antioxidants vitamin C and catalase significantly decreased DGE-mediated JNK activation and apoptosis. Moreover, blocking JNK by specific inhibitors suppressed DGE-triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that a critical role for reactive oxygen species and JNK in DGE-mediated apoptosis of human breast cancer.

  9. Insulin inhibits glucocorticoid-stimulated L-type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase gene expression by activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    De Los Pinos E; Fernández De Mattos S; Joaquin, M; Tauler, A

    2001-01-01

    The hepatic isoform of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase) is transcriptionally stimulated by glucocorticoids, whereas insulin blocks this stimulatory effect. Although this inhibitory effect has been extensively reported, nothing is known about the signalling pathway responsible. We have used well-characterized inhibitors for proteins involved in different signalling cascades to assess the involvement of these pathways on the transcriptional regulation of glucocorticoid-stimulated PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase by insulin. Our results demonstrate that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, p70/p85 ribosomal S6 kinase, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways are not involved in the inhibitory effect of insulin on glucocorticoid-stimulated PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase. To evaluate the implication of the MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)-4-stress-activated protein kinase-c-Jun-N-terminal protein kinase ('JNK-SAPK') pathway we overexpressed the N-terminal JNK-binding domain of the JNK-interacting protein 1 ('JIP-1'), demonstrating that activation of JNK is necessary for the insulin inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of MEK kinase 1 and JNK-haemagglutinin resulted in the inhibition of the glucocorticoid-stimulated PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase. These results provide clear and specific evidence for the role of JNK in the insulin inhibition of glucocorticoid-stimulated PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase gene expression. In addition, we performed experiments with a mutant of the glucocorticoid receptor in which the JNK phosphorylation target Ser-246 had been mutated to Ala. Our results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of the glucocorticoid receptor on Ser-246 is not responsible for the JNK repression of glucocorticoid-stimulated PF2K/Fru-2,6-BPase gene expression. PMID:11139390

  10. Activation of Tax protein by c-Jun-N-terminal kinase is not dependent on the presence or absence of the early growth response-1 gene product.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutierréz, Luís; Ferreira, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive neoplasia of CD4+ T cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the EGR-1 pathway is involved in the regulation of Tax-induced JNK expression in human Jurkat T cells transfected to express the Tax protein in the presence or absence of PMA or ionomycin. Overexpression of EGR-1 in Jurkat cells transfected to express Tax, promoted the activation of several genes, with the most potent being those that contained AP-1 (Jun/c-Fos), whereas knockdown of endogenous EGR-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) somewhat reduced Tax-mediated JNK-1 transcription. Additionally, luciferase-based AP-1 and NF-κB reporter gene assays demonstrated that inhibition of EGR-1 expression by an siRNA did not affect the transcriptional activity of a consensus sequence of either AP-1 or NF-κB. On the other hand, the apoptosis assay, using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as an inducer of apoptosis, confirmed that siRNA against EGR-1 failed to suppress ATRA-induced apoptosis in Jurkat and Jurkat-Tax cells, as noted by the low levels of both DEVDase activity and DNA fragmentation, indicating that the induction of apoptosis by ATRA was Egr-1-independent. Finally, our data showed that activation of Tax by JNK-1 was not dependent on the EGR-1 cascade of events, suggesting that EGR-1 is important but not a determinant for the activity for Tax-induced proliferation of Jurkat cells.

  11. c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediates disassembly of apical junctions in model intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Nayden G; Hopkins, Ann M; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2009-07-01

    Dynamic remodeling of intercellular junctions is a critical determinant of epithelial barrier function in both physiological and pathophysiological states. While the disassembly of epithelial tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) has been well-described in response to pathogens and other external stressors, the role of stress-related signaling in TJ/AJ regulation remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define the role of stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in disruption of intercellular junctions in model intestinal epithelia. We show that rapid AJ/TJ disassembly triggered by extracellular calcium depletion of T84 and SK-CO15 cell monolayers was accompanied by activation (phosphorylation) of JNK, and prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of JNK. The opposite process, TJ/AJ reassembly, was accelerated by JNK inhibition and suppressed by the JNK activator anisomycin. JNK1 but not JNK2 was found to colocalize with intercellular junctions, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of JNK1 attenuated the TJ/AJ disruption caused by calcium depletion. JNK inhibition also blocked formation of characteristic contractile F-actin rings in calcium-depleted epithelial cells, suggesting that JNK regulates junctions by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. In this role JNK acts downstream of the actin-reorganizing Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK), since ROCK inhibition abrogated JNK phosphorylation and TJ/AJ disassembly after calcium depletion. Furthermore, JNK acts upstream of F-actin-membrane linker proteins of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family, but in a complex relationship yet to be fully elucidated. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel role for JNK in the signaling pathway that links ROCK and F-actin remodeling during disassembly of epithelial junctions.

  12. The Green Tea Component (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Choi, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Park, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jae Hoon; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The green tea component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As) or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As) treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity. PMID:26375285

  13. The Green Tea Component (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Park, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jae Hoon; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The green tea component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As) or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As) treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity. PMID:26375285

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V–fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:25304312

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways.

  16. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal

  17. c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1 Is Required for Toll-Like Receptor 1 Gene Expression in Macrophages▿

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Hooman; Motameni, Amirreza T.; Bates, Tonya C.; Olivera, Elias R.; Villar-Suarez, Vega; Joshi, Ila; Garg, Renu; Osborne, Barbara A.; Davis, Roger J.; Rincón, Mercedes; Anguita, Juan

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of innate immune responses to pathogens occurs through the interaction of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) with pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the activation of several signaling pathways whose contribution to the overall innate immune response to pathogens is poorly understood. We demonstrate a mechanism of control of murine macrophage responses mediated by TLR1/2 heterodimers through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activity. JNK controls tumor necrosis factor alpha production and TLR-mediated macrophage responses to Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, and the TLR1/TLR2-specific agonist PAM3CSK4. JNK1, but not JNK2, activity regulates the expression of the tlr1 gene in the macrophage cell line RAW264.7, as well as in primary CD11b+ cells. We also show that the proximal promoter region of the human tlr1 gene contains an AP-1 binding site that is subjected to regulation by the kinase and binds two complexes that involve the JNK substrates c-Jun, JunD, and ATF-2. These results demonstrate that JNK1 regulates the response to TLR1/2 ligands and suggest a positive feedback loop that may serve to increase the innate immune response to the spirochete. PMID:17664270

  18. Regulation of Apoptotic c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling by a Stabilization-Based Feed-Forward Loop†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiheng; Kukekov, Nikolay V.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2005-01-01

    A sequential kinase cascade culminating in activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) plays a fundamental role in promoting apoptotic death in many cellular contexts. The mechanisms by which this pathway is engaged in response to apoptotic stimuli and suppressed in viable cells are largely unknown. Here, we show that apoptotic stimuli increase endogenous cellular levels of pathway components, including POSH, mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), and JNK interacting protein 1, and that this effect occurs through protein stabilization and requires the presence of POSH as well as activation of MLKs and JNKs. Our findings suggest a self-amplifying, feed-forward loop mechanism by which apoptotic stimuli promote the stabilization of JNK pathway components, thereby contributing to cell death. PMID:16260609

  19. Regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling by a stabilization-based feed-forward loop.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiheng; Kukekov, Nikolay V; Greene, Lloyd A

    2005-11-01

    A sequential kinase cascade culminating in activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) plays a fundamental role in promoting apoptotic death in many cellular contexts. The mechanisms by which this pathway is engaged in response to apoptotic stimuli and suppressed in viable cells are largely unknown. Here, we show that apoptotic stimuli increase endogenous cellular levels of pathway components, including POSH, mixed lineage kinases (MLKs), and JNK interacting protein 1, and that this effect occurs through protein stabilization and requires the presence of POSH as well as activation of MLKs and JNKs. Our findings suggest a self-amplifying, feed-forward loop mechanism by which apoptotic stimuli promote the stabilization of JNK pathway components, thereby contributing to cell death. PMID:16260609

  20. Protective role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdi, Mohammed Korrapati, Midhun C.; Chakraborty, Mala; Yee, Steven B.; Pohl, Lance R.

    2008-09-12

    Recent studies in mice suggest that stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 2 (JNK2) plays a pathologic role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury (AILI), a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In contrast, we present evidence that JNK2 can have a protective role against AILI. When male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and JNK2{sup -/-} mice were treated with 300 mg APAP/kg, 90% of JNK2{sup -/-} mice died of ALF compared to 20% of WT mice within 48 h. The high susceptibility of JNK2{sup -/-} mice to AILI appears to be due in part to deficiencies in hepatocyte proliferation and repair. Therefore, our findings are consistent with JNK2 signaling playing a protective role in AILI and further suggest that the use of JNK inhibitors as a potential treatment for AILI, as has been recommended by other investigators, should be reconsidered.

  1. Multisite phosphorylation of c-Jun at threonine 91/93/95 triggers the onset of c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C E; Albanito, L; De Marco, P; Aiello, D; Maggiolini, M; Napoli, A; Musti, A M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell (CGC) apoptosis by trophic/potassium (TK) deprivation is a model of election to study the interplay of pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways in neuronal cell death. In this model, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induces pro-apoptotic genes through the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor. On the other side, a survival pathway initiated by lithium leads to repression of pro-apoptotic c-Jun/AP-1 target genes without interfering with JNK activity. Yet, the mechanism by which lithium inhibits c-Jun activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we used this model system to study the regulation and function of site-specific c-Jun phosphorylation at the S63 and T91/T93 JNK sites in neuronal cell death. We found that TK-deprivation led to c-Jun multiphosphorylation at all three JNK sites. However, immunofluorescence analysis of c-Jun phosphorylation at single cell level revealed that the S63 site was phosphorylated in all c-Jun-expressing cells, whereas the response of T91/T93 phosphorylation was more sensitive, mirroring the switch-like apoptotic response of CGCs. Conversely, lithium prevented T91T93 phosphorylation and cell death without affecting the S63 site, suggesting that T91T93 phosphorylation triggers c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity. Accordingly, a c-Jun mutant lacking the T95 priming site for T91/93 phosphorylation protected CGCs from apoptosis, whereas it was able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Vice versa, a c-Jun mutant bearing aspartate substitution of T95 overwhelmed lithium-mediate protection of CGCs from TK-deprivation, validating that inhibition of T91/T93/T95 phosphorylation underlies the effect of lithium on cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed multiphosphorylation of c-Jun at T91/T93/T95 in cells. Moreover, JNK phosphorylated recombinant c-Jun at T91/T93 in a T95-dependent manner. On the basis of our results, we propose that T91/T93/T95 multiphosphorylation of c-Jun functions as a

  2. Pro-life role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase at rostral ventrolateral medulla in experimental brain stem death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Based on an experimental brain stem death model, we demonstrated previously that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)/ mitogen-activated protein kinase signal-interacting kinase 1/2 (MNK1/2) cascade plays a pro-life role in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of a life-and-death signal detected from systemic arterial pressure, which sequentially increases (pro-life) and decreases (pro-death) to reflect progressive dysfunction of central cardiovascular regulation during the advancement towards brain stem death in critically ill patients. The present study assessed the hypothesis that, in addition to ERK1/2, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), the other two mammalian members of MAPKs that are originally identified as stress-activated protein kinases, are activated specifically by MAPK kinase 4 (MAP2K4) or MAP2K6 and play a pro-life role in RVLM during experimental brain stem death. We further delineated the participation of phosphorylating activating transcriptional factor-2 (ATF-2) and c-Jun, the classical transcription factor activated by JNK or p38MAPK, in this process. Results An experimental model of brain stem death that employed microinjection of the organophosphate insecticide mevinphos (Mev; 10 nmol) bilaterally into RVLM of Sprague–Dawley rats was used, alongside cardiovascular, pharmacological and biochemical evaluations. Results from ELISA showed that whereas the total JNK, p38MAPK, MAP2K4 and MAP2K6 were not affected, augmented phosphorylation of JNK at Thr183 and Tyr185 and p38MAPK at Thr180 and Tyr182, accompanied by phosphorylation of their upstream activators MAP2K4 at Ser257 and Thr261 and MAP2K6 at Ser207 and Thr211 in RVLM occurred preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain stem death. Moreover, the activity of transcription factors ATF-2 at Thr71 and c-Jun at Ser73

  3. Modeling and benchmark data set for the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3.

    PubMed

    Schattel, Verena; Hinselmann, Georg; Jahn, Andreas; Zell, Andreas; Laufer, Stefan

    2011-03-28

    The goal of this paper is to present and describe a novel 2D- and 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) binary classification data set for the inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3 with previously unpublished activities for a diverse set of compounds. JNK3 is an important pharmaceutical target because it is involved in many neurological disorders. Accordingly, the development of JNK3 inhibitors has gained increasing interest. 2D and 3D versions of the data set were used, consisting of 313 (70 actives) and 249 (60 actives) compounds, respectively. All compounds, for which activity was only determined for the racemate, were removed from the 3D data set. We investigated the diversity of the data sets by an agglomerative clustering with feature trees and show that the data set contains several different scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that the benchmarks can be tackled with standard supervised learning algorithms with a convincing performance. For the 2D problem, a random decision forest classifier achieves a Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.744, the 3D problem could be modeled with a Matthew's correlation coefficient of 0.524 with 3D pharmacophores and a support vector machine. The performance of both data sets was evaluated within a nested 10-fold cross-validation. We therefore suggest that the data set is a reasonable basis for generating QSAR models for JNK3 because of its diverse composition and the performance of the classifiers presented in this study.

  4. c-jun N-terminal kinase hyperphosphorylates R406W tau at the PHF-1 site during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Planel, Emmanuel; Chui, De-Hua; Sato, Shinji; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Sahara, Naruhiko; Murayama, Miyuki; Kikuchi, Naomi; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Rivka, Ravid; Takashima, Akihiko

    2006-04-01

    Tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease (AD) probably involve a type of phosphorylation imbalance causing the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons and/or glias. Investigation of R406W tau mutation may provide insight into such abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation, since this mutation causes AD-like dementia and tauopathy in humans and because it has the unique ability to reduce tau phosphorylation in vitro and in cultured cells. Here we show that R406W mutation primarily disrupts tau phosphorylation at Ser404, a priming phosphorylation site of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), thereby reducing subsequent GSK-3beta-mediated phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site (mostly Ser396). In contrast, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as activated in the mitotic phase directly hyperphosphorylates R406W tau at the PHF-1 site. This was confirmed by PHF-1 hyperphosphorylation of R406W tau in mitotic cells, its association with cytoplasmic JNK activation, and its inhibition by a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. These data unveil the unknown mechanisms of physiological tau phosphorylation at the PHF-1 site and suggest that cytoplasmic JNK activation may play an important role in the abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation associated with R406W tau mutation and in AD.

  5. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarza, Ramon; Vela, Silvia; Solas, Maite; Ramirez, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are a family of protein kinases that play a central role in stress signaling pathways implicated in gene expression, neuronal plasticity, regeneration, cell death, and regulation of cellular senescence. It has been shown that there is a JNK pathway activation after exposure to different stressing factors, including cytokines, growth factors, oxidative stress, unfolded protein response signals or Aβ peptides. Altogether, JNKs have become a focus of screening strategies searching for new therapeutic approaches to diabetes, cancer or liver diseases. In addition, activation of JNK has been identified as a key element responsible for the regulation of apoptosis signals and therefore, it is critical for pathological cell death associated with neurodegenerative diseases and, among them, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, in vitro and in vivo studies have reported alterations of JNK pathways potentially associated with pathogenesis and neuronal death in AD. JNK’s, particularly JNK3, not only enhance Aβ production, moreover it plays a key role in the maturation and development of neurofibrillary tangles. This review aims to explain the rationale behind testing therapies based on inhibition of JNK signaling for AD in terms of current knowledge about the pathophysiology of the disease. Keeping in mind that JNK3 is specifically expressed in the brain and activated by stress-stimuli, it is possible to hypothesize that inhibition of JNK3 might be considered as a potential target for treating neurodegenerative mechanisms associated with AD. PMID:26793112

  6. c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylates DCP1a to control formation of P bodies

    PubMed Central

    Rzeczkowski, Katharina; Beuerlein, Knut; Müller, Helmut; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Schneider, Heike; Kettner-Buhrow, Daniela; Holtmann, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines and stress-inducing stimuli signal through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) using a diverse and only partially defined set of downstream effectors. In this paper, the decapping complex subunit DCP1a was identified as a novel JNK target. JNK phosphorylated DCP1a at residue S315 in vivo and in vitro and coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with DCP1a in processing bodies (P bodies). Sustained JNK activation by several different inducers led to DCP1a dispersion from P bodies, whereas IL-1 treatment transiently increased P body number. Inhibition of TAK1–JNK signaling also affected the number and size of P bodies and the localization of DCP1a, Xrn1, and Edc4. Transcriptome analysis further identified a central role for DCP1a in IL-1–induced messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. Phosphomimetic mutation of S315 stabilized IL-8 but not IκBα mRNA, whereas overexpressed DCP1a blocked IL-8 transcription and suppressed p65 NF-κB nuclear activity. Collectively, these data reveal DCP1a as a multifunctional regulator of mRNA expression and suggest a novel mechanism controlling the subcellular localization of DCP1a in response to stress or inflammatory stimuli. PMID:21859862

  7. The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 Plays a Dominant Role in Human Epidermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Hengning; Harris, Rebecca; Coloff, Jonathan; Jin, Jane Y.; Leshin, Benjamin; de Marval, Paula Miliani; Tao, Shiying; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Hall, Russell P.; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2010-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling cascade has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. It is unclear how different JNK proteins contribute to human cancer. Here, we report that JNK2 is activated in over 70% of human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples and that inhibition of JNK2 pharmacologically or genetically impairs tumorigenesis of human SCC cells. Most importantly, JNK2, but not JNK1, is sufficient to couple with oncogenic Ras to transform primary human epidermal cells into malignancy with features of SCC. JNK2 prevents Ras-induced cell senescence and growth arrest by reducing the expression levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p16 and NF-κB activation. On the other hand, JNK, along with PI3K, is essential for Ras-induced glycolysis, an energy producing process known to benefit cancer growth. These data indicate that JNK2 collaborates with other oncogenes, such as Ras, at multiple molecular levels to promote tumorigenesis and hence represents a promising therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:20354187

  8. c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1 is necessary for nicotine-induced enhancement of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    Acute nicotine enhances hippocampus-dependent learning. Identifying how acute nicotine improves learning will aid in understanding how nicotine facilitates the development of maladaptive memories that contribute to drug-seeking behaviors, help development of medications to treat disorders associated with cognitive decline, and advance understanding of the neurobiology of learning and memory. The effects of nicotine on learning may involve recruitment of signaling through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase family (JNK 1-3). Learning in the presence of acute nicotine increases the transcription of mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 (MAPK8, also known as JNK1), likely through a CREB-dependent mechanism. The functional significance of JNK1 in the effects of acute nicotine on learning, however, is unknown. The current studies undertook a backward genetic approach to determine the functional contribution JNK1 protein makes to nicotine-enhanced contextual fear conditioning. JNK1 wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were administered acute nicotine prior to contextual and cued fear conditioning. 24h later, mice were evaluated for hippocampus-dependent (contextual fear conditioning) and hippocampus-independent (cued fear conditioning) memory. Nicotine selectively enhanced contextual conditioning in WT mice, but not in KO mice. Nicotine had no effect on hippocampus-independent learning in either genotype. JNK1 KO and WT mice given saline showed similar levels of learning. These data suggest that JNK1 may be recruited by nicotine and is functionally necessary for the acute effects of nicotine on learning and memory. PMID:27235579

  9. Interleukin-25-induced chemokines and interleukin-6 release from eosinophils is mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun K; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Ip, Wai K; Lam, Christopher W K

    2005-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-25, a novel Th2 cytokine, is capable of amplifying allergic inflammation. We investigated the modulation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways in IL-25-activated eosinophils, the principal effector cells of allergic inflammation, for the in vitro release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, and inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Gene expression of chemokines and IL-6 was evaluated by RT-PCR, and concentrations of chemokines and cytokine were measured by cytokine protein array, cytometric bead array, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-kappaB, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK activities in eosinophils were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Western blot. IL-25 was found to upregulate the gene expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and IL-8, and cytokine IL-6, in eosinophils, and to significantly increase the release of the above chemokines and IL-6 from eosinophils. IL-25 could also activate the JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB activities of eosinophils, while inhibitor of IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation (BAY11-7082), JNK (SP600125), and p38 MAPK (SB203580) could suppress the release of IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and IL-6. Together, the above results showed that the induction of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-8, and IL-6 in IL-25-activated eosinophils are regulated by JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways.

  10. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway mediates chrysotile asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; LIU, TIE; KAMP, DAVID W.; LIN, ZIYING; WANG, YAHONG; LI, DONGHONG; YANG, LAWEI; HE, HUIJUAN; LIU, GANG

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chrysotile asbestos exposure is associated with an increased risk of mortality in combination with pulmonary diseases including lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. Multiple mechanisms by which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, however the role of apoptosis in human lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) has not yet been fully explored. Accumulating evidence implicates AEC apoptosis as a crucial event in the development of both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and asbestosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether chrysotile asbestos induces mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) AEC apoptosis and, if so, whether this induction occurs via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Human A549 bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells with alveolar epithelial type II-like features were used. The present study showed that chrysotile asbestos induced a dose- and time-dependent decrease in A549 cell viability, which was accompanied by the activation of the MAPK c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not the MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38. Chrysotile asbestos was also shown to induce intrinsic AEC apoptosis, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes Bax and Bak, alongside the activation of caspase-9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the release of cytochrome c. Furthermore, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked chrysotile asbestos-induced JNK activation and subsequent apoptosis, as assessed by both caspase-9 cleavage and PARP activation. The results of the present study demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos induces intrinsic AEC apoptosis by a JNK-dependent mechanism, and suggests a potential novel target for the modulation of chrysotile asbestos-associated lung diseases. PMID:25530474

  11. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  12. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-10-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  13. Molecular clone and characterization of c-Jun N-terminal kinases 2 from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minglan; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-02-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is a multifunctional mitogen-activated protein kinases involving in cell differentiation and proliferation, apoptosis, immune response and inflammatory conditions. In this study, we reported a new JNK2 (Ec-JNK2) derived from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA of Ec-JNK2 was 1920 bp in size, containing a 174 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 483 bp 3'-UTR, and a 1263 bp open reading frame (ORF), which encoded a putative protein of 420 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence of Ec-JNK2 contained a conserved Thr-Pro-Tyr (TPY) motif in the domain of serine/threonine protein kinase (S-TKc). Ec-JNK2 has been found to involve in the immune response to pathogen challenges in vivo, and the infection of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Ec-JNK2 was localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells, and moved to the nucleus after infecting with SGIV. Ec-JNK2 distributed in all immune-related tissues examined. After challenging with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), SGIV and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C), the mRNA expression of Ec-JNK2 was significantly (P < 0.01) up-regulated in juvenile orange-spotted grouper. Over-expressing Ec-JNK2 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells increased the SGIV infection and replication, while over-expressing the dominant-negative Ec-JNK2Δ181-183 mutant decreased it. These results indicated that Ec-JNK2 could be an important molecule in the successful infection and evasion of SGIV.

  14. Role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase in beta-cell recovery from nitric oxide-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Scarim, Anna L; Nishimoto, Sheri Y; Weber, Sarah M; Corbett, John A

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of rat islets with the cytokine IL-1 results in the inhibition of mitochondrial function and insulin secretion, events that are mediated by beta-cell expression of iNOS [inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase] and production of NO. beta-Cells recover from the inhibitory actions of NO, produced following 24 h incubation with IL-1, on islet oxidative metabolism and insulin secretion if iNOS enzymatic activity is inhibited and the islets are cultured (in the presence of IL-1 and iNOS inhibitors) for a brief period of 8 h. Islet recovery from cytokine- and NO-mediated damage is an active process that requires new gene expression, and NO itself is one activator of this recovery process. In this study, the mechanism by which NO stimulates islet recovery has been examined. Incubation of rat islets or RINm5F cells with the NO donor compound, sodium (Z)-1(N,N-diethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DEA-NO) for 1 h results in a 60% inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity. beta-Cells completely recover aconitase activity if the cells are washed to remove the NO donor compound and incubated for an additional 5 h in the absence of DEA-NO. The recovery of mitochondrial aconitase activity correlates with a 4-fold increase in cyclic GMP accumulation and is prevented by the inhibition of guanylate cyclase. The recovery of aconitase activity also correlates with the activation of members of the MAPKs, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and ERK, and the activation p38 and JNK is attenuated by inhibition of guanylate cyclase. ERK and p38 do not appear to participate in the recovery process as selective inhibition of these kinases fails to prevent recovery of aconitase activity; however, transduction of beta-cells with a dominant negative mutant JNK prevents beta-cell recovery from NO-mediated damage. These findings support a role for guanylate cyclase and JNK in the recovery of beta-cells from NO-mediated damage. PMID:12865320

  15. Rb binds c-Jun and activates transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nead, M A; Baglia, L A; Antinore, M J; Ludlow, J W; McCance, D J

    1998-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (Rb) acts as a critical cell-cycle regulator and loss of Rb function is associated with a variety of human cancer types. Here we report that Rb binds to members of the AP-1 family of transcription factors, including c-Jun, and stimulates c-Jun transcriptional activity from an AP-1 consensus sequence. The interaction involves the leucine zipper region of c-Jun and the B pocket of Rb as well as a C-terminal domain. We also present evidence that the complexes are found in terminally differentiating keratinocytes and cells entering the G1 phase of the cell cycle after release from serum starvation. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein, which binds to both c-Jun and Rb, inhibits the ability of Rb to activate c-Jun. The results provide evidence of a role for Rb as a transcriptional activator in early G1 and as a potential modulator of c-Jun expression during keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:9545246

  16. c-Jun N-terminal kinase negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Husvik, Camilla; Bryne, Magne; Halstensen, Trond S

    2009-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in squamous cell carcinomas is mediated through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. Examination of a basaloid and a conventional oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line revealed that inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) with SP600125 increased EGF-induced (but not basal) COX-2 transcription 1.5-1.9-fold in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathway-dependent manners. Although JNK may phosphorylate the cyclosporine A-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells c3, it was seemingly not involved because cyclosporine A did not reduce EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Thus, JNK negatively regulated EGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and/or p38-mediated COX-2 transcription, presumably through activating an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:20121928

  17. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway is critical for cell transformation by the latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, Helmut; Reisbach, Gilbert; Schultheiss, Ute; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-02-20

    The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms cells activating signal transduction pathways such as NF-{kappa}B, PI3-kinase, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here, we investigated the functional role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in cell transformation. Expression of a novel dominant-negative JNK1 allele caused a block of proliferation in LMP1-transformed Rat1 fibroblasts. The JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 reproduced this effect in Rat1-LMP1 cells and efficiently interfered with proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Inhibition of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in LCLs caused the downregulation of c-Jun and Cdc2, the essential G2/M cell cycle kinase, which was accompanied by a cell cycle arrest of LCLs at G2/M phase transition. Moreover, SP600125 retarded tumor growth of LCLs in a xenograft model in SCID mice. Our data support a critical role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway for proliferation of LMP1-transformed cells and characterize JNK as a potential target for intervention against EBV-induced malignancies.

  18. Blockade of histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced RelA/p65 acetylation and NF-kappaB activation potentiates apoptosis in leukemia cells through a process mediated by oxidative damage, XIAP downregulation, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Rahmani, Mohamed; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2005-07-01

    NF-kappaB activation is reciprocally regulated by RelA/p65 acetylation and deacetylation, which are mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that in leukemia cells, NF-kappaB activation by the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) MS-275 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid was associated with hyperacetylation and nuclear translocation of RelA/p65. The latter events, as well as the association of RelA/p65 with IkappaBalpha, were strikingly diminished by either coadministration of the IkappaBalpha phosphorylation inhibitor Bay 11-7082 (Bay) or transfection with an IkappaBalpha superrepressor. Inhibition of NF-kappaB by pharmacological inhibitors or genetic strategies markedly potentiated apoptosis induced by HDACIs, and this was accompanied by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, downregulation of Mn-superoxide dismutase and XIAP, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation. Conversely, N-acetyl L-cysteine blocked apoptosis induced by Bay/HDACIs by abrogating ROS generation. Inhibition of JNK1 activation attenuated Bay/HDACI lethality without affecting NF-kappaB inactivation and ROS generation. Finally, XIAP overexpression dramatically protected cells against the Bay/HDACI regimen but failed to prevent ROS production and JNK1 activation. Together, these data suggest that HDACIs promote the accumulation of acetylated RelA/p65 in the nucleus, leading to NF-kappaB activation. Moreover, interference with these events by either pharmacological or genetic means leads to a dramatic increase in HDACI-mediated lethality through enhanced oxidative damage, downregulation of NF-kappaB-dependent antiapoptotic proteins, and stress-related JNK1 activation.

  19. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated Rubicon expression enhances hepatocyte lipoapoptosis and promotes hepatocyte ballooning

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Wang, Ting; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the relationship between autophagy and lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis, which is termed “lipoapoptosis,” in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk, after which the liver histology and expression of proteins such as p62 or LC3 were evaluated. Alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells treated with palmitate (PA) were used as an in vitro model. RESULTS: LC3-II, p62, and Run domain Beclin-1 interacting and cysteine-rich containing (Rubicon) proteins increased in both the HFD mice and in AML12 cells in response to PA treatment. Rubicon expression was decreased upon c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition at both the mRNA and the protein level in AML12 cells. Rubicon knockdown in AML12 cells with PA decreased the protein levels of both LC3-II and p62. Rubicon expression peaked at 4 h of PA treatment in AML12, and then decreased. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor ameliorated the decrease in Rubicon protein expression at 10 h of PA and resulted in enlarged AML12 cells under PA treatment. The enlargement of AML12 cells by PA with caspase-9 inhibition was canceled by Rubicon knockdown. CONCLUSION: The JNK-Rubicon axis enhanced lipoapoptosis, and caspase-9 inhibition and Rubicon had effects that were cytologically similar to hepatocyte ballooning. As ballooned hepatocytes secrete fibrogenic signals and thus might promote fibrosis in the liver, the inhibition of hepatocyte ballooning might provide anti-fibrosis in the NASH liver. PMID:27605885

  20. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated Rubicon expression enhances hepatocyte lipoapoptosis and promotes hepatocyte ballooning

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yuji; Wang, Ting; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the relationship between autophagy and lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis, which is termed “lipoapoptosis,” in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk, after which the liver histology and expression of proteins such as p62 or LC3 were evaluated. Alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells treated with palmitate (PA) were used as an in vitro model. RESULTS: LC3-II, p62, and Run domain Beclin-1 interacting and cysteine-rich containing (Rubicon) proteins increased in both the HFD mice and in AML12 cells in response to PA treatment. Rubicon expression was decreased upon c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition at both the mRNA and the protein level in AML12 cells. Rubicon knockdown in AML12 cells with PA decreased the protein levels of both LC3-II and p62. Rubicon expression peaked at 4 h of PA treatment in AML12, and then decreased. Treatment with caspase-9 inhibitor ameliorated the decrease in Rubicon protein expression at 10 h of PA and resulted in enlarged AML12 cells under PA treatment. The enlargement of AML12 cells by PA with caspase-9 inhibition was canceled by Rubicon knockdown. CONCLUSION: The JNK-Rubicon axis enhanced lipoapoptosis, and caspase-9 inhibition and Rubicon had effects that were cytologically similar to hepatocyte ballooning. As ballooned hepatocytes secrete fibrogenic signals and thus might promote fibrosis in the liver, the inhibition of hepatocyte ballooning might provide anti-fibrosis in the NASH liver.

  1. Resveratrol alleviates diabetes-induced testicular dysfunction by inhibiting oxidative stress and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling in rats.

    PubMed

    Faid, Iman; Al-Hussaini, Heba; Kilarkaje, Narayana

    2015-12-15

    Diabetes adversely affects reproductive functions in humans and animals. The present study investigated the effects of Resveratrol on diabetes-induced alterations in oxidative stress, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling and apoptosis in the testis. Adult male Wistar rats (13-15 weeks; n=6/group) were segregated into 1) normal control, 2) Resveratrol-treated (5mg/kg; ip; given during last 3 weeks), 3) Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and, 4) Resveratrol-treated diabetic groups, and euthanized on day 42 after the confirmation of diabetes. Resveratrol did not normalize blood glucose levels in diabetic rats. Resveratrol supplementation recovered diabetes-induced decreases in reproductive organ weights, sperm count and motility, intra-testicular levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal activities (P<0.05). Resveratrol also recovered diabetes-induced increases in JNK signaling pathway proteins, namely, ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1), JNKs (46 and 54 kDa isoforms) and p-JNK to normal control levels (P<0.05). Interestingly, the expression of a down-stream target of ASK1, MKK4 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4) and its phosphorylated form (p-MKK4) did not change in experimental groups. Resveratrol inhibited diabetes-induced increases in AP-1 (activator protein-1) components, c-Jun and ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2), but not their phosphorylated forms, to normal control levels (P<0.05). Further, Resveratrol inhibited diabetes-induced increase in cleaved-caspase-3 to normal control levels. In conclusion, Resveratrol alleviates diabetes-induced apoptosis in testis by modulating oxidative stress, JNK signaling pathway and caspase-3 activities, but not by inhibiting hyperglycemia, in rats. These results suggest that Resveratrol supplementation may be a useful strategy to treat diabetes-induced testicular dysfunction.

  2. Reactive oxygen species and c-Jun N-terminal kinases contribute to TEMPO-induced apoptosis in L5178Y cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Chen, Si; Zhang, Zhuhong; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Dial, Stacey L; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-06-25

    The biological consequences of exposure to piperidine nitroxides is a concern, given their widespread use in manufacturing processes and their potential use in clinical applications. Our previous study reported that TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a low molecular weight free radical, possesses pro-oxidative activity in L5178Y cells. In this study, we investigated and characterized the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TEMPO-induced toxicity in L5178Y cells. We found that TEMPO induced time- and concentration-dependent intracellular ROS production and glutathione depletion. TEMPO also induced apoptosis as demonstrated by increased caspase-3/7 activity, an increased proportion of annexin V stained cells, and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger, attenuated the ROS production and apoptosis induced by TEMPO. Moreover, Western blot analyses revealed that TEMPO activated γ-H2A.X, a hallmark of DNA damage, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), a key member in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Addition of SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor, blocked TEMPO-mediated JNK phosphorylation and also attenuated TEMPO-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that both ROS production and JNK activation are involved in TEMPO-induced apoptosis, and may contribute to the toxicity of TEMPO in L5178Y cells.

  3. Menin uncouples Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun phosphorylation from MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Adriana; Cuozzo, Concetta; Esposito, Ilaria; Maggiolini, Marcello; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vivacqua, Adele; Garramone, Maria; Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk; Musti, Anna Maria

    2002-09-19

    Menin, a nuclear protein encoded by the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor JunD and inhibits its transcriptional activity. In addition, overexpression of Menin counteracts Ras-induced tumorigenesis. We show that Menin inhibits ERK-dependent phosphorylation and activation of both JunD and the Ets-domain transcription factor Elk-1. We also show that Menin represses the inducible activity of the c-fos promoter. Furthermore, Menin expression inhibits Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated phosphorylation of both JunD and c-Jun. Kinase assays show that Menin overexpression does not interfere with activation of either ERK2 or JNK1, suggesting that Menin acts at a level downstream of MAPK activation. An N-terminal deletion mutant of Menin that cannot inhibit JunD phosphorylation by JNK, can still repress JunD phosphorylation by ERK2, suggesting that Menin interferes with ERK and JNK pathways through two distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Taken together, our data suggest that Menin uncouples ERK and JNK activation from phosphorylation of their nuclear targets Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun, hence inhibiting accumulation of active Fos/Jun heterodimers. This study provides new molecular insights into the tumor suppressor function of Menin and suggests a mechanism by which Menin may interfere with Ras-dependent cell transformation and oncogenesis. PMID:12226747

  4. High-mobility group box-1 induces vascular remodelling processes via c-Jun activation

    PubMed Central

    Zabini, Diana; Crnkovic, Slaven; Xu, Hui; Tscherner, Maria; Ghanim, Bahil; Klepetko, Walter; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Marsh, Leigh M

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) acts as a signalling molecule during inflammation, cell differentiation and angiogenesis. Increased abundance of HMGB1 is associated with several pathological disorders such as cancer, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study, we investigated the relevance of HMGB1 in the pathological remodelling present in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with COPD. Remodelled vessels present in COPD with PH and IPAH lung samples were often surrounded by HMGB1-positive cells. Increased HMGB1 serum levels were detected in both patient populations compared to control samples. The effects of physiological HMGB1 concentrations were then examined on cellular responses in vitro. HMGB1 enhanced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and primary human arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). HMGB1 stimulated p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Furthermore, activation of the downstream AP-1 complex proteins c-Fos and c-Jun was observed. Silencing of c-Jun ablated the HMGB1-induced proliferation in PASMC. Thus, an inflammatory component such as HMGB1 can contribute to PASMC and PAEC proliferation and therefore potentially to vascular remodelling and PH pathogenesis. PMID:25726846

  5. EGCG-targeted p57/KIP2 reduces tumorigenicity of oral carcinoma cells: Role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Digumarthi, Hari; Aranbayeva, Zina; Wataha, John; Lewis, Jill; Messer, Regina; Qin, Haiyan; Dickinson, Douglas; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George S.; Hsu, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) regulates gene expression differentially in tumor and normal cells. In normal human primary epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), one of the key mediators of EGCG action is p57/KIP2, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor. EGCG potently induces p57 in NHEK, but not in epithelial cancer cells. In humans, reduced expression of p57 often is associated with advanced tumors, and tumor cells with inactivated p57 undergo apoptosis when exposed to EGCG. The mechanism of p57 induction by EGCG is not well understood. Here, we show that in NHEK, EGCG-induces p57 via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In p57-negative tumor cells, JNK signaling mediates EGCG-induced apoptosis, and exogenous expression of p57 suppresses EGCG-induced apoptosis via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We also found that restoration of p57 expression in tumor cells significantly reduced tumorigenicity in athymic mice. These results suggest that p57 expression may be an useful indicator for the clinical course of cancers, and could be potentially useful as a target for cancer therapies.

  6. TBP Is Differentially Regulated by c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1 (JNK1) and JNK2 through Elk-1, Controlling c-Jun Expression and Cell Proliferation▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuping; Fromm, Jody; Johnson, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports the idea that the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) possess overlapping but distinct functions. The potential roles of the ubiquitously expressed JNK1 and JNK2 in regulating expression of the central transcription initiation factor, TATA-binding protein (TBP), were examined. Relative to wild-type fibroblasts, TBP was decreased in Jnk1−/− cells and increased in Jnk2−/− cells. Similarly, reduction of JNK1 in human hepatoma cells decreased TBP expression, whereas reduction of JNK2 enhanced it. JNK-mediated regulation of TBP expression occurs at the transcriptional level through their ability to target Elk-1, which directly regulates the TBP promoter in response to epidermal growth factor stimulation. JNK1 increases, whereas JNK2 decreases, the phosphorylation state of Elk-1, which differentially affects Elk-1 occupancy at a defined site within the TBP promoter. These JNK-mediated alterations in TBP expression, alone, serve to regulate c-Jun expression and fibroblast proliferation rates. These studies uncovered several new molecular events that distinguish the functions of JNK1 and JNK2 that are critical for their regulation of cellular proliferation. PMID:17074809

  7. De Novo Synthesis of Sphingolipids Is Required for Cell Survival by Down-Regulating c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in Drosophila Imaginal Discs

    PubMed Central

    Adachi-Yamada, Takashi; Gotoh, Tomokazu; Sugimura, Isamu; Tateno, Minoru; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Onuki, Tomoya; Date, Hideyuki

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a conserved eukaryotic signaling factor that mediates various signals, cumulating in the activation of transcription factors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a MAPK, is activated through phosphorylation by the kinase MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK). To elucidate the extent of the involvement of ERK in various aspects of animal development, we searched for a Drosophila mutant which responds to elevated MEK activity and herein identified a lace mutant. Mutants with mild lace alleles grow to become adults with multiple aberrant morphologies in the appendages, compound eye, and bristles. These aberrations were suppressed by elevated MEK activity. Structural and transgenic analyses of the lace cDNA have revealed that the lace gene product is a membrane protein similar to the yeast protein LCB2, a subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. In fact, SPT activity in the fly expressing epitope-tagged Lace was absorbed by epitope-specific antibody. The number of dead cells in various imaginal discs of a lace hypomorph was considerably increased, thereby ectopically activating c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), another MAPK. These results account for the adult phenotypes of the lace mutant and suppression of the phenotypes by elevated MEK activity: we hypothesize that mutation of lace causes decreased de novo synthesis of sphingolipid metabolites, some of which are signaling molecules, and one or more of these changes activates JNK to elicit apoptosis. The ERK pathway may be antagonistic to the JNK pathway in the control of cell survival. PMID:10490662

  8. The Protein Dredd Is an Essential Component of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Pathway in the Drosophila Immune Response*

    PubMed Central

    Guntermann, Silvia; Foley, Edan

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila immune deficiency (IMD) pathway mobilizes c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), caspase, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) modules to counter infection with Gram-negative bacteria. Dredd is an essential caspase in the IMD pathway, and it is widely established that NF-κB activation depends on Dredd. More recent cell culture studies suggested a role for Dredd in the activation of dJNK (Drosophila JNK). However, there are no epistatic or mechanistic data on the involvement of Dredd in dJNK activation. More importantly, there is no in vivo evidence to demonstrate a physiological requirement for Dredd in the IMD/dJNK pathway. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the role of Dredd in the IMD/dJNK pathway, and we demonstrated that Dredd is essential for the activation of IMD/dJNK in cell culture. We positioned Dredd activity at an early point of the IMD/dJNK pathway and uncovered a series of interactions between Dredd and additional proximal IMD pathway molecules. Mechanistically, we showed that the caspase activity inhibitor p35 blocked dJNK activation and the induction of dJNK-dependent genes in cell culture and in vivo. Most importantly, we demonstrated that dredd mutant flies are completely inhibited in their ability to activate dJNK or express dJNK-responsive target genes after bacterial infection in vivo. In conclusion, we established Dredd as an essential component of the IMD pathway required for the full activation of IMD/dJNK in cell culture and in vivo. Our data enhance our appreciation of Dredd-dependent IMD signal transduction events. PMID:21730059

  9. c-Jun N-terminal kinase modulates oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation independent of inducible nitric oxide synthase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Chieko; Lemasters, John J.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2010-07-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose, which causes liver injury in animals and humans, activates c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Although it was shown that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 effectively reduced APAP hepatotoxicity, the mechanisms of protection remain unclear. C57Bl/6 mice were treated with 10 mg/kg SP600125 or vehicle (8% dimethylsulfoxide) 1 h before 600 mg/kg APAP administration. APAP time-dependently induced JNK activation (detected by JNK phosphorylation). SP600125, but not the vehicle, reduced JNK activation, attenuated mitochondrial Bax translocation and prevented the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor at 4-12 h. Nuclear DNA fragmentation, nitrotyrosine staining, tissue GSSG levels and liver injury (plasma ALT release and necrosis) were partially attenuated by the vehicle (- 65%) and completely eliminated by SP600125 (- 98%) at 6 and 12 h. Furthermore, SP600125 attenuated the increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein. However, APAP did not enhance plasma nitrite + nitrate levels (NO formation); SP600125 had no effect on this parameter. The iNOS inhibitor L-NIL did not reduce NO formation or injury after APAP but prevented NO formation caused by endotoxin. Since SP600125 completely eliminated the increase in hepatic GSSG levels, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidant stress, it is concluded that the inhibition of peroxynitrite was mainly caused by reduced superoxide formation. Our data suggest that the JNK inhibitor SP600125 protects against APAP-induced liver injury in part by attenuation of mitochondrial Bax translocation but mainly by preventing mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation and thereby preventing the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, a key event in APAP-induced cell necrosis.

  10. Effect of Phenylephrine Pretreatment on the Expressions of Aquaporin 5 and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in Irradiated Submandibular Gland.

    PubMed

    Han, Lichi; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fuyin; Liu, Ke Jian; Xiang, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy for malignant tumors of the head and neck commonly leads to radiation-induced sialadenitis as a result of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. We demonstrated previously that phenylephrine could protect the irradiated submandibular gland against apoptosis, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of phenylephrine pretreatment on the expressions of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) that were presumed to have a role in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Rats pretreated with phenylephrine (5 mg/kg) were locally irradiated (20 Gy) in the head and neck region. The submandibular glands were removed on day 7 after irradiation. The expression of AQP5 and activation of JNK were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The localization of AQP5 at the apical and lateral plasma membrane of acinar cells was significantly reduced by irradiation, but markedly enhanced with phenylephrine pretreatment. The protein expression of AQP5 was decreased by 84.91% in irradiated glands, whereas it was fully recovered to the control level in phenylephrine-pretreated glands. Moreover, many acinar, ductal and granular convoluted tubular cells in the irradiated glands exhibited intense immunoreactivity for p-JNK, while in the phenylephrine-pretreated irradiated glands, only a few acinar cells exhibited very faint immunoreactivity for p-JNK. The protein expression level of p-JNK was increased by 41.65% in the irradiated alone glands, but was significantly decreased in the phenylephrine-pretreated irradiated glands. These results suggest that the protective mechanism of phenylephrine might be related to the improved expression of AQP5 and decreased activation of JNK. Pretreatment with phenylephrine in patients undergoing radiotherapy may provide a helpful strategy for suppression of radiation-induced sialadenitis.

  11. Acquired tolerance in cadmium-adapted lung epithelial cells: Roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and basal level of metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Andy T.Y.; Zhang Jian; Chiu, J.-F. . E-mail: jfchiu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2006-08-15

    Cadmium-resistant cells were developed in our laboratory with rat lung epithelial cells (LECs) by stepwise exposure of LECs to cadmium chloride from 1 {mu}M to 20 {mu}M after 20 passages. To investigate the Cd-resistant phenotype in a long-term perspective, cadmium-resistant cells adapted to 20 {mu}M cadmium (Cd{sup R}) were then cultured in the absence of cadmium for various passages [Cd{sup R}(-n)]. All these adapted cells were significantly protected from cadmium toxicity as compared to parental cadmium-sensitive LECs (Cd{sup S}). The cadmium-resistant phenotype of adapted cells was relatively stable in the absence of cadmium for as long as 40 passages. Basal mRNA level of metallothionein-1 (MT-1) was dramatically higher in Cd{sup R} than in Cd{sup R}(-), which may account for the higher Cd-resistance of Cd{sup R} than Cd{sup R}(-). MT-1 mRNA level decreased drastically in Cd{sup R} after cadmium removal, suggesting that the high basal level of MT-1 in Cd{sup R} may be only partially responsible for cadmium-resistance. Treatment of cells with high levels of cadmium resulted in decreased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) in adapted cells than in sensitive cells and this cadmium-induced JNK activity was blocked by JNK inhibitor II, SP600125. Ro318220, a strong activator of JNK, reverted cadmium-sensitive phenotype in adapted cells. Taken together, our results suggest that during cadmium adaptation, cells develop tolerance to cell death, generally due to perturbation of the JNK signaling pathway and the nonresponsiveness of JNK phosphorylation is critical for the Cd-tolerance in these cells.

  12. Regulation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase by G-protein-linked muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, P G; Challiss, R A; Blank, J L

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs, or stress-activated protein kinases) are activated by diverse extracellular signals and mediate a variety of cellular responses, including mitogenesis, differentiation, hypertrophy, inflammatory reactions and apoptosis. We have examined the involvement of Ca2+ and protein kinase C (PKC) in ERK and JNK activation by the human G-protein-coupled m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We show that the Ca2+-mobilizing m3 AChR is efficiently coupled to JNK and ERK activation, whereas the m2 AChR activates ERK but not JNK. Activation of JNK in CHO-m3 cells by the agonist methacholine (MCh) was delayed in onset and more sustained relative to that of ERK in either CHO-m2 or CHO-m3 cells. The EC50 values for MCh-induced ERK activation in both cell types were essentially identical and similar to that for JNK activation in CHO-m3 cells, suggesting little amplification of the response. Agonist-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation in CHO-m3 cells was insensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX), consistent with a Gq/phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-beta mediated pathway, whereas a significant component of ERK and JNK activation in CHO-m3 cells was PTX-sensitive, indicating Gi/o involvement. Using manipulations that prevent receptor-mediated extracellular Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+-store release, we also show that ERK activation by m2 and m3 receptors is Ca2+-independent. In contrast, a significant component (>50%) of JNK activation mediated by the m3 AChR was dependent on Ca2+, mainly derived from extracellular influx. PKC inhibition and down-regulation studies suggested that JNK activation was negatively regulated by PKC. Conversely, ERK activation by both m2 and m3 AChRs required PKC, suggesting a novel mechanism for PKC activation by PTX-sensitive m2 AChRs. In summary, mAChRs activate JNK and ERK via divergent mechanisms

  13. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Guang; Yuan, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Yan; Lv, Hong-Bin; Gan, Jin-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25878592

  14. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yue; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Shu-guang; Yuan, Yuan-sheng; Li, Yan; Lv, Hong-bin; Gan, Jin-hua

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. PMID:25878592

  15. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) induces phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at Thr668, in okadaic acid-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji-Hwan; So, Sang-Pil; Kim, Na-Young; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have revealed that phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at Thr668 is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase-2A inhibitor, has been used in AD research models to increase tau phosphorylation and induce neuronal death. We previously showed that OA increased levels of APP and induced accumulation of APP in axonal swellings. In this study, we found that in OA-treated neurons, phosphorylation of APP at Thr668 increased and accumulated in axonal swellings by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and not by Cdk5 or ERK/MAPK. These results suggest that JNK may be one of therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 376-381] PMID:26839154

  16. Modulation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling and Specific Glucocorticoid Receptor Phosphorylation in the Treatment of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Jovicic, Milica J.; Lukic, Iva; Radojcic, Marija; Adzic, Miroslav; Maric, Nadja P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a common finding in major depressive disorder. Increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) phosphorylation at serine 226 is associated with increased glucocorticoid resistance. Previously we have demonstrated that depressed patients exhibit higher levels of GR phosphorylated at serine 226 compared to healthy controls. The enzyme that is involved in this specific GR phosphorylation is c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK). We propose that modulation of glucocorticoid phosphorylation at serine 226, by targeting JNK signaling pathway, could be a potential strategy for antidepressant treatment. We base this assumption on the results of previous research that examined GR phosphorylation and JNK signaling in animal models and human studies. We also discuss the potential challenges in targeting JNK signaling pathway in depression. PMID:26052031

  17. Lower susceptibility of female mice to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: Role of mitochondrial glutathione, oxidant stress and c-jun N-terminal kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-11-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms underlying the gender differences in susceptibility to APAP overdose in mice have not been clarified. In our study, APAP (300 mg/kg) caused severe liver injury in male mice but 69–77% lower injury in females. No gender difference in metabolic activation of APAP was found. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) was rapidly depleted in both genders, while GSH recovery in female mice was 2.6 fold higher in the mitochondria at 4 h, and 2.5 and 3.3 fold higher in the total liver at 4 h and 6 h, respectively. This faster recovery of GSH, which correlated with greater induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress in female mice, as suggested by a lower GSSG/GSH ratio at 6 h (3.8% in males vs. 1.4% in females) and minimal centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining. While c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was similar at 2 and 4 h post-APAP, it was 3.1 fold lower at 6 h in female mice. However, female mice were still protected by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. 17β-Estradiol pretreatment moderately decreased liver injury and oxidative stress in male mice without affecting GSH recovery. Conclusion: The lower susceptibility of female mice is achieved by the improved detoxification of reactive oxygen due to accelerated recovery of mitochondrial GSH levels, which attenuates late JNK activation and liver injury. However, even the reduced injury in female mice was still dependent on JNK. While 17β-estradiol partially protects male mice, it does not affect hepatic GSH recovery. - Highlights: • Female mice are less susceptible to acetaminophen overdose than males. • GSH depletion and protein adduct formation are similar in both genders. • Recovery of hepatic GSH levels is faster in females and correlates with Gclc. • Reduced oxidant stress in females leads to reduced JNK activation. • JNK activation and mitochondrial translocation are critical

  18. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jian-Bo; Qiu, Chun-Fang; Chen, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Min-Ying; Chen, Juan; Guan, Xiang-Dong; Ouyang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: An acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still one of the major challenges in critically ill patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) on ARDS in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS rat model. Methods: Thirty-six rats were randomized into three groups: control, LPS, and LPS + JNK inhibitor. Rats were sacrificed 8 h after LPS treatment. The lung edema was observed by measuring the wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio of the lung. The severity of pulmonary inflammation was observed by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of lung tissue. Moreover, the neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted to observe the airway inflammation. In addition, lung collagen accumulation was quantified by Sircol Collagen Assay. At the same time, the pulmonary histologic examination was performed, and lung injury score was achieved in all three groups. Results: MPO activity in lung tissue was found increased in rats treated with LPS comparing with that in control (1.26 ± 0.15 U in LPS vs. 0.77 ± 0.27 U in control, P < 0.05). Inhibiting JNK attenuated LPS-induced MPO activity upregulation (0.52 ± 0.12 U in LPS + JNK inhibitor vs. 1.26 ± 0.15 U in LPS, P < 0.05). Neutrophils in BALF were also found to be increased with LPS treatment, and inhibiting JNK attenuated LPS-induced neutrophils increase in BALF (255.0 ± 164.4 in LPS vs. 53 (44.5-103) in control vs. 127.0 ± 44.3 in LPS + JNK inhibitor, P < 0.05). At the same time, the lung injury score showed a reduction in LPS + JNK inhibitor group comparing with that in LPS group (13.42 ± 4.82 vs. 7.00 ± 1.83, P = 0.001). However, the lung W/D ratio and the collagen in BALF did not show any differences between LPS and LPS + JNK inhibitor group. Conclusions: Inhibiting JNK alleviated LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and had no effects on pulmonary edema and fibrosis. JNK inhibitor might be a potential therapeutic medication in ARDS, in the

  19. Acute inhibition of central c-Jun N-terminal kinase restores hypothalamic insulin signalling and alleviates glucose intolerance in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Benzler, J; Ganjam, G K; Legler, K; Stöhr, S; Krüger, M; Steger, J; Tups, A

    2013-05-01

    The hypothalamus has been identified as a main insulin target tissue for regulating normal body weight and glucose metabolism. Recent observations suggest that c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK)-signalling plays a crucial role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance because neuronal JNK-1 ablation in the mouse prevented high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) and increased energy expenditure, as well as insulin sensitivity. In the present study, we investigated whether central JNK inhibition is associated with sensitisation of hypothalamic insulin signalling in mice fed a high-fat diet for 3 weeks and in leptin-deficient mice. We determined whether i.c.v. injection of a pharmacological JNK-inhibitor (SP600125) improved impaired glucose homeostasis. By immunohistochemistry, we first observed that JNK activity was increased in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) in both mouse models, relative to normoglycaemic controls. This suggests that up-regulation of JNK in these regions is associated with glucose intolerance and obesity, independent of leptin levels. Acute i.c.v. injection of SP600125 ameliorated glucose tolerance within 30 min in both leptin-deficient and DIO mice. Given the acute nature of i.c.v. injections, these effects cannot be attributed to changes in food intake or energy balance. In a hypothalamic cell line, and in the ARC and VMH of leptin-deficient mice, JNK inhibition by SP600125 consistently improved impaired insulin signalling. This was determined by a reduction of phospho-insulin receptor substrate-1 [IRS-1(Ser612)] protein in a hypothalamic cell line and a decline in the number of pIRS-1(Ser612) immunoreactive cells in the ARC and VMH. Serine 612 phosphorylation of IRS-1 is assumed to negatively regulate insulin signalling. In leptin-deficient mice, in both nuclei, central inhibition of JNK increased the number of cells immunoreactive for phospho-Akt (Ser473) and phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9), which are important

  20. Glycyrrhetinic acid induces cytoprotective autophagy via the inositol-requiring enzyme 1α-c-Jun N-terminal kinase cascade in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Zhang, Le-Le; Li, Ting; Lu, Jia-Hong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2015-12-22

    Glycerrhetinic acid (GA), one of the main bioactive constituents of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, exerts anti-cancer effects on various cancer cells. We confirmed that GA inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer A549 and NCI-H1299 cells. GA also induced expression of autophagy marker phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II) and punta formation of green fluorescent protein microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3. We further proved that expression of GA-increased autophagy marker was attributed to activation instead of suppression of autophagic flux. The c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway was activated after incubation with GA. Pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or silencing of the JNK pathway by siRNA of JNK or c-jun decreased GA-induced autophagy. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses were also apparently stimulated by GA by triggering the inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) pathway. The GA-induced JNK pathway activation and autophagy were decreased by IRE1α knockdown, and inhibition of autophagy or the JNK cascade increased GA-stimulated IRE1α expression. In addition, GA-induced cell proliferative inhibition and apoptosis were increased by inhibition of autophagy or the JNK pathway. Our study was the first to demonstrate that GA induces cytoprotective autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating the IRE1α-JNK/c-jun pathway. The combined treatment of autophagy inhibitors markedly enhances the anti-neoplasmic activity of GA. Such combination shows potential as a strategy for GA or GA-contained prescriptions in cancer therapy.

  1. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway mediates chrysotile asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W; Lin, Ziying; Wang, Yahong; Li, Donghong; Yang, Lawei; He, Huijuan; Liu, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to chrysotile asbestos exposure is associated with an increased risk of mortality in combination with pulmonary diseases including lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. Multiple mechanisms by which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, however the role of apoptosis in human lung alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) has not yet been fully explored. Accumulating evidence implicates AEC apoptosis as a crucial event in the development of both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and asbestosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether chrysotile asbestos induces mitochondria‑regulated (intrinsic) AEC apoptosis and, if so, whether this induction occurs via the activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK). Human A549 bronchoalveolar carcinoma‑derived cells with alveolar epithelial type II‑like features were used. The present study showed that chrysotile asbestos induced a dose‑ and time‑dependent decrease in A549 cell viability, which was accompanied by the activation of the MAPK c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases (JNK), but not the MAPKs extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 and p38. Chrysotile asbestos was also shown to induce intrinsic AEC apoptosis, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic genes Bax and Bak, alongside the activation of caspase‑9, poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the release of cytochrome c. Furthermore, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked chrysotile asbestos‑induced JNK activation and subsequent apoptosis, as assessed by both caspase‑9 cleavage and PARP activation. The results of the present study demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos induces intrinsic AEC apoptosis by a JNK‑dependent mechanism, and suggests a potential novel target for the modulation of chrysotile asbestos‑associated lung diseases.

  2. Targeting the Gatekeeper MET146 of C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 3 Induces a Bivalent Halogen/Chalcogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Lange, Andreas; Günther, Marcel; Büttner, Felix Michael; Zimmermann, Markus O; Heidrich, Johannes; Hennig, Susanne; Zahn, Stefan; Schall, Christoph; Sievers-Engler, Adrian; Ansideri, Francesco; Koch, Pierre; Laemmerhofer, Michael; Stehle, Thilo; Laufer, Stefan A; Boeckler, Frank M

    2015-11-25

    We target the gatekeeper MET146 of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) to exemplify the applicability of X···S halogen bonds in molecular design using computational, synthetic, structural and biophysical techniques. In a designed series of aminopyrimidine-based inhibitors, we unexpectedly encounter a plateau of affinity. Compared to their QM-calculated interaction energies, particularly bromine and iodine fail to reach the full potential according to the size of their σ-hole. Instead, mutation of the gatekeeper residue into leucine, alanine, or threonine reveals that the heavier halides can significantly influence selectivity in the human kinome. Thus, we demonstrate that, although the choice of halogen may not always increase affinity, it can still be relevant for inducing selectivity. Determining the crystal structure of the iodine derivative in complex with JNK3 (4X21) reveals an unusual bivalent halogen/chalcogen bond donated by the ligand and the back-pocket residue MET115. Incipient repulsion from the too short halogen bond increases the flexibility of Cε of MET146, whereas the rest of the residue fails to adapt being fixed by the chalcogen bond. This effect can be useful to induce selectivity, as the necessary combination of methionine residues only occurs in 9.3% of human kinases, while methionine is the predominant gatekeeper (39%).

  3. Stronger learning recruits additional cell-signaling cascades: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) is necessary for expression of stronger contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    Increased training often results in stronger memories but the neural changes responsible for these stronger memories are poorly understood. It is proposed here that higher levels of training that result in stronger memories recruit additional cell signaling cascades. This study specifically examined if c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) is involved in the formation of stronger fear conditioning memories. Wildtype (WT), JNK1 heterozygous (Het), and JNK1 knockout (KO) mice were fear conditioned with 1 trial, 2 trials, or 4 trials. All mice learned both contextual (hippocampus-dependent) and cued (hippocampus-independent) fear conditioning but for contextual fear conditioning only, the JNK1 KO mice did not show higher levels of learning with increased trials. That is, WT mice showed a significant linear increase in contextual fear conditioning as training trials increased from 1 to 2 to 4 trials whereas KO mice showed the same level of contextual fear conditioning as WT mice for 1 trial training but did not have increased levels of contextual fear conditioning with additional trials. These data suggest that JNK1 may not be critical for learning but when higher levels of hippocampus-dependent learning occur, JNK1 signaling is recruited and is necessary for stronger hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  4. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated modulation of brain mitochondria function: new target proteins for JNK signalling in mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Hagen; Boyd, Clinton S; Ahmed, Ruhi; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Duncan, Roger F; Rice-Evans, Catherine; Cadenas, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and control of the release of cytochrome c during mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis are thought to involve the phosphorylation of mitochondrial Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L). Although the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been proposed to mediate the phosphorylation of Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) the mechanisms linking the modification of these proteins and the release of cytochrome c remain to be elucidated. This study was aimed at establishing interdependency between JNK signalling and mitochondrial apoptosis. Using an experimental model consisting of isolated, bioenergetically competent rat brain mitochondria, these studies show that (i) JNK catalysed the phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) as well as other mitochondrial proteins, as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/SDS/PAGE; (ii) JNK-induced cytochrome c release, in a process independent of the permeability transition of the inner mitochondrial membrane (imPT) and insensitive to cyclosporin A; (iii) JNK mediated a partial collapse of the mitochondrial inner-membrane potential (Deltapsim) in an imPT- and cyclosporin A-independent manner; and (iv) JNK was unable to induce imPT/swelling and did not act as a co-inducer, but as an inhibitor of Ca-induced imPT. The results are discussed with regard to the functional link between the Deltapsim and factors influencing the permeability transition of the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. Taken together, JNK-dependent phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins including, but not limited to, Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) may represent a potential of the modulation of mitochondrial function during apoptosis. PMID:12614194

  5. A novel dual NO-donating oxime and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor protects against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Atochin, Dmitriy N; Schepetkin, Igor A; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Seledtsov, Victor I; Swanson, Helen; Quinn, Mark T; Huang, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to be an important regulator of neuronal cell death. Previously, we synthesized the sodium salt of 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one (IQ-1S) and demonstrated that it was a high-affinity inhibitor of the JNK family. In the present work, we found that IQ-1S could release nitric oxide (NO) during its enzymatic metabolism by liver microsomes. Moreover, serum nitrite/nitrate concentration in mice increased after intraperitoneal injection of IQ-1S. Because of these dual actions as JNK inhibitor and NO-donor, the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S was evaluated in an animal stroke model. We subjected wild-type C57BL6 mice to focal ischemia (30min) with subsequent reperfusion (48h). Mice were treated with IQ-1S (25mg/kg) suspended in 10% solutol or with vehicle alone 30min before and 24h after middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion (MCAO). Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we monitored cerebral blood flow (CBF) above the MCA during 30min of MCAO provoked by a filament and during the first 30min of subsequent reperfusion. In mice treated with IQ-1S, ischemic and reperfusion values of CBF were not different from vehicle-treated mice. However, IQ-1S treated mice demonstrated markedly reduced neurological deficit and infarct volumes as compared with vehicle-treated mice after 48h of reperfusion. Our results indicate that the novel JNK inhibitor releases NO during its oxidoreductive bioconversion and improves stroke outcome in a mouse model of cerebral reperfusion. We conclude that IQ-1S is a promising dual functional agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  6. Inhibition of transcriptional activity of c-JUN by SIRT1

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhanguo; Ye Jianping

    2008-11-28

    c-JUN is a major component of heterodimer transcription factor AP-1 (Activator Protein-1) that activates gene transcription in cell proliferation, inflammation and stress responses. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1) is a histone deacetylase that controls gene transcription through modification of chromatin structure. However, it is not clear if SIRT1 regulates c-JUN activity in the control of gene transcription. Here, we show that SIRT1 associated with c-JUN in co-immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysate, and inhibited the transcriptional activity of c-JUN in the mammalian two hybridization system. SIRT1 was found in the AP-1 response element in the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) promoter DNA leading to inhibition of histone 3 acetylation as shown in a ChIP assay. The SIRT1 signal was reduced by the AP-1 activator PMA, and induced by the SIRT1 activator Resveratrol in the promoter DNA. SIRT1-mediaetd inhibition of AP-1 was demonstrated in the MMP9 gene expression at the gene promoter, mRNA and protein levels. In mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) with SIRT1 deficiency (SIRT1{sup -/-}), mRNA and protein of MMP9 were increased in the basal condition, and the inhibitory activity of Resveratrol was significantly attenuated. Glucose-induced MMP9 expression was also inhibited by SIRT1 in response to Resveratrol. These data consistently suggest that SIRT1 directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of AP-1 by targeting c-JUN.

  7. The mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa are more sensitive than the plasmalemma to osmotic-induced stress: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway.

    PubMed

    García, Beatriz Macías; Moran, Alvaro Miró; Fernández, Lauro González; Ferrusola, Cristina Ortega; Rodriguez, Antolin Morillo; Bolaños, Juan Maria Gallardo; da Silva, Carolina Maria Balao; Martínez, Heriberto Rodríguez; Tapia, Jose A; Peña, Fernando J

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation introduces extreme temperature and osmolality changes that impart lethal and sublethal effects on spermatozoa. Additionally, there is evidence that the osmotic stress induced by cryopreservation causes oxidative stress to spermatozoa. The main sources of reactive oxygen species in mammalian sperm are the mitochondria. In view of this, the aim of our study was to test whether or not osmotic stress was able to induce mitochondrial damage and to explore the osmotic tolerance of the mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa. Ejaculates from 7 stallions were subjected to osmolalities ranging from 75 to 1500 mOsm/kg, and the effect on sperm membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential was studied. Additionally, the effects of changes in osmolality from hyposmotic to isosmotic and from hyperosmotic to isosmotic solutions were studied (osmotic excursions). The cellular volume of stallion spermatozoa under isosmotic conditions was 20.4 ± 0.33 μm(3). When exposed to low osmolality, the stallion spermatozoa behaved like a linear osmometer, whereas exposure to high osmolalities up to 900 mOsm/kg resulted in decreased sperm volume. Although sperm membranes were relatively resistant to changes in osmolality, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased when osmolalities were low or very high (10.7 ± 1.74 and 16.5 ± 1.70 at 75 and 150 mOsm/kg, respectively, and 13.1 ± 1.83 at 1500 mOsm/kg), whereas in isosmolar controls the percentage of stallion sperm mitochondria with a high membrane potential was 41.1 ± 1.69 (P < .01). Osmotic excursions induced greater damage than exposure of spermatozoa to a given nonphysiologic osmolality, and again the mitochondria were more prone to damage induced by osmotic excursions than was the sperm plasma membrane. In search of intracellular components that could mediate these changes, we have detected for the first time the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 in stallion spermatozoa, which are apparently involved in the

  8. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J.; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K.; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun−/− mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of

  9. c-Jun induces apoptosis of starved BM2 monoblasts by activating cyclin A-CDK2

    SciTech Connect

    Vanhara, Petr; Bryja, Vitezslav; Horvath, Viktor; Kozubik, Alois; Hampl, Ales; Smarda, Jan . E-mail: smarda@sci.muni.cz

    2007-02-02

    c-Jun is one of the major components of the activating protein-1 (AP-1), the transcription factor that participates in regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we explored functional interactions of the c-Jun protein with several regulators of the G1/S transition in serum-deprived v-myb-transformed chicken monoblasts BM2. We show that the c-Jun protein induces expression of cyclin A, thus up-regulating activity of cyclin A-associated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and causing massive programmed cell death of starved BM2cJUN cells. Specific inhibition of CDK2 suppresses frequency of apoptosis of BM2cJUN cells. We conclude that up-regulation of cyclin A expression and CDK2 activity can represent important link between the c-Jun protein, cell cycle machinery, and programmed cell death pathway in leukemic cells.

  10. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-Dependent Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway is Critically Involved in Arjunic Acid Induced Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeEun; Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Eun Ah; Kim, Hangil; Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Though arjunic acid, a triterpene isolated from Terminalia arjuna, was known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and cytotoxic effects, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the molecular antitumor mechanism of arjunic acid was examined in A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Arjunic acid exerted cytotoxicity by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and significantly increased sub-G1 population in A549 and H460 cells by cell cycle analysis. Consistently, arjunic acid cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activated Bax, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and also attenuated the expression of pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 in A549 and H460 cells. Furthermore, arjunic acid upregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins such as IRE1 α, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in A549 and H460 cells. Conversely, CHOP depletion attenuated the increase of sub-G1 population by arjunic acid, and also JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the cytotoxicity and upregulation of IRE1 α and CHOP induced by arjunic acid in A549 and H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that arjunic acid induces apoptosis in NSCLC cells via JNK mediated ER stress pathway as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for NSCLC. PMID:26787261

  11. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase sensitizes tumor cells to flavonoid-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of JunD

    SciTech Connect

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Son, Young-Ok; Jang, Yong-Suk; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Lee, Seung-Ah; Kim, Beom-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2008-03-15

    Reduction of susceptibility to apoptosis signals is a crucial step in carcinogenesis. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells to apoptosis is a promising therapeutic strategy. c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in stress-induced apoptosis. However, many studies also emphasize the role of JNK on cell survival, although its mechanisms are not completely understood. Previously, we found that inhibition of JNK activity promotes flavonoid-mediated apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells. We thus determined whether inhibition of JNK sensitizes tumor cells to a bioflavonoid-induced apoptosis, and whether this effect of JNK is a general effect. As the results, quercetin and genistein as well as a flavonoid fraction induced apoptosis of tumor cells, which was further accelerated by specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125 or by small interfering RNA specific to JNK1/2. This effect was specific to types of cells because it was further apparent in tumorigenic cell lines. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125 also reduced flavonoid-stimulated nuclear induction of JunD which was known to have protective role in apoptosis, whereas JNK inhibition alone had little effect on apoptosis. The flavonoid-induced apoptosis of tumor cells was significantly enhanced by transfecting them with antisense JunD oligonucleotides. These results suggest that inhibition of JNK facilitates flavonoid-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of JunD, which is further sensitive to tumor cells. Therefore, combination with a specific JNK inhibitor further enhances the anti-cancer and chemopreventive potential of bio-flavonoids.

  12. Propensity for HBZ-SP1 isoform of HTLV-I to inhibit c-Jun activity correlates with sequestration of c-Jun into nuclear bodies rather than inhibition of its DNA-binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, Isabelle; Hivin, Patrick; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Lemasson, Isabelle; Barbeau, Benoit; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-09-01

    HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) contains a C-terminal zipper domain involved in its interaction with c-Jun. This interaction leads to a reduction of c-Jun DNA-binding activity and prevents the protein from activating transcription of AP-1-dependent promoters. However, it remained unclear whether the negative effect of HBZ-SP1 was due to its weak DNA-binding activity or to its capacity to target cellular factors to transcriptionally-inactive nuclear bodies. To answer this question, we produced a mutant in which specific residues present in the modulatory and DNA-binding domain of HBZ-SP1 were substituted for the corresponding c-Fos amino acids to improve the DNA-binding activity of the c-Jun/HBZ-SP1 heterodimer. The stability of the mutant, its interaction with c-Jun, DNA-binding activity of the resulting heterodimer, and its effect on the c-Jun activity were tested. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the repression of c-Jun activity in vivo is mainly due to the HBZ-SP1-mediated sequestration of c-Jun to the HBZ-NBs.

  13. c-Jun N-terminal kinases 3 (JNK3) from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, inhibiting the replication of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and SGIV-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minglan; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-12-01

    C-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), a subgroup of serine-threonine protein kinases that activated by phosphorylation, are involve in physiological and pathophysiological processes. JNK3 is one of JNK proteins involved in JNK3 signaling transduction. In the present study, two JNK3 isoforms, Ec-JNK3 X1 and Ec-JNK3 X2, were cloned from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Both Ec-JNK3 X1 and Ec-JNK3 X2 were mainly expressed in liver, gill, skin, brain and muscle of juvenile grouper. The relative expression of Ec-JNK3 X2 mRNA was much higher in muscle and gill than that of Ec-JNK3 X1. Isoform-specific immune response to challenges was revealed by the expression profiles in vivo. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that JNK3 was localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells and shown immune response to SGIV infection in vitro. Over-expressing Ec-JNK3 X1 and/or Ec-JNK3 X2 inhibited the SGIV infection and replication and the SGIV-induced apoptosis. To achieve the antiviral and anti-apoptosis activities, JNK3 promoted the activation of genes ISRE and type I IFN in the antiviral IFN signaling pathway, and inhibited the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and p53 relating to apoptosis, respectively. Ec-JNK3 X2 showed stronger activities in antivirus and anti-apoptosis than that of Ec-JNK3 X1. Our results not only define the characterization of JNK3 but also reveal new immune functions and the molecular mechanisms of JNK3 on iridoviruses infection and the virus-induced apoptosis. PMID:27422159

  14. c-Jun N-terminal kinases 3 (JNK3) from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, inhibiting the replication of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and SGIV-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minglan; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-12-01

    C-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), a subgroup of serine-threonine protein kinases that activated by phosphorylation, are involve in physiological and pathophysiological processes. JNK3 is one of JNK proteins involved in JNK3 signaling transduction. In the present study, two JNK3 isoforms, Ec-JNK3 X1 and Ec-JNK3 X2, were cloned from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Both Ec-JNK3 X1 and Ec-JNK3 X2 were mainly expressed in liver, gill, skin, brain and muscle of juvenile grouper. The relative expression of Ec-JNK3 X2 mRNA was much higher in muscle and gill than that of Ec-JNK3 X1. Isoform-specific immune response to challenges was revealed by the expression profiles in vivo. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that JNK3 was localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells and shown immune response to SGIV infection in vitro. Over-expressing Ec-JNK3 X1 and/or Ec-JNK3 X2 inhibited the SGIV infection and replication and the SGIV-induced apoptosis. To achieve the antiviral and anti-apoptosis activities, JNK3 promoted the activation of genes ISRE and type I IFN in the antiviral IFN signaling pathway, and inhibited the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and p53 relating to apoptosis, respectively. Ec-JNK3 X2 showed stronger activities in antivirus and anti-apoptosis than that of Ec-JNK3 X1. Our results not only define the characterization of JNK3 but also reveal new immune functions and the molecular mechanisms of JNK3 on iridoviruses infection and the virus-induced apoptosis.

  15. Diallyl trisulfide-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells involves c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular-signal regulated kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Choi, Sunga; Johnson, Daniel E; Vogel, Victor G; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L; Lee, Yong J; Singh, Shivendra V

    2004-07-22

    Garlic-derived organosulfides (OSCs) including diallyl trisulfide (DATS) are highly effective in affording protection against chemically induced cancer in animals. Evidence is also mounting to indicate that some naturally occurring OSCs can suppress proliferation of cancer cells by causing apoptosis, but the sequence of events leading to proapoptotic effect of OSCs is poorly defined. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells as a model, we now demonstrate that DATS is a significantly more potent apoptosis inducer than diallyl sulfide (DAS) or diallyl disulfide (DADS). DATS-induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells was associated with phosphorylation of Bcl-2, reduced Bcl-2 : Bax interaction, and cleavage of procaspase-9 and -3. Bcl-2 overexpressing PC-3 cells were significantly more resistant to apoptosis induction by DATS compared with vector-transfected control cells. DATS treatment resulted in activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and/or JNK2, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Phosphorylation of Bcl-2 in DATS-treated PC-3 cells was fully blocked in the presence of JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125. Moreover, JNK inhibitor afforded significant protection against DATS-induced apoptosis in both cells. DATS-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis were partially attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 using PD98059 or U0126. Overexpression of catalase inhibited DATS-mediated activation of JNK1/2, but not ERK1/2, and apoptosis induction in DU145 cells suggesting involvement of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger in DATS-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our data point towards important roles for Bcl-2, JNK and ERK in DATS-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

  16. NFATc2 recruits cJun homodimers to an NFAT site to synergistically activate interleukin-2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Walters, Ryan D; Drullinger, Linda F; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2013-11-01

    Transcription of interleukin-2 (IL-2), a pivotal cytokine in the mammalian immune response, is induced by NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional activators in stimulated T cells. NFATc2 and cJun drive high levels of synergistic human IL-2 transcription, which requires a unique interaction between the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 and cJun homodimers. Here we studied the mechanism by which this interaction contributes to synergistic activation of IL-2 transcription. We found that NFATc2 can recruit cJun homodimers to the -45 NFAT element, which lacks a neighboring AP-1 site. The bZip domain of cJun is sufficient to interact with the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 in the absence of DNA and this interaction is inhibited by AP-1 DNA. When the -45 NFAT site was replaced by either an NFAT/AP-1 composite site or a single AP-1 site the specificity for cJun homodimers in synergistically activating IL-2 transcription was lost, and cJun/cFos heterodimers strongly activated transcription. These studies support a model in which IL-2 transcriptional synergy is mediated by the unique recruitment of a cJun homodimer to the -45 NFAT site by NFATc2, where it acts as a co-activator for IL-2 transcription.

  17. c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor favors transforming growth factor-β to antagonize hepatitis B virus X protein-induced cell growth promotion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, YAN-HUI; AI, XI; LIU, FU-YAO; LIANG, HUI-FANG; ZHANG, BI-XIANG; CHEN, XIAO-PING

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces cell growth arrest in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) minimizes the tumor suppression of TGF-β signaling in early chronic hepatitis B. However, how to reverse the oncogenic effect of HBx and sustain the tumor-suppressive action of TGF-β has yet to be investigated. The present study examined the effect of TGF-β and a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor on cell growth in HCC cells with forced expression of HBx. It was found that HBx promoted cell growth via activation of the JNK/pSMAD3L pathway and inhibition of the transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TβRI)/pSMAD3C pathway. pSMAD3L/SMAD4 and pSMAD3C/SMAD4 complexes antagonized each other to regulate c-Myc expression. In the absence of HBx, TGF-β induced cell growth arrest through activation of the TβRI/pSMAD3C pathway in well-differentiated HCC cells. In the presence of HBx, TGF-β had no effect on cell growth. JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly reversed the oncogenic action of HBx and favored TGF-β to regain the ability to inhibit the cell growth in HBx-expressing well-differentiated HCC cells. In conclusion, targeting JNK signaling favors TGF-β to block HBx-induced cell growth promotion in well-differentiated HCC cells. As an adjunct to anti-viral therapy, the combination of TGF-β and inhibition of JNK signaling is a potential therapy for HBV-infected HCC. PMID:26648552

  18. Advanced oxidation protein products induce intestine epithelial cell death through a redox-dependent, c-jun N-terminal kinase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, F; Sun, S; Xu, A; Zheng, S; Xue, M; Wu, P; Zeng, J H; Bai, L

    2014-01-16

    Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a novel protein marker of oxidative damage, have been confirmed to accumulate in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as those with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. However, the role of AOPPs in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether AOPPs have an effect on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) death and intestinal injury. Immortalized rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells and normal Sprague Dawley rats were treated with AOPP-albumin prepared by incubation of rat serum albumin (RSA) with hypochlorous acid. Epithelial cell death, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunit activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis-related protein expression, and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were detected both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we measured AOPPs deposition and IEC death in 23 subjects with Crohn's disease (CD). Extracellular AOPP-RSA accumulation induced apoptosis in IEC-6 cultures. The triggering effect of AOPPs was mainly mediated by a redox-dependent pathway, including NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation, JNK phosphorylation, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. Chronic AOPP-RSA administration to normal rats resulted in AOPPs deposition in the villous epithelial cells and in inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. These changes were companied with IEC death, inflammatory cellular infiltration, and intestinal injury. Both cell death and intestinal injury were ameliorated by chronic treatment with apocynin. Furthermore, AOPPs deposition was also observed in IECs and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria of patients with CD. The high immunoreactive score of AOPPs showed increased apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that AOPPs trigger IEC death and intestinal tissue injury via a redox-mediated pathway. These data suggest that AOPPs may represent a novel pathogenic factor

  19. c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor favors transforming growth factor-β to antagonize hepatitis B virus X protein-induced cell growth promotion in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Hui; Ai, Xi; Liu, Fu-Yao; Liang, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bi-Xiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces cell growth arrest in well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) minimizes the tumor suppression of TGF-β signaling in early chronic hepatitis B. However, how to reverse the oncogenic effect of HBx and sustain the tumor-suppressive action of TGF-β has yet to be investigated. The present study examined the effect of TGF-β and a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor on cell growth in HCC cells with forced expression of HBx. It was found that HBx promoted cell growth via activation of the JNK/pSMAD3L pathway and inhibition of the transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TβRI)/pSMAD3C pathway. pSMAD3L/SMAD4 and pSMAD3C/SMAD4 complexes antagonized each other to regulate c-Myc expression. In the absence of HBx, TGF-β induced cell growth arrest through activation of the TβRI/pSMAD3C pathway in well-differentiated HCC cells. In the presence of HBx, TGF-β had no effect on cell growth. JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly reversed the oncogenic action of HBx and favored TGF-β to regain the ability to inhibit the cell growth in HBx-expressing well-differentiated HCC cells. In conclusion, targeting JNK signaling favors TGF-β to block HBx-induced cell growth promotion in well-differentiated HCC cells. As an adjunct to anti-viral therapy, the combination of TGF-β and inhibition of JNK signaling is a potential therapy for HBV-infected HCC.

  20. Drosophila endocytic neoplastic tumor suppressor genes regulate Sav/Wts/Hpo signaling and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brian S; Moberg, Kenneth H

    2011-12-01

    Genetic screens in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have identified a class of neoplastic tumor suppressor genes (endocytic nTSGs), which encode proteins that localize to endosomes and facilitate the trafficking of membrane-bound receptors and adhesion molecules into the degradative lysosome. Loss of endocytic nTSGs transforms imaginal disc epithelia into highly proliferative, invasive tissues that fail to differentiate and display defects in cellular apicobasal polarity, adhesion and tissue architecture. As vertebrate homologs of some Drosophila nTSGs are linked to tumor formation, identifying molecular changes in signaling associated with nTSG loss could inform understanding of neoplastic transformation in vertebrates. Here we show that mutations in genes that act at multiple steps of the endolysosomal pathway lead to autonomous activation of the Sav/Wts/Hpo (SWH) transcriptional effector Yki (YAP/TAZ in vertebrates) and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is known to promote Yki activity in cells with disrupted polarity. Yki and JNK activity are elevated by mutations at multiple steps in the endolysosomal pathway including mutations in the AP-2σ gene, which encodes a component of the AP-2 adaptor complex that recruits cargoes into clathrin-coated pits for subsequent internalization. Moreover, reduction of JNK activity can decrease elevated Yki-signaling caused by altered endocytosis. These studies reveal a broad requirement for components of the endocytic pathway in regulating SWH and JNK outputs, and place Drosophila endocytic nTSGs into a network that involving two major signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis. PMID:22101275

  1. AKT/mTOR and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways are required for chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziying; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W; Wang, Yahong; He, Huijuan; Zhou, Xu; Li, Donghong; Yang, Lawei; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Chrysotile asbestos is closely associated with excess mortality from pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. Although multiple mechanisms in which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, the role of autophagy in human lung epithelial cells has not been examined. In this study, we evaluated whether chrysotile asbestos induces autophagy in A549 human lung epithelial cells and then analyzed the possible underlying molecular mechanism. Chrysotile asbestos induced autophagy in A549 cells based on a series of biochemical and microscopic autophagy markers. We observed that asbestos increased expression of A549 cell microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II), an autophagy marker, in conjunction with dephosphorylation of phospho-AKT, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-p70S6K. Notably, AKT1/AKT2 double-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) had negligible asbestos-induced LC3-II expression, supporting a crucial role for AKT signaling. Chrysotile asbestos also led to the phosphorylation/activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK. Pharmacologic inhibition of JNK, but not p38 MAPK, dramatically inhibited the protein expression of LC3-II. Moreover, JNK2(-/-) MEFs but not JNK1(-/-) MEFs blocked LC3-II levels induced by chrysotile asbestos. In addition, N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, attenuated chrysotile asbestos-induced dephosphorylation of P-AKT and completely abolished phosphorylation/activation of JNK. Finally, we demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos-induced apoptosis was not affected by the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or autophagy-related gene 5 siRNA, indicating that the chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy may be adaptive rather than prosurvival. Our findings demonstrate that AKT/mTOR and JNK2 signaling pathways are required for chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy. These data provide a mechanistic basis for possible future clinical applications targeting

  2. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan, De-Jin; You, Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L; Liu, Yong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2003-09-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process.

  3. A Network of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Links G Protein-Coupled Receptors to the c-jun Promoter: a Role for c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase, p38s, and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Marinissen, Maria Julia; Chiariello, Mario; Pallante, Michael; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1999-01-01

    The expression of the c-jun proto-oncogene is rapidly induced in response to mitogens acting on a large variety of cell surface receptors. The resulting functional activity of c-Jun proteins appears to be critical for cell proliferation. Recently, we have shown that a large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represented by the m1 muscarinic receptor, can initiate intracellular signaling cascades that result in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) and that the activation of JNK but not of MAPK correlated with a remarkable increase in the expression of c-jun mRNA. Subsequently, however, we obtained evidence that GPCRs can potently stimulate the activity of the c-jun promoter through MEF2 transcription factors, which do not act downstream from JNK. In view of these observations, we set out to investigate further the nature of the signaling pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter. Utilizing NIH 3T3 cells, we found that GPCRs can activate the c-jun promoter in a JNK-independent manner. Additionally, we demonstrated that these GPCRs can elevate the activity of novel members of the MAPK family, including ERK5, p38α, p38γ, and p38δ, and that the activation of certain kinases acting downstream from MEK5 (ERK5) and MKK6 (p38α and p38γ) is necessary to fully activate the c-jun promoter. Moreover, in addition to JNK, ERK5, p38α, and p38γ were found to stimulate the c-jun promoter by acting on distinct responsive elements. Taken together, these results suggest that the pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter involves the integration of numerous signals transduced by a highly complex network of MAPK, rather than resulting from the stimulation of a single linear protein kinase cascade. Furthermore, our findings suggest that each signaling pathway affects one or more regulatory elements on the c-jun promoter and that the transcriptional response most likely results from the temporal integration

  4. Vesnarinone suppresses TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B, c-Jun kinase, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Manna, S K; Aggarwal, B B

    2000-06-01

    Vesnarinone, a synthetic quinolinone derivative used in the treatment of cardiac failure, exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and cell growth regulatory properties. The mechanisms underlying these properties are not understood, but due to the critical role of nuclear transcription factor NF-kappa B in these responses, we hypothesized that vesnarinone must modulate NF-kappa B activation. We investigated the effect of vesnarinone on NF-kappa B activation induced by inflammatory agents. Vesnarinone blocked TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect was mediated through inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of I kappa B alpha, an inhibitor of NF-kappa B. The effects of vesnarinone were not cell type specific, as it blocked TNF-induced NF-kappa B activation in a variety of cells. NF-kappa B-dependent reporter gene transcription activated by TNF was also suppressed by vesnarinone. The TNF-induced NF-kappa B activation cascade involving TNF receptor 1-TNF receptor associated death domain-TNF receptor associated factor 2 NF-kappa B-inducing kinase-IKK was interrupted at the TNF receptor associated factor 2 and NF-kappa B-inducing kinase sites by vesnarinone, thus suppressing NF-kappa B reporter gene expression. Vesnarinone also blocked NF-kappa B activation induced by several other inflammatory agents, inhibited the TNF-induced activation of transcription factor AP-1, and suppressed the TNF-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase. TNF-induced cytotoxicity, caspase activation, and lipid peroxidation were also abolished by vesnarinone. Overall, our results indicate that vesnarinone inhibits activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1 and their associated kinases. This may provide a molecular basis for vesnarinone's ability to suppress inflammation, immunomodulation, and growth regulation.

  5. The drosophila T-box transcription factor midline functions within Insulin/Akt and c-Jun-N terminal kinase stress-reactive signaling pathways to regulate interommatial bristle formation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q. Brent; Das, Sudeshna; Visic, Petra; Buford, Kendrick D.; Zong, Yan; Buti, Wisam; Odom, Kelly R.; Lee, Hannah; Leal, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the T-box transcription factor midline (mid) functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell fates in early-staged pupal eye imaginal discs and to suppress apoptosis (Das et al.). From genetic and allelic modifier screens, we now report that mid interacts with genes downstream of the insulin receptor(InR)/Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Notch signaling pathways to regulate interommatidial bristle (IOB) formation and cell survival. One of the most significant mid-interacting genes identified from the modifier screen is dFOXO, a transcription factor exhibiting a nucleocytoplasmic subcellular distribution pattern. In common with dFOXO, we show that Mid exhibits a nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern within WT third-instar larval (3°L) tissue homogenates. Because dFOXO is a stress-responsive factor, we assayed the effects of either oxidative or metabolic stress responses on modifying the mid mutant phenotype which is characterized by a 50% loss of IOBs within the adult compound eye. While metabolic starvation stress does not affect the mid mutant phenotype, either 1 mM paraquat or 20% coconut oil, oxidative stress inducers, partially suppresses the mid mutant phenotype resulting in a significant recovery of IOBs. Another significant mid-interacting gene we identified is groucho (gro). Mid and Gro are predicted to act as corepressors of the enhancer-of-split gene complex downstream of Notch. Immunolabeling WT and dFOXO null 3°L eye-antennal imaginal discs with anti-Mid and anti-Engrailed (En) antibodies indicate that dFOXO is required to activate Mid and En expression within photoreceptor neurons of the eye disc. Taken together, these studies show that Mid and dFOXO serve as critical effectors of cell fate specification and survival within integrated Notch, InR/dAkt, and JNK signaling pathways during 3°L and pupal eye imaginal disc development. PMID:25748605

  6. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs.

  7. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs. PMID:17105733

  8. c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MARCKSL1 Determines Actin Stability and Migration in Neurons and in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Björkblom, Benny; Padzik, Artur; Mohammad, Hasan; Westerlund, Nina; Komulainen, Emilia; Hollos, Patrik; Parviainen, Lotta; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kallioniemi, Olli; Kallajoki, Markku; Courtney, Michael J.; Mågård, Mats; James, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental biological function, critical during development and regeneration, whereas deregulated migration underlies neurological birth defects and cancer metastasis. MARCKS-like protein 1 (MARCKSL1) is widely expressed in nervous tissue, where, like Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), it is required for neural tube formation, though the mechanism is unknown. Here we show that MARCKSL1 is directly phosphorylated by JNK on C-terminal residues (S120, T148, and T183). This phosphorylation enables MARCKSL1 to bundle and stabilize F-actin, increase filopodium numbers and dynamics, and retard migration in neurons. Conversely, when MARCKSL1 phosphorylation is inhibited, actin mobility increases and filopodium formation is compromised whereas lamellipodium formation is enhanced, as is cell migration. We find that MARCKSL1 mRNA is upregulated in a broad range of cancer types and that MARCKSL1 protein is strongly induced in primary prostate carcinomas. Gene knockdown in prostate cancer cells or in neurons reveals a critical role for MARCKSL1 in migration that is dependent on the phosphorylation state; phosphomimetic MARCKSL1 (MARCKSL1S120D,T148D,T183D) inhibits whereas dephospho-MARCKSL1S120A,T148A,T183A induces migration. In summary, these data show that JNK phosphorylation of MARCKSL1 regulates actin homeostasis, filopodium and lamellipodium formation, and neuronal migration under physiological conditions and that, when ectopically expressed in prostate cancer cells, MARCKSL1 again determines cell movement. PMID:22751924

  9. c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation of MARCKSL1 determines actin stability and migration in neurons and in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Padzik, Artur; Mohammad, Hasan; Westerlund, Nina; Komulainen, Emilia; Hollos, Patrik; Parviainen, Lotta; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Iljin, Kristiina; Kallioniemi, Olli; Kallajoki, Markku; Courtney, Michael J; Mågård, Mats; James, Peter; Coffey, Eleanor T

    2012-09-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental biological function, critical during development and regeneration, whereas deregulated migration underlies neurological birth defects and cancer metastasis. MARCKS-like protein 1 (MARCKSL1) is widely expressed in nervous tissue, where, like Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), it is required for neural tube formation, though the mechanism is unknown. Here we show that MARCKSL1 is directly phosphorylated by JNK on C-terminal residues (S120, T148, and T183). This phosphorylation enables MARCKSL1 to bundle and stabilize F-actin, increase filopodium numbers and dynamics, and retard migration in neurons. Conversely, when MARCKSL1 phosphorylation is inhibited, actin mobility increases and filopodium formation is compromised whereas lamellipodium formation is enhanced, as is cell migration. We find that MARCKSL1 mRNA is upregulated in a broad range of cancer types and that MARCKSL1 protein is strongly induced in primary prostate carcinomas. Gene knockdown in prostate cancer cells or in neurons reveals a critical role for MARCKSL1 in migration that is dependent on the phosphorylation state; phosphomimetic MARCKSL1 (MARCKSL1(S120D,T148D,T183D)) inhibits whereas dephospho-MARCKSL1(S120A,T148A,T183A) induces migration. In summary, these data show that JNK phosphorylation of MARCKSL1 regulates actin homeostasis, filopodium and lamellipodium formation, and neuronal migration under physiological conditions and that, when ectopically expressed in prostate cancer cells, MARCKSL1 again determines cell movement.

  10. SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on days...

  11. CONTRIBUTION OF INSPIRATORY FLOW TO ACTIVATION OF EGFR, RAS, MAPK, ATF-2 AND C-JUN DURING LUNG STRETCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contribution of Inspiratory Flow to Activation of EGFR, Ras, MAPK, ATF-2 and c-Jun during Lung Stretch

    R. Silbajoris 1, Z. Li 2, J. M. Samet 1 and Y. C. Huang 1. 1 NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC .

    Mechanical ventilation with larg...

  12. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in c-jun directly targeted in vitro by protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Richard T. . E-mail: rwaldron@mednet.ucla.edu; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-05-04

    Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates the c-jun amino-terminal in vitro at site(s) distinct from JNK [C. Hurd, R.T. Waldron, E. Rozengurt, Protein kinase D complexes with c-jun N-terminal kinase via activation loop phosphorylation and phosphorylates the c-jun N-terminus, Oncogene 21 (2002) 2154-2160], but the sites have not been identified. Here, metabolic {sup 32}P-labeling of c-jun protein in COS-7 cells indicated that PKD phosphorylates c-jun in vivo at a site(s) between aa 43-93, a region containing important functional elements. On this basis, the PKD-mediated phosphorylation site(s) was further characterized in vitro using GST-c-jun fusion proteins. PKD did not incorporate phosphate into Ser63 and Ser73, the JNK sites in GST-c-jun(1-89). Rather, PKD and JNK could sequentially phosphorylate distinct site(s) simultaneously. By mass spectrometry of tryptic phosphopeptides, Ser58 interposed between the JNK-binding portion of the delta domain and the adjacent TAD1 was identified as a prominent site phosphorylated in vitro by PKD. These data were further supported by kinase reactions using truncations or point-mutations of GST-c-jun. Together, these data suggest that PKD-mediated phosphorylation modulates c-jun at the level of its N-terminal functional domains.

  13. Capsaicin attenuates palmitate-induced expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 1 and interleukin 8 by increasing palmitate oxidation and reducing c-Jun activation in THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell) cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-E; Kim, Tae Ho; Yi, Sang-A; Hwang, Yun Cheong; Hwang, Won Sun; Choe, Sun Jung; Han, Seung Jin; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Kang, Yup; Lee, Kwan-Woo

    2011-06-01

    Capsaicin, a spicy component of hot peppers, has been shown to improve inflammatory disease and obesity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory activity of capsaicin can be used to improve free fatty acid (FFA)-induced inflammation by reducing gene expression of macrophage inflammatory protein 1 (MIP-1) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) in THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell) macrophages. To investigate whether capsaicin ameliorates palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions, we treated THP-1 cells with palmitate in the presence or absence of capsaicin and measured MIP-1 and IL-8 by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To elucidate the mechanism by which capsaicin effects on palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions, we performed immunoblotting with stress kinase-related antibodies and measured palmitate oxidation and palmitate oxidation-related gene expression. Palmitate and stearate but not the unsaturated FFA oleate significantly increased MIP-1 and IL-8 expressions in THP-1 macrophages. Treatment with capsaicin or FFA oxidation stimulators inhibited palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 expressions in THP-1 macrophages. Capsaicin increased the gene expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and the β-oxidation of palmitate. Furthermore, capsaicin significantly reduced palmitate-stimulated activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38. Our data suggest that the attenuation of palmitate-induced MIP-1 and IL-8 gene expressions by capsaicin is associated with reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 and preserved β-oxidation activity.

  14. Preventing polyglutamine-induced activation of c-Jun delays neuronal dysfunction in a mouse model of SCA7 retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Merienne, Karine; Friedman, James; Akimoto, Masayuki; Abou-Sleymane, Gretta; Weber, Chantal; Swaroop, Anand; Trottier, Yvon

    2007-03-01

    We have approached the role of cellular stress in neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyglutamine expansion (polyQ) in the context of Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) that includes retinal degeneration. Using the R7E mouse, in which polyQ-ataxin-7 is specifically over-expressed in rod photoreceptors, we previously showed that rod dysfunction correlated to moderate and prolonged activation of the JNK/c-Jun stress pathway. SCA7 retinopathy was also associated with reduced expression of rod-specific genes, including the transcription factor Nrl, which is essential for rod differentiation and function. Here, we report that R7E retinopathy is improved upon breeding with the JunAA knock-in mice, in which JNK-mediated activation of c-Jun is compromised. Expression of Nrl and its downstream targets, which are involved in phototranduction, are partially restored in the JunAA-R7E mice. We further show that c-Jun can directly repress the transcription of Nrl. Our studies suggest that polyQ-induced cellular stress leads to repression of genes necessary for neuronal fate and function. PMID:17189700

  15. Physical interaction of the activator protein-1 factors c-Fos and c-Jun with Cbfa1 for collagenase-3 promoter activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Karsenty, Gerard; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we determined that the activator protein-1 (AP-1)-binding site and the runt domain (RD)-binding site and their binding proteins, c-Fos.c-Jun and Cbfa, regulate the collagenase-3 promoter in parathyroid hormone-treated and differentiating osteoblasts. Here we show that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun appear to cooperatively bind the RD- and AP-1-binding sites and form ternary structures in vitro. Both in vitro and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid studies further demonstrate interaction between Cbfa1 with c-Fos and c-Jun in the absence of phosphorylation and without binding to DNA. Additionally, only the runt domain of Cbfa1 was required for interaction with c-Jun and c-Fos. In mammalian cells, overexpression of Cbfa1 enhanced c-Jun activation of AP-1-binding site promoter activity, demonstrating functional interaction. Finally, insertion of base pairs that disrupted the helical phasing between the AP-1- and RD-binding sites also inhibited collagenase-3 promoter activation. Thus, we provide direct evidence that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun physically interact and cooperatively bind the AP-1- and RD-binding sites in the collagenase-3 promoter. Moreover, the AP-1- and RD-binding sites appear to be organized in a specific required helical arrangement that facilitates transcription factor interaction and enables promoter activation.

  16. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA), which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and rhynchophylline (RP) have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg), RP (0.25 mg/kg), and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg) for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp) of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β , IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period. PMID:24381640

  17. c-fos/c-jun expression and AP-1 activation in skin fibroblasts from centenarians.

    PubMed

    Grassilli, E; Bellesia, E; Salomoni, P; Croce, M A; Sikora, E; Radziszewska, E; Tesco, G; Vergelli, M; Latorraca, S; Barbieri, D; Fagiolo, U; Santacaterina, S; Amaducci, L; Tiozzo, R; Sorbi, S; Franceschi, C

    1996-09-13

    In vitro replicative senescence is characterized by an irreversible growth arrest due to the inability of the cell to induce some key regulators of cell cycle progression, such as c-fos and AP-1, in response to mitogenic stimuli. In vitro replicative senescence and in vivo aging have been assumed to be two related phenomena, likely controlled by overlapping or interacting genes. As a corollary, fibroblasts from centenarians, which have undergone a long process of senescence in vivo should have very limited proliferative capability. On the contrary, in a previous work we found that fibroblasts from centenarians exhibited the same capacity to respond to different mitogenic stimuli as fibroblasts from young donors. Here we provide evidences that the well preserved proliferative response is likely due to the fact that some pivotal regulators- c-fos, c-jun and AP-1-are still fully inducible, despite a long process of in vivo senescence. Our data therefore suggest that in vivo and in vitro aging are separate phenomena whose possible relationships, if any, have to be ascertained very carefully. PMID:8806666

  18. TOPK promotes lung cancer resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors by phosphorylating and activating c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ting; Niu, Mengjie; Zhang, Shengli; Jia, Lintao; Li, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have shown promising clinical efficacy in non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, resistance is frequently observed in malignant cells, operating through a mechanism that remains largely unknown. The present study shows that T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is upregulated in NSCLC and excessively activated in TKI-refractory cells. TOPK dictates the responsiveness of lung cancers to the EGFR-targeted TKI gefitinib through the transcription factor AP-1 component c-Jun. TOPK binds directly to and phosphorylates c-Jun, which consequently activates the transcription of AP-1 target genes, including CCND1 and CDC2. TOPK silencing sensitizes EGFR-TKI-resistant lung cancer cells to gefitinib and increases gefitinib efficacy in preclinical lung adenocarcinoma xenograft models. These findings represent a novel mechanism of lung cancer resistance to TKIs and suggest that TOPK may have value both as a predictive biomarker and as a therapeutic target: TOPK-targeted therapy may synergize with EGFR-targeted therapy in lung cancers. PMID:26745678

  19. Dual Role of Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activity in Bone Morphogenetic Protein-Mediated Drosophila Ventral Head Development.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yeon; Stultz, Brian G; Hursh, Deborah A

    2015-12-01

    The Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein encoded by decapentaplegic (dpp) controls ventral head morphogenesis by expression in the head primordia, eye-antennal imaginal discs. These are epithelial sacs made of two layers: columnar disc proper cells and squamous cells of the peripodial epithelium. dpp expression related to head formation occurs in the peripodial epithelium; cis-regulatory mutations disrupting this expression display defects in sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, gena, and maxillary palps. Here we document that disruption of this dpp expression causes apoptosis in peripodial cells and underlying disc proper cells. We further show that peripodial Dpp acts directly on the disc proper, indicating that Dpp must cross the disc lumen to act. We demonstrate that palp defects are mechanistically separable from the other mutant phenotypes; both are affected by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway but in opposite ways. Slight reduction of both Jun N-terminal kinase and Dpp activity in peripodial cells causes stronger vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects than Dpp alone; additionally, strong reduction of Jun N-terminal kinase activity alone causes identical defects. A more severe reduction of dpp results in similar vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects, but also causes mutant maxillary palps. This latter defect is correlated with increased peripodial Jun N-terminal kinase activity and can be caused solely by ectopic activation of Jun N-terminal kinase. We conclude that formation of sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena tissue in head morphogenesis requires the action of Jun N-terminal kinase in peripodial cells, while excessive Jun N-terminal kinase signaling in these same cells inhibits the formation of maxillary palps.

  20. NPM-ALK oncogenic kinase promotes cell-cycle progression through activation of JNK/cJun signaling in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Leventaki, Vasiliki; Drakos, Elias; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S; Claret, Francois X; Rassidakis, George Z

    2007-09-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) frequently carries the t(2;5)(p23;q35), resulting in aberrant expression of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK). We show that in 293T and Jurkat cells, forced expression of active NPM-ALK, but not kinase-dead mutant NPM-ALK (210K>R), induced JNK and cJun phosphorylation, and this was linked to a dramatic increase in AP-1 transcriptional activity. Conversely, inhibition of ALK activity in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells resulted in a concentration-dependent dephosphorylation of JNK and cJun and decreased AP-1 DNA-binding. In addition, JNK physically binds NPM-ALK and is highly activated in cultured and primary NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells. cJun phosphorylation in NPM-ALK(+) ALCL cells is mediated by JNKs, as shown by selective knocking down of JNK1 and JNK2 genes using siRNA. Inhibition of JNK activity using SP600125 decreased cJun phosphorylation and AP-1 transcriptional activity and this was associated with decreased cell proliferation and G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of the cJun gene by siRNA led to a decreased S-phase cell-cycle fraction associated with upregulation of p21 and downregulation of cyclin D3 and cyclin A. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function of NPM-ALK, phosphorylation and activation of JNK and cJun, which may contribute to uncontrolled cell-cycle progression and oncogenesis.

  1. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim7 mediates c-Jun/AP-1 activation by Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Diefenbacher, Markus E.; Mylona, Anastasia; Kassel, Olivier; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun/AP-1 transcription factor controls key cellular behaviours, including proliferation and apoptosis, in response to JNK and Ras/MAPK signalling. While the JNK pathway has been well characterised, the mechanism of activation by Ras was elusive. Here we identify the uncharacterised ubiquitin ligase Trim7 as a critical component of AP-1 activation via Ras. We found that MSK1 directly phosphorylates Trim7 in response to direct activation by the Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK pathway, and this modification stimulates Trim7 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Trim7 mediates Lys63-linked ubiquitination of the AP-1 coactivator RACO-1, leading to RACO-1 protein stabilisation. Consequently, Trim7 depletion reduces RACO-1 levels and AP-1-dependent gene expression. Moreover, transgenic overexpression of Trim7 increases lung tumour burden in a Ras-driven cancer model, and knockdown of Trim7 in established xenografts reduces tumour growth. Thus, phosphorylation-ubiquitination crosstalk between MSK1, Trim7 and RACO-1 completes the long sought-after mechanism linking growth factor signalling and AP-1 activation. PMID:25851810

  3. Expression of pokeweed antiviral protein in mammalian cells activates c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase without causing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chan Tung, Kelvin W; Mansouri, Sheila; Hudak, Katalin A

    2008-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a ribosome inactivating protein isolated from the pokeweed plant (Phytolacca americana L.) that exhibits broad range antiviral activity against several human viruses including HIV and influenza. This characteristic suggests that PAP may have therapeutic applications; however, it is not known whether the protein elicits a ribotoxic stress response that would result in cell death. Therefore, we expressed PAP in 293T cells and showed that the enzyme did not inhibit protein translation even though approximately 15% of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was depurinated. PAP expression induced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), which was specific to rRNA depurination, as the enzymatically inactive mutant PAPx did not affect kinase activity. Moreover, incubation of PAP-expressing cells with translation inhibitors diminished JNK activation, indicating that the signal for induction of the kinase pathway originated from ribosomes. JNK activation did not result in apoptosis as demonstrated by the absence of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and by the lack of cell staining for morphological changes in membrane permeability. Unlike all ribosome inactivating proteins tested thus far, the stress response triggered by PAP expression did not result in cell death, which supports further investigation of the enzyme in the design of novel antiviral agents.

  4. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 via enhancing signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-dependent cJun expression mediates retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the involvement of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) in endothelial cell angiogenic responses, its role in pathological retinal angiogenesis is not known. In the present study, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) induces Pyk2 activation in mediating human retinal microvascular endothelial cell (HRMVEC) migration, sprouting and tube formation. Downstream to Pyk2, VEGFA induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and cJun expression in the modulation of HRMVEC migration, sprouting and tube formation. Consistent with these observations, hypoxia induced activation of Pyk2-STAT3-cJun signaling axis and siRNA-mediated downregulation of Pyk2, STAT3 or cJun levels substantially inhibited hypoxia-induced retinal endothelial cell proliferation, tip cell formation and neovascularization. Together, these observations suggest that activation of Pyk2-mediated STAT3-cJun signaling is required for VEGFA-induced HRMVEC migration, sprouting and tube formation in vitro and hypoxia-induced retinal endothelial cell proliferation, tip cell formation and neovascularization in vivo. PMID:27210483

  5. SUMOylation of the inducible (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex occurs on target promoters to limit transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tempé, D; Vives, E; Brockly, F; Brooks, H; De Rossi, S; Piechaczyk, M; Bossis, G

    2014-02-13

    The inducible proto-oncogenic (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 transcription complex binds 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-responsive elements (TRE) in its target genes. It is tightly controlled at multiple levels to avoid the deleterious effects of its inappropriate activation. In particular, SUMOylation represses its transactivation capacity in transient reporter assays using constitutively expressed proteins. This led to the presumption that (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation would be required to turn-off transcription of its target genes, as proposed for various transcription factors. Instead, thanks to the generation of an antibody specific for SUMO-modified c-Fos, we provide here direct evidence that SUMOylated c-Fos is present on a stably integrated reporter TPA-inducible promoter at the onset of transcriptional activation and colocalizes with RNA polymerase II within chromatin. Interestingly, (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 SUMOylation limits reporter gene induction, as well as the appearance of active transcription-specific histone marks on its promoter. Moreover, non-SUMOylatable mutant (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 dimers accumulate to higher levels on their target promoter, suggesting that SUMOylation might facilitate the release of (c-Fos:c-Jun)/AP-1 from promoters. Finally, activation of GADD153, an AP-1 target gene, is also associated with a rapid increase in SUMOylation at the level of its TRE and c-Fos SUMOylation dampens its induction by TPA. Taken together, our data suggest that SUMOylation could serve to buffer transcriptional activation of AP-1 target genes.

  6. Retinoic acid inhibits induction of c-Jun protein by ultraviolet radiation that occurs subsequent to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G J; Talwar, H S; Lin, J; Lin, P; McPhillips, F; Wang, Z; Li, X; Wan, Y; Kang, S; Voorhees, J J

    1998-03-15

    Human skin is exposed daily to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV induces the matrix metalloproteinases collagenase, 92-kD gelatinase, and stromelysin, which degrade skin connective tissue and may contribute to premature skin aging (photoaging). Pretreatment of skin with all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) inhibits UV induction of matrix metalloproteinases. We investigated upstream signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of tRA inhibition of UV induction of matrix metalloproteinases in human skin in vivo. Exposure of human skin in vivo to low doses of UV activated EGF receptors, the GTP-binding regulatory protein p21Ras, and stimulated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Both JNK and p38 phosphorylated, and thereby activated transcription factors c-Jun and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2), which bound to the c-Jun promoter and upregulated c-Jun gene expression. Elevated c-Jun, in association with constitutively expressed c-Fos, formed increased levels of transcription factor activator protein (AP) 1, which is required for transcription of matrix metalloproteinases. Pretreatment of human skin with tRA inhibited UV induction of c-Jun protein and, consequently, AP-1. c-Jun protein inhibition occurred via a posttranscriptional mechanism, since tRA did not inhibit UV induction of c-Jun mRNA. These data demonstrate, for the first time, activation of MAP kinase pathways in humans in vivo, and reveal a novel posttranscriptional mechanism by which tRA antagonizes UV activation of AP-1 by inhibiting c-Jun protein induction. Inhibition of c-Jun induction likely contributes to the previously reported prevention by tRA of UV induction of AP-1-regulated matrix-degrading metalloproteinases in human skin.

  7. Small-Molecule Prodigiosin Restores p53 Tumor Suppressor Activity in Chemoresistant Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells via c-Jun-Mediated ΔNp73 Inhibition and p73 Activation.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Varun V; Hong, Bo; Allen, Joshua E; Zhang, Shengliang; Lulla, Amriti R; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-04-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is frequently mutated or inactivated in colorectal cancer. In contrast, p53 family member p73 is rarely mutated in colorectal cancer and p73 activation elicits p53-like tumor suppression. Colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSC) comprise a rare self-renewing subpopulation that contributes to tumor maintenance and chemoresistance. p53 restoration is known to target CRCSCs, but p73 restoration in CRCSCs has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the effects of the small-molecule prodigiosin, which restores the p53 pathway in tumor cells via p73 activation, on CRCSCs in vitro and in vivo Prodigiosin prevented colonosphere formation independent of p53 status and reduced the viability of self-renewing, 5-fluorouracil-resistant Aldefluor positive [Aldefluor(+)] CRCSCs in vitro Furthermore, prodigiosin inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors initiated with Aldefluor+ cells without toxic effects and limited the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Consistently, prodigiosin induced activation of a p53-responsive luciferase reporter in colonospheres, Aldefluor(+) cells, and tumor xenografts. Mechanistic studies revealed that prodigiosin increased the levels of p73 and reduced levels of the oncogenic N-terminally truncated isoform ΔNp73 in Aldefluor(+) cells. Accordingly, p73 knockdown or ΔNp73 overexpression suppressed prodigiosin-mediated inhibition of colonosphere formation. Moreover, prodigiosin increased levels of the transcription factor c-Jun, a regulator of p73 and ΔNp73, in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. c-Jun knockdown attenuated prodigiosin-mediated p53-reporter activation, ΔNp73 downregulation, p73 activation, and cell death. Collectively, our findings highlight the previously uncharacterized use of p73-activating therapeutics to target CRCSCs. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1989-99. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence transcriptional activity, virus replication and latency properties. Previously, we investigated the proviral latency properties of different HIV-1 subtypes in the SupT1 T cell line. Here, subtype-specific latency and replication properties were studied in primary PHA-activated T lymphocytes. No major differences in latency and replication capacity were measured among the HIV-1 subtypes. Subtype B and AE LTRs were studied in more detail with regard to a putative AP-1 binding site using luciferase reporter constructs. c-Jun, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, can activate both subtype B and AE LTRs, but the latter showed a stronger response, reflecting a closer match with the consensus AP-1 binding site. c-Jun overexpression enhanced Tat-mediated transcription of the viral LTR, but in the absence of Tat inhibited basal promoter activity. Thus, c-Jun can exert a positive or negative effect via the AP-1 binding site in the HIV-1 LTR promoter, depending on the presence or absence of Tat. PMID:24447950

  9. Salmonella induces SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling pathways in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on d...

  10. Quantitative proteomics reveals dynamic interaction of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) with RNA transport granule proteins splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (Sfpq) and non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (Nono) during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sury, Matthias D; McShane, Erik; Hernandez-Miranda, Luis Rodrigo; Birchmeier, Carmen; Selbach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is an important mediator of physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system. Importantly, JNK not only is involved in neuronal cell death, but also plays a significant role in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. For example, nerve growth factor induces JNK-dependent neuronal differentiation in several model systems. The mechanism by which JNK mediates neuronal differentiation is not well understood. Here, we employed a proteomic strategy to better characterize the function of JNK during neuronal differentiation. We used SILAC-based quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that interact with JNK in PC12 cells in a nerve growth factor-dependent manner. Intriguingly, we found that JNK interacted with neuronal transport granule proteins such as Sfpq and Nono upon NGF treatment. We validated the specificity of these interactions by showing that they were disrupted by a specific peptide inhibitor that blocks the interaction of JNK with its substrates. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting experiments confirmed the interaction of JNK1 with Sfpq/Nono and demonstrated that it was RNA dependent. Confocal microscopy indicated that JNK1 associated with neuronal granule proteins in the cytosol of PC12 cells, primary cortical neurons, and P19 neuronal cells. Finally, siRNA experiments confirmed that Sfpq was necessary for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and that it most likely acted in the same pathway as JNK. In summary, our data indicate that the interaction of JNK1 with transport granule proteins in the cytosol of differentiating neurons plays an important role during neuronal development.

  11. c-Jun transactivates Puma gene expression to promote osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Hou, Gang; Zhang, Yongkai; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disorder in which genetic, hormonal, mechanical and ageing factors affect its progression. Current studies are focusing on chondrocytes as a key mediator of OA at a cellular level. however, the mechanism underlying chondrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. PUMA is a pro-apoptotic member of the BH3-only subgroup of the Bcl-2 family and is involved in a large number of physiological and pathological processes. In the present study, we examined whether PUMA has a role in IL-1β-induced apoptosis and whether the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway mediates the induction of PUMA, thus contributing to chondrocyte apoptosis. The results demonstrated an increase in PUMA protein and mRNA levels in cultured mouse chondrocytes following 4 h of IL-1β treatment. Furthermore, this upregulation of PUMA was critical for chondrocyte apoptosis as knockdown of PUMA using PUMA-specific siRNA significantly reduced apoptosis in cultured cells. Upon pharmacological inhibition of the JNK/c-Jun pathway with CE11004 or SP600125, the expression of PUMA was notably suppressed with a concomitant decrease in apoptosis observed in IL-1β-treated chondrocytes. Also, immunohistochemical studies revealed that the PUMA and c-Jun proteins were upregulated in chondrocytes from the articular cartilage of OA patients. Together, these data suggest a role for PUMA and the JNK/c-Jun pathway in the regulation of chondrocyte apoptosis during OA.

  12. sPLA2 -IIA Overexpression in Mice Epidermis Depletes Hair Follicle Stem Cells and Induces Differentiation Mediated Through Enhanced JNK/c-Jun Activation.

    PubMed

    Sarate, Rahul M; Chovatiya, Gopal L; Ravi, Vagisha; Khade, Bharat; Gupta, Sanjay; Waghmare, Sanjeev K

    2016-09-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 Group-IIA (sPLA2 -IIA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to yield fatty acids and lysophospholipids. sPLA2 -IIA is deregulated in various cancers; however, its role in hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) regulation is obscure. Here we report a transgenic mice overexpressing sPLA2 -IIA (K14-sPLA2 -IIA) showed depletion of HFSC pool. This was accompanied with increased differentiation, loss of ortho-parakeratotic organization and enlargement of sebaceous gland, infundibulum and junctional zone. The colony forming efficiency of keratinocytes was significantly reduced. Microarray profiling of HFSCs revealed enhanced level of epithelial mitogens and transcription factors, c-Jun and FosB that may be involved in proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, K14-sPLA2 -IIA keratinocytes showed enhanced activation of EGFR and JNK1/2 that led to c-Jun activation, which co-related with enhanced differentiation. Further, depletion of stem cells in bulge is associated with high levels of chromatin silencing mark, H3K27me3 and low levels of an activator mark, H3K9ac suggestive of alteration in gene expression contributing toward stem cells differentiation. Our results, first time uncovered that overexpression of sPLA2 -IIA lead to depletion of HFSCs and differentiation associated with altered histone modification. Thus involvement of sPLA2 -IIA in stem cells regulation and disease pathogenesis suggest its prospective clinical implications. Stem Cells 2016;34:2407-2417. PMID:27299855

  13. sPLA2 -IIA Overexpression in Mice Epidermis Depletes Hair Follicle Stem Cells and Induces Differentiation Mediated Through Enhanced JNK/c-Jun Activation.

    PubMed

    Sarate, Rahul M; Chovatiya, Gopal L; Ravi, Vagisha; Khade, Bharat; Gupta, Sanjay; Waghmare, Sanjeev K

    2016-09-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 Group-IIA (sPLA2 -IIA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids to yield fatty acids and lysophospholipids. sPLA2 -IIA is deregulated in various cancers; however, its role in hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) regulation is obscure. Here we report a transgenic mice overexpressing sPLA2 -IIA (K14-sPLA2 -IIA) showed depletion of HFSC pool. This was accompanied with increased differentiation, loss of ortho-parakeratotic organization and enlargement of sebaceous gland, infundibulum and junctional zone. The colony forming efficiency of keratinocytes was significantly reduced. Microarray profiling of HFSCs revealed enhanced level of epithelial mitogens and transcription factors, c-Jun and FosB that may be involved in proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, K14-sPLA2 -IIA keratinocytes showed enhanced activation of EGFR and JNK1/2 that led to c-Jun activation, which co-related with enhanced differentiation. Further, depletion of stem cells in bulge is associated with high levels of chromatin silencing mark, H3K27me3 and low levels of an activator mark, H3K9ac suggestive of alteration in gene expression contributing toward stem cells differentiation. Our results, first time uncovered that overexpression of sPLA2 -IIA lead to depletion of HFSCs and differentiation associated with altered histone modification. Thus involvement of sPLA2 -IIA in stem cells regulation and disease pathogenesis suggest its prospective clinical implications. Stem Cells 2016;34:2407-2417.

  14. Stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 target Cdc25B for degradation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sanae; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kizu, Ryoichi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Poon, Randy Y C; Yamashita, Katsumi

    2009-08-15

    Cdc25 dual specificity phosphatases positively regulate the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin complexes. Of the three mammalian Cdc25 isoforms, Cdc25A is phosphorylated by genotoxic stress-activated Chk1 or Chk2, which triggers its SCFbeta-TrCP-mediated degradation. However, the roles of Cdc25B and Cdc25C in cell stress checkpoints remain inconclusive. We herein report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) induces the degradation of Cdc25B. Nongenotoxic stress induced by anisomycin caused rapid degradation of Cdc25B as well as Cdc25A. Cdc25B degradation was dependent mainly on JNK and partially on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). Accordingly, cotransfection with JNK1, JNK2, or p38 destabilized Cdc25B. In vitro kinase assays and site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the critical JNK and p38 phosphorylation site in Cdc25B was Ser101. Cdc25B with Ser101 mutated to alanine was refractory to anisomycin-induced degradation, and cells expressing such mutant Cdc25B proteins were able to override the anisomycin-induced G2 arrest. These results highlight the importance of a novel JNK/p38-Cdc25B axis for a nongenotoxic stress-induced cell cycle checkpoint.

  15. ZAK induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and brain natriuretic peptide expression via p38/JNK signaling and GATA4/c-Jun transcriptional factor activation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, You-Liang; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Su, Chia-Chi; Chung, Li-Chin; Pai, Peiying; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-07-01

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is an adaptive response of heart to various stress conditions. During the period of stress accumulation, transition from physiological hypertrophy to pathological hypertrophy results in the promotion of heart failure. Our previous studies found that ZAK, a sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase, was highly expressed in infarcted human hearts and demonstrated that overexpression of ZAK induced cardiac hypertrophy. This study evaluates, cellular events associated with the expression of two doxycycline (Dox) inducible Tet-on ZAK expression systems, a Tet-on ZAK WT (wild-type), and a Tet-on ZAK DN (mutant, Dominant-negative form) in H9c2 myoblast cells; Tet-on ZAK WT was found to increase cell size and hypertrophic marker BNP in a dose-dependent manner. To ascertain the mechanism of ZAK-mediated hypertrophy, expression analysis with various inhibitors of the related upstream and downstream proteins was performed. Tet-on ZAK WT expression triggered the p38 and JNK pathway and also activated the expression and nuclear translocation of p-GATA4 and p-c-Jun transcription factors, without the involvement of p-ERK or NFATc3. However, Tet-on ZAK DN showed no effect on the p38 and JNK signaling cascade. The results showed that the inhibitors of JNK1/2 and p38 significantly suppressed ZAK-induced BNP expression. The results show the role of ZAK and/or the ZAK downstream events such as JNK and p38 phosphorylation, c-Jun, and GATA-4 nuclear translocation in cardiac hypertrophy. ZAK and/or the ZAK downstream p38, and JNK pathway could therefore be potential targets to ameliorate cardiac hypertrophy symptoms in ZAK-overexpressed patients. PMID:25869677

  16. GTPase-deficient G alpha 16 and G alpha q induce PC12 cell differentiation and persistent activation of cJun NH2-terminal kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Heasley, L E; Storey, B; Fanger, G R; Butterfield, L; Zamarripa, J; Blumberg, D; Maue, R A

    1996-01-01

    Persistent stimulation of specific protein kinase pathways has been proposed as a key feature of receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular oncoproteins that signal neuronal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Among the protein serine/threonine kinases identified to date, the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been highlighted for their potential role in signalling PC12 cell differentiation. We report here that retrovirus-mediated expression of GTPase-deficient, constitutively active forms of the heterotrimeric Gq family members, G alpha qQ209L and G alpha 16Q212L, in PC12 cells induces neuronal differentiation as indicated by neurite outgrowth and the increased expression of voltage-dependent sodium channels. Differentiation was not observed after cellular expression of GTPase-deficient forms of alpha i2 or alpha 0, indicating selectivity for the Gq family of G proteins. As predicted, overexpression of alpha qQ209L and alpha 16Q212L constitutively elevated basal phospholipase C activity approximately 10-fold in PC12 cells. Significantly, little or no p42/44 MAP kinase activity was detected in PC12 cells differentiated with alpha 16Q212L or alpha qQ209L, although these proteins were strongly activated following expression of constitutively active cRaf-1. Rather, a persistent threefold activation of the cJun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) was observed in PC12 cells expressing alpha qQ209L and alpha 16Q212L. This level of JNK activation was similar to that achieved with nerve growth factor, a strong inducer of PC12 cell differentiation. Supportive of a role for JNK activation in PC12 cell differentiation, retrovirus-mediated overexpression of cJun, a JNK target, in PC12 cells induced neurite outgrowth. The results define a p42/44 MAP kinase-independent mechanism for differentiation of PC12 cells and suggest that persistent activation of the JNK members of the proline-directed protein kinase family by GTPase-deficient G alpha q and G

  17. 14-3-3σ Gene Loss Leads to Activation of the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition Due to the Stabilization of c-Jun Protein.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Kumarkrishna; Chaudhary, Neelam; Gurjar, Mansa; D'Souza, Roseline; Limzerwala, Jazeel; Maddika, Subbareddy; Dalal, Sorab N

    2016-07-29

    Loss of 14-3-3σ has been observed in multiple tumor types; however, the mechanisms by which 14-3-3σ loss leads to tumor progression are not understood. The experiments in this report demonstrate that loss of 14-3-3σ leads to a decrease in the expression of epithelial markers and an increase in the expression of mesenchymal markers, which is indicative of an induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The EMT was accompanied by an increase in migration and invasion in the 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells. 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells show increased stabilization of c-Jun, resulting in an increase in the expression of the EMT transcription factor slug. 14-3-3σ induces the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Jun in an FBW7-dependent manner. c-Jun ubiquitination is dependent on the presence of an intact nuclear export pathway as c-Jun is stabilized and localized to the nucleus in the presence of a nuclear export inhibitor. Furthermore, the absence of 14-3-3σ leads to the nuclear accumulation and stabilization of c-Jun, suggesting that 14-3-3σ regulates the subcellular localization of c-Jun. Our results have identified a novel mechanism by which 14-3-3σ maintains the epithelial phenotype by inhibiting EMT and suggest that this property of 14-3-3σ might contribute to its function as a tumor suppressor gene.

  18. 14-3-3σ Gene Loss Leads to Activation of the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition Due to the Stabilization of c-Jun Protein.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Kumarkrishna; Chaudhary, Neelam; Gurjar, Mansa; D'Souza, Roseline; Limzerwala, Jazeel; Maddika, Subbareddy; Dalal, Sorab N

    2016-07-29

    Loss of 14-3-3σ has been observed in multiple tumor types; however, the mechanisms by which 14-3-3σ loss leads to tumor progression are not understood. The experiments in this report demonstrate that loss of 14-3-3σ leads to a decrease in the expression of epithelial markers and an increase in the expression of mesenchymal markers, which is indicative of an induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). The EMT was accompanied by an increase in migration and invasion in the 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells. 14-3-3σ(-/-) cells show increased stabilization of c-Jun, resulting in an increase in the expression of the EMT transcription factor slug. 14-3-3σ induces the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Jun in an FBW7-dependent manner. c-Jun ubiquitination is dependent on the presence of an intact nuclear export pathway as c-Jun is stabilized and localized to the nucleus in the presence of a nuclear export inhibitor. Furthermore, the absence of 14-3-3σ leads to the nuclear accumulation and stabilization of c-Jun, suggesting that 14-3-3σ regulates the subcellular localization of c-Jun. Our results have identified a novel mechanism by which 14-3-3σ maintains the epithelial phenotype by inhibiting EMT and suggest that this property of 14-3-3σ might contribute to its function as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:27261462

  19. Antiestrogenic activity of flavnoid phytochemicals mediated via c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase pathway. Cell-type specific regulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoid phytochemicals act as both agonists and antagonists of the human estrogen receptors (ERs). While a number of these compounds act by directly binding to the ER, certain phytochemicals, such as the flavonoid compounds chalcone and flavone, elicit antagonistic effects on estrogen signaling in...

  20. The regulation of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis by JNK/c-Jun pathway in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Das, Hrishita; Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal loss in selective areas of brain underlies the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidences place oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ) central to the disease. However, mechanism of neuron death in response to Aβ remains elusive. Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and induction of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun are reported in AD. However, targets of JNK/c-Jun in Aβ-induced neuron death are mostly unknown. Our study shows that pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-Jun pathway is activated, in cultures of cortical neurons following treatment with oligomeric Aβ and in AD transgenic mice, and that inhibition of this pathway by selective inhibitor blocks induction of Puma by Aβ. We also find that both JNK and p53 pathways co-operatively regulate Puma expression in Aβ-treated neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel AP1-binding site on rat puma gene which is necessary for direct binding of c-Jun with Puma promoter. Finally, we find that knocking down of c-Jun by siRNA provides significant protection from Aβ toxicity and that induction of Bim and Puma by Aβ in neurons requires c-Jun. Taken together, our results suggest that both Bim and Puma are target of c-Jun and elucidate the intricate regulation of Puma expression by JNK/c-Jun and p53 pathways in neurons upon Aβ toxicity. JNK/c-Jun pathway is shown to be activated in neurons of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and plays a vital role in neuron death in AD models. However, downstream targets of c-Jun in this disease have not been thoroughly elucidated. Our study shows that two important pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-jun pathway is activated, in cultures

  1. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B.; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Wang, Austin L.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2016-01-01

    Complexin activates Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca2+-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca2+-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca2+-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca2+-triggered release. PMID:27444020

  2. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Wang, Austin L; Diao, Jiajie; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-08-01

    Complexin activates Ca(2+)-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca(2+)-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca(2+)-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca(2+)-triggered release. PMID:27444020

  3. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Wang, Austin L; Diao, Jiajie; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-08-01

    Complexin activates Ca(2+)-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca(2+)-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca(2+)-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca(2+)-triggered release.

  4. Activation of c-Jun-NH2-kinase by UV irradiation is dependent on p21ras.

    PubMed

    Adler, V; Pincus, M R; Polotskaya, A; Montano, X; Friedman, F K; Ronai, Z

    1996-09-20

    We have demonstrated previously that Jun-NH2-kinase (JNK) activation in vitro is potentiated by association with the p21(ras) protein. To determine if in vivo activation of JNK also depends on p21(ras), we have used M1311 cells that carry the cDNA for the neutralizing antibody to p21(ras), Y13-259, under a dexamethasone-inducible promoter. The ability of UV to activate JNK gradually decreased over a 4-day period of cell growth in dexamethasone. This decrease coincides with weaker transcriptional activation measured via gel shift and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. Peptides corresponding to amino acids 96-110 on p21(ras), which were shown to block Ras-JNK association, inhibited UV-mediated JNK activation in mouse fibroblast 3T3-4A cells as well as in M1311 cells, further supporting the role of p21(ras) in UV-mediated JNK activation. Overall, the present studies provide in vivo confirmation of the role p21(ras) plays in JNK activation by UV irradiation.

  5. Regulation of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo by the stress-activated protein kinases/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases

    PubMed Central

    Choukroun, Gabriel; Hajjar, Roger; Fry, Stefanie; del Monte, Federica; Haq, Syed; Guerrero, J. Luis; Picard, Michael; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Force, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy often presages the development of heart failure. Numerous cytosolic signaling pathways have been implicated in the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes in culture, but their roles in the hypertrophic response to physiologically relevant stimuli in vivo is unclear. We previously reported that adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of SEK-1(KR), a dominant inhibitory mutant of the immediate upstream activator of the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), abrogates the hypertrophic response of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to endothelin-1 in culture. We now report that gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) to the adult rat heart blocks SAPK activation by pressure overload, demonstrating that the activity of cytosolic signaling pathways can be inhibited by gene transfer of loss-of-function mutants in vivo. Furthermore, gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) inhibited pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, as determined by echocardiography and several postmortem measures including left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, the ratio of LV weight to body weight, cardiomyocyte diameter, and inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor expression. Our data suggest that the SAPKs are critical regulators of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, and therefore may serve as novel drug targets in the treatment of hypertrophy and heart failure. J. Clin. Invest. 104:391–398 (1999). PMID:10449431

  6. Protein kinase B/Akt activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by increasing NO production in response to shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Boo, Y. C.; Park, H.; Maland, M. C.; Patel, R.; Pritchard, K. A. Jr; Fujio, Y.; Walsh, K.; Darley-Usmar, V.; Jo, H.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar shear stress activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) by the mechanisms involving both nitric oxide (NO) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Because protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of PI3K, has been shown to phosphorylate and activate endothelial NO synthase, we hypothesized that Akt regulates shear-dependent activation of JNK by stimulating NO production. Here, we examined the role of Akt in shear-dependent NO production and JNK activation by expressing a dominant negative Akt mutant (Akt(AA)) and a constitutively active mutant (Akt(Myr)) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). As expected, pretreatment of BAEC with the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) prevented shear-dependent stimulation of Akt and NO production. Transient expression of Akt(AA) in BAEC by using a recombinant adenoviral construct inhibited the shear-dependent stimulation of NO production and JNK activation. However, transient expression of Akt(Myr) by using a recombinant adenoviral construct did not induce JNK activation. This is consistent with our previous finding that NO is required, but not sufficient on its own, to activate JNK in response to shear stress. These results and our previous findings strongly suggest that shear stress triggers activation of PI3K, Akt, and endothelial NO synthase, leading to production of NO, which (along with O(2-), which is also produced by shear) activates Ras-JNK pathway. The regulation of Akt, NO, and JNK by shear stress is likely to play a critical role in its antiatherogenic effects.

  7. Simvastatin induces NFκB/p65 down-regulation and JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation, leading to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 down-regulation in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathways associated with the effect of simvastatin on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. In sharp contrast to its insignificant effect on MMP-2, simvastatin down-regulated MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels in K562 cells. Simvastatin-induced Pin1 down-regulation evoked NFκB/p65 degradation. Meanwhile, simvastatin induced JNK-mediated c-Jun and ATF-2 activation. Over-expression of Pin1 suppressed simvastatin-induced MMP-9 down-regulation. Treatment with SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) or knock-down of JNK1 reduced MMP-2 expression in simvastatin-treated cells. Simvastatin enhanced the binding of c-Jun/ATF-2 with the MMP-2 promoter. Down-regulation of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA revealed that c-Jun/ATF-2 activation was crucial for MMP-2 expression. Suppression of p65 activation or knock-down of Pin1 by shRNA reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in K562 cells. Over-expression of constitutively active JNK1 rescued MMP-2 expression in Pin1 shRNA-transfected cells. Simvastatin treatment also suppressed MMP-9 but not MMP-2 expression in human leukemia U937 and KU812 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that simvastatin-induced p65 instability leads to MMP-9 down-regulation in leukemia cells, while simvastatin-induced JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation maintains the MMP-2 expression underlying p65 down-regulation.

  8. The tetramethoxyflavone zapotin selectively activates protein kinase C epsilon, leading to its down-modulation accompanied by Bcl-2, c-Jun and c-Fos decrease.

    PubMed

    Toton, Ewa; Lisiak, Natalia; Rubis, Blazej; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Gruber, Peter; Hofmann, Johann; Rybczynska, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Zapotin, a tetramethoxyflavone, is a natural compound with a wide spectrum of activities in neoplastic cells. Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) has been shown to be oncogenic, with the ability to increase cell migration, invasion and survival of tumor cells. Here we report that zapotin inhibits cell proliferation. In wild-type HeLa cells with basal endogenous expression of PKCε, the IC(50) was found to be 17.9 ± 1.6 μM. In HeLa cells overexpressing doxycycline-inducible constitutively active PKCε (HeLaPKCεA/E), the IC(50) was 7.6 ± 1.3 μM, suggesting that PKCε enhances the anti-proliferative effect of zapotin. Moreover, we found that zapotin selectively activated PKCε in comparison with other PKC family members, but attenuated doxycycline-induced PKCε expression. As a result of zapotin treatment for 6, 12 and 24h, the doxycycline-induced levels of the two differently phosphorylated PKCε forms (87 kDa and 95 kDa) were decreased. Migration assays revealed that increasing concentrations of zapotin (from 3.5 to 15 μM) decreased migration of HeLaPKCεA/E cells. Furthermore, zapotin significantly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells in doxycycline-induced (HeLaPKCεA/E) cells after 24h and decreased the levels of Bcl-2, c-Jun, c-Fos. This was accompanied by a degradation of PARP-1. In summary, activation of PKCε and down-modulation of the induced PKCε level by zapotin were associated with decreased migration and increased apoptosis. These observations are consistent with the previously reported chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic action of zapotin.

  9. The tetramethoxyflavone zapotin selectively activates protein kinase C epsilon, leading to its down-modulation accompanied by Bcl-2, c-Jun and c-Fos decrease

    PubMed Central

    Toton, Ewa; Lisiak, Natalia; Rubis, Blazej; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Gruber, Peter; Hofmann, Johann; Rybczynska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Zapotin, a tetramethoxyflavone, is a natural compound with a wide spectrum of activities in neoplastic cells. Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) has been shown to be oncogenic, with the ability to increase cell migration, invasion and survival of tumor cells. Here we report that zapotin inhibits cell proliferation. In wild-type HeLa cells with basal endogenous expression of PKCε, the IC50 was found to be 17.9 ± 1.6 μM. In HeLa cells overexpressing doxycycline-inducible constitutively active PKCε (HeLaPKCεA/E), the IC50 was 7.6 ± 1.3 μM, suggesting that PKCε enhances the anti-proliferative effect of zapotin. Moreover, we found that zapotin selectively activated PKCε in comparison with other PKC family members, but attenuated doxycycline-induced PKCε expression. As a result of zapotin treatment for 6, 12 and 24 h, the doxycycline-induced levels of the two differently phosphorylated PKCε forms (87 kDa and 95 kDa) were decreased. Migration assays revealed that increasing concentrations of zapotin (from 3.5 to 15 μM) decreased migration of HeLaPKCεA/E cells. Furthermore, zapotin significantly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells in doxycycline-induced (HeLaPKCεA/E) cells after 24 h and decreased the levels of Bcl-2, c-Jun, c-Fos. This was accompanied by a degradation of PARP-1. In summary, activation of PKCε and down-modulation of the induced PKCε level by zapotin were associated with decreased migration and increased apoptosis. These observations are consistent with the previously reported chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic action of zapotin. PMID:22381066

  10. Activation of the KCa3.1 channel contributes to traumatic scratch injury-induced reactive astrogliosis through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mengni; Dou, Fangfang; Lu, Qin; Yu, Zhihua; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2016-06-15

    Reactive astrogliosis is widely considered to contribute to pathogenic responses to stress and brain injury and to diseases as diverse as ischemia and neurodegeneration. We previously found that expression of the intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) involved in TGF-β-activated astrogliosis. In the present study, we investigated whether migration of cortical astrocytes following mechanical scratch injury involves the KCa3.1 channel, which contributes to Ca(2+)-mediated migration in other cells. We found that scratch injury increased the expression of KCa3.1 protein in reactive astrocytes. Application of the KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 decreased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression and slowed migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of the Ca(2+) chelators, EGTA and BAPTA-AM, also slowed the migration of astrocytes. Blockade or genetic deletion of KCa3.1 both slowed and dramatically reduced the scratch injuries induced the sharp rise in astrocytes Ca(2+) concentrations. The scratch injury-induced phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun proteins was also attenuated both by blockade of KCa3.1 with TRAM-34 and in KCa3.1(-/-) astrocytes. Using KCa3.1 knockout mice, we further confirmed that deletion of KCa3.1 reduced expression of GFAP in an in vivo stab wound model. Taken together, our findings highlight a novel role for KCa3.1 in phenotypic modulation of reactive astrocytes and in astrocyte mobilization in response to mechanical stress, providing a potential target for therapeutic intervention in brain injuries.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) are differentially regulated during cardiac volume and pressure overload hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sopontammarak, Somkiat; Aliharoob, Assad; Ocampo, Catherina; Arcilla, Rene A; Gupta, Mahesh P; Gupta, Madhu

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pressure overload (PO) and volume overload (VO) result in morphologically and functionally distinct forms of myocardial hypertrophy. However, the molecular mechanism initiating these two types of hypertrophy is not yet understood. Data obtained from different cell types have indicated that the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) comprising c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 play an important role in transmitting signals of stress stimuli to elicit the cellular response. We tested the hypothesis that early induction of MAPKs differs in two types of overload on the heart and associates with distinct expression of hypertrophic marker genes, namely ANF, alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC), and beta-MHC. In rats, VO was induced by aortocaval shunt and PO by constriction of the abdominal aorta. The PO animals were further divided into two groups depending on the severity of the constriction, mild (MPO) and severe pressure overload (SPO), having 35 and 85% aortic constriction, respectively. Early changes in MAPK activity (2-120 min and 1 to 2 d) were analyzed by the in vitro kinase assay using kinase-specific antibodies for p38, JNK, and ERK2. The change in expression of hypertrophy marker genes was examined by Northern blot analysis. In VO hypertrophy, the activity of p38 was markedly increased (10-fold), without changing the activity of ERK and JNK. However, during PO hypertrophy, the activity of JNK was significantly increased (two- to sixfold) and depended on the severity of the load. The activity of p38 was not changed in MPO hypertrophy, whereas it was slightly elevated (50%) in hearts with SPO. Similarly, ERK activity was not changed in hearts with MPO, but a transient rise in activity was observed in hearts with SPO. The expression of ANF and beta-MHC genes was elevated in both PO and VO hypertrophy; however, this change was much greater in hearts subjected to PO than VO hypertrophy. Alpha

  12. Transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3)-induced activation of AP-1 requires Ca2+ ions and the transcription factors c-Jun, ATF2, and ternary complex factor.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Andrea; Hui, Xin; Lipp, Peter; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    The steroid pregnenolone sulfate activates the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) via stimulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-3 (TRPM3) channels. Here, we show that the signaling pathway requires an influx of Ca(2+) ions into the cells and a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The upregulation of AP-1 was attenuated in cells that overexpressed mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase-1, indicating that Ca(2+) ions prolong the signaling cascade via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases. On the transcriptional level, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the basic region leucine zipper protein c-Jun, a major constituent of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, or expression of a c-Jun-specific short hairpin RNA attenuated pregnenolone sulfate-induced AP-1 activation. In addition, stimulation of TRPM3 channels increased the transcriptional activation potential of the basic region leucine zipper protein ATF2. Inhibition of ATF2 target gene expression via expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ATF2 or expression of an ATF2-specific short hairpin RNA interfered with TRPM3-mediated stimulation of AP-1. Moreover, we show that a dominant-negative mutant of the ternary complex factor (TCF) Elk-1 attenuated the upregulation of AP-1 following stimulation of TRPM3 channels. Thus, c-Jun, ATF2, and TCFs are required to connect the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by activation of TRPM3 channels with enhanced transcription of AP-1-regulated genes. We conclude that pregnenolone sulfate-induced TRPM3 channel activation changes the gene expression pattern of the cells by activating transcription of c-Jun-, ATF2-, and TCF-controlled genes.

  13. Deregulated repression of c-Jun provides a potential link to its role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk

    2004-02-01

    The transcription factor c-Jun cooperates with oncogenic alleles of ras in malignant transformation. Constitutively active Ras causes, via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases, phosphorylation of c-Jun which is essential for subsequent target gene activation and tumorigenesis. Studying the mechanisms controlling c-Jun activity we found that its transcription activation function is actively repressed by a presumably multimeric repressor complex that includes histone deacetylase 3 as a critical subunit. Suppression of c-Jun is relieved by MAP kinase-mediated phosphorylation and/or titration of inhibitor components. The viral tumorigenic counterpart of c-Jun, v-Jun, escapes this inhibition, suggesting deregulated transcriptional activity of c-Jun as a relevant cause for carcinogenesis.

  14. Estrogens suppress RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via a stromal cell independent mechanism involving c-Jun repression

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Nirupama K.; Bendixen, Amy C.; Dienger, Krista M.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2000-01-01

    Loss of ovarian function following menopause results in a substantial increase in bone turnover and a critical imbalance between bone formation and resorption. This imbalance leads to a progressive loss of trabecular bone mass and eventually osteoporosis, in part the result of increased osteoclastogenesis. Enhanced formation of functional osteoclasts appears to be the result of increased elaboration by support cells of osteoclastogenic cytokines such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6, all of which are negatively regulated by estrogens. We show here that estrogen can suppress receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism that does not require mediation by stromal cells. This suppression is dose-dependent, isomer-specific, and reversed by ICI 182780. Furthermore, the bone-sparing analogues tamoxifen and raloxifene mimic estrogen's effects. Estrogen blocks RANKL/M-CSF-induced activator protein-1-dependent transcription, likely through direct regulation of c-Jun activity. This effect is the result of a classical nuclear activity by estrogen receptor to regulate both c-Jun expression and its phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our results suggest that estrogen modulates osteoclast formation both by down-regulating the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines from supportive cells and by directly suppressing RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10869427

  15. STRAP regulates c-Jun ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Jennifer; Ye, Fei; Kashikar, Nilesh D.; Datta, Pran K.

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} STRAP is specifically correlated with c-Jun expression and activation in fibroblasts. {yields} STRAP inhibits c-Jun ubiquitylation in vivo and prolongs the half-life of c-Jun. {yields} STRAP expression increases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, and promotes cell autonomous growth. -- Abstract: STRAP is a ubiquitous WD40 protein that has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Previous studies suggest that STRAP imparts oncogenic characteristics to cells by promoting ERK and pRb phosphorylation. While these findings suggest that STRAP can activate mitogenic signaling pathways, the effects of STRAP on other MAPK pathways have not been investigated. Herein, we report that STRAP regulates the expression of the c-Jun proto-oncogene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of STRAP expression results in reduced phospho-c-Jun and total c-Jun but does not significantly reduce the level of two other early response genes, c-Myc and c-Fos. STRAP knockout also decreases expression of the AP-1 target gene, cyclin D1, which is accompanied by a reduction in cell growth. No significant differences in JNK activity or basal c-Jun mRNA levels were observed between wild type and STRAP null fibroblasts. However, proteasomal inhibition markedly increases c-Jun expression in STRAP knockout MEFs and STRAP over-expression decreases the ubiquitylation of c-Jun in 293T cells. Loss of STRAP accelerates c-Jun turnover in fibroblasts and ectopic over-expression of STRAP in STRAP null fibroblasts increases c-Jun expression. Collectively, our findings indicate that STRAP regulates c-Jun stability by decreasing the ubiquitylation and proteosomal degradation of c-Jun.

  16. Design, synthesis and evaluation of antimicrobial activity of N-terminal modified Leucocin A analogues.

    PubMed

    Bodapati, Krishna Chaitanya; Soudy, Rania; Etayash, Hashem; Stiles, Michael; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2013-07-01

    Class IIa bacteriocins are potent antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid bacteria to destroy competing microorganisms. The N-terminal domain of these peptides consists of a conserved YGNGV sequence and a disulphide bond. The YGNGV motif is essential for activity, whereas, the two cysteines involved in the disulphide bond can be replaced with hydrophobic residues. The C-terminal region has variable sequences, and folds into a conserved amphipathic α-helical structure. To elucidate the structure-activity relationship in the N-terminal domain of these peptides, three analogues (1-3) of a class IIa bacteriocin, Leucocin A (LeuA), were designed and synthesized by replacing the N-terminal β-sheet residues of the native peptide with shorter β-turn motifs. Such replacement abolished the antibacterial activity in the analogues, however, analogue 1 was able to competitively inhibit the activity of native LeuA. Native LeuA (37-mer) was synthesized using native chemical ligation method in high yield. Solution conformation study using circular dichroism spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the C-terminal region of analogue 1 adopts helical folding as found in LeuA, while the N-terminal region did not fold into β-sheet conformation. These structure-activity studies highlight the role of proper folding and complete sequence in the activity of class IIa bacteriocins.

  17. Characterization of c-Jun from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides involved in SGIV infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shina; Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein c-Jun is a member of the AP1 family of transcription activating complex, can be induced by various extracellular stimuli such as virus infection. In this study, the c-Jun gene (Ec-c-Jun) was cloned from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length Ec-c-Jun cDNA is composed of 2046 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 328 amino acids with 81% identity of zebrafish. Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that Ec-c-Jun contained three conserved domains including a transactivation domain (TAD), a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and leucine zipper domain (LZD). RT-PCR results showed that Ec-c-Jun transcript was most abundant in spleen, kidney, heart and gill. The expression of Ec-c-Jun was up-regulated after challenged with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). To investigate the roles of Ec-c-Jun during SGIV infection, we constructed its dominant-negative mutant (DN-Ec-c-Jun) by deleting the major TAD that lacks amino acids 3-122. Fluorescence microscopy observation revealed that Ec-c-Jun and DN-Ec-c-Jun were expressed predominantly in the nucleus in transfected cells. Interestingly, the green fluorescence of Ec-c-Jun was congregated and co-localized with virus assembly sites at the late stage of SGIV infection. However, in DN-Ec-c-Jun transfected cells, no virus assembly sites were observed, and the distribution of fluorescence remained unchanged. Moreover, overexpression of DN-Ec-c-Jun in vitro delayed the occurrence of CPE induced by SGIV infection and inhibited the virus gene transcription. In addition, ectopic expression of DN-Ec-c-Jun was able to inhibit SGIV induced c-Jun/AP1 promoter activity in GS cells. Thus, we proposed that c-Jun transcription factor was essential for SGIV replication in vitro. Our results will contribute to understanding the crucial roles of JNK signaling pathway in fish virus infection.

  18. Activated Ki-Ras suppresses 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, K; Shirasawa, S; Nishioka, M; Sasazuki, T

    1999-05-15

    Although the frequency of activated Ki-ras genes is high in human colorectal tumors, much less is known of activated Ki-ras-mediated signaling pathways. Using gene targeting, we examined HCT116 cells that contain the Gly-13-->Asp mutation of Ki-ras and activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones derived from HCT116. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced immediate early genes, such as c-Jun, c-Fos, and Egr-1 in activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones, whereas c-Jun induction was rare in HCT116. TPA induced both phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (SEK1) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones but not in HCT116. On the other hand, TPA-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was equally induced between HCT116 and the Ki-ras-disrupted clones. Furthermore, TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation was observed in a DLD-1-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted clone but not in DLD-1. The TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation in these disrupted clones was completely inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, GF109203X (1 microM), but not by another PKC inhibitor, H7 (50 microM), whereas TPA-induced MEK1/2-ERK activation was partially and completely inhibited by GF109203X (1 microM) and H7 (50 microM), respectively. A phosphoinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, did not inhibit the TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation. Taken together, these results suggest that activated Ki-Ras-mediated signals are involved in the SEK1-JNK pathway through a PKC isotype that is distinct from that involved in MEK1/2-ERK activation in human colon cancer cells and independent of phosphoinositol 3-kinase activation, and the imbalance between ERK and JNK activity caused by activated Ki-Ras may play critical roles in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

  19. Acacetin-induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells involves caspase cascade, mitochondria-mediated death signaling and SAPK/JNK1/2-c-Jun activation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hye-Young; Park, Jong-Hwa; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Darrick S H L; Han, Ye Sun

    2007-08-31

    The mechanism of acacetin-induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was investigated. Acacetin caused 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of MCF-7 cells at 26.4% 0.7% M over 24 h in the MTT assay. Apoptosis was characterized by DNA fragmentation and an increase of sub-G1 cells and involved activation of caspase-7 and PARP (poly-ADP-ribose polymerase). Maximum caspase 7 activity was observed with 100 microM acacetin for 24 h. Caspase 8 and 9 activation cascades mediated the activation of caspase 7. Acacetin caused a reduction of Bcl-2 expression leading to an increase of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. It also caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential that induced release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) into the cytoplasm, enhancing ROS generation and subsequently resulting in apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reduced ROS generation and cell growth inhibition, and pretreatment with NAC or a caspase 8 inhibitor (Z-IETD-FMK) inhibited the acacetin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c and AIF. Stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH4-terminal kinase 1/2 (SAPK/ JNK1/2) and c-Jun were activated by acacetin but extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were not. Our results show that acacetin-induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells is mediated by caspase activation cascades, ROS generation, mitochondria-mediated cell death signaling and the SAPK/JNK1/2-c-Jun signaling pathway, activated by acacetin-induced ROS generation.

  20. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  1. Luminescent and substrate binding activities of firefly luciferase N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Ayabe, Keiichi; Aburatani, Takahide; Kamiya, Noriho; Kitayama, Atsushi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-07-30

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes highly efficient emission of light from the substrates luciferin, Mg-ATP, and oxygen. A number of amino acid residues are identified to be important for the luminescent activity, and almost all the key residues are thought to be located in the N-terminal domain (1-437), except one in the C-terminal domain, Lys529, which is thought to be critical for efficient substrate orientation. Here we show that the purified N-terminal domain still binds to the substrates luciferin and ATP with reduced affinity, and retains luminescent activity of up to 0.03% of the wild-type enzyme (WT), indicating that all the essential residues for the activity are located in the N-terminal domain. Also found is low luminescence enhancement by coenzyme A (CoA), which implies a lower product inhibition than in the WT enzyme. These findings have interesting implications for the light emission reaction mechanism of the enzyme, such as reaction intermediates, product inhibition, and the role of the C-terminal domain.

  2. Rs6295 promoter variants of the serotonin type 1A receptor are differentially activated by c-Jun in vitro and correlate to transcript levels in human epileptic brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Pernhorst, Katharina; van Loo, Karen M J; von Lehe, Marec; Priebe, Lutz; Cichon, Sven; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Sander, Thomas; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2013-03-01

    Many brain disorders, including epilepsy, migraine and depression, manifest with episodic symptoms that may last for various time intervals. Transient alterations of neuronal function such as related to serotonin homeostasis generally underlie this phenomenon. Several nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene promoters associated with these diseases have been described. For obvious reasons, their regulatory roles on gene expression particularly in human brain tissue remain largely enigmatic. The rs6295 G-/C-allelic variant is located in the promoter region of the human HTR1a gene, encoding the G-protein-coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT1AR). In addition to reported transcriptional repressor binding, our bioinformatic analyses predicted a reduced binding affinity of the transcription factor (TF) c-Jun for the G-allele. In vitro luciferase transfection assays revealed c-Jun to (a) activate the rs6295 C- significantly stronger than the G-allelic variant and (b) antagonize efficiently the repressive effect of Hes5 on the promoter. The G-allele of rs6295 is known to be associated with aspects of major depression and migraine. In order to address a potential role of rs6295 variants in human brain tissue, we have isolated DNA and mRNA from fresh frozen hippocampal tissue of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients (n=140) after epilepsy surgery for seizure control. We carried out SNP genotyping studies and mRNA analyses in order to determine HTR1a mRNA expression in human hippocampal samples stratified according to the rs6295 allelic variant. The mRNA expression of HTR1a was significantly more abundant in hippocampal mRNA of TLE patients homozygous for the rs6295 C-allele as compared to those with the GG-genotype. These data may point to a novel, i.e., rs6295 allelic variant and c-Jun dependent transcriptional 5HT1AR 'receptoropathy'. PMID:23333373

  3. N-Terminal region is responsible for chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Osamu; Wada, Shinpei; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Sakai, Takamitsu; Takano, Tomokazu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to locate the functional region responsible for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder interleukin 8 (IL-8), which lacks the glutamic acid-leucine-arginine (ELR) motif essential for the induction of neutrophil migration by mammalian IL-8. Using a human cell line, we produced a secretory recombinant protein of flounder IL-8, and analyzed its chemotaxis-inducing activity on leukocytes collected from the flounder kidney. The recombinant IL-8 induced significant migration in neutrophils, which were morphologically and functionally characterized. Using the Edman degradation method, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of rIL-8 was identified as VSLRSLGV. To examine the significance of the N-terminal region for the bioactivity of flounder IL-8, we prepared several recombinant proteins that containing mutations at the N-terminus. Modification of three residues (residues 9-11: serine-leucine-histidine) corresponding in position to the ELR motif in mammalian IL-8 did not reduce its chemotaxis-inducing activity. However, deletion of the first six or more residues significantly reduced its chemotaxis-inducing activity. We propose that residue 6 (leucine) at the N-terminus is important for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

  4. N-terminal cleavage of proTGFα occurs at the cell surface by a TACE-independent activity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    ProTGFα (transforming growth factor α precursor) maturation and conversion into soluble TGFα is a complex process that involves three proteolytic steps. One, that occurs co-translationally, eliminates the signal sequence. Another, occurring at the juxtamembrane domain, solubilizes TGFα. A third cleavage removes the N-terminal extension of proTGFα. This latter step has been poorly studied, mainly because of the rapid kinetics of this cleavage. In the present study, we have designed a strategy to analyse several aspects regarding this N-terminal cleavage. In vivo treatment with the hydroxamate-based metalloprotease inhibitors BB3103 or TAPI-2 (tumour necrosis factor-α protease inhibitor 2) reversibly induced accumulation of forms of proTGFα that included the N-terminal extension. N-terminal shedding was rapid, and occurred at the cell surface. However, the machinery responsible for the N-terminal cleavage was inactive in other cellular sites, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Experiments of proTGFα expression and maturation in cells deficient in TACE (tumour-necrosis-factor-α-converting enzyme) activity indicated that this protease was dispensable for N-terminal processing of proTGFα in vivo, but was required for regulated cleavage at the C-terminus. These findings indicate that TACE is not involved in N-terminal processing of proTGFα, and suggest differences in the machineries that control the cleavage at both ends of TGFα within its precursor. PMID:15777285

  5. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-01

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile. PMID:26751825

  6. Synaptonuclear messenger PRR7 inhibits c-Jun ubiquitination and regulates NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kravchick, Dana O; Karpova, Anna; Hrdinka, Matous; Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Iacobas, Sanda; Carbonell, Abigail U; Iacobas, Dumitru A; Kreutz, Michael R; Jordan, Bryen A

    2016-09-01

    Elevated c-Jun levels result in apoptosis and are evident in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia and after global cerebral insults including stroke and epilepsy. NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonists block c-Jun upregulation and prevent neuronal cell death following excitotoxic insults. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating c-Jun abundance in neurons are poorly understood. Here, we show that the synaptic component Proline rich 7 (PRR7) accumulates in the nucleus of hippocampal neurons following NMDAR activity. We find that PRR7 inhibits the ubiquitination of c-Jun by E3 ligase SCF(FBW) (7) (FBW7), increases c-Jun-dependent transcriptional activity, and promotes neuronal death. Microarray assays show that PRR7 abundance is directly correlated with transcripts associated with cellular viability. Moreover, PRR7 knockdown attenuates NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity in neuronal cultures in a c-Jun-dependent manner. Our results show that PRR7 links NMDAR activity to c-Jun function and provide new insights into the molecular processes that underlie NMDAR-dependent excitotoxicity. PMID:27458189

  7. Recombinant N-Terminal Slit2 Inhibits TGF-β-Induced Fibroblast Activation and Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Darren A; Huang, Yi-Wei; Liu, Guang-Ying; Patel, Sajedabanu; Fang, Fei; Zhou, Joyce; Thai, Kerri; Sidiqi, Ahmad; Szeto, Stephen G; Chan, Lauren; Lu, Mingliang; He, Xiaolin; John, Rohan; Gilbert, Richard E; Scholey, James W; Robinson, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Fibrosis and inflammation are closely intertwined injury pathways present in nearly all forms of CKD for which few safe and effective therapies exist. Slit glycoproteins signaling through Roundabout (Robo) receptors have been described to have anti-inflammatory effects through regulation of leukocyte cytoskeletal organization. Notably, cytoskeletal reorganization is also required for fibroblast responses to TGF-β Here, we examined whether Slit2 also controls TGF-β-induced renal fibrosis. In cultured renal fibroblasts, which we found to express Slit2 and Robo-1, the bioactive N-terminal fragment of Slit2 inhibited TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis, actin cytoskeletal reorganization, and Smad2/3 transcriptional activity, but the inactive C-terminal fragment of Slit2 did not. In mouse models of postischemic renal fibrosis and obstructive uropathy, treatment with N-terminal Slit2 before or after injury inhibited the development of renal fibrosis and preserved renal function, whereas the C-terminal Slit2 had no effect. Our data suggest that administration of recombinant Slit2 may be a new treatment strategy to arrest chronic injury progression after ischemic and obstructive renal insults by not only attenuating inflammation but also, directly inhibiting renal fibrosis.

  8. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  9. Linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, stimulate c-Fos, c-Jun, and c-Myc mRNA expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and growth in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G N; Alexander, R W; Runge, M S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies from other laboratories suggest that linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, play an important role in modulating the growth of some cells. A correlation has been demonstrated between hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids and conditions characterized by abnormal cell growth such as atherosclerosis and psoriasis. To determine if linoleic acid and its metabolites modulate cell growth in atherosclerosis, we measured DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Linoleic acid induces DNA synthesis, c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc mRNA expression and MAPK activation in VSMC. Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a potent inhibitor of the lipoxygenase system, significantly reduced the growth-response effects of linoleic acid in VSMC, suggesting that conversion of linoleic acid to hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids (HPODEs) is required for these effects. HPODEs also caused significant induction of DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and MAPK activation in growth-arrested VSMC, suggesting that linoleic acid and its metabolic products, HPODEs, are potential mitogens in VSMC, and that conditions such as oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation which provoke the production of these substances may alter VSMC growth. Images PMID:7635978

  10. Tf-lipoplex-mediated c-Jun silencing improves neuronal survival following excitotoxic damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, A L C; Costa, P; de Almeida, L P; Simões, S; Plesnila, N; Culmsee, C; Wagner, E; de Lima, M C Pedroso

    2010-03-19

    Excitotoxicity is one of the main features responsible for neuronal cell death after acute brain injury and in several neurodegenerative disorders, for which only few therapeutic options are currently available. In this work, RNA interference was employed to identify and validate a potential target for successful treatment of excitotoxic brain injury, the transcription factor c-Jun. The nuclear translocation of c-Jun and its upregulation are early events following glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage in primary neuronal cultures. We present evidence for the efficient knockdown of this transcription factor using a non-viral vector consisting of cationic liposomes associated to transferrin (Tf-lipoplexes). Tf-lipoplexes were able to deliver anti-c-Jun siRNAs to neuronal cells in culture, resulting in efficient silencing of c-Jun mRNA and protein and in a significant decrease of cell death following glutamate-induced damage or oxygen-glucose deprivation. This formulation also leads to a significant c-Jun knockdown in the mouse hippocampus in vivo, resulting in the attenuation of both neuronal death and inflammation following kainic acid-mediated lesion of this region. Furthermore, a strong reduction of seizure activity and cytokine production was observed in animals treated with anti-c-Jun siRNAs. These findings demonstrate the efficient delivery of therapeutic siRNAs to the brain by Tf-lipoplexes and validate c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disorders involving excitotoxic lesions. PMID:19913061

  11. c-Jun localizes to the nucleus independent of its phosphorylation by and interaction with JNK and vice versa promotes nuclear accumulation of JNK

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Ilona; Al-Rawi, Marco; Mingot, Jose-Manuel; Scholl, Christine; Diefenbacher, Markus Elmar; O'Donnell, Paul; Bohmann, Dirk; Weiss, Carsten

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} HSP70, Ku70 and 80 as well as importin 8 are novel interactors of c-Jun. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of c-Jun does not require its functions as a transcription factor. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of c-Jun does not require the interaction with its kinase JNK. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of JNK is regulated by interaction with c-Jun. -- Abstract: In order to activate gene expression, transcription factors such as c-Jun have to reside in the nucleus. The abundance of c-Jun in the nucleus correlates with the activity of its target genes. As a consequence of excessive c-Jun activation, cells undergo apoptosis or changes in differentiation whereas decreased c-Jun function can reduce proliferation. In the present study we addressed how nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor c-Jun is regulated. First, we analyzed which functions of c-Jun are required for efficient nuclear accumulation. Mutants of c-Jun deficient in dimerization or DNA-binding show no defect in nuclear transport. Furthermore, c-Jun import into the nucleus of living cells occurred when the c-Jun phosphorylation sites were mutated as well in cells that lack the major c-Jun kinase, JNK, suggesting that c-Jun transport into the nucleus does not require JNK signaling. Conversely, however, binding of c-Jun seemed to enhance nuclear accumulation of JNK. In order to identify proteins that might be relevant for the nuclear translocation of c-Jun we searched for novel binding partners by a proteomic approach. In addition to the heat shock protein HSP70 and the DNA damage repair factors Ku70 and 80, we isolated human importin 8 as a novel interactor of c-Jun. Interaction of Imp 8 with c-Jun in human cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Nuclear accumulation of c-Jun does not require its functions as a transcription factor or the interaction with its kinase JNK. Interestingly, nuclear accumulation of JNK is regulated by interaction with c-Jun. Unraveling the

  12. Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide, induces antitumor proliferation via activation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 by decreasing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Sato, Takashi . E-mail: satotak@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Ito, Akira

    2005-11-04

    Triptolide, a diterpenoid triepoxide extracted from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f., exerts antitumorigenic actions against several tumor cells, but the intracellular target signal molecule(s) for this antitumorigenesis activity of triptolide remains to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that triptolide, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080, human squamous carcinoma SAS, and human uterine cervical carcinoma SKG-II cells. In addition, triptolide was found to decrease phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. A PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002, mimicked the triptolide-induced antiproliferative activity in HT-1080, SAS, and SKG-II cells. There was no change in the activity of Akt or protein kinase C (PKC), both of which are downstream effectors in the PI3K pathway. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 was not modified in HT-1080 cells treated with triptolide. However, the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) was found to increase in both triptolide- and LY-294002-treated cells. Furthermore, the triptolide-induced inhibition of HT-1080 cell proliferation was not observed by JNK1 siRNA-treatment. These results provide novel evidence that PI3K is a crucial target molecule in the antitumorigenic action of triptolide. They further suggest a possible triptolide-induced inhibitory signal for tumor cell proliferation that is initiated by the decrease in PI3K activity, which in turn leads to the augmentation of JNK1 phosphorylation via the Akt and/or PKC-independent pathway(s). Moreover, it is likely that the activation of JNK1 is required for the triptolide-induced inhibition of tumor proliferation.

  13. The N-terminal, polybasic region is critical for prion protein neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Turnbaugh, Jessie A; Westergard, Laura; Unterberger, Ursula; Biasini, Emiliano; Harris, David A

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the normal form of the prion protein, PrP(C), exerts a neuroprotective activity against cellular stress or toxicity. One of the clearest examples of such activity is the ability of wild-type PrP(C) to suppress the spontaneous neurodegenerative phenotype of transgenic mice expressing a deleted form of PrP (Δ32-134, called F35). To define domains of PrP involved in its neuroprotective activity, we have analyzed the ability of several deletion mutants of PrP (Δ23-31, Δ23-111, and Δ23-134) to rescue the phenotype of Tg(F35) mice. Surprisingly, all of these mutants displayed greatly diminished rescue activity, although Δ23-31 PrP partially suppressed neuronal loss when expressed at very high levels. Our results pinpoint the N-terminal, polybasic domain as a critical determinant of PrP(C) neuroprotective activity, and suggest that identification of molecules interacting with this region will provide important clues regarding the normal function of the protein. Small molecule ligands targeting this region may also represent useful therapeutic agents for treatment of prion diseases.

  14. Novel human neutrophil agonistic properties of arsenic trioxide: involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or c-jun NH2-terminal MAPK but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Girard, Denis

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and for inducing apoptosis and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in promyelocytes and cancer cells. We recently reported that ATO induces neutrophil apoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not ATO recruits MAPKs in neutrophils, as well as to further investigate its agonistic properties. We found that ATO activates p38 and that, unlike H2O2, this response was not inhibited by exogenous catalase. Also, we demonstrated that ATO-induced p38 activation occurs before H2O2 generation and without a calcium burst. We next established that ATO recruits c-jun NH2-terminal (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk-1/2). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO occurs by a MAPK-independent mechanism. In contrast, the ability of ATO to enhance adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, release, and activity of gelatinase and degranulation of secretory, specific, and gelatinase, but not azurophilic granules, is dependent upon activation of p38 and/or JNK. This is the first study establishing that ATO possesses important agonistic properties in human neutrophils. Given the central role of neutrophils in various inflammatory disorders, we propose that ATO might have broader therapeutic implications in clinics, especially for regulating inflammation.

  15. Activation of GPR30 inhibits the growth of prostate cancer cells through sustained activation of Erk1/2, c-jun/c-fos-dependent upregulation of p21, and induction of G(2) cell-cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Chan, Q K Y; Lam, H-M; Ng, C-F; Lee, A Y Y; Chan, E S Y; Ng, H-K; Ho, S-M; Lau, K-M

    2010-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor-30 (GPR30) shows estrogen-binding affinity and mediates non-genomic signaling of estrogen to regulate cell growth. We here showed for the first time, in contrast to the reported promoting action of GPR30 on the growth of breast and ovarian cancer cells, that activation of GPR30 by the receptor-specific, non-estrogenic ligand G-1 inhibited the growth of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vitro and PC-3 xenografts in vivo. However, G-1 elicited no growth or histological changes in the prostates of intact mice and did not inhibit growth in quiescent BPH-1, an immortalized benign prostatic epithelial cell line. Treatment of PC-3 cells with G-1 induced cell-cycle arrest at the G(2) phase and reduced the expression of G(2)-checkpoint regulators (cyclin-A2, cyclin-B1, cdc25c, and cdc2) and phosphorylation of their common transcriptional regulator NF-YA in PC-3 cells. With extensive use of siRNA-knockdown experiments and the MEK inhibitor PD98059 in this study, we dissected the mechanism underlying G-1-induced inhibition of PC-3 cell growth, which was mediated through GPR30, followed by sustained activation of Erk1/2 and a c-jun/c-fos-dependent upregulation of p21, resulting in the arrest of PC-3 growth at the G(2) phase. The discovery of this signaling pathway lays the foundation for future development of GPR30-based therapies for PCa.

  16. Persistent induction of c-fos and c-jun expression by asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, N.H.; Mossman, B.T. ); Janssen, Y.M. Univ. of Limburg, Maastricht )

    1993-04-15

    To investigate the mechanisms of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis, expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes was examined in rat pleural mesothelial cells and hamster tracheal epithelial cells after exposure to crocidolite or chrysotile asbestos. In contrast to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which induces rapid and transient increases in c-fos and c-jun mRNA, asbestos causes 2- to 5-fold increases in c-fos and c-jun mRNA that persist for at least 24 hr in mesothelial cells. The induction of c-fos and c-jun mRNA by asbestos in mesothelial cells is dose-dependent and is most pronounced with crocidolite, the type of asbestos most pathogenic in the causation of pleural mesothelioma. Induction of c-jun gene expression by asbestos occurs in tracheal epithelial cells but is not accompanied by a corresponding induction of c-fos gene expression. In both cell types, asbestos induces increases in protein factors that bind specifically to the DNA sites that mediate gene expression by the AP-1 family of transcription factors. The persistent induction of AP-1 transcription factors by asbestos suggests a model of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis involving chronic stimulation of cell proliferation through activation of the early response gene pathway that includes c-jun and/or c-fos. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Activations of c-fos/c-jun signaling are involved in the modulation of hypothalamic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in amphetamine-mediated appetite suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Y.-S.; Yang, S.-F.; Chiou, H.-L.; Kuo, D.-Y. . E-mail: dykuo@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-04-15

    Amphetamine (AMPH) is known as an anorectic agent. The mechanism underlying the anorectic action of AMPH has been attributed to its inhibitory action on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), an appetite stimulant in the brain. This study was aimed to examine the molecular mechanisms behind the anorectic effect of AMPH. Results showed that AMPH treatment decreased food intake, which was correlated with changes of NPY mRNA level, but increased c-fos, c-jun and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNA levels in hypothalamus. To determine if c-fos or c-jun was involved in the anorectic response of AMPH, infusions of antisense oligonucleotide into the brain were performed at 1 h before daily AMPH treatment in freely moving rats, and the results showed that c-fos or c-jun knockdown could block this anorectic response and restore NPY mRNA level. Moreover, c-fos or c-jun knockdown could partially block SOD mRNA level that might involve in the modulation of NPY gene expression. It was suggested that c-fos/c-jun signaling might involve in the central regulation of AMPH-mediated feeding suppression via the modulation of NPY gene expression.

  18. Impact of the N-Terminal Domain of STAT3 in STAT3-Dependent Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tiancen; Yeh, Jennifer E.; Pinello, Luca; Jacob, Jaison; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT3 is constitutively active in many cancers, where it mediates important biological effects, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of STAT3 performs multiple functions, such as cooperative DNA binding, nuclear translocation, and protein-protein interactions. However, it is unclear which subsets of STAT3 target genes depend on the NTD for transcriptional regulation. To identify such genes, we compared gene expression in STAT3-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) stably expressing wild-type STAT3 or STAT3 from which NTD was deleted. NTD deletion reduced the cytokine-induced expression of specific STAT3 target genes by decreasing STAT3 binding to their regulatory regions. To better understand the potential mechanisms of this effect, we determined the crystal structure of the STAT3 NTD and identified a dimer interface responsible for cooperative DNA binding in vitro. We also observed an Ni2+-mediated oligomer with an as yet unknown biological function. Mutations on both dimer and Ni2+-mediated interfaces affected the cytokine induction of STAT3 target genes. These studies shed light on the role of the NTD in transcriptional regulation by STAT3 and provide a structural template with which to design STAT3 NTD inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:26169829

  19. Cadmium-induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis are associated with transcriptional activation of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc proto-oncogenes: role of cellular calcium and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Joseph, P; Muchnok, T K; Klishis, M L; Roberts, J R; Antonini, J M; Whong, W Z; Ong, T

    2001-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis by cadmium were studied using BALB/c-3T3 cell transformation and nude mouse tumorigenesis models. BALB/c-3T3 cells transformed with cadmium chloride were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to develop tumors and the cell lines derived from these tumors were used in the present study. The proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun were overexpressed in 100% (10 out of 10) of the cell lines, while a statistically significant overexpression of c-myc was observed in 40% (4 out of 10) of the cell lines. Analysis of tumor cells stained with fluorescent dyes specific for reactive oxygen species revealed that these cells possessed markedly higher levels of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide compared with the nontransformed cells. Similarly, the intracellular calcium level was higher in the tumor cells compared with the nontransformed cells. Overexpression of the proto-oncogenes in these cells was blocked by treating the cells with superoxide dismutase, catalase, and 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetoxy methyl ester (BAPTA/AM), which are scavengers of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and calcium, respectively. This confirmed that the overexpression of the proto-oncogenes in the tumor cells required elevated intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and calcium. In addition to the scavengers of reactive oxygen species and calcium, inhibitors specific for transcription (actinomycin D), protein kinase C (RO-31-8220), and MAP kinase (PD 98059) also blocked the cadmium-induced overexpression of the proto-oncogenes in the tumor cells. Exposure of the nontransformed BALB/c-3T3 cells to 20 microM cadmium chloride for 1 h caused elevated intracellular levels of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and calcium, with corresponding increases in the expression levels of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc. As in the case of the tumor cells, treating the nontransformed cells with the various modulators prior to their exposure to

  20. Phosphorylation of Glutathione S-Transferase P1 (GSTP1) by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Promotes Formation of the GSTP1-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) Complex and Suppresses JNK Downstream Signaling and Apoptosis in Brain Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Tatsunori; Antoun, Gamil; Keir, Stephen T; Friedman, Henry; Bigner, Darell D; Ali-Osman, Francis

    2015-12-25

    Under normal physiologic conditions, the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) protein exists intracellularly as a dimer in reversible equilibrium with its monomeric subunits. In the latter form, GSTP1 binds to the mitogen-activated protein kinase, JNK, and inhibits JNK downstream signaling. In tumor cells, which frequently are characterized by constitutively high GSTP1 expression, GSTP1 undergoes phosphorylation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at tyrosine residues 3, 7, and 198. Here we report on the effect of this EGFR-dependent GSTP1 tyrosine phosphorylation on the interaction of GSTP1 with JNK, on the regulation of JNK downstream signaling by GSTP1, and on tumor cell survival. Using in vitro and in vivo growing human brain tumors, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation shifts the GSTP1 dimer-monomer equilibrium to the monomeric state and facilitates the formation of the GSTP1-JNK complex, in which JNK is functionally inhibited. Targeted mutagenesis and functional analysis demonstrated that the increased GSTP1 binding to JNK results from phosphorylation of the GSTP1 C-terminal Tyr-198 by EGFR and is associated with a >2.5-fold decrease in JNK downstream signaling and a significant suppression of both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis in the tumor cells. The findings define a novel mechanism of regulatory control of JNK signaling that is mediated by the EGFR/GSTP1 cross-talk and provides a survival advantage for tumors with activated EGFR and high GSTP1 expression. The results lay the foundation for a novel strategy of dual EGFR/GSTP1 for treating EGFR+ve, GSTP1 expressing GBMs.

  1. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  2. Structural Diversity of the Active N-Terminal Kinase Domain of p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Liu, Kangdong; Zheng, Duo; D'Angelo, Igor; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Steinman, Valerie; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2010-10-08

    The p90 ribosomal protein kinase 2 (RSK2) is a highly expressed Ser/Thr kinase activated by growth factors and is involved in cancer cell proliferation and tumor promoter-induced cell transformation. RSK2 possesses two non-identical kinase domains, and the structure of its N-terminal domain (NTD), which is responsible for phosphorylation of a variety of substrates, is unknown. The crystal structure of the NTD RSK2 was determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution in complex with AMP-PNP. The N-terminal kinase domain adopted a unique active conformation showing a significant structural diversity of the kinase domain compared to other kinases. The NTD RSK2 possesses a three-stranded {beta}B-sheet inserted in the N-terminal lobe, resulting in displacement of the {alpha}C-helix and disruption of the Lys-Glu interaction, classifying the kinase conformation as inactive. The purified protein was phosphorylated at Ser227 in the T-activation loop and exhibited in vitro kinase activity. A key characteristic is the appearance of a new contact between Lys216 ({beta}B-sheet) and the {beta}-phosphate of AMP-PNP. Mutation of this lysine to alanine impaired both NTDs in vitro and full length RSK2 ex vivo activity, emphasizing the importance of this interaction. Even though the N-terminal lobe undergoes structural re-arrangement, it possesses an intact hydrophobic groove formed between the {alpha}C-helix, the {beta}4-strand, and the {beta}B-sheet junction, which is occupied by the N-terminal tail. The presence of a unique {beta}B-sheet insert in the N-lobe suggests a different type of activation mechanism for RSK2.

  3. Exercise maintains euglycemia in association with decreased activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in the liver of ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Király, Michael A; Campbell, Jon; Park, Edward; Bates, Holly E; Yue, Jessica T Y; Rao, Venket; Matthews, Stephen G; Bikopoulos, George; Rozakis-Adcock, Maria; Giacca, Adria; Vranic, Mladen; Riddell, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Stress-activated systems and oxidative stress are involved in insulin resistance, which, along with beta-cell failure, contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Exercise improves insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, and these adaptations may, in part, be related to reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated circulating and tissue-specific markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and insulin-signaling pathways in a rodent model of T2DM, the Zucker diabetic fatty rat, with and without voluntary exercise. At 5 wk of age, Zucker diabetic fatty rats (n = 8-9/group) were divided into basal (B), voluntary exercise (E), and sedentary control (S) groups. B rats were euthanized at 6 wk of age, and S and E rats were euthanized 10 wk later. E rats ran approximately 5 km/day, which improved insulin sensitivity and maintained fed and fasted glucose levels and glucose tolerance. Ten weeks of exercise also decreased whole body markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in plasma and liver, including lowered circulating IL-6, haptoglobin, and malondialdehyde levels, hepatic protein oxidation, and phosphorylated JNK, the latter indicating decreased JNK activity. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase levels and Ser(307)-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 were also reduced in E compared with S rats. In summary, we show that, in a rodent model of T2DM, voluntary exercise decreases circulating markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and lowers hepatic JNK activation and Ser(307)-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1. These changes in oxidative stress markers and inflammation are associated with decreased hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and reduced expression of the main gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. PMID:19996384

  4. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation by mechanical stretch is integrin-dependent and matrix-specific in rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    MacKenna, D A; Dolfi, F; Vuori, K; Ruoslahti, E

    1998-01-01

    Integrins, which connect the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and mediate a variety of signaling cascades, may transduce mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals. We studied integrin- and matrix-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK1), and p38 in response to 4% static biaxial stretch in rat cardiac fibroblasts. ERK2 and JNK1, but not p38, were rapidly activated by stretch when the fibroblasts were allowed to synthesize their own matrices. When the cells were limited to specific matrix substrates, ERK2 and JNK1 were differentially activated: ERK2 was only activated when the cells were plated on fibronectin, while JNK1 was activated when the cells were plated on fibronectin, vitronectin, or laminin. Plating cells on collagen before stretching did not activate either kinase. Adhesion to all matrices was integrin-dependent because it could be blocked by inhibitors of specific integrins. ERK2 activation could be blocked with a combination of anti-alpha4 and -alpha5 antibodies and an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, while the antibodies or peptide used separately failed to block ERK2 activation. This result suggests that at least two integrins, alpha4beta1 and an RGD-directed, non-alpha5beta1 integrin, activate ERK2 in response to mechanical stimulation. Activation of JNK1 could not be blocked with the inhibitors, suggesting that an RGD-independent integrin or integrins other than alpha4beta1 can activate JNK1 in cells adherent to fibronectin. This study demonstrates that integrins act as mechanotransducers, providing insight into potential mechanisms for in vivo responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:9435301

  5. Contraction-induced Interleukin-6 Gene Transcription in Skeletal Muscle Is Regulated by c-Jun Terminal Kinase/Activator Protein-1*

    PubMed Central

    Whitham, Martin; Chan, M. H. Stanley; Pal, Martin; Matthews, Vance B.; Prelovsek, Oja; Lunke, Sebastian; El-Osta, Assam; Broenneke, Hella; Alber, Jens; Brüning, Jens C.; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Febbraio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise increases the expression of the prototypical myokine IL-6, but the precise mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be identified. To mimic exercise conditions, C2C12 myotubes were mechanically stimulated via electrical pulse stimulation (EPS). We compared the responses of EPS with the pharmacological Ca2+ carrier calcimycin (A23187) because contraction induces marked increases in cytosolic Ca2+ levels or the classical IκB kinase/NFκB inflammatory response elicited by H2O2. We demonstrate that, unlike H2O2-stimulated increases in IL-6 mRNA, neither calcimycin- nor EPS-induced IL-6 mRNA expression is under the transcriptional control of NFκB. Rather, we show that EPS increased the phosphorylation of JNK and the reporter activity of the downstream transcription factor AP-1. Furthermore, JNK inhibition abolished the EPS-induced increase in IL-6 mRNA and protein expression. Finally, we observed an exercise-induced increase in both JNK phosphorylation and IL-6 mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of mice after 30 min of treadmill running. Importantly, exercise did not increase IL-6 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle-specific JNK-deficient mice. These data identify a novel contraction-mediated transcriptional regulatory pathway for IL-6 in skeletal muscle. PMID:22351769

  6. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  7. Zinc folds the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase, promotes multimerization, and enhances catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ronglan; Jenkins, Timothy M.; Craigie, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase contains a pair of His and Cys residues (the HHCC motif) that are conserved among retroviral integrases. Although His and Cys residues are often involved in binding zinc, the HHCC motif does not correspond to any recognized class of zinc binding domain. We have investigated the binding of zinc to HIV-1 integrase protein and find that it binds zinc with a stoichiometry of one zinc per integrase monomer. Analysis of zinc binding to deletion derivatives of integrase locates the binding site to the N-terminal domain. Integrase with a mutation in the HHCC motif does not bind zinc, consistent with coordination of zinc by these residues. The isolated N-terminal domain is disordered in the absence of zinc but, in the presence of zinc, it adopts a secondary structure with a high alpha helical content. Integrase bound by zinc tetramerizes more readily than the apoenzyme and is also more active than the apoenzyme in in vitro integration assays. We conclude that binding of zinc to the HHCC motif stabilizes the folded state of the N-terminal domain of integrase and bound zinc is required for optimal enzymatic activity. PMID:8942990

  8. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. PMID:26587907

  9. Potential role of proteasome on c-jun related signaling in hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sozen, Erdi; Karademir, Betul; Yazgan, Burak; Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its complications are major causes of death all over the world. One of the major risks of atherosclerosis is hypercholesterolemia. During atherosclerosis, oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) regulates CD36-mediated activation of c-jun amino terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and modulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) induction which stimulates inflammation with an invasion of monocytes. Additionally, inhibition of proteasome leads to an accumulation of c-jun and phosphorylated c-jun and activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) related increase of MMP expression. We have previously reported a significant increase in cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) mRNA levels in hypercholesterolemic rabbits and shown that vitamin E treatment prevented the cholesterol induced increase in CD36 mRNA expression. In the present study, our aim is to identify the signaling molecules/transcription factors involved in the progression of atherosclerosis following CD36 activation in an in vivo model of hypercholesterolemic (induced by 2% cholesterol containing diet) rabbits. In this direction, proteasomal activities by fluorometry and c-jun, phospo c-jun, JNK1, MMP-9 expressions by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting were tested in aortic tissues. The effects of vitamin E on these changes were also investigated in this model. As a result, c-jun was phosphorylated following decreased proteasomal degradation in hypercholesterolemic group. MMP-9 expression was also increased in cholesterol group rabbits contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. In addition, vitamin E showed its effect by decreasing MMP-9 levels and phosphorylation of c-jun. PMID:25009774

  10. Induction of apoptosis by vinblastine via c-Jun autoamplification and p53-independent down-regulation of p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Kolomeichuk, Sergey N; Bene, Anca; Upreti, Meenakshi; Dennis, Richard A; Lyle, Christopher S; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Chambers, Timothy C

    2008-01-01

    Vinblastine treatment in all cell lines examined causes a robust increase in c-Jun protein expression and phosphorylation and a corresponding increase in activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. We show in KB-3 carcinoma cells that this is due to a strong autoamplification loop involving the proximal AP-1 site in the c-Jun promoter, resulting in highly increased c-Jun mRNA and c-Jun protein. Inhibitors of RNA transcription and protein translation blocked both vinblastine-induced c-Jun expression and apoptotic cell death, suggesting that apoptosis is dependent, at least in part, on transcription/translation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) to c-Jun was used to interrupt the amplification cycle and was found to be highly effective, reducing vinblastine-induced c-Jun expression at both the mRNA and protein levels by 90%. Apoptosis and caspase-3 activation were significantly inhibited in c-Jun siRNA-treated cells. To uncover potential mechanisms of c-Jun-mediated cell death and protection by c-Jun siRNA, candidate target genes were examined. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed preferential association of c-Jun with the p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor) gene promoter after vinblastine treatment. In KB-3 cells, which have compromised p53 function, and in p53-null cells but not in p53 wild-type cells, vinblastine caused down-regulation of p21 expression concomitant with increased c-Jun expression, suggesting a role for c-Jun in negative regulation of the p21 promoter independent of p53. These results provide strong evidence that c-Jun induction in response to vinblastine plays a proapoptotic role in part via down-regulation of p21, promoting cycling and subsequent cell death of mitotically impaired cells.

  11. Tissue-specific deletion of c-Jun in the pancreas has limited effects on pancreas formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ayako; Toyoda, Shuichi; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2007-11-30

    It is well known that activating protein-1 (AP-1) is involved in a variety of cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. AP-1 is a dimer complex consisting of different subunits, and c-Jun is known to be one of its major components. In addition, it has been shown that mice lacking c-Jun are embryonic lethal and that c-Jun is essential for liver and heart development. However, the role of c-Jun in the pancreas is not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of c-Jun in the pancreas. First, c-Jun was strongly expressed in pancreatic duct-like structures at an embryonic stage, while a lower level of expression was observed in some part of the adult pancreas, implying that c-Jun might play a role during pancreas development. Second, to address this point, we generated pancreas-specific c-Jun knock-out mice (Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} mice) by crossing Ptf1a-Cre knock-in mice with c-Jun floxed mice. Ptf1a is a pancreatic transcription factor and its expression is confined to pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to all three types of pancreatic tissue: endocrine, exocrine, and duct. Contrary to our expectation, however, there was no morphological difference in the pancreas between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. In addition, there was no difference in body weight, pancreas weight, and the expression of various pancreas-related factors (insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin, and amylase) between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose tolerance between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. Taken together, although we cannot exclude the possibility that c-Jun ablation is compensated by some unknown factors, c-Jun appears to be dispensable for pancreas development at least after ptf1a gene promoter is activated.

  12. N-terminal aromatic residues closely impact the cytolytic activity of cupiennin 1a, a major spider venom peptide.

    PubMed

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Sheynis, Tania; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Jelinek, Raz

    2013-12-01

    Cupiennins are small cationic α-helical peptides from the venom of the ctenid spider Cupiennius salei which are characterized by high bactericidal as well as hemolytic activities. To gain insight into the determinants responsible for the broad cytolytic activities, two analogues of cupiennin 1a with different N-terminal hydrophobicities were designed. The insecticidal, bactericidal and hemolytic activities of these analogues were assayed and compared to the native peptide. Specifically, substitution of two N-terminal Phe residues by Ala results in less pronounced insecticidal and cytolytic activity, whereas a substitution by Lys reduces strongly its bactericidal activity and completely diminishes its hemolytic activity up to very high tested concentrations. Biophysical analyses of peptide/bilayer membrane interactions point to distinct interactions of the analogues with lipid bilayers, and dependence upon membrane surface charge. Indeed, we find that lower hemolytic activity was correlated with less surface association of the analogues. In contrast, our data indicate that the reduced bactericidal activity of the two cupiennin 1a analogues likely correspond to greater bilayer-surface localization of the peptides. Overall, ultimate insertion and destruction of the host cell membrane is highly dependent on the presence of Phe-2 and Phe-6 (Cu 1a) or Leu-6 (Cu 2a) in the N-terminal sequences of native cupiennins.

  13. c-Jun controls the efficiency of MAP kinase signaling by transcriptional repression of MAP kinase phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprowles, Amy; Wu Yimi; Kung, H.-J.; Wisdom, Ron . E-mail: ronald.wisdom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-15

    The mammalian JNK signaling pathway regulates the transcriptional response of cells to environmental stress, including UV irradiation. This signaling pathway is composed of a classical MAP kinase cascade; activation results in phosphorylation of the transcription factor substrates c-Jun and ATF2, and leads to changes in gene expression. The defining components of this pathway are conserved in the fission yeast S. pombe, where the genetic studies have shown that the ability of the JNK homolog Spc1 to be activated in response to UV irradiation is dependent on the presence of the transcription factor substrate Atf1. We have used genetic analysis to define the role of c-Jun in activation of the mammalian JNK signaling pathway. Our results show that optimal activation of JNK requires the presence of its transcription factor substrate c-Jun. Mutational analysis shows that the ability of c-Jun to support efficient activation of JNK requires the ability of Jun to bind DNA, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with this, we show that c-Jun represses the expression of several MAP kinase phosphatases. In the absence of c-Jun, the increased expression of MAP kinase phosphatases leads to impaired activation of the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases after pathway activation. The results show that one function of c-Jun is to regulate the efficiency of signaling by the ERK, p38, and JNK MAP kinases, a function that is likely to affect cellular responses to many different stimuli.

  14. Regulation of protein translation and c-Jun expression by prostate tumor overexpressed 1.

    PubMed

    Marqués, N; Sesé, M; Cánovas, V; Valente, F; Bermudo, R; de Torres, I; Fernández, Y; Abasolo, I; Fernández, P L; Contreras, H; Castellón, E; Celià-Terrassa, T; Méndez, R; Ramón Y Cajal, S; Thomson, T M; Paciucci, R

    2014-02-27

    Prostate tumor overexpressed-1 (PTOV1), a modulator of the Mediator transcriptional regulatory complex, is expressed at high levels in prostate cancer and other neoplasias in association with a more aggressive disease. Here we show that PTOV1 interacts directly with receptor of activated protein C kinase 1 (RACK1), a regulator of protein kinase C and Jun signaling and also a component of the 40S ribosome. Consistent with this interaction, PTOV1 was associated with ribosomes and its overexpression promoted global protein synthesis in prostate cancer cells and COS-7 fibroblasts in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Transfection of ectopic PTOV1 enhanced the expression of c-Jun protein without affecting the levels of c-Jun or RACK1 mRNA. Conversely, knockdown of PTOV1 caused significant declines in global protein synthesis and c-Jun protein levels. High levels of PTOV1 stimulated the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, which required c-Jun, whereas knockdown of PTOV1 strongly inhibited the tumorigenic and metastatic potentials of PC-3 prostate cancer cells. In human prostate cancer samples, the expression of high levels of PTOV1 in primary and metastatic tumors was significantly associated with increased nuclear localization of active c-Jun. These results unveil new functions of PTOV1 in the regulation of protein translation and in the progression of prostate cancer to an invasive and metastatic disease. PMID:23455324

  15. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and PBR drug ligands in fibroblast and fibrosarcoma cell proliferation: role of ERK, c-Jun and ligand-activated PBR-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Kletsas, Dimitris; Li, Wenping; Han, Zeqiu; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2004-05-15

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a 18-kDa high-affinity drug and cholesterol binding protein, that has been implicated in several physiological processes, such as cholesterol transport and mitochondrial respiration. Specific PBR ligands regulate cell proliferation, although their action is controversial and probably cell-type specific. The aim of the present study was to examine the expression of PBR in cells of mesenchymal origin, i.e. human fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells, as well as its role in the regulation of their proliferation. Both mesenchymal cell types express high levels of PBR, localized exclusively in mitochondria. PBR-specific drug ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK 11195 and the benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, at relative high concentrations (10(-4)M), exert a strong inhibitory effect on cell proliferation by arresting the cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, while no apoptotic cell death was observed. In normal fibroblasts, this inhibition was correlated with a decrease in the activation of the cell cycle markers ERK and c-Jun. PBR knockdown by RNA inhibition did not affect the proliferation of either cell type and did not influence the inhibitory effect of PK 11195 and Ro5-4864 on cell growth. These data suggest that in fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells PBR drug ligands inhibit cell proliferation in a PBR-independent manner. These results are in contrast to data reported on cells of epithelial origin, suggesting that the origin of the cells is crucial in defining the role of PBR in their proliferation, and raise caution in the commonly made assumption that PBR mediates cell functions affected by PBR drug ligands.

  16. The Sec7 N-terminal regulatory domains facilitate membrane-proximal activation of the Arf1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C; Halaby, Steve L; Gustafson, Margaret A; Fromme, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is the central sorting compartment of eukaryotic cells. Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Arf-GEFs) regulate virtually all traffic through the Golgi by activating Arf GTPase trafficking pathways. The Golgi Arf-GEFs contain multiple autoregulatory domains, but the precise mechanisms underlying their function remain largely undefined. We report a crystal structure revealing that the N-terminal DCB and HUS regulatory domains of the Arf-GEF Sec7 form a single structural unit. We demonstrate that the established role of the N-terminal region in dimerization is not conserved; instead, a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain is responsible for dimerization of Sec7. We find that the DCB/HUS domain amplifies the ability of Sec7 to activate Arf1 on the membrane surface by facilitating membrane insertion of the Arf1 amphipathic helix. This enhancing function of the Sec7 N-terminal domains is consistent with the high rate of Arf1-dependent trafficking to the plasma membrane necessary for maximal cell growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12411.001 PMID:26765562

  17. c-Myc inhibits Ras-mediated differentiation of pheochromocytoma cells by blocking c-Jun up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Vaqué, José P; Fernández-García, Belén; García-Sanz, Pablo; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Calvo, Fernando; Crespo, Piero; Marín, María C; León, Javier

    2008-02-01

    Although mutant Ras proteins were originally described as transforming oncoproteins, they induce growth arrest, senescence, and/or differentiation in many cell types. c-Myc is an oncogenic transcription factor that cooperates with Ras in cellular transformation and oncogenesis. However, the Myc-Ras relationship in cellular differentiation is largely unknown. Here, we have analyzed the effects of c-Myc on PC12-derived cells (UR61 cell line), harboring an inducible N-Ras oncogene. In these cells, Ras activation induces neuronal-like differentiation by a process involving c-Jun activation. We found that c-Myc inhibited Ras-mediated differentiation by a mechanism that involves the blockade of c-Jun induction in response to Ras signal. Accordingly, ectopically expressed c-Jun could bypass c-Myc impediment of Ras-induced differentiation and activator protein 1 activation. Interestingly, it did not rescue the proliferative arrest elicited by Ras and did not enhance the differentiation-associated apoptosis. The blockade of Ras-mediated induction of c-Jun takes place at the level of c-Jun proximal promoter. Mutational analysis revealed that c-Myc regions involved in DNA binding and transactivation are required to block differentiation and c-Jun induction. c-Myc does not seem to require Miz-1 to inhibit differentiation and block c-Jun induction. Furthermore, Max is not required for c-Myc activity, as UR61 cells lack a functional Max gene. c-Myc-inhibitory effect on the Ras/c-Jun connection is not restricted to UR61 cells as it can occur in other cell types as K562 or HEK293. In conclusion, we describe a novel interplay between c-Myc and c-Jun that controls the ability of Ras to trigger the differentiation program of pheochromocytoma cells.

  18. ERK/c-Jun Recruits Tet1 to Induce Zta Expression and Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation through DNA Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Han, Dongjie; Wan, Pin; Pan, Pan; Cao, Yanhua; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    DNA demethylation plays an essential role in the reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency infection. However, it is unclear how epigenetic modification is initiated in responding to stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that ERK/c-Jun signaling is involved in DNA demethylation of EBV immediate early (IE) gene Zta in response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulation. Remarkably, Ser73 phosphorylation of c-Jun facilitates Zta promoter demethylation and EBV reactivation, whereas knockdown of c-Jun attenuates Zta demethylation and viral reactivation. More importantly, we reveal for the first time that c-Jun interacts with DNA dioxygenase Tet1 and facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter. The binding of c-Jun and Tet1 to Zta enhances promoter demethylation, resulting in the activation of Zta, the stimulation of BHRF1 (a lytic early gene) and gp350/220 (a lytic late gene), and ultimately the reactivation of EBV. Knockdown of Tet1 attenuates TPA-induced Zta demethylation and EBV reactivation. Thus, TPA activates ERK/c-Jun signaling, which subsequently facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter, leading to DNA demethylation, gene expression, and EBV reactivation. This study reveals important roles of ERK/c-Jun signaling and Tet1 dioxygenase in epigenetic modification, and provides new insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of virus latent and lytic infection. PMID:27708396

  19. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I.

  20. c-Jun and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Functionally Cooperate in Hypoxia-Induced Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Alfranca, Arántzazu; Gutiérrez, M. Dolores; Vara, Alicia; Aragonés, Julián; Vidal, Felipe; Landázuri, Manuel O.

    2002-01-01

    Under low-oxygen conditions, cells develop an adaptive program that leads to the induction of several genes, which are transcriptionally regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). On the other hand, there are other factors which modulate the HIF-1-mediated induction of some genes by binding to cis-acting motifs present in their promoters. Here, we show that c-Jun functionally cooperates with HIF-1 transcriptional activity in different cell types. Interestingly, a dominant-negative mutant of c-Jun which lacks its transactivation domain partially inhibits HIF-1-mediated transcription. This cooperative effect is not due to an increase in the nuclear amount of the HIF-1α subunit, nor does it require direct binding of c-Jun to DNA. c-Jun and HIF-1α are able to associate in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting that this interaction involves the participation of additional proteins and/or a posttranslational modification of these factors. In this context, hypoxia induces phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63 in endothelial cells. This process is involved in its cooperative effect, since specific blockade of the JNK pathway and mutation of c-Jun at Ser63 and Ser73 impair its functional cooperation with HIF-1. The functional interplay between c-Jun and HIF-1 provides a novel insight into the regulation of some genes, such as the one for VEGF, which is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis. PMID:11739718

  1. Moracin M inhibits airway inflammation by interrupting the JNK/c-Jun and NF-κB pathways in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Sang Kook; Moon, Bong Soo; Lee, Chan Woo; Mandava, Suresh; Samala, Mallesham; Lee, Jongkook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2016-07-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of moracins as 2-arylbenzofuran derivatives against airway inflammation was examined. Moracin M, O, and R were isolated from the root barks of Morus alba, and they inhibited interleukin (IL)-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) at 101-00μM. Among them, moracin M showed the strongest inhibitory effect (IC50=8.1μM). Downregulation of IL-6 expression by moracin M was mediated by interrupting the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway. Moracin derivatives inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-catalyzed NO production from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated alveolar macrophages (MH-S) at 50-100μM. In particular, moracin M inhibited NO production by downregulating iNOS. When orally administered, moracin M (20-60mg/kg) showed comparable inhibitory action with dexamethasone (30mg/kg) against LPS-induced lung inflammation, acute lung injury, in mice with that of dexamethasone (30mg/kg). The action mechanism included interfering with the activation of nuclear transcription factor-κB in inflamed lungs. Therefore, it is concluded that moracin M inhibited airway inflammation in vitro and in vivo, and it has therapeutic potential for treating lung inflammatory disorders. PMID:27138708

  2. IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun and STAT3 expression in B-CLL.

    PubMed

    Antosz, Halina; Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Sajewicz, Joanna; Choroszyńska, Dorota; Marzec-Kotarska, Barbara; Osiak, Magdalena; Pająk, Natalia; Tomczak, Waldemar; Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata; Baszak, Jacek

    2015-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is characterized by the accumulation of functionally abnormal, monoclonal B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen, resulting in a reduction count of normal immunocompetent cells and their impaired immune function. The defect in transmission of signals from various types of extracellular receptors, leading to aberrant cytokines and transcription factors gene expression, may underlie the basis of immune failure in B-CLL. The aim of the study was to assess of IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 expression. In response to antigenic stimulation IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 proteins induce mutual activity. The subject of the study was subpopulations of leukemic lymphocytes (CD5+ CD19+) and CD19+ B cells from healthy donors (control group). Our results provide evidence that the regulation of IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 gene expression in CLL B cells is clearly different from normal B lymphocytes. In B-CLL STAT3 expression in unstimulated lymphocytes is significantly higher (p<0.0001) compared with normal subpopulation of B cell. In contrast, IL-6, IL-10, and c-Jun mRNA expressions are statistically lower in B-CLL in comparison with the control group, in all cases (p<0.0001). When analyzing the relationship between c-Jun expression and B-CLL stage according Rai we revealed decreasing c-Jun expression, both at the mRNA and protein levels, along with advancing stage of disease. PMID:25477266

  3. The N-terminal Arg residue is essential for autocatalytic activation of a lipopolysaccharide-responsive protease zymogen.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-09-12

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. PMID:25077965

  4. The N-terminal Arg Residue Is Essential for Autocatalytic Activation of a Lipopolysaccharide-responsive Protease Zymogen*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. PMID:25077965

  5. The N-terminal Arg residue is essential for autocatalytic activation of a lipopolysaccharide-responsive protease zymogen.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-09-12

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules.

  6. Differential Contributions of Tacaribe Arenavirus Nucleoprotein N-Terminal and C-Terminal Residues to Nucleocapsid Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Foscaldi, Sabrina; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) is the main protein component of viral nucleocapsids and is strictly required for viral genome replication mediated by the L polymerase. Homo-oligomerization of NP is presumed to play an important role in nucleocapsid assembly, albeit the underlying mechanism and the relevance of NP-NP interaction in nucleocapsid activity are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the contribution of the New World Tacaribe virus (TCRV) NP self-interaction to nucleocapsid functional activity. We show that alanine substitution of N-terminal residues predicted to be available for NP-NP interaction strongly affected NP self-association, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, produced a drastic inhibition of transcription and replication of a TCRV minigenome RNA, and impaired NP binding to RNA. Mutagenesis and functional analysis also revealed that, while dispensable for NP self-interaction, key amino acids at the C-terminal domain were essential for RNA synthesis. Furthermore, mutations at these C-terminal residues rendered NP unable to bind RNA both in vivo and in vitro but had no effect on the interaction with the L polymerase. In addition, while all oligomerization-defective variants tested exhibited unaltered capacities to sustain NP-L interaction, NP deletion mutants were fully incompetent to bind L, suggesting that, whereas NP self-association is dispensable, the integrity of both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is required for binding the L polymerase. Overall, our results suggest that NP self-interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain may play a critical role in TCRV nucleocapsid assembly and activity and that the C-terminal domain of NP is implicated in RNA binding. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of arenavirus functional nucleocapsid assembly is still poorly understood. No detailed information is available on the nucleocapsid structure, and the regions of full-length NP involved in binding to viral RNA remain to be

  7. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Janosch; Zou, Peijian; Nössner, Elfriede; Ling, Paul D.; Sattler, Michael; Kempkes, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END) domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:26024477

  8. Characterization of regions within the N-terminal 6-kilodalton domain of phytochrome A that modulate its biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, E T; Marita, J M; Clough, R C; Vierstra, R D

    1997-01-01

    Phytochrome A (phyA) is a red/far-red (FR) light photoreceptor responsible for initiating numerous light-mediated plant growth and developmental responses, especially in FR light-enriched environments. We previously showed that the first 70 amino acids of the polypeptide contain at least two regions with potentially opposite functions (E.T. Jordan, J.R. Cherry, J.M. Walker, R.D. Vierstra [1996] Plant J 9: 243-257). One region is required for activity and correct apoprotein/chromophore interactions, whereas the second appears to regulate phytochrome activity. We have further resolved these functional regions by analysis of N-terminal deletion and alanine-scanning mutants of oat (Avena sativa) phyA in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The results indicate that the region involved in chromophore/apoprotein interactions contains two separate segments (residues 25-33 and 50-62) also required for biological activity. The region that regulates phyA activity requires only five adjacent serines (Sers) (residues 8-12). Removal or alteration of these Sers generates a photoreceptor that increases the sensitivity of transgenic seedlings to red and FR light more than intact phyA. Taken together, these data identify three distinct regions in the N-terminal domain necessary for photoreceptor activity, and further define the Ser-rich region as an important site for phyA regulation. PMID:9342873

  9. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with (/sup 3/H)-NaBH/sub 4/, and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P.

  10. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-06-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence.

  11. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel.

    PubMed

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-01-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence. PMID:27345869

  12. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-01-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence. PMID:27345869

  13. N-terminal domain of turkey pancreatic lipase is active on long chain triacylglycerols and stabilized by colipase.

    PubMed

    Bou Ali, Madiha; Karray, Aida; Gargouri, Youssef; Ben Ali, Yassine

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding the TPL N-terminal domain (N-TPL), fused with a His6-tag, was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris, under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) constitutive promoter. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed and secreted with an expression level of 5 mg/l of culture medium after 2 days of culture. The N-TPL was purified through a one-step Ni-NTA affinity column with a purification factor of approximately 23-fold. The purified N-TPL, with a molecular mass of 35 kDa, had a specific activity of 70 U/mg on tributyrin. Surprisingly, this domain was able to hydrolyse long chain TG with a specific activity of 11 U/mg using olive oil as substrate. This result was confirmed by TLC analysis showing that the N-TPL was able to hydrolyse insoluble substrates as olive oil. N-TPL was unstable at temperatures over 37°C and lost 70% of its activity at acid pH, after 5 min of incubation. The N-TPL exhibited non linear kinetics, indicating its rapid denaturation at the tributyrin-water interface. Colipase increased the N-TPL stability at the lipid-water interface, so the TPL N-terminal domain probably formed functional interactions with colipase despite the absence of the C-terminal domain.

  14. c-Jun promotes whereas JunB inhibits epidermal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jane Y; Ke, Hengning; Hall, Russell P; Zhang, Jennifer Y

    2011-05-01

    Deregulation of the activator protein 1 (AP1) family gene regulators has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. In this study we report that c-Jun was activated in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and coexpression of c-Jun with oncogenic Ras was sufficient to transform primary human epidermal cells into malignancy in a regenerated human skin grafting model. In contrast, JunB was not induced in a majority of human SCC cells. Moreover, exogenous expression of JunB inhibited tumorigenesis driven by Ras or spontaneous human SCC cells. Conversely, the dominant-negative JunB mutant (DNJunB) promoted tumorigenesis, which is in contrast to the tumor-suppressor function of the corresponding c-Jun mutant. At the cellular level, JunB induced epidermal cell senescence and slowed cell growth in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistently, coexpression of JunB and Ras induced premature epidermal differentiation concomitant with upregulation of p16 and filaggrin and downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). These findings indicate that JunB and c-Jun differentially regulate cell growth and differentiation and induce opposite effects on epidermal neoplasia.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://www.nature.com/jid/journalclub.

  15. c-Jun promotes whereas JunB inhibits epidermal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jane Y; Ke, Hengning; Hall, Russell P; Zhang, Jennifer Y

    2011-05-01

    Deregulation of the activator protein 1 (AP1) family gene regulators has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. In this study we report that c-Jun was activated in human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and coexpression of c-Jun with oncogenic Ras was sufficient to transform primary human epidermal cells into malignancy in a regenerated human skin grafting model. In contrast, JunB was not induced in a majority of human SCC cells. Moreover, exogenous expression of JunB inhibited tumorigenesis driven by Ras or spontaneous human SCC cells. Conversely, the dominant-negative JunB mutant (DNJunB) promoted tumorigenesis, which is in contrast to the tumor-suppressor function of the corresponding c-Jun mutant. At the cellular level, JunB induced epidermal cell senescence and slowed cell growth in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistently, coexpression of JunB and Ras induced premature epidermal differentiation concomitant with upregulation of p16 and filaggrin and downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). These findings indicate that JunB and c-Jun differentially regulate cell growth and differentiation and induce opposite effects on epidermal neoplasia.JID JOURNAL CLUB ARTICLE: For questions, answers, and open discussion about this article, please go to http://www.nature.com/jid/journalclub. PMID:21289643

  16. Cop1 constitutively regulates c-Jun protein stability and functions as a tumor suppressor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Migliorini, Domenico; Bogaerts, Sven; Defever, Dieter; Vyas, Rajesh; Denecker, Geertrui; Radaelli, Enrico; Zwolinska, Aleksandra; Depaepe, Vanessa; Hochepied, Tino; Skarnes, William C.; Marine, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical studies have suggested conflicting roles for the E3 ubiquitin ligase constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (Cop1; also known as Rfwd2) in tumorigenesis, providing evidence for both the oncoprotein c-Jun and the tumor suppressor p53 as its targets. Here we present what we believe to be the first in vivo investigation of the role of Cop1 in cancer etiology. Using an innovative genetic approach to generate an allelic series of Cop1, we found that Cop1 hypomorphic mice spontaneously developed malignancy at a high frequency in the first year of life and were highly susceptible to radiation-induced lymphomagenesis. Further analysis revealed that c-Jun was a key physiological target for Cop1 and that Cop1 constitutively kept c-Jun at low levels in vivo and thereby modulated c-Jun/AP-1 transcriptional activity. Importantly, Cop1 deficiency stimulated cell proliferation in a c-Jun–dependent manner. Focal deletions of COP1 were observed at significant frequency across several cancer types, and COP1 loss was determined to be one of the mechanisms leading to c-Jun upregulation in human cancer. We therefore conclude that Cop1 is a tumor suppressor that functions, at least in part, by antagonizing c-Jun oncogenic activity. In the absence of evidence for a genetic interaction between Cop1 and p53, our data strongly argue against the use of Cop1-inhibitory drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:21403399

  17. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  18. The N-terminal Part of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 4 Determines the Localization and Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Rojas, Tomás; Mérida, Ángel

    2016-05-13

    Starch synthase 4 (SS4) plays a specific role in starch synthesis because it controls the number of starch granules synthesized in the chloroplast and is involved in the initiation of the starch granule. We showed previously that SS4 interacts with fibrillins 1 and is associated with plastoglobules, suborganelle compartments physically attached to the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts. Both SS4 localization and its interaction with fibrillins 1 were mediated by the N-terminal part of SS4. Here we show that the coiled-coil region within the N-terminal portion of SS4 is involved in both processes. Elimination of this region prevents SS4 from binding to fibrillins 1 and alters SS4 localization in the chloroplast. We also show that SS4 forms dimers, which depends on a region located between the coiled-coil region and the glycosyltransferase domain of SS4. This region is highly conserved between all SS4 enzymes sequenced to date. We show that the dimerization seems to be necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Both dimerization and the functionality of the coiled-coil region are conserved among SS4 proteins from phylogenetically distant species, such as Arabidopsis and Brachypodium This finding suggests that the mechanism of action of SS4 is conserved among different plant species.

  19. The N-terminal Part of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 4 Determines the Localization and Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Rojas, Tomás; Mérida, Ángel

    2016-05-13

    Starch synthase 4 (SS4) plays a specific role in starch synthesis because it controls the number of starch granules synthesized in the chloroplast and is involved in the initiation of the starch granule. We showed previously that SS4 interacts with fibrillins 1 and is associated with plastoglobules, suborganelle compartments physically attached to the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts. Both SS4 localization and its interaction with fibrillins 1 were mediated by the N-terminal part of SS4. Here we show that the coiled-coil region within the N-terminal portion of SS4 is involved in both processes. Elimination of this region prevents SS4 from binding to fibrillins 1 and alters SS4 localization in the chloroplast. We also show that SS4 forms dimers, which depends on a region located between the coiled-coil region and the glycosyltransferase domain of SS4. This region is highly conserved between all SS4 enzymes sequenced to date. We show that the dimerization seems to be necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Both dimerization and the functionality of the coiled-coil region are conserved among SS4 proteins from phylogenetically distant species, such as Arabidopsis and Brachypodium This finding suggests that the mechanism of action of SS4 is conserved among different plant species. PMID:26969163

  20. A basic motif in the N-terminal region of RAG1 enhances V(D)J recombination activity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, C J; Difilippantonio, M J; Rao, N; Spanopoulou, E; Schatz, D G

    1997-01-01

    The variable portions of antigen receptor genes are assembled from component gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins are the critical lymphoid cell-specific components of the recombination enzymatic machinery and are responsible for site-specific DNA recognition and cleavage. Previous studies had defined a minimal, recombinationally active core region of murine RAG1 consisting of amino acids 384 to 1008 of the 1,040-residue RAG1 protein. No recombination function has heretofore been ascribed to any portion of the 383-amino-acid N-terminal region that is missing from the core, but it seems likely to be of functional significance, based on its evolutionary conservation. Using extrachromosomal recombination substrates, we demonstrate here that the N-terminal region enhances the recombination activity of RAG1 by up to an order of magnitude in a variety of cell lines. Deletion analysis localized a region of the N terminus critical for this effect to amino acids 216 to 238, and further mutagenesis demonstrated that a small basic amino acid motif (BIIa) in this region is essential for enhancing the activity of RAG1. Despite the fact that BIIa is important for the interaction of RAG1 with the nuclear localization factor Srp-1, it does not appear to enhance recombination by facilitating nuclear transport of RAG1. A variety of models for how this region stimulates the recombination activity of RAG1 are considered. PMID:9234712

  1. N-terminal constraint activates the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in the absence of DNA or Ku

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Modesti, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) was identified as an activity and as its three component polypeptides 25 and 15 years ago, respectively. It has been exhaustively characterized as being absolutely dependent on free double stranded DNA ends (to which it is directed by its regulatory subunit, Ku) for its activation as a robust nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase. Here, we report the unexpected finding of robust DNA-PKcs activation by N-terminal constraint, independent of either DNA or its regulatory subunit Ku. These data suggest that an N-terminal conformational change (likely induced by DNA binding) induces enzymatic activation. PMID:22167471

  2. Clostridium thermocellum thermostable lichenase with circular permutations and modifications in the N-terminal region retains its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, A А; Sadovskaya, N S; Nikiforova, Kh R; Mustafaev, O N; Komakhin, R A; Fadeev, V S; Goldenkova-Pavlova, I V

    2015-01-01

    The Clostridium thermocellum lichenase (endo-β-1,3;1,4-glucan-D-glycosyl hydrolase) displays a high thermostability and specific activity and has a compact protein molecule, which makes it attractive, in particular, for protein engineering. We have utilized in silico analysis to construct circularly permuted (CP) variants and estimated the retained activity and thermostability. New open termini in the region of residues 53 or 99 in two lichenase CP variants (CN-53 and CN-99) had no effect on their activity and thermal tolerance versus another variant CP variant, CN-140 (cut in the region of residue 140), which displayed a dramatic decrease in the activity and thermostability. Construction and further activity and thermostability testing of the modified lichenase variants (M variants) and CP variants with peptides integrated via insertion fusion have demonstrated that the N-terminal regions in the lichenase catalytic domain (53 and 99 amino acid residues) that permit circular permutations with retention of activity and thermostability of the enzyme as well as the region between the C and N termini of the native lichenase in thermostable and active lichenase variants (CN-53 and CN-99) may be used for integrating small peptides without the loss of activity and thermostability. These findings not only suggest that CP predictions can be used in search for internal integration sites within protein molecule, but also form the background for further enzymatic engineering of the C. thermocellum thermostable lichenase aiming to create new fusion proteins. PMID:25448724

  3. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Dove, Stefan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Urbauer, Ramona J. Bieber; Moskovitz, Jackob; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF) is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM) leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met) residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut) with Met to leucine (Leu) substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils. PMID:26184312

  4. Purification, characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease from bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, A J; Shoshani, I; Minuth, M; Awad, J A; Elce, J S; Johnson, R A

    1995-03-01

    We previously reported the extraction of a factor from bovine sperm that activated adenylyl cyclases of rat brain and human platelets, and identified it as a trypsin-like protease that was referred to as "ninhibin." This proteolytic activity was purified to near homogeneity from an alkaline extract of washed sperm particles by sequential chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine agarose and CM-Sephadex. Purification was greater than 100-fold with nearly 30% recovery of protease activity exhibiting a major band of approximately 40 kDa. An approximately 45-kDa form of the protease was also evident in crude extracts and was preferentially isolated when the enzyme was prepared in the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors. The larger form of the protease was substantially less effective in stimulating adenylyl cyclase than was the smaller form; it is likely to be a zymogen form from which the smaller, more active form is derived. Purified forms of acrosin and ninhibin exhibited similar mobilities on PAGE, similar capacities for activating adenylyl cyclase, similar patterns of proteolytic fragmentation, and similar immunoblot patterns obtained with an antibody against purified bovine acrosin. More importantly, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine ninhibin was found to be identical with that of bovine acrosin and caprine acrosin and more than 75% identical with porcine acrosin. The data support the conclusion that the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease previously referred to as ninhibin is, in fact, acrosin. PMID:7756444

  5. N-terminal serine dephosphorylation is required for KCC3 cotransporter full activation by cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Zesergio; de los Heros, Paola; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Vázquez, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Alessi, Dario R; Mercado, Adriana; Gamba, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    The K(+):Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC) activity is modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. In isotonic conditions, KCCs are inactive and phosphorylated, whereas hypotonicity promotes their dephosphorylation and activation. Two phosphorylation sites (Thr-991 and Thr-1048) in KCC3 have been found to be critical for its regulation. However, here we show that the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A could be further activated by hypotonicity, suggesting that additional phosphorylation site(s) are involved. We observed that in vitro activated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) complexed to its regulatory MO25 subunit phosphorylated KCC3 at Ser-96 and that in Xenopus laevis oocytes Ser-96 of human KCC3 is phosphorylated in isotonic conditions and becomes dephosphorylated during incubation in hypotonicity, leading to a dramatic increase in KCC3 function. Additionally, WNK3, which inhibits the activity of KCC3, promoted phosphorylation of Ser-96 as well as Thr-991 and Thr-1048. These observations were corroborated in HEK293 cells stably transfected with WNK3. Mutation of Ser-96 alone (KCC3-S96A) had no effect on the activity of the cotransporter when compared with wild type KCC3. However, when compared with the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A, the triple mutant KCC3-S96A/T991A/T1048A activity in isotonic conditions was significantly higher, and it was not further increased by hypotonicity or inhibited by WNK3. We conclude that serine residue 96 of human KCC3 is a third site that has to be dephosphorylated for full activation of the cotransporter during hypotonicity.

  6. N-terminal Serine Dephosphorylation Is Required for KCC3 Cotransporter Full Activation by Cell Swelling*

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Zesergio; de los Heros, Paola; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Vázquez, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A.; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Alessi, Dario R.; Mercado, Adriana; Gamba, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The K+:Cl− cotransporter (KCC) activity is modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. In isotonic conditions, KCCs are inactive and phosphorylated, whereas hypotonicity promotes their dephosphorylation and activation. Two phosphorylation sites (Thr-991 and Thr-1048) in KCC3 have been found to be critical for its regulation. However, here we show that the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A could be further activated by hypotonicity, suggesting that additional phosphorylation site(s) are involved. We observed that in vitro activated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) complexed to its regulatory MO25 subunit phosphorylated KCC3 at Ser-96 and that in Xenopus laevis oocytes Ser-96 of human KCC3 is phosphorylated in isotonic conditions and becomes dephosphorylated during incubation in hypotonicity, leading to a dramatic increase in KCC3 function. Additionally, WNK3, which inhibits the activity of KCC3, promoted phosphorylation of Ser-96 as well as Thr-991 and Thr-1048. These observations were corroborated in HEK293 cells stably transfected with WNK3. Mutation of Ser-96 alone (KCC3-S96A) had no effect on the activity of the cotransporter when compared with wild type KCC3. However, when compared with the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A, the triple mutant KCC3-S96A/T991A/T1048A activity in isotonic conditions was significantly higher, and it was not further increased by hypotonicity or inhibited by WNK3. We conclude that serine residue 96 of human KCC3 is a third site that has to be dephosphorylated for full activation of the cotransporter during hypotonicity. PMID:24043619

  7. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  8. The N-terminal domain allosterically regulates cleavage and activation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-08-15

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr(370) in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation.

  9. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  10. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-08-15

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1-20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  11. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1–20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  12. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  13. Cross monomer substrate contacts reposition the Hsp90 N-terminal domain and prime the chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Street, Timothy O.; Lavery, Laura A.; Verba, Kliment; Lee, Chung-Tien; Mayer, Matthias P.; Agard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous molecular chaperone Hsp90 plays a critical role in substrate protein folding and maintenance, but the functional mechanism has been difficult to elucidate. In previous work a model Hsp90 substrate revealed an activation process in which substrate binding accelerates a large open/closed conformational change required for ATP hydrolysis by Hsp90. While this could serve as an elegant mechanism for conserving ATP usage for productive interactions on the substrate, the structural origin of substrate catalyzed Hsp90 conformational changes are unknown. Here we find that substrate binding affects an intrinsically unfavorable rotation of the Hsp90 N-terminal domain (NTD) relative to the middle domain (MD) that is required for closure. We identify an MD substrate binding region on the interior cleft of the Hsp90 dimer and show that a secondary set of substrate contacts drive an NTD orientation change on the opposite monomer. These results suggest an Hsp90 activation mechanism in which cross-monomer contacts mediated by a partially structured substrate prime the chaperone for its functional activity. PMID:22063096

  14. Crucial role of c-Jun phosphorylation at Ser63/73 mediated by PHLPP protein degradation in the cheliensisin a inhibition of cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junlan; Zhang, Jingjie; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Yu, Yonghui; Jin, Honglei; Li, Yang; Deng, Xu; Gao, Jimin; Zhao, Qinshi; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-12-01

    Cheliensisin A (Chel A), as a novel styryl-lactone isolated from Goniothalamus cheliensis Hu, has been demonstrated to have an inhibition of EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via stabilizing p53 protein in a Chk1-dependent manner, suggesting its chemopreventive activity in our previous studies. However, its underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully characterized yet. In the current study, we found that Chel A treatment could increase c-Jun protein phosphorylation and activation, whereas the inhibition of c-Jun phosphorylation, by ectopic expression of a dominant-negative mutant of c-Jun, TAM67, reversed the Chel A inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation and impaired Chel A induction of p53 protein and apoptosis. Moreover, our results indicated that Chel A treatment led to a PHLPP downregulation by promoting PHLPP protein degradation. We also found that PHLPP could interact with and bind to c-Jun protein, whereas ectopic PHLPP expression blocked c-Jun activation, p53 protein and apoptotic induction by Chel A, and further reversed the Chel A inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation. With the findings, we have demonstrated that Chel A treatment promotes a PHLPP protein degradation, which can bind to c-Jun and mediates c-Jun phosphorylation, and further leading to p53 protein induction, apoptotic responses, subsequently resulting in cell transformation inhibition and chemopreventive activity of Chel A. PMID:25281487

  15. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4/PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. We, therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, we further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin. Images PMID:3033645

  16. The Expression Patterns of c-Fos and c-Jun Induced by Different Frequencies of Electroacupuncture in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zheng-Ying; Ding, Yi; Cui, Lu-ying; Hu, Man-Li; Ding, Ming-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate patterns of c-Fos and c-Jun expression induced by different frequencies of electroacupuncture (EA) in the brain, goats were stimulated by EA of 0, 2, 60, or 100 Hz at a set of “Baihui, Santai, Ergen, and Sanyangluo” points for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using the potassium iontophoresis method. The levels of c-Fos and c-Jun were determined with Streptavidin-Biotin Complex immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the pain threshold induced by 60 Hz was 82.2% higher (P < 0.01) than that by 0, 2, or 100 Hz (6.5%, 35.2%, or 40.9%). EA induced increased c-Fos and c-Jun expression in most analgesia-related nuclei and areas in the brain. Sixty Hz EA increased more c-Fos or c-Jun expression than 2 Hz or 100 Hz EA in all the measured nuclei and areas except for the nucleus accumbens, the area septalis lateralis, the caudate nucleus, the nucleus amygdala basalis, and the locus coeruleus, in which c-Fos or c-Jun expressions induced by 60 Hz EA did not differ from those by 2 Hz or 100 Hz EA. It was suggested that 60 Hz EA activated more extensive neural circuits in goats, which may contribute to optimal analgesic effects. PMID:26491460

  17. Are there multiple proteolytic pathways contributing to c-Fos, c-Jun and p53 protein degradation in vivo?

    PubMed

    Salvat, C; Aquaviva, C; Jariel-Encontre, I; Ferrara, P; Pariat, M; Steff, A M; Carillo, S; Piechaczyk, M

    1999-04-01

    The c-Fos and c-Jun oncoproteins and the p53 tumor suppressor protein are short-lived transcription factors. Several catabolic pathways contribute to their degradation in vivo. c-Fos and c-Jun are thus mostly degraded by the proteasome, but there is indirect evidence that, under certain experimental/physiological conditions, calpains participate in their destruction, at least to a limited extent. Lysosomes have also been reported to participate in the destruction of c-Fos. Along the same lines, p53 is mostly degraded following the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and calpains also seem to participate in its degradation. Moreover, c-Fos, c-Jun and p53 turnovers are regulated upon activation of intracellular signalling cascades. All taken together, these observations underline the complexity of the mechanisms responsible for the selective destruction of proteins within cells.

  18. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%–25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  19. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%-25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  20. Role of leucine zipper motif in apoE3 N-terminal domain lipid binding activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Ryan, Robert O

    2006-09-01

    The N terminal domain of human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3-NT) functions as a ligand for members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Whereas lipid-free apoE3-NT adopts a stable four-helix bundle conformation, a lipid binding induced conformational change is required for LDLR recognition. To investigate the role of a leucine zipper motif identified in the helix bundle on lipid binding activity, three leucine residues in helix 2 (Leu63, Leu71 and Leu78) were replaced by alanine. Recombinant "leucine to alanine" (LA) apoE3-NT was produced in E. coli, isolated and characterized. Stability studies revealed a transition midpoint of guanidine hydrochloride induced denaturation of 2.7 M and 2.1 M for wild type (WT) and LA apoE3-NT, respectively. Results from fluorescent dye binding assays revealed that, compared to WT apoE3-NT, LA apoE3-NT has an increased content of solvent exposed hydrophobic surfaces. In phospholipid vesicle solubilization assays, LA apoE3-NT was more effective than WT apoE3-NT at inducing a time-dependent decrease in dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol vesicle light scattering intensity. Likewise, in lipoprotein binding assays, LA apoE3-NT protected human low-density lipoprotein from phospholipase C induced aggregation to a greater extent than WT apoE3-NT. On the other hand, LA apoE3-NT and WT apoE3-NT were equivalent in terms of their ability to bind a soluble LDLR fragment. The results suggest that the leucine zipper motif confers stability to the apoE3-NT helix bundle state and may serve to modulate lipid binding activity of this domain and, thereby, influence the conformational transition associated with manifestation of LDLR binding activity.

  1. Longikaurin A, a natural ent-kaurane, induces G2/M phase arrest via downregulation of Skp2 and apoptosis induction through ROS/JNK/c-Jun pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-J; Bai, H-Y; Li, Z-H; Zou, J; Chen, J-W; Zheng, F; Zhang, J-X; Mai, S-J; Zeng, M-S; Sun, H-D; Pu, J-X; Xie, D

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of primary liver cancer, and is also highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy treatments. In this study, we report that Longikaurin A (LK-A), an ent-kaurane diterpenoid isolated from the plant Isodon ternifolius, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HCC cell lines. LK-A also suppressed tumor growth in SMMC-7721 xenograft models, without inducing any notable major organ-related toxicity. LK-A treatment led to reduced expression of the proto-oncogene S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) in SMMC-7721 cells. Lower Skp2 levels correlated with increased expression of p21 and p-cdc2 (Try15), and a corresponding decrease in protein levels of Cyclin B1 and cdc2. Overexpression of Skp2 significantly inhibited LK-A-induced cell cycle arrest in SMMC-7721 cells, suggesting that LK-A may target Skp2 to arrest cells at the G2/M phase. LK-A also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells. LK-A induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase and P38 MAP kinase. Treatment with, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 prevented LK-A-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented phosphorylation of both JNK and c-Jun. Taken together, these data indicate that LK-A induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells by dampening Skp2 expression, and thereby activating the ROS/JNK/c-Jun signaling pathways. LK-A is therefore a potential lead compound for development of antitumor drugs targeting HCC. PMID:24651440

  2. Differential Inhibition of Macrophage Activation by Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus and Pichinde Virus Is Mediated by the Z Protein N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junji; Chai, Zheng; Ly, Hinh

    2015-01-01

    Several arenavirus pathogens, such as Lassa and Junin viruses, inhibit macrophage activation, the molecular mechanism of which is unclear. We show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can also inhibit macrophage activation, in contrast to Pichinde and Tacaribe viruses, which are not known to naturally cause human diseases. Using a recombinant Pichinde virus system, we show that the LCMV Z N-terminal domain (NTD) mediates the inhibition of macrophage activation and immune functions. PMID:26423945

  3. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex. PMID:27422629

  4. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex.

  5. Dimeric combinations of MafB, cFos and cJun control the apoptosis-survival balance in limb morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suda, Natsuno; Itoh, Takehiko; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirakawa, Daisuke; Bando, Masashige; Katou, Yuki; Kataoka, Kohsuke; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Tickle, Cheryll; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2014-07-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism for sculpting morphology. However, the molecular cascades that control apoptosis in developing limb buds remain largely unclear. Here, we show that MafB was specifically expressed in apoptotic regions of chick limb buds, and MafB/cFos heterodimers repressed apoptosis, whereas MafB/cJun heterodimers promoted apoptosis for sculpting the shape of the limbs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing in chick limb buds identified potential target genes and regulatory elements controlled by Maf and Jun. Functional analyses revealed that expression of p63 and p73, key components known to arrest the cell cycle, was directly activated by MafB and cJun. Our data suggest that dimeric combinations of MafB, cFos and cJun in developing chick limb buds control the number of apoptotic cells, and that MafB/cJun heterodimers lead to apoptosis via activation of p63 and p73.

  6. Functional roles of N-terminal and C-terminal domains in the overall activity of a novel single-stranded DNA binding protein of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Ujaoney, Aman K.; Basu, Bhakti; Muniyappa, K.; Apte, Shree K.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding protein (Ssb) of Deinococcus radiodurans comprises N- and C-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) folds connected by a beta hairpin connector. To assign functional roles to the individual OB folds, we generated three Ssb variants: SsbN (N-terminal without connector), SsbNC (N-terminal with connector) and SsbC (C-terminal), each harboring one OB fold. Both SsbN and SsbNC displayed weak single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding activity, compared to the full-length Ssb (SsbFL). The level of ssDNA binding activity displayed by SsbC was intermediate between SsbFL and SsbN. SsbC and SsbFL predominantly existed as homo-dimers while SsbNC/SsbN formed different oligomeric forms. In vitro, SsbNC or SsbN formed a binary complex with SsbC that displayed enhanced ssDNA binding activity. Unlike SsbFL, Ssb variants were able to differentially modulate topoisomerase-I activity, but failed to stimulate Deinococcal RecA-promoted DNA strand exchange. The results suggest that the C-terminal OB fold is primarily responsible for ssDNA binding. The N-terminal OB fold binds weakly to ssDNA but is involved in multimerization. PMID:25973364

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates IL-1β mediated iNOS expression in hepatocytes by down-regulating c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Jaganathan; Zhang, Baochun; Nweze, Ikenna C; Du, Yibo; Harbrecht, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Excessive nitric oxide from the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) increases shock-induced hepatic injury, hepatic dysfunction, inflammation, and mortality in animal models. Cytokines increase the expression of iNOS in hepatocytes, but the signaling mechanisms involved are not completely understood. We have previously demonstrated that Akt mediates the inhibitory effect of cAMP and insulin on cytokine-induced hepatocyte iNOS expression. We hypothesized that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a target of Akt phosphorylation, would regulate hepatocyte iNOS expression. In cultured rat hepatocytes, GSK3 inhibitors decreased IL-1β mediated nitric oxide (NO) production and iNOS protein expression, while the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002 increased the cytokine-mediated NO production and iNOS expression. Over-expression of the constitutively active form of GSK3β enhanced IL-1β-mediated iNOS expression. GSK3 catalyzes the phosphorylation of c-Jun at the c-terminal Thr239 that facilitates c-Jun degradation. Inhibition of GSK3 with SB216763 and lithium chloride significantly reduced, whereas blocking PI3K/Akt increased phosphorylation of c-Jun at Thr239. The levels of total-c-Jun and c-Jun phosphorylated at Ser63 inversely correlated with c-Jun phosphorylated at Thr239, GSK3 activation and iNOS expression. Over-expression of a dominant negative c-Jun not only caused an increase in IL-1β-mediated iNOS promoter activity and iNOS protein expression but was also able to reverse the SB216763-mediated suppression of iNOS. These results demonstrate that GSK3, a downstream target of Akt, regulates IL-1β-stimulated iNOS expression in hepatocytes by directly phosphorylating c-Jun in an inhibitory manner. PMID:25160751

  8. Selective modification of the N-terminal structure of polytheonamide B significantly changes its cytotoxicity and activity as an ion channel.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Naoki; Itoh, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Inoue, Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    Chemical point mutation: Polytheonamide B is a naturally occurring polypeptide containing 48 amino acids. It both displays potent cytotoxicity and acts as a monovalent cation channel in vitro. Chemoselective methods to modify the 44th, N-, and C-terminal residues of the natural product have been developed, and evaluation of the resultant derivatives suggests that the intrinsic activities of the peptide can only be altered by switching its N-terminal substitution.

  9. Induction of c-Jun by air particulate matter (PM₁₀) of Mexico city: Participation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Salcido-Neyoy, Martha Estela; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro Román; Gonsebatt, María Eugenia; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Petrosyan, Pavel; Molina-Servin, Edith Danny; Vega, Elizabeth; Manzano-León, Natalia; García-Cuellar, Claudia M

    2015-08-01

    The carcinogenic potential of urban particulate matter (PM) has been partly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) content, which activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Here we report the effect of PM with an aerodynamic size of 10 μm (PM10) on the induction of AhR pathway in A549 cells, evaluating its downstream targets CYP1B1, IL-6, IL-8 and c-Jun. Significant increases in CYP1B1 protein and enzyme activity; IL-6 and IL-8 secretion and c-Jun protein were found in response to PM10. The formation of PAH-DNA adducts was also detected. The involvement of AhR pathway was confirmed with Resveratrol as AhR antagonist, which reversed CYP1B1 and c-Jun induction. Nevertheless, in IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, the Resveratrol was ineffective, suggesting an effect independent of this pathway. Considering the role of c-Jun in oncogenesis, its induction by PM may be contributing to its carcinogenic potential through induction of AhR pathway by PAHs present in PM10. PMID:25909326

  10. Induction of c-Jun by air particulate matter (PM₁₀) of Mexico city: Participation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Salcido-Neyoy, Martha Estela; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro Román; Gonsebatt, María Eugenia; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Petrosyan, Pavel; Molina-Servin, Edith Danny; Vega, Elizabeth; Manzano-León, Natalia; García-Cuellar, Claudia M

    2015-08-01

    The carcinogenic potential of urban particulate matter (PM) has been partly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) content, which activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Here we report the effect of PM with an aerodynamic size of 10 μm (PM10) on the induction of AhR pathway in A549 cells, evaluating its downstream targets CYP1B1, IL-6, IL-8 and c-Jun. Significant increases in CYP1B1 protein and enzyme activity; IL-6 and IL-8 secretion and c-Jun protein were found in response to PM10. The formation of PAH-DNA adducts was also detected. The involvement of AhR pathway was confirmed with Resveratrol as AhR antagonist, which reversed CYP1B1 and c-Jun induction. Nevertheless, in IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, the Resveratrol was ineffective, suggesting an effect independent of this pathway. Considering the role of c-Jun in oncogenesis, its induction by PM may be contributing to its carcinogenic potential through induction of AhR pathway by PAHs present in PM10.

  11. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I.; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  12. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  13. Tumor promoter arsenite stimulates histone H3 phosphoacetylation of proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun chromatin in human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Gorospe, Myriam; Barnes, Janice; Liu, Yusen

    2003-04-11

    Although epidemiological studies have long established that inorganic arsenic is a potent human carcinogen, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that inorganic arsenic may act as a tumor promoter by perturbing key signaling transduction pathways. We have shown previously that arsenite can potently activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades and induce the expression of proliferation-associated genes, including proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos. In order to elucidate further the molecular mechanisms underlying its tumor-promoting properties, we investigated the signaling events involved in arsenite-mediated induction of c-fos and c-jun. We found that induction of both c-fos and c-jun by arsenite can be substantially inhibited by the MEK- selective inhibitor U0126, suggesting that the ERK pathway is critically involved in their up-regulation. Interestingly, arsenite dramatically induced the phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3 preceding the induction of mRNAs encoding c-fos and c-jun. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that arsenite treatment markedly induced the phosphorylation/acetylation of histone H3 associated with the c-fos and c-jun genes through an ERK-dependent pathway. Our results strongly suggest that arsenic-triggered alterations in chromatin structure perturb specific gene transcription, including that of proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos, and may thereby contribute to the carcinogenic process.

  14. AP-1 Transcription Factors c-FOS and c-JUN Mediate GnRH-Induced Cadherin-11 Expression and Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Liyang; Wang, Yan-Ling; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-06-01

    GnRH is expressed in first-trimester human placenta and increases cell invasion in extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVTs). Invasive phenotypes have been reported to be regulated by transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) and mesenchymal cadherin-11. The aim of our study was to investigate the roles of AP-1 components (c-FOS/c-JUN) and cadherin-11 in GnRH-induced cell invasion in human EVT cells. Phosphorylated c-FOS and phosphorylated c-JUN were detected in the cell column regions of human first-trimester placental villi by immunohistochemistry. GnRH treatment increased c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 mRNA and protein levels in immortalized EVT (HTR-8/SVneo) cells. Moreover, GnRH treatment induced c-FOS and c-JUN protein phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation. Pretreatment with antide, a GnRH antagonist, attenuated GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression. Importantly, basal and GnRH-induced cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion were reduced by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of c-FOS, c-JUN, and cadherin-11 in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our results suggest that GnRH induces the expression and phosphorylation of the AP-1 transcription factors c-FOS and c-JUN in trophoblast cells, which contributes to GnRH-induced elevation of cadherin-11 expression and cell invasion. PMID:25794160

  15. N-terminal activation is an essential early step in the mechanism of action of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac insecticidal toxin.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Sanchez, Jorge; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Crickmore, Neil

    2002-07-01

    A variant form of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin that is not cleaved at the N terminus during proteolytic activation with trypsin was found to be incapable of forming pores in Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles in vitro and had reduced insecticidal activity in vivo. Binding studies indicated an altered binding pattern of the mutant toxin in that bound toxin could not be fully displaced by a high molar excess of fully trypsin-activated toxin. These results suggest that proteolytic removal of the N-terminal peptide of Cry1Ac is an important step in toxin activation.

  16. Ulinastatin attenuates LPS-induced human endothelial cells oxidative damage through suppressing JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunping; Ma, Dandan; Chen, Man; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jicheng; Qu, Xin; Wang, Chunting

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress is a main feature observed in the sepsis by increasing endothelial oxidative damage. Many studies have demonstrated that Ulinastatin (UTI) can inhibit pro-inflammatory proteases, decrease inflammatory cytokine levels and suppress oxidative stress. However, the potential molecular mechanism underlying UTI which exerts its antioxidant effect is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of UTI on the LPS-induced oxidative stress and the underlying mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After oxidative stress induced By LPS in HUVECs, the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm were measured. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined. We found that LPS resulted in a profound elevation of ROS production and MDA levels. The decrease in Cu/Zn-SOD protein and increased in Mn-SOD protein were observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These responses were suppressed by an addition of UTI. The increase in c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation by LPS in HUVECs was markedly blocked by UTI or JNK inhibitor SP600125. Our results suggest that UTI exerts its anti-oxidant effects by decreasing overproduction of ROS induced by LPS via suppressing JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Therefore UTI may play a protective role in vascular endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress such as sepsis. This study may provide insight into a possible molecular mechanism by which Ulinastatin inhibits LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Interactions among LRF-1, JunB, c-Jun, and c-Fos define a regulatory program in the G1 phase of liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, J C; Bravo, R; Taub, R

    1992-01-01

    In regenerating liver, a physiologically normal model of cell growth, LRF-1, JunB, c-Jun, and c-Fos among Jun/Fos/LRF-1 family members are induced posthepatectomy. In liver cells, high levels of c-Fos/c-Jun, c-Fos/JunB, LRF-1/c-Jun, and LRF-1/JunB complexes are present for several hours after the G0/G1 transition, and the relative level of LRF-1/JunB complexes increases during G1. We provide evidence for dramatic differences in promoter-specific activation by LRF-1- and c-Fos-containing complexes. LRF-1 in combination with either Jun protein strongly activates a cyclic AMP response element-containing promoter which c-Fos/Jun does not activate. LRF-1/c-Jun, c-Fos/c-Jun, and c-Fos/JunB activate specific AP-1 and ATF site-containing promoters, and in contrast, LRF-1/JunB potently represses c-Fos- and c-Jun-mediated activation of these promoters. Repression is dependent on a region in LRF-1 that includes amino acids 40 to 84 (domain R) and the basic/leucine zipper domain. As the relative level of LRF-1/JunB complexes increases posthepatectomy, c-Fos/Jun-mediated ATF and AP-1 site activation is likely to decrease with simultaneous transcriptional activation of the many liver-specific genes whose promoters contain cyclic AMP response element sites. Thus, through complex interactions among LRF-1, JunB, c-Jun, and c-Fos, control of delayed gene expression may be established for extended times during the G1 phase of hepatic growth. Images PMID:1406655

  18. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61–211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39–211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  19. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  20. Disulfide Bond-mediated Multimerization of Ask1 and Its Reduction by Thioredoxin-1 Regulate H2O2-induced c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Philippe J.; Charette, Steve J.; Toledano, Michel B.

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulated kinase-1 (Ask1) lies upstream of a major redox-sensitive pathway leading to the activation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and the induction of apoptosis. We found that cell exposure to H2O2 caused the rapid oxidation of Ask1, leading to its multimerization through the formation of interchain disulfide bonds. Oxidized Ask1 was fully reduced within minutes after induction by H2O2. During this reduction, the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) became covalently associated with Ask1. Overexpression of Trx1 accelerated the reduction of Ask1, and a redox-inactive mutant of Trx1 (C35S) remained trapped with Ask1, blocking its reduction. Preventing the oxidation of Ask1 by either overexpressing Trx1 or using an Ask1 mutant in which the sensitive cysteines were mutated (Ask1-ΔCys) impaired the activation of JNK and the induction of apoptosis while having little effect on Ask1 activation. These results indicate that Ask1 oxidation is required at a step subsequent to activation for signaling downstream of Ask1 after H2O2 treatment. PMID:17652454

  1. Delayed Cell Cycle Progression in Selenoprotein W-depleted Cells Is Regulated by a Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4-p38/c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase-p53 Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Wayne Chris; Alkan, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved thioredoxin-like protein whose depletion causes a transient p53- and p21Cip1-dependent G1-phase cell cycle arrest in breast and prostate epithelial cells. SEPW1 depletion increases phosphorylation of Ser-33 in p53, which is associated with decreased p53 ubiquitination and stabilization of p53. We report here that delayed cell cycle progression, Ser-33 phosphorylation, and p53 nuclear accumulation from SEPW1 depletion require mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4). Silencing MKK4 rescued G1 arrest, Ser-33 phosphorylation, and nuclear accumulation of p53 induced by SEPW1 depletion, but silencing MKK3, MKK6, or MKK7 did not. SEPW1 silencing did not change the phosphorylation state of MKK4 but increased total MKK4 protein. Silencing p38γ, p38δ, or JNK2 partially rescued G1 arrest from SEPW1 silencing, suggesting they signal downstream from MKK4. These results imply that SEPW1 silencing increases MKK4, which activates p38γ, p38δ, and JNK2 to phosphorylate p53 on Ser-33 and cause a transient G1 arrest. PMID:22730327

  2. Effect of N-terminal truncation on antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and membrane perturbation activity of Cc-CATH3.

    PubMed

    Jittikoon, Jiraphun; Ngamsaithong, Narumon; Pimthon, Jutarat; Vajragupta, Opa

    2015-10-01

    A series of amino-terminal truncated analogues of quail antimicrobial peptide Cc-CATH3(1-29) were created and examined antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, cytotoxicity against mouse fibroblast cell line, and membrane perturbation activity against various membrane models. Parent peptide Cc-CATH3(1-29) and the first four-residue truncated peptide Cc-CATH3(5-29) were active in all tested experiments. In contrast, the eight- and twelve-residue truncated variants Cc-CATH3(9-29) and Cc-CATH3(13-29) appeared to have lost activities. Cc-CATH3(1-29) and Cc-CATH3(5-29) possessed antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 2-4 and 1-2 µM, respectively. For cytotoxicity, Cc-CATH3(1-29) and Cc-CATH3(5-29) displayed cytotoxicity with the IC50 values of 9.33 and 4.93 μM, respectively. Cc-CATH3(5-29) induced greater liposome membranes disruption than Cc-CATH3(1-29) regardless of lipid type and composition. The leakage results of Cc-CATH3(1-29) share a similar trend with that in Cc-CATH3(5-29); they exhibit no preferential binding to anionic phospholipids. In conclusion, the results suggested that the first four residues at the N-terminus "RVRR" is not essential for presenting all test activities. In contrast, residues five to eight of "FWPL" are necessary as the exclusion of this short motif in Cc-CATH3(9-29) and Cc-CATH3(13-29) leads to a loss of activities. This study will be beneficial for further design and development of Cc-CATH3 to be novel antibiotic.

  3. N-terminal guanidinylation of TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe) peptides results in major changes of the opioid activity profile.

    PubMed

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Chung, Nga N; Wilkes, Brian C; Schiller, Peter W

    2013-09-15

    Derivatives of peptides of the TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe; Tic=1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) family containing a guanidino (Guan) function in place of the N-terminal amino group were synthesized in an effort to improve their blood-brain barrier permeability. Unexpectedly, N-terminal amidination significantly altered the in vitro opioid activity profiles. Guan-analogues of TIPP-related δ opioid antagonists showed δ partial agonist or mixed δ partial agonist/μ partial agonist activity. Guanidinylation of the mixed μ agonist/δ antagonists H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) and H-Dmt-TicΨ[CH2NH]Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2[Ψ]) converted them to mixed μ agonist/δ agonists. A docking study revealed distinct positioning of DIPP-NH2 and Guan-DIPP-NH2 in the δ receptor binding site. Lys(3)-analogues of DIPP-NH2 and DIPP-NH2[Ψ] (guanidinylated or non-guanidinylated) turned out to be mixed μ/κ agonists with δ antagonist-, δ partial agonist- or δ full agonist activity. Compounds with some of the observed mixed opioid activity profiles have therapeutic potential as analgesics with reduced side effects or for treatment of cocaine addiction.

  4. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  5. Role of c-Jun in cellular sensitivity to the microtubule inhibitor vinblastine.

    PubMed

    Obey, Toria B; Lyle, Christopher S; Chambers, Timothy C

    2005-10-01

    The role of c-Jun in the apoptotic response of cells to the microtubule inhibitor vinblastine was investigated using fibroblasts lacking or overexpressing c-Jun. c-Jun null cells were found to be more sensitive than wild-type cells at low (1-3 nM) concentrations of vinblastine, but showed essentially identical apoptotic responses as wild-type cells at a higher concentration of 10nM. In contrast, c-Jun overexpressing cells were highly vinblastine-resistant, with an IC50 of 12-fold greater than wild-type cells. The fate of cells exposed to lethal concentrations of vinblastine was examined by propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. All cell types appeared to undergo mitotic arrest prior to apoptosis. Apoptosis of wild-type cells was associated with significant DNA re-replication. In contrast, DNA re-replication was much less prominent in vinblastine-treated c-Jun null cells and absent during apoptosis of c-Jun overexpressing cells. These results suggest that c-Jun plays a key role in the cellular sensitivity to vinblastine. In addition, c-Jun appears to regulate the pathway to cell death following mitotic arrest.

  6. Evidence of mineralization activity and supramolecular assembly by the N-terminal sequence of ACCBP, a biomineralization protein that is homologous to the acetylcholine binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Amos, Fairland F; Ndao, Moise; Evans, John Spencer

    2009-12-14

    Several biomineralization proteins that exhibit intrinsic disorder also possess sequence regions that are homologous to nonmineral associated folded proteins. One such protein is the amorphous calcium carbonate binding protein (ACCBP), one of several proteins that regulate the formation of the oyster shell and exhibit 30% conserved sequence identity to the acetylcholine binding protein sequences. To gain a better understanding of the ACCBP protein, we utilized bioinformatic approaches to identify the location of disordered and folded regions within this protein. In addition, we synthesized a 50 AA polypeptide, ACCN, representing the N-terminal domain of the mature processed ACCBP protein. We then utilized this polypeptide to determine the mineralization activity and qualitative structure of the N-terminal region of ACCBP. Our bioinformatic studies indicate that ACCBP consists of a ten-stranded beta-sandwich structure that includes short disordered sequence blocks, two of which reside within the primarily helical and surface-accessible ACCN sequence. Circular dichroism studies reveal that ACCN is partially disordered in solution; however, ACCN can be induced to fold into an alpha helix in the presence of TFE. Furthermore, we confirm that the ACCN sequence is multifunctional; this sequence promotes radial calcite polycrystal growth on Kevlar threads and forms supramolecular assemblies in solution that contain amorphous-appearing deposits. We conclude that the partially disordered ACCN sequence is a putative site for mineralization activity within the ACCBP protein and that the presence of short disordered sequence regions within the ACCBP fold are essential for function.

  7. FRA1 promotes squamous cell carcinoma growth and metastasis through distinct AKT and c-Jun dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Wu, Joseph; Luo, Suju; Lechler, Terry; Zhang, Jennifer Y

    2016-06-01

    FRA1 (Fos-like antigen 1) is highly expressed in many epithelial cancers including squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (cSCC) and head and neck (HNSCC). However, the functional importance and the mechanisms mediating FRA1 function in these cancers are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that FRA1 gene silencing in HNSCC and cSCC cells resulted in two consequences - impaired cell proliferation and migration. FRA1 regulation of cell growth was distinct from that of c-Jun, a prominent Jun group AP-1 factor. While c-Jun was required for the expression of the G1/S phase cell cycle promoter CDK4, FRA1 was essential for AKT activation and AKT-dependent expression of CyclinB1, a molecule required for G2-M progression. Exogenous expression of a constitutively active form of AKT rescued cancer cell growth defect caused by FRA1-loss. Additionally, FRA1 knockdown markedly slowed cell adhesion and migration, and conversely expression of an active FRA1 mutant (FRA1DD) expedited these processes in a JNK/c-Jun-dependent manner. Through protein and ChIP-PCR analyses, we identified KIND1, a cytoskeletal regulator of the cell adhesion molecule β1-integrin, as a novel FRA1 transcriptional target. Restoring KIND1 expression rescued migratory defects induced by FRA1 loss. In agreement with these in vitro data, HNSCC cells with FRA1 loss displayed markedly reduced rates of subcutaneous tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Together, these results indicate that FRA1 promotes cancer growth through AKT, and enhances cancer cell migration through JNK/c-Jun, pinpointing FRA1 as a key integrator of JNK and AKT signaling pathways and a potential therapeutic target for cSCC and HNSCC.

  8. FRA1 promotes squamous cell carcinoma growth and metastasis through distinct AKT and c-Jun dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Wu, Joseph; Luo, Suju; Lechler, Terry; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2016-01-01

    FRA1 (Fos-like antigen 1) is highly expressed in many epithelial cancers including squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (cSCC) and head and neck (HNSCC). However, the functional importance and the mechanisms mediating FRA1 function in these cancers are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that FRA1 gene silencing in HNSCC and cSCC cells resulted in two consequences – impaired cell proliferation and migration. FRA1 regulation of cell growth was distinct from that of c-Jun, a prominent Jun group AP-1 factor. While c-Jun was required for the expression of the G1/S phase cell cycle promoter CDK4, FRA1 was essential for AKT activation and AKT-dependent expression of CyclinB1, a molecule required for G2-M progression. Exogenous expression of a constitutively active form of AKT rescued cancer cell growth defect caused by FRA1-loss. Additionally, FRA1 knockdown markedly slowed cell adhesion and migration, and conversely expression of an active FRA1 mutant (FRA1DD) expedited these processes in a JNK/c-Jun-dependent manner. Through protein and ChIP-PCR analyses, we identified KIND1, a cytoskeletal regulator of the cell adhesion molecule β1-integrin, as a novel FRA1 transcriptional target. Restoring KIND1 expression rescued migratory defects induced by FRA1 loss. In agreement with these in vitro data, HNSCC cells with FRA1 loss displayed markedly reduced rates of subcutaneous tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Together, these results indicate that FRA1 promotes cancer growth through AKT, and enhances cancer cell migration through JNK/c-Jun, pinpointing FRA1 as a key integrator of JNK and AKT signaling pathways and a potential therapeutic target for cSCC and HNSCC. PMID:27144339

  9. Bile acid regulates c-Jun expression through the orphan nuclear receptor SHP induction in gastric cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Il; Park, Min Jung; An, Jin Kwang; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Cheong, JaeHun Yang, Ung Suk

    2008-05-02

    Bile reflux is considered to be one of the most important causative factors in gastric carcinogenesis, due to the attendant inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we have assessed the molecular mechanisms inherent to the contribution of bile acid to the transcriptional regulation of inflammatory-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated that bile acid induced the expression of the SHP orphan nuclear receptor at the transcriptional level via c-Jun activation. Bile acid also enhanced the protein interaction of NF-{kappa}B and SHP, thereby resulting in an increase in c-Jun expression and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF{alpha}. These results indicate that bile acid performs a critical function in the regulation of the induction of inflammatory-related genes in gastric cells, and that bile acid-mediated gene expression provides a pre-clue for the development of gastric cellular malformation.

  10. Neurotoxicity and other pharmacological activities of the snake venom phospholipase A2 OS2: The N-terminal region is more important than enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rouault, Morgane; Rash, Lachlan D.; Escoubas, Pierre; Boilard, Eric; Bollinger, James; Lomonte, Bruno; Maurin, Thomas; Guillaume, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Schrével, Joseph; Doglio, Alain; Gutiérrez, José María; Lazdunski, Michel; Gelb, Michael H.; Lambeau, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    Several snake venom secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) including OS2 exert a variety of pharmacological effects ranging from central neurotoxicity to anti-HIV activity by mechanisms that are not yet fully understood. To conclusively address the role of enzymatic activity and map the key structural elements of OS2 responsible for its pharmacological properties, we have prepared single point OS2 mutants at the catalytic site and large chimeras between OS2 and OS1, an homologous but non toxic sPLA2. Most importantly, we found that the enzymatic activity of the active site mutant H48Q is 500-fold lower than that of the wild-type protein, while central neurotoxicity is only 16-fold lower, providing convincing evidence that catalytic activity is at most a minor factor that determines central neurotoxicity. The chimera approach has identified the N-terminal region (residues 1–22) of OS2, but not the central one (residues 58–89), as crucial for both enzymatic activity and pharmacological effects. The C-terminal region of OS2 (residues 102–119) was found to be critical for enzymatic activity, but not for central neurotoxicity and anti-HIV activity, allowing us to further dissociate enzymatic activity and pharmacological effects. Finally, direct binding studies with the C-terminal chimera which poorly binds to phospholipids while it is still neurotoxic, led to the identification of a subset of brain N-type receptors which may be directly involved in central neurotoxicity. PMID:16669624

  11. Fibroin and Sericin from Bombyx mori Silk Stimulate Cell Migration through Upregulation and Phosphorylation of c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    García-Vizcaíno, Eva María; Alcaraz, Antonia; Cenis, José Luis; Nicolás, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a biological process directed to the restoration of tissue that has suffered an injury. An important phase of wound healing is the generation of a basal epithelium able to wholly replace the epidermis of the wound. A broad range of products derived from fibroin and sericin from Bombyx mori silk are used to stimulate wound healing. However, so far the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been elucidated. The aim of this work was to determine the molecular basis underlying wound healing properties of silk proteins using a cell model. For this purpose, we assayed fibroin and sericin in a wound healing scratch assay using MDA-MB-231 and Mv1Lu cells. Both proteins stimulated cell migration. Furthermore, treatment with sericin and fibroin involved key factors of the wound healing process such as upregulation of c-Jun and c-Jun protein phosphorylation. Moreover, fibroin and sericin stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and JNK 1/2 kinases. All these experiments were done in the presence of specific inhibitors for some of the cell signalling pathways referred above. The obtained results revealed that MEK, JNK and PI3K pathways are involved in fibroin and sericin stimulated cells migration. Inhibition of these three kinases prevented c-Jun upregulation and phosphorylation by fibroin or sericin. Fibroin and sericin were tested in the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, with similar results. Altogether, our results showed that fibroin and sericin initiate cell migration by activating the MEK, JNK and PI3K signalling pathways ending in c-Jun activation. PMID:22860103

  12. Role of TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Girish; Vu, Trung; Jin, Lin; Samanta, Debangshu; Datta, Pran K

    2016-10-01

    Claudin-4 has been identified as an integral member of tight junctions and has been found to be upregulated in various types of cancers especially in metastatic cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of the upregulation of Claudin-4 and its role in lung tumorigenesis are unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of Claudin-4 on migration and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and to examine the regulatory effects of TGF-β on Claudin-4 expression. We have observed that TGF-β induces the expression of Claudin-4 dramatically in lung cell lines in a time dependent manner. TGF-β-induced Smad signaling is important for enhancing Claudin-4 mRNA level through inducing its promoter activity. Treatment with curcumin, a c-Jun inhibitor, or stable knockdown of c-Jun abrogates TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression suggesting an involvement of the c-Jun pathway. Notably, TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun pathway plays a role in TGF-β-mediated motility and tumorigenicity of these cells. In support of these observations, we have uncovered that Claudin-4 is upregulated in 14 of 24 (58%) lung tumors when compared with normal lung tissue. This is the first study to show how TGF-β regulates the expression of Claudin-4 through c-Jun signaling and how this pathway contributes to the migratory and tumorigenic phenotype of lung tumor cells. PMID:27424491

  13. Voxel-based analysis of the immediate early gene, c-jun, in the honey bee brain after a sucrose stimulus.

    PubMed

    McNeill, M S; Robinson, G E

    2015-06-01

    Immediate early genes (IEGs) have served as useful markers of brain neuronal activity in mammals, and more recently in insects. The mammalian canonical IEG, c-jun, is part of regulatory pathways conserved in insects and has been shown to be responsive to alarm pheromone in honey bees. We tested whether c-jun was responsive in honey bees to another behaviourally relevant stimulus, sucrose, in order to further identify the brain regions involved in sucrose processing. To identify responsive regions, we developed a new method of voxel-based analysis of c-jun mRNA expression. We found that c-jun is expressed in somata throughout the brain. It was rapidly induced in response to sucrose stimuli, and it responded in somata near the antennal and mechanosensory motor centre, mushroom body calices and lateral protocerebrum, which are known to be involved in sucrose processing. c-jun also responded to sucrose in somata near the lateral suboesophageal ganglion, dorsal optic lobe, ventral optic lobe and dorsal posterior protocerebrum, which had not been previously identified by other methods. These results demonstrate the utility of voxel-based analysis of mRNA expression in the insect brain.

  14. Role of TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Girish; Vu, Trung; Jin, Lin; Samanta, Debangshu; Datta, Pran K

    2016-10-01

    Claudin-4 has been identified as an integral member of tight junctions and has been found to be upregulated in various types of cancers especially in metastatic cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of the upregulation of Claudin-4 and its role in lung tumorigenesis are unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of Claudin-4 on migration and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and to examine the regulatory effects of TGF-β on Claudin-4 expression. We have observed that TGF-β induces the expression of Claudin-4 dramatically in lung cell lines in a time dependent manner. TGF-β-induced Smad signaling is important for enhancing Claudin-4 mRNA level through inducing its promoter activity. Treatment with curcumin, a c-Jun inhibitor, or stable knockdown of c-Jun abrogates TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression suggesting an involvement of the c-Jun pathway. Notably, TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun pathway plays a role in TGF-β-mediated motility and tumorigenicity of these cells. In support of these observations, we have uncovered that Claudin-4 is upregulated in 14 of 24 (58%) lung tumors when compared with normal lung tissue. This is the first study to show how TGF-β regulates the expression of Claudin-4 through c-Jun signaling and how this pathway contributes to the migratory and tumorigenic phenotype of lung tumor cells.

  15. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action.

  16. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action. PMID:7274610

  17. The N-terminal hybrid binding domain of RNase HI from Thermotoga maritima is important for substrate binding and Mg2+-dependent activity.

    PubMed

    Jongruja, Nujarin; You, Dong-Ju; Kanaya, Eiko; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2010-11-01

    Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease H (RNase H) I (Tma-RNase HI) contains a hybrid binding domain (HBD) at the N-terminal region. To analyze the role of this HBD, Tma-RNase HI, Tma-W22A with the single mutation at the HBD, the C-terminal RNase H domain (Tma-CD) and the N-terminal domain containing the HBD (Tma-ND) were overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Tma-RNase HI prefers Mg(2+) to Mn(2+) for activity, and specifically loses most of the Mg(2+)-dependent activity on removal of the HBD and 87% of it by the mutation at the HBD. Tma-CD lost the ability to suppress the RNase H deficiency of an E. coli rnhA mutant, indicating that the HBD is responsible for in vivo RNase H activity. The cleavage-site specificities of Tma-RNase HI are not significantly changed on removal of the HBD, regardless of the metal cofactor. Binding analyses of the proteins to the substrate using surface plasmon resonance indicate that the binding affinity of Tma-RNase HI is greatly reduced on removal of the HBD or the mutation. These results indicate that there is a correlation between Mg(2+)-dependent activity and substrate binding affinity. Tma-CD was as stable as Tma-RNase HI, indicating that the HBD is not important for stability. The HBD of Tma-RNase HI is important not only for substrate binding, but also for Mg(2+)-dependent activity, probably because the HBD affects the interaction between the substrate and enzyme at the active site, such that the scissile phosphate group of the substrate and the Mg(2+) ion are arranged ideally.

  18. HDAC inhibitors suppress c-Jun/Fra-1-mediated proliferation through transcriptionally downregulating MKK7 and Raf1 in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaomei; Xia, Yong; He, Guozhen; Min, Zhiqun; Li, Chun; Xiong, Shiqiu; Shi, Zhi; Lu, Yongjian; Yuan, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a transcriptional factor composed of the dimeric members of bZIP proteins, which are frequently deregulated in human cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to identify an oncogenic AP-1 dimer critical for the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells and to investigate whether histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), a new generation of anticancer agents, could target the AP-1 dimer. We report here that HDACIs including trichostatin A, suberoylanilidehydroxamic acid, valproic acid and M344 can transcriptionally suppress both c-Jun and Fra-1, preceding their inhibition of cell growth. c-Jun preferentially interacting with Fra-1 as a heterodimer is responsible for AP-1 activity and critical for cell growth. Mechanistically, HDACIs suppress Fra-1 expression through transcriptionally downregulating Raf1 and subsequently decreasing MEK1/2-ERK1/2 activity. Unexpectedly, HDACI treatment caused MKK7 downregulation at both the protein and mRNA levels. Deletion analysis of the 5′-flanking sequence of the MKK7 gene revealed that a major element responsible for the downregulation by HDACI is located at −149 to −3 relative to the transcriptional start site. Knockdown of MKK7 but not MKK4 remarkably decreased JNK/c-Jun activity and proliferation, whereas ectopic MKK7-JNK1 reversed HDACI-induced c-Jun suppression. Furthermore, suppression of both MKK-7/c-Jun and Raf-1/Fra-1 activities was involved in the tumor growth inhibitory effects induced by SAHA in SH-SY5Y xenograft mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that c-Jun/Fra-1 dimer is critical for neuroblastoma cell growth and that HDACIs act as effective suppressors of the two oncogenes through transcriptionally downregulating MKK7 and Raf1. PMID:26734995

  19. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata; Aumercier, Marc; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Tyagi, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  20. Identifying the activation motif in the N-terminal of rainbow trout and zebrafish melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein 1 (MRAP1) orthologs.

    PubMed

    Dores, Robert M; Liang, Liang; Hollmann, Rebecca E; Sandhu, Navdeep; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2016-08-01

    The activation of mammalian melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R) orthologs is dependent on a four-amino acid activation motif (LDYL/I) located in the N-terminal of mammalian MRAP1 (melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein). Previous alanine substitution analysis had shown that the Y residue in this motif appears to be the most important for mediating the activation of mammalian MC2R orthologs. Similar, but not identical amino acid motifs were detected in rainbow trout MRAP1 (YDYL) and zebrafish MRAP1 (YDYV). To determine the importance of these residues in the putative activation motifs, rainbow trout and zebrafish MRAP1 orthologs were individually co-expressed in CHO cells with rainbow trout MC2R, and the activation of this receptor with either the wild-type MRAP1 ortholog or alanine-substituted analogs of the two teleost MRAP1s was analyzed. Alanine substitutions at all four amino acid positions in rainbow trout MRAP1 blocked activation of the rainbow trout MC2R. Single alanine substitutions of the D and Y residues in rainbow trout and zebrafish MRAP1 indicate that these two residues play a significant role in the activation of rainbow trout MC2R. These observations indicate that there are subtle differences in the way that teleost and mammalian MRAPs are involved in the activation of their corresponding MC2R orthologs.

  1. c-jun gene expression in human cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Horio, M.; Huberman, E.

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and protein kinase C (PKC) in radiation- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-evoked c-jun gene expression in human HL-205 cells. This induction of c-jun gene expression could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with Nacetylcysteine (an antioxidant) or H7 (a PKC and PKA inhibitor) but not by HA1004, a PKA inhibitor, suggesting a role for ROls and PKC in mediating c-jun gene expression. We also investigated potential differences in c-jun gene expression in a panel of normal and tumor cells untreated or treated with ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Treatment with radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced a varied response, from some reduction to an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA. These data indicate that although induction of c-jun may be a common response to ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, this response was reduced or absent in some cell types.

  2. Differential phosphorylation of c-Jun and JunD in response to the epidermal growth factor is determined by the structure of MAPK targeting sequences.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Maria; Vivacqua, Adele; Fasanella, Giovanna; Gallo, Adriana; Cuozzo, Concetta; Morano, Annalisa; Maggiolini, Marcello; Musti, Anna Maria

    2004-03-01

    MAPK phosphorylation of various substrates is mediated by the presence of docking sites, including the D domain and the DEF motif. Depending on the number and sequences of these domains, substrates are phosphorylated by specific subsets of MAPKs. For example, a D domain targets JNK to c-Jun, whereas a DEF motif is required for ERK phosphorylation of c-Fos. JunD, in contrast, contains both D and DEF domains. Here we show that these motifs mediate JunD phosphorylation in response to either ERK or JNK activation. An intact D domain is required for phosphorylation and activation of JunD by both subtypes of MAPK. The DEF motif acts together with the D domain to elicit efficient phosphorylation of JunD in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) but has no function on JunD phosphorylation and activation by JNK signaling. Furthermore, we show that conversion of a c-Jun sequence to a canonical DEF domain, as it is present in JunD, elicits c-Jun activation in response to EGF. Our results suggest that evolution of a particular modular system of MAPK targeting sequences has determined a differential response of JunD and c-Jun to ERK activation. PMID:14676207

  3. A multilayered regulatory mechanism for the autoinhibition and activation of a plant CC-NB-LRR resistance protein with an extra N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhu, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Wenyang; Li, Jia; Wu, Jianyan; Li, Chun; Bai, Baohui; Lu, Gang; Chen, Hongyu; Moffett, Peter; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-10-01

    The tomato resistance protein Sw-5b differs from the classical coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) resistance proteins by having an extra N-terminal domain (NTD). To understand how NTD, CC and NB-LRR regulate autoinhibition and activation of Sw-5b, we dissected the function(s) of each domain. When viral elicitor was absent, Sw-5b LRR suppressed the central NB-ARC to maintain autoinhibition of the NB-LRR segment. The CC and NTD domains independently and additively enhanced the autoinhibition of NB-LRR. When viral elicitor was present, the NB-LRR segment of Sw-5b was specifically activated to trigger a hypersensitive response. Surprisingly, Sw-5b CC suppressed the activation of NB-LRR, whereas the extra NTD of Sw-5b became a positive regulator and fully activated the resistance protein, probably by relieving the inhibitory effects of the CC. In infection assays of transgenic plants, the NB-LRR segment alone was insufficient to confer resistance against Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus; the layers of NTD and CC regulation on NB-LRR were required for Sw-5b to confer resistance. Based on these findings, we propose that, to counter the negative regulation of the CC on NB-LRR, Sw-5b evolved an extra NTD to coordinate with the CC, thus developing a multilayered regulatory mechanism to control autoinhibition and activation.

  4. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase's properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca(2+) were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center. PMID:26926401

  5. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase’s properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca2+ were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center. PMID:26926401

  6. A multilayered regulatory mechanism for the autoinhibition and activation of a plant CC-NB-LRR resistance protein with an extra N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhu, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Wenyang; Li, Jia; Wu, Jianyan; Li, Chun; Bai, Baohui; Lu, Gang; Chen, Hongyu; Moffett, Peter; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-10-01

    The tomato resistance protein Sw-5b differs from the classical coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) resistance proteins by having an extra N-terminal domain (NTD). To understand how NTD, CC and NB-LRR regulate autoinhibition and activation of Sw-5b, we dissected the function(s) of each domain. When viral elicitor was absent, Sw-5b LRR suppressed the central NB-ARC to maintain autoinhibition of the NB-LRR segment. The CC and NTD domains independently and additively enhanced the autoinhibition of NB-LRR. When viral elicitor was present, the NB-LRR segment of Sw-5b was specifically activated to trigger a hypersensitive response. Surprisingly, Sw-5b CC suppressed the activation of NB-LRR, whereas the extra NTD of Sw-5b became a positive regulator and fully activated the resistance protein, probably by relieving the inhibitory effects of the CC. In infection assays of transgenic plants, the NB-LRR segment alone was insufficient to confer resistance against Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus; the layers of NTD and CC regulation on NB-LRR were required for Sw-5b to confer resistance. Based on these findings, we propose that, to counter the negative regulation of the CC on NB-LRR, Sw-5b evolved an extra NTD to coordinate with the CC, thus developing a multilayered regulatory mechanism to control autoinhibition and activation. PMID:27558751

  7. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Antimicrobial Peptide Arasin 1 — And Mode of Action Studies of the N-Terminal, Proline-Rich Region

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Victoria S.; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Benincasa, Monica; Haug, Tor; Eksteen, Jacobus J.; Styrvold, Olaf B.; Scocchi, Marco; Stensvåg, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1–23) was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1–23) were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1–23) was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1–23) was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), arasin 1(1–23) was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1–23) has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1–23) involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC. PMID:23326415

  8. Strong and prolonged induction of c-jun and c-fos proto-oncogenes by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Kick, G.; Messer, G.; Plewig, G.; Kind, P.; Goetz, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently under investigation in phase II and III clinical studies for the treatment of tumours in superficial localisations. Thus far, the underlying mechanisms of PDT regarding cellular responses and gene regulation are poorly understood. Photochemically generated singlet oxygen (1O2) is mainly responsible for cytotoxicity induced by PDT. If targeted cells are not disintegrated, photo-oxidative stress leads to transcription and translation of various stress response and cytokine genes. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, interleukin (IL) 1 and IL-6 are strongly induced by photodynamic treatment, supporting inflammatory action and immunological anti-tumour responses. To investigate the first steps of gene activation, this study focused on the proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos, both coding for the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1), which was found to mediate IL-6 gene expression. We here determine the effects of photodynamic treatment on transcriptional regulation and DNA binding of transcription factor AP-1 in order to understand the modulation of subsequent regulatory steps. Photodynamic treatment of epithelial HeLa cells was performed by incubation with Photofrin and illumination with 630 nm laser light in vitro. Expression of the c-jun and c-fos genes was determined by way of Northern blot analysis, and DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor AP-1 was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Photofrin-mediated photosensitisation of HeLa cells resulted in a rapid and dose-dependent induction of both genes but preferential expression of c-jun. Compared with the transient expression of c-jun and c-fos by phorbol ester stimulation, photodynamic treatment led to a prolonged activation pattern of both immediate early genes. Furthermore, mRNA stability studies revealed an increased half-life of c-jun and c-fos transcripts resulting from photosensitisation. Although mRNA accumulation after PDT was

  9. Parathyroid hormone induces c-fos and c-jun messenger RNA in rat osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    PTH is a potent regulator of osteoblast gene expression, yet the nuclear events that mediate PTH action are poorly understood. We were interested in identifying immediate early genes which may regulate PTH-altered gene expression in the osteoblast. Therefore, we examined the effects of PTH on c-fos and c-jun gene expression in a rat osteoblastic cell line (UMR 106-01). Under control conditions, c-fos and c-jun mRNAs were present at low basal levels. After PTH treatment, c-fos mRNA abundance dramatically increased, with a maximal and transient response at 30 min. PTH also stimulated an increase in c-jun mRNA, but in a biphasic manner, with maximal levels at 30 min and 2 h. These responses were dose dependent, not altered by cotreatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and preceded PTH-induced expression of matrix metallo-proteinase-1 mRNA. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of c-fos and c-jun transcription after PTH exposure. To determine the signal transduction pathways involved, second messenger analogs were tested for their ability to mimic the effects of PTH. 8-Bromo-cAMP and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused increases in the abundance of c-fos and c-jun transcripts. Ionomycin had no effect on the expression of these genes. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA resulted in a decrease in basal c-jun expression, but did not alter the PTH-mediated increase in c-fos, c-jun, or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. N-terminal domain of Bothrops asper Myotoxin II Enhances the Activity of Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 and Neprilysin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A. Ian; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W.; Kleifeld, Oded; Lomonte, Bruno; Sikanyika, Nkumbu L.; Spicer, Alexander J.; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Conroy, Paul J.; Small, David H.; Kaye, David M.; Parkington, Helena C.; Whisstock, James C.; Kuruppu, Sanjaya

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) and endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) are two enzymes that degrade amyloid beta in the brain. Currently there are no molecules to stimulate the activity of these enzymes. Here we report, the discovery and characterisation of a peptide referred to as K49-P1-20, from the venom of Bothrops asper which directly enhances the activity of both ECE-1 and NEP. This is evidenced by a 2- and 5-fold increase in the Vmax of ECE-1 and NEP respectively. The K49-P1-20 concentration required to achieve 50% of maximal stimulation (AC50) of ECE-1 and NEP was 1.92 ± 0.07 and 1.33 ± 0.12 μM respectively. Using BLITZ biolayer interferometry we have shown that K49-P1-20 interacts directly with each enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence of the enzymes change in the presence of K49-P1-20 suggesting a change in conformation. ECE-1 mediated reduction in the level of endogenous soluble amyloid beta 42 in cerebrospinal fluid is significantly higher in the presence of K49-P1-20 (31 ± 4% of initial) compared with enzyme alone (11 ± 5% of initial; N = 8, P = 0.005, unpaired t-test). K49-P1-20 could be an excellent research tool to study mechanism(s) of enzyme stimulation, and a potential novel drug lead in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26931059

  11. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Jeong, Jieun; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  12. c-Jun/AP-1 pathway-mediated cyclin D1 expression participates in low dose arsenite-induced transformation in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongyun; Li Jingxia; Gao Jimin; Huang Chuanshu

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen associated with skin carcinogenesis. Our previous work reveals that arsenite exposure is able to induce cell transformation in mouse epidermal cell JB6 Cl41 through the activation of ERK, rather than JNK pathway. Our current studies further evaluate downstream pathway in low dose arsenite-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells. Our results showed that treatment of cells with low dose arsenite induced activation of c-Jun/AP-1 pathway, and ectopic expression of dominant negative mutant of c-Jun (TAM67) blocked arsenite-induced transformation. Furthermore, our data indicated that cyclin D1 was an important downstream molecule involved in c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure, because inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by its specific siRNA in the JB6 Cl41 cells resulted in impairment of anchorage-independent growth of cells induced by low dose arsenite. Collectively, our results demonstrate that c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cyclin D1 expression is at least one of the key events implicated in cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure.

  13. A novel antimicrobial peptide derived from modified N-terminal domain of bovine lactoferrin: design, synthesis, activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria and Candida.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Biswajit; Leishangthem, Geeta Devi; Gill, Kamaldeep; Singh, Abhay K; Das, Swagata; Singh, Kusum; Xess, Immaculata; Dinda, Amit; Kapil, Arti; Patro, Ishan K; Dey, Sharmistha

    2013-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is believed to contribute to the host's defense against microbial infections. This work focuses on the antibacterial and antifungal activities of a designed peptide, L10 (WFRKQLKW) by modifying the first eight N-terminal residues of bovine LF by selective homologous substitution of amino acids on the basis of hydrophobicity, L10 has shown potent antibacterial and antifungal properties against clinically isolated extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL), producing gram-negative bacteria as well as Candida strains with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1 to 8 μg/mL and 6.5 μg/mL, respectively. The peptide was found to be least hemolytic at a concentration of 800 μg/mL. Interaction with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipid A (LA) suggests that the peptide targets the membrane of gram-negative bacteria. The membrane interactive nature of the peptide, both antibacterial and antifungal, was further confirmed by visual observations employing electron microscopy. Further analyses, by means of propidium iodide based flow cytometry, also supported the membrane permeabilization of Candida cells. The peptide was also found to possess anti-inflammatory properties, by virtue of its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). L10 therefore emerges as a potential therapeutic remedial solution for infections caused by ESBL positive, gram-negative bacteria and multidrug-resistant (MDR) fungal strains, on account of its multifunctional activities. This study may open up new approach to develop and design novel antimicrobials. PMID:23026014

  14. Transformation by Raf and other oncogenes renders cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative c-jun mutant.

    PubMed

    Rapp, U R; Troppmair, J; Beck, T; Birrer, M J

    1994-12-01

    In NIH3T3 cells expressing active Raf-1 protein serine/threonine kinase (PSK) c-jun expression is constitutive while c-fos expression is attenuated. This alteration prompted us to determine whether oncogene transformation would render cells differentially sensitive to growth inhibition by a dominant negative mutant of c-jun, TAM 67. Growth inhibition was observed in three types of assays: (1) transfection of TAM 67 into cells stably transformed by a variety of oncogenes, (2) cotransfection of TAM 67 with oncogene expression plasmids into NIH3T3 cells and (3) titration of oncogene-expressing retroviruses on cells stably expressing TAM 67. The results clearly demonstrate that Raf-1 dependent oncogenes, which include receptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs)-, intracellular PTKs- and Ras-derived genes share the Raf phenotype of constitutive c-jun expression, attenuated c-fos induction, and high sensitivity to growth suppression by TAM 67. Additionally, the intracellular PSK oncogene, mos and the nuclear oncogenes c-myc, c-fos, and SV40 T antigen were TAM 67-sensitive for transformation. This universal pattern of altered growth regulation in oncogene transformed fibroblast cell lines highlights the potential usefulness of c-jun based inhibitors for control of tumor cell growth.

  15. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata; Aumercier, Marc; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. PMID:25265064

  16. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata; Aumercier, Marc; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling.

  17. Chaperone-like activities of different molecular forms of beta-casein. Importance of polarity of N-terminal hydrophilic domain.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Shchutskaya, Yulia Y; Zimny, Jaroslaw; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Muronetz, Vladimir I; Zuev, Yuriy F; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As a member of intrinsically unstructured protein family, beta-casein (beta-CN) contains relatively high amount of prolyl residues, adopts noncompact and flexible structure and exhibits chaperone-like activity in vitro. Like many chaperones, native beta-CN does not contain cysteinyl residues and exhibits strong tendencies for self-association. The chaperone-like activities of three recombinant beta-CNs wild type (WT) beta-CN, C4 beta-CN (with cysteinyl residue in position 4) and C208 beta-CN (with cysteinyl residue in position 208), expressed and purified from E. coli, which, consequently, lack the phosphorylated residues, were examined and compared with that of native beta-CN using insulin and alcohol dehydrogenase as target/substrate proteins. The dimers (beta-CND) of C4-beta-CN and C208 beta-CN were also studied and their chaperone-like activities were compared with those of their monomeric forms. Lacking phosphorylation, WT beta-CN, C208 beta-CN, C4 beta-CN and C4 beta-CND exhibited significantly lower chaperone-like activities than native beta-CN. Dimerization of C208 beta-CN with two distal hydrophilic domains considerably improved its chaperone-like activity in comparison with its monomeric form. The obtained results demonstrate the significant role played by the polar contributions of phosphorylated residues and N-terminal hydrophilic domain as important functional elements in enhancing the chaperone-like activity of native beta-CN. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 623-632, 2009.This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:19322774

  18. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  19. Three new structures of left-handed RADA helical filaments: structural flexibility of N-terminal domain is critical for recombinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lee, Chien-Der; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lin, Kuei-Ann; Chang, Chia-Seng; Wang, Andrew H-J; Wang, Ting-Fang

    2009-01-01

    RecA family proteins, including bacterial RecA, archaeal RadA, and eukaryotic Dmc1 and Rad51, mediate homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genome integrity. In the presence of ATP, these proteins bind a single-strand DNA to form a right-handed nucleoprotein filament, which catalyzes pairing and strand exchange with a homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), by as-yet unknown mechanisms. We recently reported a structure of RadA left-handed helical filament, and here present three new structures of RadA left-handed helical filaments. Comparative structural analysis between different RadA/Rad51 helical filaments reveals that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of RadA/Rad51, implicated in dsDNA binding, is highly flexible. We identify a hinge region between NTD and polymerization motif as responsible for rigid body movement of NTD. Mutant analysis further confirms that structural flexibility of NTD is essential for RadA's recombinase activity. These results support our previous hypothesis that ATP-dependent axial rotation of RadA nucleoprotein helical filament promotes homologous recombination.

  20. Upregulation of miR-21 in Cisplatin Resistant Ovarian Cancer via JNK-1/c-Jun Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría-Vargas, Ileabett M.; Valiyeva, Fatma; Vivas-Mejía, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin has been the most accepted drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer for almost 40 years. Although the majority of patients with ovarian cancer respond to front-line platinum combination chemotherapy, many patients will develop cisplatin-resistance disease, which is extremely rapid and fatal. Although various mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been postulated, the key molecules involved in such resistance have not been identified. MiRNAs are endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs, which are evolutionarily conserved and function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Dysregulation of miRNAs have been associated with cancer initiation, progression and drug resistance. The oncogenic miRNA-21, one of the best-studied miRNAs, is upregulated in almost all human cancers. However, the regulation of miR-21 in cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells has not been assessed. In this study, we measured the miR-21 expression by real-time PCR and found upregulation of miR-21 in cisplatin resistant compared with cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated the association of the c-Jun transcription factor to the pri-mir-21 DNA promoter regions. Blocking the JNK-1, the major activator of c-Jun phosphorylation, reduced the expression of pre-mir-21 and increased the expression of its well-known target gene, PDCD4. Overexpression of miR-21 in cisplatin sensitive cells decreased PDCD4 levels and increased cell proliferation. Finally, targeting miR-21 reduced cell growth, proliferation and invasion of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. These results suggest that the JNK-1/c-Jun/miR-21 pathway contributes to the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells and demonstrated that miR-21 is a plausible target to overcome cisplatin resistance. PMID:24865582

  1. The nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1 play additive roles with c-JUN through distinct elements on the mouse Star promoter.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2009-02-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein plays an essential role in steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. It is involved in the transport of cholesterol through the mitochondrial membrane where the first step of steroidogenesis occurs. Star gene expression in testicular Leydig cells is regulated by the pituitary LH through the cAMP signaling pathway. So far, several transcription factors have been implicated in the regulation of Star promoter activity in these cells. These include the nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1, AP-1 family members (particularly c-JUN), GATA4, C/EBPbeta, DLX5/6, and CREB. Some of these factors were also shown to act in a cooperative manner to further enhance Star promoter activity. Here, we report that NUR77 and c-JUN have additive effects on the Star promoter. These effects were abolished only when both elements, NUR77 at -95 bp and AP-1 at -78 bp, were mutated. Consistent with this, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NUR77 and c-JUN interact and that this interaction is mediated through part of the ligand binding domain of NUR77. Furthermore, we found that SF1 could cooperate with c-JUN on the mouse Star promoter but this cooperation involved different regulatory elements. Collectively, our data not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control mouse Star transcription in Leydig cells but also reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of NR4A1-dependent genes in tissues where NUR77 and c-JUN factors are co-expressed.

  2. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere. PMID:26831109

  3. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Samantha P.; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E.; White, Howard D.; Galkin, Vitold E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure–function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the “open” structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca2+ have been achieved. We suggest that Ca2+ modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere. PMID:26831109

  4. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  5. A novel function of B-cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1) in the regulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice via c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Deng, Jiali; Yu, Junjie; Guo, Yajie; Chen, Shanghai; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the major factors contributing to metabolic diseases, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. As an important cofactor, B-cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1) is involved in many physiologic processes; however, the direct effect of BTG1 on insulin sensitivity has not been described. In our study, BTG1 overexpression or knockdown improved or impaired insulin signaling in vitro, respectively. In addition, adenovirus-mediated BTG1 overexpression improved insulin sensitivity in wild-type (WT) and insulin-resistant leptin-receptor mutated (db/db) mice. In addition, transgenic BTG1-overexpressing mice were resistant to high-carbohydrate diet-induced insulin resistance. Adenovirus-mediated BTG1 knockdown consistently impaired insulin sensitivity in WT and insulin-sensitive leucine-deprived mice. Moreover, hepatic BTG1 expression was increased by leucine deprivation via the mammalian target of rapamycin/ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 pathway. Furthermore, c-Jun expression was up-regulated by BTG1, and adenovirus-mediated c-Jun knockdown blocked BTG1-improved insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Finally, BTG1 promoted c-Jun expression via stimulating c-Jun and retinoic acid receptor activities. Taken together, these results identify a novel function for BTG1 in the regulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity and provide important insights into the nutritional regulation of BTG1 expression.- Xiao, F., Deng, J., Yu, J., Guo, Y., Chen, S., Guo, F. A novel function of B-cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1) in the regulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice via c-Jun.

  6. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Attenuates Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression via c-Jun/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Na; Yang, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shao

    2015-11-01

    Scorpion venom has been used in the Orient to treat central nervous system diseases for many years, and the protein/peptide toxins in Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom are believed to be the effective components. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is an active component of the scorpion venom extracted from BmK. In a previous study, we found that SVHRP could inhibit the formation of a glial scar, which is characterized by enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, in the epileptic hippocampus. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be clarified. The results of the present study indicate that endogenous GFAP expression in primary rat astrocytes was attenuated by SVHRP. We further demonstrate that the suppression of GFAP was primarily mediated by inhibiting both c-Jun expression and its binding with AP-1 DNA binding site and other factors at the GFAP promoter. These results support that SVHRP contributes to reducing GFAP at least in part by decreasing the activity of the transcription factor AP-1. In conclusion, the effects of SVHRP on astrocytes with respect to the c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway in vitro provide a practical basis for studying astrocyte activation and inhibition and a scientific basis for further studies of traditional medicine.

  7. An N-terminal segment of the active component of the bacterial genotoxin cytolethal distending toxin B (CDTB) directs CDTB into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nishikubo, Shuichi; Ohara, Masaru; Ueno, Yoko; Ikura, Masae; Kurihara, Hidemi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi; Oswald, Eric; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2003-12-12

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, is a putative virulence factor in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. It is a cell cycle specific inhibitor at the G2/M transition. CDTB, one of the subunits of the CDT holotoxin, is implicated in a genotoxic role after entering the target cells, whereby chromosomal damage induces checkpoint phosphorylation cascades. CDTB microinjected into the cytoplasm was shown to localize in the nucleus and induce chromatin collapse. To investigate the molecular mechanism involved in nuclear transport of CDTB, we used transient expression and microinjection of a CDTB-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. After microinjection, His-tagged CDTB-GFP entered the nucleus in 3-4 h. Leptomycin B did not increase the speed of entry of the fusion protein, suggesting that the relatively slow entry of the fusion protein is not due to the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of the protein. Nuclear localization of the CDTBGFP was temperature-dependent. An in vitro transport assay demonstrated that the nuclear localization of CDTB is mediated by active transport. An assay using transient expression of a series of truncated CDTB-GFP fusion proteins revealed that residues 48-124 constitute the minimum region involved in nuclear transport of CDTB. A domain swapping experiment of the region involved in nuclear transport of CDTB with an SV40 T nuclear localization signal indicated that CDTB is composed of two domains, an N-terminal domain for nuclear transport and a C-terminal active domain. Our results strongly suggest that nuclear localization of CDTB is required for the holotoxin to induce cytodistension and cell cycle block. This is the first demonstration that a bacterial toxin possessing a unique domain for nuclear transport is transferred to the animal cell nucleus by active transport. PMID:12947116

  8. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  9. In vitro catalytic activity of N-terminal and C-terminal domains in NukM, the post-translational modification enzyme of nukacin ISK-1.

    PubMed

    Shimafuji, Chinatsu; Noguchi, Megumi; Nishie, Mami; Nagao, Jun-Ichi; Shioya, Kouki; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Lantibiotics are antibacterial peptides containing unique thioether cross-links termed lanthionine and methyllanthionine. NukM, the modifying enzyme of nukacin ISK-1, which is produced by Staphylococcus warneri ISK-1, catalyzes the dehydration of specific Ser/Thr residues in a precursor peptide, followed by conjugative addition of intramolecular Cys to dehydrated residues to generate a cyclic structure. By contrast, the precursor peptide of nisin is modified by 2 enzymes, NisB and NisC, which mediate dehydration and cyclization, respectively. While the C-terminal domain of NukM is homologous to NisC, the N-terminal domain has no homology with other known proteins. We expressed and characterized the N- and C-terminal domains of NukM, NukMN, and NukMC, separately. In vitro reconstitution revealed that full-length NukM fully modified the substrate peptide NukA. NukMN partially phosphorylated, dehydrated, and cyclized NukA. By contrast, NukMC did not catalyze dehydration, phosphorylation, or cyclization reactions. Interaction studies using surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that NukM and NukMN can bind NukA with high affinity, whereas NukMC has low substrate-recognition activity. These results suggest that NukMN is mainly responsible for substrate recognition and dehydration and that the whole NukM structure, including the C-terminal domain, is required for the complete modification of NukA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report providing insights into the in vitro catalytic activity of individual domains of a LanM-type modification enzyme. PMID:25971839

  10. Structural insights into the N-terminal GIY-YIG endonuclease activity of "Arabidopsis" glutaredoxin AtGRXS16 in chloroplasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) have been identified across taxa as important mediators in various physiological functions. A chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin, AtGRXS16 from "Arabidopsis thaliana", comprises two distinct functional domains, an N-terminal domain (NTD) with GlyIleTyr-TyrIleGly (GIY-YIG) endo...

  11. Structure, activity, and stability of metagenome-derived glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase with an N-terminal Ig-like domain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Kanaya, Eiko; Ozaki, Masashi; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A metagenome-derived glycoside hydrolase family 9 enzyme with an N-terminal immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain, leaf-branch compost (LC)-CelG, was characterized and its crystal structure was determined. LC-CelG did not hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl cellobioside but hydrolyzed CM-cellulose, indicating that it is endoglucanase. LC-CelG exhibited the highest activity at 70°C and >80% of the maximal activity at a broad pH range of 5-9. Its denaturation temperature was 81.4°C, indicating that LC-CelG is a thermostable enzyme. The structure of LC-CelG resembles those of CelD from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCelD), Cel9A from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (AaCel9A), and cellobiohydrolase CbhA from C. thermocellum (CtCbhA), which show relatively low (29-31%) amino acid sequence identities to LC-CelG. Three acidic active site residues are conserved as Asp194, Asp197, and Glu558 in LC-CelG. Ten of the thirteen residues that form the substrate binding pocket of AaCel9A are conserved in LC-CelG. Removal of the Ig-like domain reduced the activity and stability of LC-CelG by 100-fold and 6.3°C, respectively. Removal of the Gln40- and Asp99-mediated interactions between the Ig-like and catalytic domains destabilized LC-CelG by 5.0°C without significantly affecting its activity. These results suggest that the Ig-like domain contributes to the stabilization of LC-CelG mainly due to the Gln40- and Asp99-mediated interactions. Because the LC-CelG derivative lacking the Ig-like domain accumulated in Escherichia coli cells mostly in an insoluble form and this derivative accumulated in a soluble form exhibited very weak activity, the Ig-like domain may be required to make the conformation of the active site functional and prevent aggregation of the catalytic domain. PMID:25545469

  12. Structure, activity, and stability of metagenome-derived glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase with an N-terminal Ig-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Kanaya, Eiko; Ozaki, Masashi; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    A metagenome-derived glycoside hydrolase family 9 enzyme with an N-terminal immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain, leaf-branch compost (LC)-CelG, was characterized and its crystal structure was determined. LC-CelG did not hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl cellobioside but hydrolyzed CM-cellulose, indicating that it is endoglucanase. LC-CelG exhibited the highest activity at 70°C and >80% of the maximal activity at a broad pH range of 5–9. Its denaturation temperature was 81.4°C, indicating that LC-CelG is a thermostable enzyme. The structure of LC-CelG resembles those of CelD from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCelD), Cel9A from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (AaCel9A), and cellobiohydrolase CbhA from C. thermocellum (CtCbhA), which show relatively low (29–31%) amino acid sequence identities to LC-CelG. Three acidic active site residues are conserved as Asp194, Asp197, and Glu558 in LC-CelG. Ten of the thirteen residues that form the substrate binding pocket of AaCel9A are conserved in LC-CelG. Removal of the Ig-like domain reduced the activity and stability of LC-CelG by 100-fold and 6.3°C, respectively. Removal of the Gln40- and Asp99-mediated interactions between the Ig-like and catalytic domains destabilized LC-CelG by 5.0°C without significantly affecting its activity. These results suggest that the Ig-like domain contributes to the stabilization of LC-CelG mainly due to the Gln40- and Asp99-mediated interactions. Because the LC-CelG derivative lacking the Ig-like domain accumulated in Escherichia coli cells mostly in an insoluble form and this derivative accumulated in a soluble form exhibited very weak activity, the Ig-like domain may be required to make the conformation of the active site functional and prevent aggregation of the catalytic domain. PMID:25545469

  13. A motif within the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 specifically promotes the proangiogenic activity of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Juliana Vieira; Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Egot, Marion; Lokajczyk, Anna; Grelac, Françoise; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Juliano, Luiz; Le-Bonniec, Bernard; Takiya, Cristina Maeda; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Morandi, Verônica; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2012-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gives rise to fragments that have both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The TSP-HepI peptide (2.3 kDa), located in the N-terminal domain of TSP-1, has proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells. We have previously shown that TSP-1 itself exhibits a dual effect on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) by enhancing their adhesion through its TSP-HepI fragment while reducing their proliferation and differentiation into vascular tubes (tubulogenesis) in vitro. This effect is likely mediated through CD47 binding to the TSP-1 C-terminal domain. Here we investigated the effect of TSP-HepI peptide on the angiogenic properties of ECFC in vitro and in vivo. TSP-HepI peptide potentiated FGF-2-induced neovascularisation by enhancing ECFC chemotaxis and tubulogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. ECFC exposure to 20 μg/mL of TSP-HepI peptide for 18 h enhanced cell migration (p < 0.001 versus VEGF exposure), upregulated alpha 6-integrin expression, and enhanced their cell adhesion to activated endothelium under physiological shear stress conditions at levels comparable to those of SDF-1α. The adhesion enhancement appeared to be mediated by the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) syndecan-4, as ECFC adhesion was significantly reduced by a syndecan-4-neutralising antibody. ECFC migration and tubulogenesis were stimulated neither by a TSP-HepI peptide with a modified heparin-binding site (S/TSP-HepI) nor when the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) moieties were removed from the ECFC surface by enzymatic treatment. Ex vivo TSP-HepI priming could potentially serve to enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic neovascularisation with ECFC.

  14. A motif within the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 specifically promotes the proangiogenic activity of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Juliana Vieira; Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Egot, Marion; Lokajczyk, Anna; Grelac, Françoise; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Juliano, Luiz; Le-Bonniec, Bernard; Takiya, Cristina Maeda; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Morandi, Verônica; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2012-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gives rise to fragments that have both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The TSP-HepI peptide (2.3 kDa), located in the N-terminal domain of TSP-1, has proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells. We have previously shown that TSP-1 itself exhibits a dual effect on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) by enhancing their adhesion through its TSP-HepI fragment while reducing their proliferation and differentiation into vascular tubes (tubulogenesis) in vitro. This effect is likely mediated through CD47 binding to the TSP-1 C-terminal domain. Here we investigated the effect of TSP-HepI peptide on the angiogenic properties of ECFC in vitro and in vivo. TSP-HepI peptide potentiated FGF-2-induced neovascularisation by enhancing ECFC chemotaxis and tubulogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. ECFC exposure to 20 μg/mL of TSP-HepI peptide for 18 h enhanced cell migration (p < 0.001 versus VEGF exposure), upregulated alpha 6-integrin expression, and enhanced their cell adhesion to activated endothelium under physiological shear stress conditions at levels comparable to those of SDF-1α. The adhesion enhancement appeared to be mediated by the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) syndecan-4, as ECFC adhesion was significantly reduced by a syndecan-4-neutralising antibody. ECFC migration and tubulogenesis were stimulated neither by a TSP-HepI peptide with a modified heparin-binding site (S/TSP-HepI) nor when the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) moieties were removed from the ECFC surface by enzymatic treatment. Ex vivo TSP-HepI priming could potentially serve to enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic neovascularisation with ECFC. PMID:22796565

  15. Peptide-DNA conjugates as tailored bivalent binders of the oncoprotein c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Elena; Portela, Cecilia; Penas, Cristina; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-05-21

    We describe a ds-oligonucleotide-peptide conjugate that is able to efficiently dismount preformed DNA complexes of the bZIP regions of oncoproteins c-Fos and c-Jun (AP-1), and therefore might be useful as disrupters of AP-1-mediated gene expression pathways.

  16. Cancer/Testis Antigen PAGE4, a Regulator of c-Jun Transactivation, Is Phosphorylated by Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase 1, a Component of the Stress-Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4) is a cancer/testis antigen that is typically restricted to the testicular germ cells but is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Furthermore, PAGE4 is developmentally regulated with dynamic expression patterns in the developing prostate and is also a stress-response protein that is upregulated in response to cellular stress. PAGE4 interacts with c-Jun, which is activated by the stress-response kinase JNK1, and plays an important role in the development and pathology of the prostate gland. Here, we have identified homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 1 (HIPK1), also a component of the stress-response pathway, as a kinase that phosphorylates PAGE4 at T51. We show that phosphorylation of PAGE4 is critical for its transcriptional activity since mutating this T residue abolishes its ability to potentiate c-Jun transactivation. In vitro single molecule FRET indicates phosphorylation results in compaction of (still) intrinsically disordered PAGE4. Interestingly, however, while our previous observations indicated that the wild-type nonphosphorylated PAGE4 protein interacted with c-Jun [RajagopalanK. et al. (2014) Biochim, Biophys. Acta1842, 154−16324263171], here we show that phosphorylation of PAGE4 weakens its interaction with c-Jun in vitro. These data suggest that phosphorylation induces conformational changes in natively disordered PAGE4 resulting in its decreased affinity for c-Jun to promote interaction of c-Jun with another, unidentified, partner. Alternatively, phosphorylated PAGE4 may induce transcription of a novel partner, which then potentiates c-Jun transactivation. Regardless, the present results clearly implicate PAGE4 as a component of the stress-response pathway and uncover a novel link between components of this pathway and prostatic development and disease. PMID:24559171

  17. L-DOPA modulates cell viability through the ERK-c-Jun system in PC12 and dopaminergic neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun Hong; Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Park, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Myung Koo

    2016-02-01

    L-DOPA causes neurotoxicity by modulating the Epac-ERK system in PC12 cells. This study investigated the effects of a single treatment with L-DOPA and multiple treatments with L-DOPA (MT-LD) on ERK1/2 and JNK1/2-c-Jun systems. In PC12 cells, a toxic L-DOPA concentration (200 μM) induced sustained ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation that was inhibited by the Epac inhibitor brefeldin A, but not by the PKA inhibitor H89. This ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation was also inhibited by ERK1/2 (U0126) and JNK1/2 (SP600125) inhibitors, respectively, but sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not affected by JNK1/2 phosphorylation. A non-toxic L-DOPA concentration (20 μM) induced c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser73) via transient ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas the toxic L-DOPA concentration induced c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser63) and c-Jun expression via Epac-sustained ERK1/2-JNK1/2 phosphorylation, which then enhanced cleaved caspase-3 expression. MT-LD (20 μM) initially enhanced c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser73) (for 1-4 days), but later (5-6 days) induced c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser63) and c-Jun expression. In the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease, L-DOPA administration (10 mg/kg) protected against neurotoxicity through c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser73) for 1-2 weeks. However, L-DOPA administration (10 or 30 mg/kg) showed neurotoxicity through c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser63) and c-Jun expression via ERK1/2 phosphorylation for 3-4 weeks. Thus, in PC12 cells, non-toxic L-DOPA treatment maintained cell survival through c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser73). By contrast, toxic L-DOPA treatment or MT-LD (20 μM) induced c-Jun phosphorylation (Ser63) and c-Jun expression via Epac-dependent sustained ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation, which subsequently led to cell death. These results were validated by those obtained after long-term L-DOPA administration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Our data indicate that L-DOPA causes neurotoxicity via the ERK1/2-c-Jun system in

  18. Factor D of the alternative pathway of human complement. Purification, alignment and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major cyanogen bromide fragments, and localization of the serine residue at the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D M; Gagnon, J; Reid, K B

    1980-01-01

    The serine esterase factor D of the complement system was purified from outdated human plasma with a yield of 20% of the initial haemolytic activity found in serum. This represented an approx. 60 000-fold purification. The final product was homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (with an apparent mol.wt. of 24 000), its migration as a single component in a variety of fractionation procedures based on size and charge, and its N-terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 36 residues of the intact molecule was found to be homologous with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the catalytic chains of other serine esterases. Factor D showed an especially strong homology (greater than 60% identity) with rat 'group-specific protease' [Woodbury, Katunuma, Kobayashi, Titani, & Neurath (1978) Biochemistry 17, 811-819] over the first 16 amino acid residues. This similarity is of interest since it is considered that both enzymes may be synthesized in their active, rather than zymogen, forms. The three major CNBr fragments of factor D, which had apparent mol.wts. of 15 800, 6600 and 1700, were purified and then aligned by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and amino acid analysis. By using factor D labelled with di-[1,3-14C]isopropylphosphofluoridate it was shown that the CNBr fragment of apparent mol.wt. 6600, which is located in the C-terminal region of factor D, contained the active serine residue. The amino acid sequence around this residue was determined. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6821372

  19. Apoptosis induced by temozolomide and nimustine in glioblastoma cells is supported by JNK/c-Jun-mediated induction of the BH3-only protein BIM.

    PubMed

    Tomicic, Maja T; Meise, Ruth; Aasland, Dorthe; Berte, Nancy; Kitzinger, Rebekka; Krämer, Oliver H; Kaina, Bernd; Christmann, Markus

    2015-10-20

    The outcome of cancer therapy strongly depends on the complex network of cell signaling pathways, including transcription factor activation following drug exposure. Here we assessed whether and how the MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade and its downstream target, the transcription factor AP-1, influence the sensitivity of malignant glioma cells to the anticancer drugs temozolomide (TMZ) and nimustine (ACNU). Both drugs induce apoptosis in glioma cells at late times following treatment. Activation of the MAPK cascade precedes apoptosis, as shown by phosphorylation of Jun kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, a main component of AP-1. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA mediated knockdown of JNK and c-Jun reduced the level of apoptosis in LN-229 glioma cells treated with TMZ or ACNU. Analyzing the underlying molecular mechanism, we identified the pro-apoptotic gene BIM as a critical target of AP-1, which is upregulated following TMZ and ACNU. Importantly, shRNA mediated downregulation of BIM in the malignant glioma cell lines LN-229 and U87MG led to an attenuated cleavage of caspase-9 and, consequently, reduced the level of apoptosis following TMZ and ACNU treatment. Overall, we identified JNK/c-Jun activation and BIM induction as a late pro-apoptotic response of glioma cells treated with alkylating anticancer drugs. PMID:26418950

  20. Apoptosis induced by temozolomide and nimustine in glioblastoma cells is supported by JNK/c-Jun-mediated induction of the BH3-only protein BIM

    PubMed Central

    Aasland, Dorthe; Berte, Nancy; Kitzinger, Rebekka; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kaina, Bernd; Christmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of cancer therapy strongly depends on the complex network of cell signaling pathways, including transcription factor activation following drug exposure. Here we assessed whether and how the MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade and its downstream target, the transcription factor AP-1, influence the sensitivity of malignant glioma cells to the anticancer drugs temozolomide (TMZ) and nimustine (ACNU). Both drugs induce apoptosis in glioma cells at late times following treatment. Activation of the MAPK cascade precedes apoptosis, as shown by phosphorylation of Jun kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, a main component of AP-1. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA mediated knockdown of JNK and c-Jun reduced the level of apoptosis in LN-229 glioma cells treated with TMZ or ACNU. Analyzing the underlying molecular mechanism, we identified the pro-apoptotic gene BIM as a critical target of AP-1, which is upregulated following TMZ and ACNU. Importantly, shRNA mediated downregulation of BIM in the malignant glioma cell lines LN-229 and U87MG led to an attenuated cleavage of caspase-9 and, consequently, reduced the level of apoptosis following TMZ and ACNU treatment. Overall, we identified JNK/c-Jun activation and BIM induction as a late pro-apoptotic response of glioma cells treated with alkylating anticancer drugs. PMID:26418950

  1. Synthesis and optimization of thiadiazole derivatives as a novel class of substrate competitive c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De, Surya K.; Chen, Vida; Stebbins, John L.; Chen, Li-Hsing; Cellitti, Jason F.; Machleidt, Thomas; Barile, Elisa; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Dahl, Russell; Yang, Li; Emdadi, Aras; Murphy, Ria; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    A series of thiadiazole derivatives has been designed as potential allosteric, substrate competitive inhibitors of the protein kinase JNK. We report on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of a series of compounds that resulted in the identification of potent and selective JNK inhibitors targeting its JIP-1 docking site. PMID:20045647

  2. Small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of sperm associated antigen 9 having structural homology with c-Jun N-terminal kinase-interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Ritu; Jagadish, Nirmala; Garg, Manoj; Mishra, Deepshikha; Dahiya, Neetu; Chaurasiya, Dipak; Suri, Anil . E-mail: anil@nii.res.in

    2006-02-03

    Recently, we reported a novel testis-specific sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) protein, a new member of the JNK-interacting protein family, having a functional role in sperm-egg fusion [N. Jagadish, R. Rana, R. Selvi, D. Mishra, M. Garg, S. Yadav, J.C. Herr, K. Okumura, A. Hasegawa, K. Koyama, A. Suri, Biochem. J. 389 (2005) 73-82]. NCBI Blast searches revealed SPAG9 nucleotide sequence similarities with ESTs of various cancerous tissues. In the present study, we compared the efficiency of two independent SPAG9 specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) constructs, BS/U6/spag9 and BS/U6/spag9-I, to ablate the SPAG9 expression in mammalian cells. A positive correlation between the ratio of target gene versus siRNA and the suppression of SPAG9 expression was observed. Further, the cotransfection of BS/U6/spag9 with pcDNA-SPAG9 and pFlag-CMV2-JNK-3 resulted in specific suppression of SPAG9 without affecting JNK-3 expression. The present investigation will eventually extend the application of SPAG9 siRNA in in vivo targeting experiments that aim to define the SPAG9 functional genomics in tumor and reproductive biology.

  3. Erythropoietin Attenuates the Apoptosis of Adult Neurons After Brachial Plexus Root Avulsion by Downregulating JNK Phosphorylation and c-Jun Expression and Inhibiting c-PARP Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Cao, Rang-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Xing-Yu; Li, Long-Yun; Cui, Shu-Sen

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the effects of erythropoietin (EPO) on preventing adult neurons from apoptosis (introduced by brachial plexus avulsion) were examined, and the mechanism was analyzed. Fifty injury rat models were established in this study by using micro-hemostat forceps to pull out brachial plexus root from the intervertebral foramen in supine position. These models were divided into EPO group (avulsion + 1000 U/kg subcutaneously on alternate days) and control group (avulsion + normal saline). C5-T1 spinal cord was harvested at days 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14. Compared with the control group, the apoptosis of spinal motoneurons was significantly decreased on days 4 and 7 in the EPO group, which was also approved by TUNEL examination results. The detection of p-JNK and expression of c-Jun and cleavage of cleaved PARP (c-PARP) were also examined by immunohistochemistry and were increased immediately at day 1, and peaked at day 2, day 2, and day 4 in control group, respectively. However, the amounts were decreased and delayed by EPO treatment significantly at the same time points. In conclusion, the apoptosis of adult spinal motorneurons was associated with JNK phosphorylation, c-Jun expression, and caspase activity, and EPO-mediated neuronal protective effect is proved by downregulating the JNK phosphorylation and c-Jun expression and inhibiting of c-PARP cleavage. PMID:25877688

  4. Protein 4.1N acts as a potential tumor suppressor linking PP1 to JNK-c-Jun pathway regulation in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Min; Yang, Qin; Zeng, Yayue; Sun, Yang; Sun, Shuming; Wang, Yanpeng; Zhang, Yibin; Weng, Haibo; Chen, Lixiang; Ye, Mao; An, Xiuli; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Protein 4.1N is a member of protein 4.1 family and has been recognized as a potential tumor suppressor in solid tumors. Here, we aimed to investigate the role and mechanisms of 4.1N in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We confirmed that the expression level of 4.1N was inversely correlated with the metastatic properties of NSCLC cell lines and histological grade of clinical NSCLC tissues. Specific knockdown of 4.1N promoted tumor cell proliferation, migration and adhesion in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in mouse xenograft models. Furthermore, we identified PP1 as a novel 4.1N-interacting molecule, and the FERM domain of 4.1N mediated the interaction between 4.1N and PP1. Further, ectopic expression of 4.1N could inactivate JNK-c-Jun signaling pathway through enhancing PP1 activity and interaction between PP1 and p-JNK. Correspondingly, expression of potential downstream metastasis targets (ezrin and MMP9) and cell cycle targets (p53, p21 and p19) of JNK-c-Jun pathway were also regulated by 4.1N. Our data suggest that down-regulation of 4.1N expression is a critical step for NSCLC development and that repression of JNK-c-Jun signaling through PP1 is one of the key anti-tumor mechanisms of 4.1N. PMID:26575790

  5. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  6. Localization and regulation of c-fos and c-jun protooncogene induction by systolic wall stress in normal and hypertrophied rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, H; Jahn, L; Izumo, S; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of changes in left ventricular (LV) systolic force generation on cardiac c-fos and c-jun protooncogene expression was studied by using isolated beating hearts from male Wistar rats. An isovolumic buffer-perfused heart preparation was utilized in which coronary flow and heart rate were held constant and increments in LV balloon volume were used to generate defined levels of LV systolic wall stress. Using Northern and slot-blot analyses, we found that LV tissue from control hearts that generated high levels of LV systolic wall stress expressed 3- to 4.4-fold higher c-fos and c-jun mRNA levels in comparison with tissue from the respective flaccid right ventricles, and in comparison with LV tissue from hearts that generated minimal LV systolic wall stress. To distinguish the role of passive LV diastolic wall stretch from active LV force generation, we found that distension of the LV balloon per se did not have a significant effect on protooncogene induction in hearts perfused with 2,3-butanedione monoxime, which prevents systolic cross-bridge cycling and force generation. In additional hearts studied at a constant LV balloon volume to generate an LV end-diastolic pressure of 10 mm Hg, c-fos mRNA levels were proportional to the magnitude of peak LV systolic wall stress (r = 0.823, P less than 0.05). In these protocols, Fos protein was localized by immunohistochemistry in myocyte nuclei with minimal staining in fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle. When c-fos and c-jun mRNA expression was compared in hearts with chronic LV hypertrophy due to ascending aortic banding and age-matched control hearts that generated similar incremental levels of LV systolic wall stress, significantly lower levels of c-fos and c-jun mRNA were measured in the hypertrophied hearts. However, there was no difference in protooncogene mRNA expression in response to stimulation by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. These data suggest that, in this isolated isovolumic beating heart preparation

  7. Control of Polarized Growth by the Rho Family GTPase Rho4 in Budding Yeast: Requirement of the N-Terminal Extension of Rho4 and Regulation by the Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Bem2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; He, Fei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho4 GTPase partially plays a redundant role with Rho3 in the control of polarized growth, as deletion of RHO4 and RHO3 together, but not RHO4 alone, caused lethality and a loss of cell polarity at 30°C. Here, we show that overexpression of the constitutively active rho4Q131L mutant in an rdi1Δ strain caused a severe growth defect and generated large, round, unbudded cells, suggesting that an excess of Rho4 activity could block bud emergence. We also generated four temperature-sensitive rho4-Ts alleles in a rho3Δ rho4Δ strain. These mutants showed growth and morphological defects at 37°C. Interestingly, two rho4-Ts alleles contain mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Rho4. Rho4 possesses a long N-terminal extension that is unique among the six Rho GTPases in the budding yeast but is common in Rho4 homologs in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. We show that the N-terminal extension plays an important role in Rho4 function since rho3Δ rho4Δ61 cells expressing truncated Rho4 lacking amino acids (aa) 1 to 61 exhibited morphological defects at 24°C and a growth defect at 37°C. Furthermore, we show that Rho4 interacts with Bem2, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) for Cdc42 and Rho1, by yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays. Bem2 specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho4, and the interaction is mediated by its RhoGAP domain. Overexpression of BEM2 aggravates the defects of rho3Δ rho4 mutants. These results suggest that Bem2 might be a novel GAP for Rho4. PMID:23264647

  8. Nicotine induces chromatin changes and c-Jun up-regulation in HL-60 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Landais, Emilie; El-Khoury, Victoria; Prevost, Alain; Dufer, Jean; Liautaud-Roger, Françoise

    2005-12-01

    Although nicotine has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human cancer, its mechanisms of action regarding cancer development remain largely unknown. HL-60 cells were used to investigate the effects of a short-term treatment with nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers. The findings show that nicotine induces chromatin decondensation, histone H3 acetylation and up-regulation of the c-Jun transcription factor mRNA. This increase is inhibited by mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist, suggesting that nicotine alters cellular function directly via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and may then play a role in cell physiology and tumor promotion.

  9. HP1a/KDM4A is involved in the autoregulatory loop of the oncogene gene c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Daoyong

    2015-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Jun plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis, and its aberrant expression has been implicated in many cancers. Previous studies have shown that the c-Jun gene is positively autoregulated by its product. Notably, it has also been reported that c-Jun proteins are enriched in its gene body region. However, the role of c-Jun proteins in its gene body region has yet to be uncovered. HP1a is an evolutionarily conserved heterochromatin-associated protein, which plays an essential role in heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing. Interestingly, accumulating evidence shows that HP1a is also localized to euchromatic regions to positively regulate gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanism has not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that HP1a is involved in the positive autoregulatory loop of the Jra gene, the c-Jun homolog in Drosophila. Jra recruits the HP1a/KDM4A complex to its gene body region upon osmotic stress to reduce H3K36 methylation levels and disrupt H3K36 methylation-dependent histone deacetylation, resulting in high levels of histone acetylation in the Jra gene body region, thus promoting gene transcription. These results not only expand our knowledge toward the mechanism of c-Jun regulation, but also reveal the mechanism by which HP1a exerts its positive regulatory function in gene expression.

  10. Functional cooperation between GATA factors and cJUN on the star promoter in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Bergeron, Francis; Viger, Robert S; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormone biosynthesis requires the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR). STAR is part of a protein complex that transports cholesterol through the mitochondrial membrane where steroidogenesis begins. Several transcription factors participate to direct the proper spatiotemporal and hormonal regulation of the Star gene in Leydig cells. Mechanistically, this is believed to involve the functional interplay between many of these factors. Here we report a novel transcriptional cooperation between GATA factors and cJUN on the mouse Star and human STAR promoters in MA-10 Leydig cells. This cooperation was observed with different GATA members (GATA1, 4, and 6), whereas only cJUN could cooperate with GATA factors. GATA/cJUN transcriptional cooperation on the Star promoter is mediated via closely juxtaposed GATA and AP-1 binding motifs. Mutation of all functional GATA and cJUN elements abolished GATA/cJUN cooperation, which is in agreement with previous data reporting a direct interaction between GATA4 and cJUN in a heterologous system. These data add valuable new insights that further define the molecular mechanisms that govern Star transcription in steroidogenic cells of the testis.

  11. ets-2 Is a Target for an Akt (Protein Kinase B)/Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway in Macrophages of motheaten-viable Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James L.; Schaffner, Alicia E.; Hofmeister, Joseph K.; Hartman, Matthew; Wei, Guo; Forsthoefel, David; Hume, David A.; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor ets-2 was phosphorylated at residue threonine 72 in a colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)- and mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent manner in macrophages isolated from motheaten-viable (me-v) mice. The CSF-1 and ets-2 target genes coding for Bcl-x, urokinase plasminogen activator, and scavenger receptor were also expressed at high levels independent of CSF-1 addition to me-v cells. Akt (protein kinase B) was constitutively active in me-v macrophages, and an Akt immunoprecipitate catalyzed phosphorylation of ets-2 at threonine 72. The p54 isoform of c-jun N-terminal kinase–stress-activated kinase (JNK- SAPK) coimmunoprecipitated with Akt from me-v macrophages, and treatment of me-v cells with the specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell survival, Akt and JNK kinase activities, ets-2 phosphorylation, and Bcl-x mRNA expression. Therefore, ets-2 is a target for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt–JNK action, and the JNK p54 isoform is an ets-2 kinase in macrophages. Constitutive ets-2 activity may contribute to the pathology of me-v mice by increasing expression of genes like the Bcl-x gene that promote macrophage survival. PMID:11027273

  12. Antimicrobial activity of human α-defensin 5 and its linear analogs: N-terminal fatty acylation results in enhanced antimicrobial activity of the linear analogs.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Basil; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-09-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5) exhibits broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and plays an important role in mucosal immunity of the small intestine. Although there have been several studies, the structural requirements for activity and mechanism of bacterial killing is yet to be established unequivocally. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of HD5 and linear analogs. Cysteine deletions attenuated the antibacterial activity considerably. Candidacidal activity was affected to a lesser extent. Fatty acid conjugated linear analogs showed antimicrobial activity comparable activity to HD5. Effective surface charge neutralization of bacteria was observed for HD5 as compared to the non-fatty acylated linear analogs. Our results show that HD5 and non-fatty acylated linear analogs enter the bacterial cytoplasm without causing damage to the bacterial inner membrane. Although fatty acylated peptides exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable to HD5, their mechanism of action involved permeabilization of the Escherichia coli inner membrane. HD5 and analogs had the ability to bind plasmid DNA. HD5 had greater binding affinity to plasmid DNA as compared to the analogs. The three dimensional structure of HD5 favors greater interaction with the bacterial cell surface and also with DNA. Antibacterial activity of HD5 involves entry into bacterial cytoplasm and binding to DNA which would result in shut down of the bacterial metabolism leading to cell death. We show how a moderately active linear peptide derived from the α-defensin HD5 can be engineered to enhance antimicrobial activity almost comparable to the native peptide. PMID:26206286

  13. The N-Terminal Region of the Oenococcus oeni Bacteriophage fOg44 Lysin Behaves as a Bona Fide Signal Peptide in Escherichia coli and as a cis-Inhibitory Element, Preventing Lytic Activity on Oenococcal Cells

    PubMed Central

    São-José, Carlos; Parreira, Ricardo; Vieira, Graça; Santos, Mário A.

    2000-01-01

    The function of the N-terminal region of the Oenococcus oeni phage fOg44 lysin (Lys44) as an export signal was investigated. We observed that when induced in Escherichia coli, Lys44 was cleaved between residues 27 and 28 in a SecA-dependent manner. Lys44 processing could be blocked by a specific signal peptidase inhibitor and was severely reduced by modification of the cleavage site. The lethal effect of Lys44 expression observed in E. coli was ascribed to the presence of its N-terminal 27-residue sequence, as its deletion resulted in the production of a nontoxic, albeit active, product. We have further established that lytic activity in oenococcal cells was dependent on Lys44 processing. An active protein with the molecular mass expected for the cleaved enzyme was detected in extracts from O. oeni-infected cells. The temporal pattern of its appearance suggests that synthesis and export of Lys44 in the infected host progress along with phage maturation. Overall, these results provide, for the first time, experimental evidence for the presence of a signal peptide in a bacteriophage lysin. Database searches and alignment of protein sequences support the prediction that other known O. oeni and Lactococcus lactis phages also encode secretory lysins. The evolutionary significance of a putative phage lysis mechanism relying on secretory lytic enzymes is tentatively discussed, on the basis of host cell wall structure and autolytic capacity. PMID:11004183

  14. Negative transcriptional regulation of the interferon-gamma promoter by glucocorticoids and dominant negative mutants of c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, M; Sica, A; Viggiano, V; Ye, J; Ghosh, P; Birrer, M J; Young, H A

    1995-05-26

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is an immunoregulatory cytokine expressed in large granular lymphocytes and T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying IFN-gamma gene transcription have not been fully defined. Here, we analyze the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of IFN-gamma promoter activity by the glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone. Cotransfection assays performed in Jurkat T cells demonstrated that the activity of the initial 108 base pairs of the IFN-gamma promoter was down-regulated in the presence of dexamethasone. Furthermore, utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, we identified activator protein 1 AP-1-cAMP response element binding protein-activating transcription factor (CREB-ATF) binding elements situated in positions of the IFN-gamma promoter previously identified as essential for promoter activity. Moreover, dominant negative mutants of the c-Jun proto-oncogene were able to mimic the same down-regulatory effect exerted by dexamethasone, and mutations that abolished the binding of the AP-1 CREB-ATF factors were able to block the glucocorticoid effect. These results suggest a model involving the inhibition of IFN-gamma AP-1 CREB-ATF DNA binding complexes as one of the mechanisms involved in the negative regulatory action of glucocorticoids on IFN-gamma gene expression and support the relevance of AP-1 CREB-ATF binding factors during the transcriptional activation of the IFN-gamma promoter in T cells. PMID:7759501

  15. Expressions of c-jun and jun-B proto-oncogenes in odontoblasts during development of bovine tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, C; Terashita, M

    1997-04-01

    c-jun and jun-B genes are among the nuclear proto-oncogenes induced by growth factors such as the TGF-beta superfamily and play important roles in cell differentiation. These gene products enhance expressions of proteins including osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagens. On the other hand, it is well-known that the TGF-beta superfamily affects odontoblast differentiation, and that differentiated odontoblasts express extracellular and membrane proteins as described above. However, there are few reports of factors that participate in the transcriptional regulation of odontoblasts. Especially, little is known about the expression of c-jun and jun-B genes. In this study, we focused on the examination of expressions of c-jun and jun-B genes in dental papillae of bovine tooth germs. Using in situ hybridization, we found that these genes were expressed only in the odontoblastic lineage, but not in other dental papilla cells. Levels of c-jun and jun-B mRNAs increased along the gradient of differentiation of odontoblasts. These levels of c-jun mRNAs were maintained in both young and mature odontoblasts. However, unlike the c-jun gene, expression of the jun-B gene became sparse in mature odontoblasts compared with young odontoblasts. For further analysis, Northern hybridization of total RNA extracted from differentiated odontoblasts was performed for the examination of levels of jun-B mRNAs, indicating that levels of jun-B mRNAs of mature odontoblasts were clearly less than those of young odontoblasts. These results suggest that c-jun and jun-B genes may participate in the transcriptional regulation of odontoblasts of bovine tooth germs, and may control the odontoblast phenotype. Furthermore, our results suggest that these genes can be markers of odontoblasts during dentinogenesis; especially, high expression of jun-B gene can be a marker of young odontoblasts that start to form the new dentin matrix. PMID:9126177

  16. Role of Muscle c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase 1 in Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Kennedy, Norman J.; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity caused by feeding of a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with an increased activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Activated JNK1 is implicated in the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Significantly, Jnk1−/− mice are protected against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that an ablation of the Jnk1 gene in skeletal muscle does not influence HFD-induced obesity. However, muscle-specific JNK1-deficient (MKO) mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity compared with control wild-type (MWT) mice. Thus, insulin-stimulated AKT activation is suppressed in muscle, liver, and adipose tissue of HFD-fed MWT mice but is suppressed only in the liver and adipose tissue of MKO mice. These data demonstrate that JNK1 in muscle contributes to peripheral insulin resistance in response to diet-induced obesity. PMID:19841069

  17. Role of muscle c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 in obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Kennedy, Norman J; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    Obesity caused by feeding of a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with an increased activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Activated JNK1 is implicated in the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Significantly, Jnk1(-)(/)(-) mice are protected against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that an ablation of the Jnk1 gene in skeletal muscle does not influence HFD-induced obesity. However, muscle-specific JNK1-deficient (M(KO)) mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity compared with control wild-type (M(WT)) mice. Thus, insulin-stimulated AKT activation is suppressed in muscle, liver, and adipose tissue of HFD-fed M(WT) mice but is suppressed only in the liver and adipose tissue of M(KO) mice. These data demonstrate that JNK1 in muscle contributes to peripheral insulin resistance in response to diet-induced obesity.

  18. The N-terminal part of TIF1, a putative mediator of the ligand-dependent activation function (AF-2) of nuclear receptors, is fused to B-raf in the oncogenic protein T18.

    PubMed Central

    Le Douarin, B; Zechel, C; Garnier, J M; Lutz, Y; Tora, L; Pierrat, P; Heery, D; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) bound to response elements mediate the effects of cognate ligands on gene expression. Their ligand-dependent activation function, AF-2, presumably acts on the basal transcription machinery through intermediary proteins/mediators. We have isolated a mouse nuclear protein, TIF1, which enhances RXR and RAR AF-2 in yeast and interacts in a ligand-dependent manner with several NRs in yeast and mammalian cells, as well as in vitro. Remarkably, these interactions require the amino acids constituting the AF-2 activating domain conserved in all active NRs. Moreover, the oestrogen receptor (ER) AF-2 antagonist hydroxytamoxifen cannot promote ER-TIF1 interaction. We propose that TIF1, which contains several conserved domains found in transcriptional regulatory proteins, is a mediator of ligand-dependent AF-2. Interestingly, the TIF1 N-terminal moiety is fused to B-raf in the mouse oncoprotein T18. Images PMID:7744009

  19. Metformin prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis through AMPK-PI3K-c-Jun NH2 pathway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jung, T.W.; Lee, M.W.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to be partially associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress toxicity on pancreatic beta cells and the result of decreased insulin synthesis and secretion. In this study, we showed that a well-known insulin sensitizer, metformin, directly protects against dysfunction and death of ER stress-induced NIT-1 cells (a mouse pancreatic beta cell line) via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. We also showed that exposure of NIT-1 cells to metformin (5mM) increases cellular resistance against ER stress-induced NIT-1 cell dysfunction and death. AMPK and PI3 kinase inhibitors abolished the effect of metformin on cell function and death. Metformin-mediated protective effects on ER stress-induced apoptosis were not a result of an unfolded protein response or the induced inhibitors of apoptotic proteins. In addition, we showed that exposure of ER stressed-induced NIT-1 cells to metformin decreases the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK). These data suggest that metformin is an important determinant of ER stress-induced apoptosis in NIT-1 cells and may have implications for ER stress-mediated pancreatic beta cell destruction via regulation of the AMPK-PI3 kinase-JNK pathway.

  20. A 10-amino-acid sequence in the N-terminal A/B domain of thyroid hormone receptor alpha is essential for transcriptional activation and interaction with the general transcription factor TFIIB.

    PubMed Central

    Hadzic, E; Desai-Yajnik, V; Helmer, E; Guo, S; Wu, S; Koudinova, N; Casanova, J; Raaka, B M; Samuels, H H

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the thyroid hormone (3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine [T3]) on gene transcription are mediated by nuclear T3 receptors (T3Rs). alpha- and beta-isoform T3Rs (T3R alpha and -beta) are expressed from different genes and are members of a superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors that also includes the receptors for steroid hormones, vitamin D, and retinoids. Although T3 activates transcription by mediating a conformational change in the C-terminal approximately 220-amino-acid ligand-binding domain (LBD), the fundamental mechanisms of T3R-mediated transcriptional activation remain to be determined. We found that deletion of the 50-amino-acid N-terminal A/B domain of chicken T3R alpha (cT3R alpha) decreases T3-dependent stimulation of genes regulated by native thyroid hormone response elements about 10- to 20-fold. The requirement of the A/B region for transcriptional activation was mapped to amino acids 21 to 30, which contain a cluster of five basic amino acids. The A/B region of cT3R alpha is not required for T3 binding or for DNA binding of the receptor as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. In vitro binding studies indicate that the N-terminal region of cT3R alpha interacts efficiently with TFIIB and that this interaction requires amino acids 21 to 30 of the A/B region. In contrast, the LBD interacts poorly with TFIIB. The region of TFIIB primarily involved in the binding of cT3R alpha includes an amphipathic alpha helix contained within residues 178 to 201. Analysis using a fusion protein containing the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 and the entire A/B region of cT3R alpha suggests that this region does not contain an intrinsic activation domain. These and other studies indicate that cT3R alpha mediates at least some of its effects through TFIIB in vivo and that the N-terminal region of DNA-bound cT3R alpha acts to recruit and/or stabilize the binding of TFIIB to the transcription complex. T3 stimulation could then result from ligand

  1. miR-216b regulation of c-Jun mediates GADD153/CHOP-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenhua; Bu, Yiwen; Chitnis, Nilesh; Koumenis, Costas; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Diehl, J. Alan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the unfolded protein response, UPR, to regulate cell homeostasis through both gene expression and protein synthesis has been well documented. One primary pro-apoptotic protein that responds to both PERK and Ire1 signalling is the CHOP/GADD153 transcription factor. Although CHOP deficiency delays onset of cell death, questions remain regarding how CHOP regulates apoptosis. Here, we provide evidence demonstrating that CHOP/GADD153-dependent apoptosis reflects expression of micro-RNA, miR-216b. MiR-216b accumulation requires PERK-dependent induction of CHOP/GADD153, which then directly regulates miR-216b expression. As maximal expression of miR-216b is antagonized by Ire1, miR-216b accumulation reflects the convergence of PERK and Ire1 activities. Functionally, miR-216b directly targets c-Jun, thereby reducing AP-1-dependent transcription and sensitizing cells to ER stress-dependent apoptosis. These results provide direct insight into the molecular mechanisms of CHOP/GADD153-dependent cell death. PMID:27173017

  2. Expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes in the uteri of immature mice neonatally exposed to diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Takayanagi, A; Shimizu, N

    2003-01-01

    We studied the cell-type-specific and temporal expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes after 17beta-estradiol (E2) stimulation in the uteri of immature 3-week-old mice neonatally exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES), DES-mice, and the ontogenic expression of these genes in the uteri of DES-mice using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. A single E2 injection induced the transient and rapid expression of c-fos mRNA and c-Fos protein in the endometrial epithelium and endothelial cells of the blood vessels in both 3-week-old vehicle-treated controls and DES-mice; a peak of mRNA expression was 2 hours after E2 injection and that of protein expression was 2 to 3 hours after the injection. The expression of c-fos mRNA and protein after E2 stimulation was lower in the DES-mice than in the control animals. There were no significant differences in the c-jun expression patterns in both experimental groups before and after the E2 injection. The E2 injection transiently down-regulated the c-jun expression in the epithelium and up-regulated it in the stroma and myometrium. The uterine epithelium of DES-mice showed much stronger c-Jun immunostaining on days 4 and 10, compared with those of controls. Neonatal DES treatment reduced c-Jun immunoreactivity in the uterine epithelium on days 4 and 10, and increased the reaction in the stroma on day 4. These results suggested that the neonatal DES treatment induces permanent changes in the c-fos expression pattern independent of the postpuberal secretion of ovarian steroids. The changes in the expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes, particularly during postnatal development, are likely to play important roles in the production of uterine abnormalities in the DES-mice.

  3. N-Terminal Modification of Proteins with o-Aminophenols

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic modification of proteins plays an important role in chemical biology and biomaterials science. These fields provide a constant need for chemical tools that can introduce new functionality in specific locations on protein surfaces. In this work, an oxidative strategy is demonstrated for the efficient modification of N-terminal residues on peptides and N-terminal proline residues on proteins. The strategy uses o-aminophenols or o-catechols that are oxidized to active coupling species in situ using potassium ferricyanide. Peptide screening results have revealed that many N-terminal amino acids can participate in this reaction, and that proline residues are particularly reactive. When applied to protein substrates, the reaction shows a stronger requirement for the proline group. Key advantages of the reaction include its fast second-order kinetics and ability to achieve site-selective modification in a single step using low concentrations of reagent. Although free cysteines are also modified by the coupling reaction, they can be protected through disulfide formation and then liberated after N-terminal coupling is complete. This allows access to doubly functionalized bioconjugates that can be difficult to access using other methods. PMID:24963951

  4. p21(Cip1) up-regulated during histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced CD4(+) T-cell anergy selectively associates with mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Selma Dagtas, Ayse; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2010-04-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor n-butyrate induced proliferative unresponsiveness in antigen-stimulated murine CD4(+) T cells. T cells anergized by n-butyrate demonstrated reduced interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion and decreased activating protein 1 (AP-1) activity upon restimulation. Mechanistic studies determined that the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21(Cip1) was up-regulated in the anergic CD4(+) T cells. p21(Cip1) is known to inhibit the cell cycle through its interaction with cdk, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). p21(Cip1) did not preferentially associate with PCNA or cdk in anergic T helper type 1 (Th1) cells. Instead, among the three interaction partners, p21(Cip1) was found to interact with phospho-JNK and phospho-c-jun selectively in the anergic CD4(+) T cells. The activity of c-jun and downstream transcription factor AP-1 were suppressed in the anergic Th1 cells. In contrast, p21(Cip1) and the two phospho-proteins were never detected concurrently in the control CD4(+) T cells. The n-butyrate-induced p21(Cip1)-mediated inhibition of JNK and c-jun represents a novel potential mechanism by which proliferative unresponsiveness was maintained in CD4(+) T cells.

  5. Ras association domain family member 10 suppresses gastric cancer growth by cooperating with GSTP1 to regulate JNK/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Liang, Q; Liu, W; Zhang, N; Xu, L; Zhang, X; Zhang, J; Sung, J J Y; Yu, J

    2016-05-12

    The Ras association domain family (RASSF) encodes several members with tumor-suppressive potentials. We aimed to investigate the biological function and clinical implication of RASSF10 in gastric cancer (GC). We found that RASSF10 was silenced in six of seven GC cell lines and in primary GC tissues, but was highly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The silence of RASSAF10 was mediated by promoter methylation as evaluated by bisulfite genomic sequencing. RASSF10 expression could be restored by demethylation treatment. A negative correlation between methylation and mRNA expression of RASSF10 was observed in 223 gastric samples of The Cancer Genome Atlas study (P<0.0001). Re-expression of RASSF10 in GC cell lines (AGS and MKN45) significantly suppressed cell viability, colony formation, migration and invasion, reduced cells in S phase, accumulated cells in G2 phase and induced cell apoptosis in vitro, and inhibited tumorigenicity in nude mice. These were confirmed by decreased expression of proliferation markers (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p-CDC2 and p-CDC25) and increased apoptotic cascades (cleaved caspases-9, -8, -3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase). Conversely, RASSF10 knockdown in normal gastric cell line yielded an opposing effect. Co-immunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry analyses were performed to reveal the downstream effectors of RASSF10. The result revealed that glutathione S-transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1) was a direct cooperator of RASSF10. The tumor-suppressive effect of RASSF10 was partially mediated by cooperating with GSTP1 to deregulate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway. Importantly, RASSF10 methylation was detected in 56.6% (98/173) of primary GCs and is an independent risk factor for poor survival of GC patients (P=0.001). In conclusions, RASSF10 functions as a tumor suppressor by cooperating with GSTP1 to deregulate JNK/c-Jun/AP-1 pathway in GC. Promoter methylation of RASSF10 is associated with poor survival

  6. Biological Activities of 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole Derivatives: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Suresh, Bhojraj

    2012-01-01

    2-Mercaptobenzothiazoles are an important class of bioactive and industrially important organic compounds. These compounds are reported for their antimicrobial and antifungal activities, and are subsequently highlighted as a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of several enzymes like acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase, monoamine oxidase, heat shock protein 90, cathepsin D, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases. These derivatives are also known to possess antitubercular, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, amoebic, antiparkinsonian, anthelmintic, antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic, antiulcer, chemoprotective, and selective CCR3 receptor antagonist activity. This present review article focuses on the pharmacological profile of 2-mercaptobenzothiazoles with their potential activities. PMID:23264933

  7. N-terminal groups of buffalo thyroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, V; Ramachandran, L K

    1990-04-01

    N-Terminal analysis of purified buffalo thyroglobulin by the fluorodinitrobenzene method of Sanger yielded about 1.5 moles of DNP-glutamic acid per mole of buffalo thyroglobulin. No water-soluble DNP-amino acid was detectable as N-terminal. The presence of glutamic acid has been confirmed by Edman degradation and characterization of the PTH-amino acid in different solvent systems, and also after regeneration of free amino acid from PTH-amino acid in butanol-acetic acid-water (4:1:5, v/v) system. This is in contrast to the occurrence of aspartic acid or asparagine as N-terminals for several other mammalian thyroglobulins.

  8. Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiuping; Meng, Qingming; Xu, Xuebin; Zhi, Tongle; Shi, Qiong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of Bex2 markedly increased in glioma tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bex2 over-expression promoted cell proliferation, while its down-regulation inhibited cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bex2 down-regulation promoted cell apoptosis via JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. -- Abstract: The function of Bex2, a member of the Brain Expressed X-linked gene family, in glioma is controversial and its mechanism is largely unknown. We report here that Bex2 regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The expression level of Bex2 is markedly increased in glioma tissues. We observed that Bex2 over-expression promotes cell proliferation, while down-regulation of Bex2 inhibits cell growth. Furthermore, Bex2 down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and activates the JNK pathway; these effects were abolished by administration of the JNK specific inhibitor, (SP600125). Thus, Bex2 may be an important player during the development of glioma.

  9. MITF and c-Jun antagonism interconnects melanoma dedifferentiation with pro-inflammatory cytokine responsiveness and myeloid cell recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Riesenberg, Stefanie; Groetchen, Angela; Siddaway, Robert; Bald, Tobias; Reinhardt, Julia; Smorra, Denise; Kohlmeyer, Judith; Renn, Marcel; Phung, Bengt; Aymans, Pia; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Davidson, Irwin; Goding, Colin R.; Jönsson, Göran; Landsberg, Jennifer; Tüting, Thomas; Hölzel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation promotes phenotypic plasticity in melanoma, a source of non-genetic heterogeneity, but the molecular framework is poorly understood. Here we use functional genomic approaches and identify a reciprocal antagonism between the melanocyte lineage transcription factor MITF and c-Jun, which interconnects inflammation-induced dedifferentiation with pro-inflammatory cytokine responsiveness of melanoma cells favouring myeloid cell recruitment. We show that pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α instigate gradual suppression of MITF expression through c-Jun. MITF itself binds to the c-Jun regulatory genomic region and its reduction increases c-Jun expression that in turn amplifies TNF-stimulated cytokine expression with further MITF suppression. This feed-forward mechanism turns poor peak-like transcriptional responses to TNF-α into progressive and persistent cytokine and chemokine induction. Consistently, inflammatory MITFlow/c-Junhigh syngeneic mouse melanomas recruit myeloid immune cells into the tumour microenvironment as recapitulated by their human counterparts. Our study suggests myeloid cell-directed therapies may be useful for MITFlow/c-Junhigh melanomas to counteract their growth-promoting and immunosuppressive functions. PMID:26530832

  10. Dentin bonding agents induce c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2003-01-01

    An important requirement for a dentin bonding agent is biologic compatibility; the bonding agent usually remains in close contact with living dental tissues over a long period of time. Information on the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity potentials of dentin bonding agents is rare. It has been shown that c-fos and c-jun are induced rapidly by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli. Little is known about the induction of cellular signaling events and specific gene expression after cell exposure to dentin bonding agents. Therefore, we used primary human gingival fibroblasts to examine the effect of six dentin bonding agents on the expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes to evaluate the genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity potential of the dentin bonding agents. The levels of mRNA were measured by the quantitative RT-PCR analysis. c-fos and c-jun mRNA expression in dentin bonding agents-treated cells revealed a rapid accumulation of the transcript, a significant signal first was detectable after 1h of exposure. Persistent induction of c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes by dentine bonding agents may distribute systemically to cause some unexpected adverse effects on human beings. It would be necessary to identify the severely toxic compounds and replace these substances by better biocompatible components. Otherwise, leaching of those genotoxicity/mutagenicity and cacinogenicity components must be minimized or prevented.

  11. The AP-1 Transcription Factor c-Jun Prevents Stress-Imposed Maladaptive Remodeling of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Windak, Renata; Müller, Julius; Felley, Allison; Akhmedov, Alexander; Wagner, Erwin F.; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Sumara, Grzegorz; Ricci, Romeo

    2013-01-01

    Systemic hypertension increases cardiac workload and subsequently induces signaling networks in heart that underlie myocyte growth (hypertrophic response) through expansion of sarcomeres with the aim to increase contractility. However, conditions of increased workload can induce both adaptive and maladaptive growth of heart muscle. Previous studies implicate two members of the AP-1 transcription factor family, junD and fra-1, in regulation of heart growth during hypertrophic response. In this study, we investigate the function of the AP-1 transcription factors, c-jun and c-fos, in heart growth. Using pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice and targeted deletion of Jun or Fos in cardiomyocytes, we show that c-jun is required for adaptive cardiac hypertrophy, while c-fos is dispensable in this context. c-jun promotes expression of sarcomere proteins and suppresses expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Capacity of cardiac muscle to contract depends on organization of principal thick and thin filaments, myosin and actin, within the sarcomere. In line with decreased expression of sarcomere-associated proteins, Jun-deficient cardiomyocytes present disarrangement of filaments in sarcomeres and actin cytoskeleton disorganization. Moreover, Jun-deficient hearts subjected to pressure overload display pronounced fibrosis and increased myocyte apoptosis finally resulting in dilated cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, c-jun but not c-fos is required to induce a transcriptional program aimed at adapting heart growth upon increased workload. PMID:24039904

  12. N-Terminal Fatty Acid Substitution Increases the Leishmanicidal Activity of CA(1-7)M(2-9), a Cecropin-Melittin Hybrid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Chicharro, Cristina; Granata, Cesare; Lozano, Rosario; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the leishmanicidal activity of the synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), a systematic study of its acylation with saturated linear fatty acids was carried out. Acylation of the Nɛ-7 lysine residue led to a drastic decrease in leishmanicidal activity, whereas acylation at lysine 1, in either the α or the ɛ NH2 group, increased up to 3 times the activity of the peptide against promastigotes and increased up to 15 times the activity of the peptide against amastigotes. Leishmanicidal activity increased with the length of the fatty acid chain, reaching a maximum for the lauroyl analogue (12 carbons). According to the fast kinetics, dissipation of membrane potential, and parasite membrane permeability to the nucleic acid binding probe SYTOX green, the lethal mechanism was directly related to plasma membrane permeabilization. PMID:11502512

  13. From reptilian phylogenomics to reptilian genomes: analyses of c-Jun and DJ-1 proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Y; Braun, E L; Guillette, L J; Iguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Genome projects have revolutionized our understanding of both molecular biology and evolution, but there has been a limited collection of genomic data from reptiles. This is surprising given the pivotal position of reptiles in vertebrate phylogeny and the potential utility of information from reptiles for understanding a number of biological phenomena, such as sex determination. Although there are many potential uses for genomic data, one important and useful approach is phylogenomics. Here we report cDNA sequences for the c-Jun(JUN) and DJ-1(PARK7) proto-oncogenes from 3 reptiles (the American alligator, Nile crocodile, and Florida red-belly turtle), show that both genes are expressed in the alligator, and integrate them into analyses of their homologs from other organisms. With these taxa it was possible to conduct analyses that include all major vertebrate lineages. Analyses of c-Jun revealed an unexpected but well-supported frog-turtle clade while analyses of DJ-1 revealed a topology largely congruent with expectation based upon other data. The conflict between the c-Jun topology and expectation appears to reflect the overlap between c-Jun and a CpG island in most taxa, including crocodilians. This CpG island is absent in the frog and turtle, and convergence in base composition appears to be at least partially responsible for the signal uniting these taxa. Noise reduction approaches can eliminate the unexpected frog-turtle clade, demonstrating that multiple signals are present in the c-Jun alignment. We used phylogenetic methods to visualize these signals; we suggest that examining both historical and non-historical signals will prove important for phylogenomic analyses.

  14. The dark and bright sides of an enzyme: a three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of Zophobas morio luciferase-like enzyme, inferences on the biological function and origin of oxygenase/luciferase activity.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Santos, C R; Kato, D I; Murakami, M T; Viviani, V R

    2016-05-11

    Beetle luciferases, the enzymes responsible for bioluminescence, are special cases of CoA-ligases which have acquired a novel oxygenase activity, offering elegant models to investigate the structural origin of novel catalytic functions in enzymes. What the original function of their ancestors was, and how the new oxygenase function emerged leading to bioluminescence remains unclear. To address these questions, we solved the crystal structure of a recently cloned Malpighian luciferase-like enzyme of unknown function from Zophobas morio mealworms, which displays weak luminescence with ATP and the xenobiotic firefly d-luciferin. The three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain showed the expected general fold of CoA-ligases, with a unique carboxylic substrate binding pocket, permitting the binding and CoA-thioesterification activity with a broad range of carboxylic substrates, including short-, medium-chain and aromatic acids, indicating a generalist function consistent with a xenobiotic-ligase. The thioesterification activity with l-luciferin, but not with the d-enantiomer, confirms that the oxygenase activity emerged from a stereoselective impediment of the thioesterification reaction with the latter, favoring the alternative chemiluminescence oxidative reaction. The structure and site-directed mutagenesis support the involvement of the main-chain amide carbonyl of the invariant glycine G323 as the catalytic base for luciferin C4 proton abstraction during the oxygenase activity in this enzyme and in beetle luciferases (G343).

  15. The dark and bright sides of an enzyme: a three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of Zophobas morio luciferase-like enzyme, inferences on the biological function and origin of oxygenase/luciferase activity.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Santos, C R; Kato, D I; Murakami, M T; Viviani, V R

    2016-05-11

    Beetle luciferases, the enzymes responsible for bioluminescence, are special cases of CoA-ligases which have acquired a novel oxygenase activity, offering elegant models to investigate the structural origin of novel catalytic functions in enzymes. What the original function of their ancestors was, and how the new oxygenase function emerged leading to bioluminescence remains unclear. To address these questions, we solved the crystal structure of a recently cloned Malpighian luciferase-like enzyme of unknown function from Zophobas morio mealworms, which displays weak luminescence with ATP and the xenobiotic firefly d-luciferin. The three dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain showed the expected general fold of CoA-ligases, with a unique carboxylic substrate binding pocket, permitting the binding and CoA-thioesterification activity with a broad range of carboxylic substrates, including short-, medium-chain and aromatic acids, indicating a generalist function consistent with a xenobiotic-ligase. The thioesterification activity with l-luciferin, but not with the d-enantiomer, confirms that the oxygenase activity emerged from a stereoselective impediment of the thioesterification reaction with the latter, favoring the alternative chemiluminescence oxidative reaction. The structure and site-directed mutagenesis support the involvement of the main-chain amide carbonyl of the invariant glycine G323 as the catalytic base for luciferin C4 proton abstraction during the oxygenase activity in this enzyme and in beetle luciferases (G343). PMID:27101527

  16. TNF receptor-associated factor-3 signaling mediates activation of p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase, cytokine secretion, and Ig production following ligation of CD40 on human B cells.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Swantek, J L; McFarland, R D; Miura, Y; Geppert, T; Lipsky, P E

    1998-08-01

    CD40 engagement induces a variety of functional outcomes following association with adaptor molecules of the TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family. Whereas TRAF2, -5, and -6 initiate NF-kappaB activation, the outcomes of TRAF3-initiated signaling are less characterized. To delineate CD40-induced TRAF3-dependent events, Ramos B cells stably transfected with a dominant negative TRAF3 were stimulated with membranes expressing recombinant CD154/CD40 ligand. In the absence of TRAF3 signaling, activation of p38 and control of Ig production were abrogated, whereas Jun N-terminal kinase activation and secretion of IL-10, lymphotoxin-alpha, and TNF-alpha were partially blocked. By contrast, induction of apoptosis, activation of NF-kappaB, generation of granulocyte-macrophage CSF, and up-regulation of CD54, MHC class II, and CD95 were unaffected by the TRAF3 dominant negative. Together, these results indicate that TRAF3 initiates independent signaling pathways via p38 and JNK that are associated with specific functional outcomes.

  17. Induction of c-myc and c-jun proto-oncogene expression in rat L6 myoblasts by cadmium is inhibited by zinc preinduction of the metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Abshire, M.K.; Buzard, G.S.; Shiraishi, Noriyuki; Waalkers, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    Certain proto-oncogenes transfer growth regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. These genes often show activation soon after cells are exposed to mitogenic stimulation but can also be activated as a nonmitogenic stress response. Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal in humans and rodents and, though its mechanism of action is unknown, it could involve activation of such proto-oncogenes. Metallothionein (MT), a metal-inducible protein that binds Cd, can protect against many aspects of Cd toxicity, including genotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis. Thus, the effects of Cd on expression of c-myc and c-jun in rat L6 myoblasts, and the effect of preactivation of the MT gene by Zn treatment on such oncogene expression, were studied. MT protein levels were measured using oligonucleotide hybridization and standardized to {beta}-actin levels. Cd (5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, 0-30 h) stimulated both c-myc and c-jun mRNA expression. An initial peak of activation of c-myc expression occurred 2 h after initiation of Cd exposure, and levels remained elevated throughout the assessment period. Zn pretreatment markedly reduced the activation of c-myc expression by Cd compared to cells not receiving Zn pretreatment. Cd treatment increased c-jun mRNA levels by up to 3.5-fold. Again, Zn pretreatment markedly reduced. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  18. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bluhm, Martina E. C.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8–16 and 8–32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared

  19. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Martina E C; Schneider, Viktoria A F; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8-16 and 8-32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared with Api

  20. The domain structure of Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase: the N-terminal domain can be dispensable for helicase activity whereas the extreme C-terminal region is essential for its function

    PubMed Central

    Nitharwal, Ram Gopal; Paul, Subhankar; Dar, Ashraf; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Soni, Rajesh K; Prusty, Dhaneswar; Sinha, Sukrat; Kashav, Tara; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Gourinath, Samudrala; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Hexameric DnaB type replicative helicases are essential for DNA strand unwinding along with the direction of replication fork movement. These helicases in general contain an amino terminal domain and a carboxy terminal domain separated by a linker region. Due to the lack of crystal structure of a full-length DnaB like helicase, the domain structure and function of these types of helicases are not clear. We have reported recently that Helicobacter pylori DnaB helicase is a replicative helicase in vitro and it can bypass Escherichia coli DnaC activity in vivo. Using biochemical, biophysical and genetic complementation assays, here we show that though the N-terminal region of HpDnaB is required for conformational changes between C6 and C3 rotational symmetry, it is not essential for in vitro helicase activity and in vivo function of the protein. Instead, an extreme carboxy terminal region and an adjacent unique 34 amino acid insertion region were found to be essential for HpDnaB activity suggesting that these regions are important for proper folding and oligomerization of this protein. These results confer great potential in understanding the domain structures of DnaB type helicases and their related function. PMID:17430964

  1. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  2. Combined Expression of c-jun, c-fos, and p53 Improves Estimation of Prognosis in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Xu, Xin; Xu, Fei; Meng, Yan; Sun, Changsheng; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Eryang

    2016-09-13

    To identify the prognostic value of c-jun, c-fos, and p53 in oral cancer, we examined the impact of immunohistochemical expression of these markers on tumor progression in 157 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We found that c-jun or c-fos was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, and coexpression of c-jun/c-fos, or c-jun/c-fos/p53 were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, poor differentiation and clinical stage. The coexpression of c-jun/c-fos/p53 was identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Simultaneous coexpression of these markers in OSCCs might prove to be a useful indicator for differentiation of low and high-risk patients.

  3. Protein kinase C-α downregulates estrogen receptor-α by suppressing c-Jun phosphorylation in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Lee, Se Kyung; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minkuk; Kil, Won Ho; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2014-03-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is elevated in malignant compared with that in normal human breast tissue. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory mechanism and the co-relationship between PKC-α and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) in ER-α-positive and tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) breast cancer cells. Our results showed that the level of ER-α expression was significantly decreased in TAMR when compared with that in tamoxifen-sensitive (TAMS) breast cancer cells. However, PKC-α phosphorylation was increased in TAMR breast cancer cells when compared to that in TAMS breast cancer cells. Additionally, ER-α expression was significantly decreased due to the overexpression of constitutively active PKC-α (CA-PKC-α). Next, we investigated the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a reversible activator of PKC, on ER-α expression in ER-α-positive breast cancer cells. TPA decreased the levels of ER-α expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the TPA-induced downregulation of ER-α was prevented by Go6983, a specific PKC inhibitor. Notably, we found that CA-PKC-α suppressed c-JUN phosphorylation, which is a major activating protein-1 factor, and TPA-induced downregulation of ER-α was prevented by SR11302, a specific activator protein-1 inhibitor. Taken together, we demonstrated that PKC-α activity suppressed the level of ER-α expression by inhibiting c-JUN phosphorylation in ER-α-positive breast cancer cells. Therefore, we suggest that PKC-α may be a potential therapeutic target for treating ER-positive and TAMR breast cancer.

  4. TNF-α Mediates PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun-Dependent Monocyte Adhesion via ICAM-1 Induction in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Liu, Shiau-Wen; Chi, Pei-Ling; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Retinal inflammatory diseases induced by cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are associated with an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs). Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of epithelial cells that forms the outer blood-retinal barrier in the posterior segment of the eye, and is also implicated in the pathology of, such as neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the detailed mechanisms of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression are largely unclear in human RPECs. We demonstrated that in RPECs, TNF-α could induce ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity, and monocyte adhesion. TNF-α-mediated responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of PKCs (Ro318220), PKCδ (Rottlerin), MEK1/2 (U0126), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of TNFR1, TRAF2, JNK2, p42, or c-Jun. We showed that TNF-α could stimulate the TNFR1 and TRAF2 complex formation. TNF-α-stimulated JNK1/2 was also reduced by Rottlerin or SP600125. However, Rottlerin had no effect on TNF-α-induced p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. We observed that TNF-α induced c-Jun phosphorylation which was inhibited by Rottlerin or SP600125. On the other hand, TNF-α-stimulated ICAM-1 promoter activity was prominently lost in RPECs transfected with the point-mutated AP-1 ICAM-1 promoter plasmid. These results suggest that TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion is mediated through a TNFR1/TRAF2/PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun pathway in RPECs. These findings concerning TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPECs imply that TNF-α might play an important role in ocular inflammation and diseases. PMID:25675437

  5. miR-221 Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition through Targeting PTEN and Forms a Positive Feedback Loop with β-catenin/c-Jun Signaling Pathway in Extra-Hepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Li, Guodong; Ma, Donglai; Sun, Chen; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHCC) is a refractory malignancy with poor prognosis due to its early invasion, metastasis and recurrence after operation. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis is the key to the development of new and effective therapeutic strategies for EHCC. In the present study we demonstrated that miR-221 promoted EHCC invasion and metastasis through targeting PTEN and formed a positive feedback loop with β-catenin/c-Jun signaling pathway. We found miR-221 was upregulated in EHCC specimens and CC cell lines. Moreover, miR-221 was found strongly associated with the metastasis and prognosis of EHCC patients. The expression of PTEN was downregulated in EHCC patients and CC cell lines, and was further demonstrated as one of the downstream targets of miR-221. In addition, our data indicated that β-catenin activated miR-221 through c-jun, while miR-221 enhanced β-catenin signaling induced-epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by targeting PTEN, hence forming a positive feedback loop in EHCC cell lines. In conclusion, our results suggested that miR-221 promotes EMT through targeting PTEN and forms a positive feedback loop with β-catenin/c-Jun signaling pathway in EHCC. PMID:26501139

  6. Effect of Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 on the replication of Penicillium marneffei in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Xi, Liyan; Huang, Xiaowen; Ma, Tuan; Ren, Hong; Ji, Guangquan

    2015-05-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a human pathogen which persists in macrophages and threatens the immunocompromised patients. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we evaluated the effect of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) on cytokine expression, phagosomal maturation and multiplication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-stimulated human macrophages. P. marneffei induced the rapid phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Using the specific inhibitor of JNK1/2 (SP600125), we found that the inhibition of JNK1/2 suppressed P. marneffei-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-10 production. In addition, the presence of SP600125 increased phagosomal acidification and maturation and decreased intracellular replication. These data suggest that JNK1/2 may play an important role in promoting the replication of P. marneffei. Our findings further indicate that the pathogen through the JNK1/2 pathway may attenuate the immune response and macrophage antifungal function.

  7. Inhibitory effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Seok; Kwon, Yi-Young; Han, Young-Sun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2008-10-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) induces photoaging associated with up-regulated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activities and decreased collagen synthesis. We previously reported that panduratin A, a chalcone compound isolated from KAEMPFERIA PANDURATA Roxb ., decreased MMP-1 expression in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Here, we have investigated the effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling modules such as extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK), Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Treatment with panduratin A in the range of 0.001 - 0.1 microM significantly inhibited UV-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation. Moreover, inhibition of ERK, JNK and p38 by panduratin A resulted in decreased c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation induced by UV, which led to inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding activity. Panduratin A showed stronger activity than epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate (EGCG) known as a natural anti-aging agent. The results suggest that panduratin A can down-regulate UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting the MAPKs pathways and AP-1 activation. AP-1:activator protein-1 EGCG:epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate ERK:extracellular-regulated protein kinase JNK:c-Jun N-terminal kinase MAPK:mitogen-activated protein kinase MMP:matrix metalloproteinase UV:ultraviolet.

  8. Myeloperoxidase Inactivates TIMP-1 by Oxidizing Its N-terminal Cysteine Residue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Rosen, Henry; Madtes, David K.; Shao, Baohai; Martin, Thomas R.; Heinecke, Jay W.; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance between the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the activity of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is implicated in tissue injury during inflammation. The N-terminal cysteine of TIMP-1 plays a key role in the inhibitory activity of the protein because it coordinates the essential catalytic Zn2+ of the MMP, preventing the metal ion from functioning. An important mechanism for controlling the interaction of TIMPs with MMPs might involve hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system of phagocytes. Here, we show that HOCl generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system inactivates TIMP-1 by oxidizing its N-terminal cysteine. The product is a novel 2-oxo acid. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that methionine and N-terminal cysteine residues were rapidly oxidized by MPO-derived HOCl but only oxidation of the N-terminal cysteine of TIMP-1 correlated well with loss of inhibitory activity. Importantly, we detected the signature 2-oxo-acid N-terminal peptide in tryptic digests of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, demonstrating that TIMP-1 oxidation occurs in vivo. Loss of the N-terminal amino group and disulfide structure are crucial for preventing TIMP-1 from inhibiting MMPs. Our findings suggest that pericellular production of HOCl by phagocytes is a pathogenic mechanism for impairing TIMP-1 activity during inflammation. PMID:17726014

  9. β-Catenin Binds to the Activation Function 2 Region of the Androgen Receptor and Modulates the Effects of the N-Terminal Domain and TIF2 on Ligand-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang-Nian; Herrell, Roger; Byers, Stephen; Shah, Salimuddin; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Gelmann, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional molecule that is activated by signaling through WNT receptors. β-Catenin can also enhance the transcriptional activity of some steroid hormone receptors such as the androgen receptor and retinoic acid receptor α. Androgens can affect nuclear translocation of β-catenin and influence its subcellular distribution. Using mammalian two-hybrid binding assays, analysis of reporter gene transcription, and coimmunoprecipitation, we now show that β-catenin binds to the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) and modulates the transcriptional effects of TIF2 and the androgen receptor N-terminal domain (NTD). In functional assays, β-catenin bound to androgen receptor only in the presence of ligand agonists, not antagonists. β-Catenin binding to the androgen receptor LBD was independent of and cooperative with the androgen receptor NTD and the p160 coactivator TIF2, both of which bind to the activation function 2 (AF-2) region of the androgen receptor. Different mutations of androgen receptor helix 3 amino acids disrupted binding of androgen receptor NTD and β-catenin. β-Catenin, androgen receptor NTD, and TIF2 binding to the androgen receptor LBD were affected similarly by a subset of helix 12 mutations, but disruption of two sites on helix 12 affected only binding of β-catenin and not of TIF2 or the androgen receptor NTD. Mutational disruption of each of five LXXLL peptide motifs in the β-catenin armadillo repeats did not disrupt either binding to androgen receptor or transcriptional coactivation. ICAT, an inhibitor of T-cell factor 4 (TCF-4), and E-cadherin binding to β-catenin also blocked binding of the androgen receptor LBD. We also demonstrated cross talk between the WNT and androgen receptor signaling pathways because excess androgen receptor could interfere with WNT signaling and excess TCF-4 inhibited the interaction of β-catenin and androgen receptor. Taken together, the data show that β-catenin can bind to the

  10. Quinacrine induces apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells via p38 MAPK-elicited BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Changchien, Jung-Jung; Chen, Ying-Jung; Huang, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Chang, Long-Sen

    2015-04-01

    Although previous studies have revealed the anti-cancer activity of quinacrine, its effect on leukemia is not clearly resolved. We sought to explore the cytotoxic effect and mechanism of quinacrine action in human leukemia K562 cells. Quinacrine induced K562 cell apoptosis accompanied with ROS generation, mitochondrial depolarization, and down-regulation of BCL2L1 and BCL2. Upon exposure to quinacrine, ROS-mediated p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation were observed in K562 cells. Quinacrine-induced cell death and mitochondrial depolarization were suppressed by the p38MAPK inhibitor SB202190 and constitutively active MEK1 over-expression. Activation of p38 MAPK was shown to promote BCL2 degradation. Further, ERK inactivation suppressed c-Jun-mediated transcriptional expression of BCL2L1. Over-expression of BCL2L1 and BCL2 attenuated quinacrine-evoked mitochondrial depolarization and rescued the viability of quinacrine-treated cells. Taken together, our data indicate that quinacrine-induced K562 cell apoptosis is mediated through mitochondrial alterations triggered by p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression. - Highlights: • Quinacrine induces K562 cell apoptosis via down-regulation of BCL2 and BCL2L1. • Quinacrine induces p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation in K562 cells. • Quinacrine elicits p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation. • Quinacrine suppresses ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression.

  11. Gallic Acid Induces a Reactive Oxygen Species-Provoked c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase-Dependent Apoptosis in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Chun; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disorder characterized by fibroblasts proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Induction of fibroblast apoptosis therefore plays a crucial role in the resolution of this disease. Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), a common botanic phenolic compound, has been reported to induce apoptosis in tumor cell lines and renal fibroblasts. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in lung fibroblasts apoptosis induced by gallic acid. We found that treatment with gallic acid resulted in activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (PKB, Akt), but not p38MAPK, in mouse lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of JNK using pharmacologic inhibitor (SP600125) and genetic knockdown (JNK specific siRNA) significantly inhibited p53 accumulation, reduced PUMA and Fas expression, and abolished apoptosis induced by gallic acid. Moreover, treatment with antioxidants (vitamin C, N-acetyl cysteine, and catalase) effectively diminished gallic acid-induced hydrogen peroxide production, JNK and p53 activation, and cell death. These observations imply that gallic acid-mediated hydrogen peroxide formation acts as an initiator of JNK signaling pathways, leading to p53 activation and apoptosis in mouse lung fibroblasts. PMID:23533505

  12. Patient derived mutation W257G of PPP2R1A enhances cancer cell migration through SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Han, Sora; Lee, Sunyi; Su Park, Jeong; Lu, Yiling; Yu, Shuangxing; Li, Jane; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Young

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of PPP2R1A has been observed at high frequency in endometrial serous carcinomas but at low frequency in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. However, the biological role of mutation of PPP2R1A in ovarian and endometrial cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PPP2R1A expression is elevated in high-grade primary tumor patients with papillary serous tumors of the ovary. To determine whether increased levels or mutation of PPP2R1A might contribute to cancer progression, the effects of overexpression or mutation of PPP2R1A on cell proliferation, migration, and PP2A phosphatase activity were investigated using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Among the mutations, PPP2R1A-W257G enhanced cell migration in vitro through activating SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Overexpression of wild type (WT) PPP2R1A increased its binding ability with B56 regulatory subunits, whereas PPP2R1A-mutations lost the ability to bind to most B56 subunits except B56δ. Total PP2A activity and PPP2R1A-associated PP2Ac activity were significantly increased in cells overexpressing PPP2R1A-WT. In addition, overexpression of PPP2R1A-WT increased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27272709

  13. Low-dose Bisphenol A Activates Cyp11a1 Gene Expression and Corticosterone Secretion in Adrenal Gland via the JNK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hsin-Chieh; Lin, I-Wen; Yang, Zhi-Jie; Lin, Jyun-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Certain commonly used compounds that interfere with the functions of the endocrine system are classified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Bisphenol A (BPA) is an EDC that is widely used in food containers. BPA levels in human sera are commonly observed to be approximately 1-100 nM. Compared with the effects of BPA on the gonads, its effects on the adrenal gland are poorly understood. To investigate the influence of BPA on steroidogenesis, we examined the activity of the steroidogenic gene Cyp11a1 and its regulatory pathways in mouse Y1 adrenal cortex cells. Treatment with BPA at < 100 µM did not cause cell death. However, increased promoter activity and protein expression of Cyp11a1 were induced by low doses of BPA (10-1000 nM). Moreover, BPA induced c-Jun phosphorylation, and a specific inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) significantly suppressed BPA-induced steroidogenesis. Thus, treatment of adrenal cells with low doses of BPA activated Cyp11a1 and increased corticosterone production through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. Identical results were observed in rats after BPA injection. The abnormal induction of hormone synthesis by BPA in the adrenal gland might be linked to human metabolic defects and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26209791

  14. miR-138 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis via MLK3/JNK/c-jun pathway

    SciTech Connect

    He, Siyi; Liu, Peng; Jian, Zhao; Li, Jingwei; Zhu, Yun; Feng, Zezhou; Xiao, Yingbin

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •First time to find miR-138 is up-regulated in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. •First time to find miR-138 targets MLK3 and regulates JNK/c-jun pathway. •Rare myocardial biopsy of patients with CHD were collected. •Both silence and overexpression of miR-138 were implemented. •Various methods were used to detect cell function. -- Abstract: Cardiomyocytes experience a series of complex endogenous regulatory mechanisms against apoptosis induced by chronic hypoxia. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate cellular pathophysiological processes. Recently, microRNA-138 (miR-138) has been found related to hypoxia, and beneficial for cell proliferation. Therefore, we intend to study the role of miR-138 in hypoxic cardiomyocytes and the main mechanism. Myocardial samples of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were collected to test miR-138 expression. Agomir or antagomir of miR-138 was transfected into H9C2 cells to investigate its effect on cell apoptosis. Higher miR-138 expression was observed in patients with cyanotic CHD, and its expression gradually increased with prolonged hypoxia time in H9C2 cells. Using MTT and LDH assays, cell growth was significantly greater in the agomir group than in the negative control (NC) group, while antagomir decreased cell survival. Dual luciferase reporter gene and Western-blot results confirmed MLK3 was a direct target of miR-138. It was found that miR-138 attenuated hypoxia-induced apoptosis using TUNEL, Hoechst staining and Annexin V-PE/7-AAD flow cytometry analysis. We further detected expression of apoptosis-related proteins. In the agomir group, the level of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved-caspase-3, cleaved-PARP and Bad significantly reduced, while Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Opposite changes were observed in the antagomir group. Downstream targets of MLK3, JNK and c-jun, were also suppressed by miR-138. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of miR-138 plays

  15. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in rat primary astrocytes. • tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an ARE-dependent manner. • tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. • Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. • Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction. - Abstract: Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes.

  16. The Effects of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 on the Expression of Prothrombotic and Proinflammatory Molecules Induced by Anti-β2GPI in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinjing; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Ting; Yan, Jinchuan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) are involved in the process of anti-β2GPI/β2GPI-induced tissue factor (TF) expression in monocytes. However, the role of NF-κB and AP-1 in pathogenic mechanisms of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in vivo has been rarely studied. This study aimed to investigate whether NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 are involved in anti-β2GPI-induced expression of prothrombotic and proinflammatory molecules in mouse. IgG-APS or anti-β2GPI antibodies were injected into BALB/c mice in the presence or absence of PDTC (a specific inhibitor of NF-κB) and Curcumin (a potent inhibitor of AP-1) treatment. Our data showed that both IgG-APS and anti-β2GPI could induce the activation of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The anti-β2GPI-induced TF activity in homogenates of carotid arteries and peritoneal macrophages from mice could significantly decrease after PDTC and/or Curcumin treatment, in which PDTC showed the strongest inhibitory effect, but combination of two inhibitors had no synergistic effect. Furthermore, anti-β2GPI-induced expression of TF, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin in the aorta and expression of TF, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages of mice were also significantly attenuated by PDTC and/or Curcumin treatment. These results indicate that both NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 are involved in regulating anti-β2GPI-induced expression of prothrombotic and proinflammatory molecules in vivo. Inhibition of NF-κB and c-Jun/AP-1 pathways may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis and inflammation in patients with APS. PMID:26829121

  17. Tristetraprolin induces cell cycle arrest in breast tumor cells through targeting AP-1/c-Jun and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Ning, Huan; Gu, Ling; Wang, Qinghong; Lu, Wenbao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Weiguang; Ying, Baoling; Ross, Christina R; Wilson, Gerald M; Wei, Lin; Wold, William S M; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    The main characteristic of cancers, including breast cancer, is the ability of cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably. However, the underlying mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation, especially those regulated by the RNA binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), are not completely understood. In this study, we found that TTP inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo through inducing cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Our studies demonstrate that TTP inhibits c-Jun expression through the C-terminal Zn finger and therefore increases Wee1 expression, a regulatory molecule which controls cell cycle transition from the S to the G2 phase. In contrast to the well-known function of TTP in regulating mRNA stability, TTP inhibits c-Jun expression at the level of transcription by selectively blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Reconstitution of NF-κB p65 completely abolishes the inhibition of c-Jun transcription by TTP. Moreover, reconstitution of c-Jun in TTP-expressing breast tumor cells diminishes Wee1 overexpression and promotes cell proliferation. Our results indicate that TTP suppresses c-Jun expression that results in Wee1 induction which causes cell cycle arrest at the S phase and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our study provides a new pathway for TTP function as a tumor suppressor which could be targeted in tumor treatment. PMID:26497679

  18. Tristetraprolin induces cell cycle arrest in breast tumor cells through targeting AP-1/c-Jun and NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ling; Wang, Qinghong; Lu, Wenbao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Weiguang; Ying, Baoling; Ross, Christina R.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Wei, Lin; Wold, William S.M.; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The main characteristic of cancers, including breast cancer, is the ability of cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably. However, the underlying mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation, especially those regulated by the RNA binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), are not completely understood. In this study, we found that TTP inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo through inducing cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Our studies demonstrate that TTP inhibits c-Jun expression through the C-terminal Zn finger and therefore increases Wee1 expression, a regulatory molecule which controls cell cycle transition from the S to the G2 phase. In contrast to the well-known function of TTP in regulating mRNA stability, TTP inhibits c-Jun expression at the level of transcription by selectively blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Reconstitution of NF-κB p65 completely abolishes the inhibition of c-Jun transcription by TTP. Moreover, reconstitution of c-Jun in TTP-expressing breast tumor cells diminishes Wee1 overexpression and promotes cell proliferation. Our results indicate that TTP suppresses c-Jun expression that results in Wee1 induction which causes cell cycle arrest at the S phase and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our study provides a new pathway for TTP function as a tumor suppressor which could be targeted in tumor treatment. PMID:26497679

  19. High CO2 Leads to Na,K-ATPase Endocytosis via c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase-Induced LMO7b Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Dada, Laura A; Trejo Bittar, Humberto E; Welch, Lynn C; Vagin, Olga; Deiss-Yehiely, Nimrod; Kelly, Aileen M; Baker, Mairead R; Capri, Joseph; Cohn, Whitaker; Whitelegge, Julian P; Vadász, István; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2015-12-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a role in inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell adhesion and cell migration by phosphorylating paxillin and β-catenin. JNK phosphorylation downstream of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation is required for high CO2 (hypercapnia)-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we provide evidence that during hypercapnia, JNK promotes the phosphorylation of LMO7b, a scaffolding protein, in vitro and in intact cells. LMO7b phosphorylation was blocked by exposing the cells to the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and by infecting cells with dominant-negative JNK or AMPK adenovirus. The knockdown of the endogenous LMO7b or overexpression of mutated LMO7b with alanine substitutions of five potential JNK phosphorylation sites (LMO7b-5SA) or only Ser-1295 rescued both LMO7b phosphorylation and the hypercapnia-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. Moreover, high CO2 promoted the colocalization and interaction of LMO7b and the Na,K-ATPase α1 subunit at the plasma membrane, which were prevented by SP600125 or by transfecting cells with LMO7b-5SA. Collectively, our data suggest that hypercapnia leads to JNK-induced LMO7b phosphorylation at Ser-1295, which facilitates the interaction of LMO7b with Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane promoting the endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase in alveolar epithelial cells.

  20. High CO2 Leads to Na,K-ATPase Endocytosis via c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase-Induced LMO7b Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Trejo Bittar, Humberto E.; Welch, Lynn C.; Vagin, Olga; Deiss-Yehiely, Nimrod; Kelly, Aileen M.; Baker, Mairead R.; Capri, Joseph; Cohn, Whitaker; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Vadász, István; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a role in inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell adhesion and cell migration by phosphorylating paxillin and β-catenin. JNK phosphorylation downstream of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation is required for high CO2 (hypercapnia)-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we provide evidence that during hypercapnia, JNK promotes the phosphorylation of LMO7b, a scaffolding protein, in vitro and in intact cells. LMO7b phosphorylation was blocked by exposing the cells to the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and by infecting cells with dominant-negative JNK or AMPK adenovirus. The knockdown of the endogenous LMO7b or overexpression of mutated LMO7b with alanine substitutions of five potential JNK phosphorylation sites (LMO7b-5SA) or only Ser-1295 rescued both LMO7b phosphorylation and the hypercapnia-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. Moreover, high CO2 promoted the colocalization and interaction of LMO7b and the Na,K-ATPase α1 subunit at the plasma membrane, which were prevented by SP600125 or by transfecting cells with LMO7b-5SA. Collectively, our data suggest that hypercapnia leads to JNK-induced LMO7b phosphorylation at Ser-1295, which facilitates the interaction of LMO7b with Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane promoting the endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase in alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:26370512

  1. Differentiating N-terminal aspartic and isoaspartic acid residues in peptides.

    PubMed

    Sargaeva, Nadezda P; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Formation of isoaspartic acid (isoAsp) is a common modification of aspartic acid (Asp) or asparagine (Asn) residue in proteins. Differentiation of isoAsp and Asp residues is a challenging task owing to their similar properties and identical molecular mass. It was recently shown that they can be differentiated using ion-electron or ion-ion interaction fragmentation methods (ExD) because these methods provide diagnostic fragments c + 57 and z(•) - 57 specific to the isoAsp residue. To date, however, the presence of such fragments has not been explored on peptides with an N-terminal isoAsp residue. To address this question, several N-terminal isoAsp-containing peptides were analyzed using ExD methods alone or combined with chromatography. A diagnostic fragment [M + 2H - 74](+•) was observed for the doubly charged precursor ions with N-terminal isoAsp residues. For some peptides, identification of the N-terminal isoAsp residue was challenging because of the low diagnostic ion peak intensity and the presence of interfering peaks. Supplemental activation was used to improve diagnostic ion detection. Further, N-terminal acetylation was offered as a means to overcome the interference problem by shifting the diagnostic fragment peak to [M + 2H - 116](+•).

  2. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in perfluorooctane sulfonic acid-induced inflammatory reaction in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingying; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-01

    Microglial activation is closely related to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by producing proinflammatory cytokines. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), known as an emerging persistent organic pollutant, is reported to disturb human immune homeostasis; however, whether it affects cytokine production or the immune response in the central nervous system remains unclear. The present study was aimed to explore whether PFOS contributed to inflammatory action and to investigate the corresponding mechanisms in BV2 microglia. PFOS-mediated morphologic changes, cytokine responses and signaling events were examined by light microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot assays. Our results indicated that PFOS increased BV2 cells activation and simultaneously increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 expression. In addition, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor (SP600125), as well as ERK1/2 blocker (PD98059), transcriptionally at least, displayed anti-inflammatory properties on PFOS-elicited cytokine responses. Moreover, the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was specifically activated by PFOS as well. These results, taken together, suggested that PFOS exerts its functional effects on the response of microglial cell activation via, in part, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways with its subsequent influence on proinflammatory action.

  3. Induction of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes expression by formaldehyde-releasing and epoxy resin-based root-canal sealers in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tai, Kuo-Wei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2002-03-01

    An important requirement for a root-canal sealer is biologic compatibility; most evaluations have focused on general toxicological and local tissue irritating properties. There is only scant information about mutagenicity or carcinogenicity testing for root-canal sealer. It has been shown that c-fos and c-jun are induced rapidly by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli. Numerous works have extensively investigated the induction mechanisms of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes by these agents; however, little is known about the induction of cellular signaling events and specific gene expression after cell exposure to root-canal sealers. Therefore, we used osteoblastic cell line U2-OS to examine the effect of zinc-oxide eugenol-based (N2 and Endomethasome), epoxy resin-based (AH Plus), and calcium hydroxide-based (Sealapex) root-canal sealers on the expression of c-fos and c-jun protooncogenes to understand in more detail the molecular mechanisms of root-canal sealer-induced genotoxicity. The cytotoxicity decreased in an order of N2 > Endomethasome > AH Plus > Sealapex. In addition, N2, Endomethasome, and AH Plus rapidly induced c-jun and c-fos mRNA levels in cells. However, Sealapex did not induce c-jun and c-fos mRNA expression at detectable levels all time points. Taken together, persistent induction of c-jun and c-fos protooncogenes by formaldehyde-releasing and epoxy resin-based root-canal sealers may be distributed systemically via apex to cause some unexpected adverse effects on human beings. These data should be taken into consideration when choosing a root-canal sealer.

  4. NF-kB and c-Jun induce the expression of the oncogenic miR-221 and miR-222 in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Galardi, Silvia; Mercatelli, Neri; Farace, Maria G; Ciafrè, Silvia A

    2011-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent negative regulators of gene expression involved in all aspects of cell biology. They finely modulate virtually all physiological pathways in metazoans, and are deeply implicated in all main pathologies, among which cancer. Mir-221 and miR-222, two closely related miRNAs encoded in cluster from a genomic region on chromosome X, are strongly upregulated in several forms of human tumours. In this work, we report that the ectopic modulation of NF-kB modifies miR-221/222 expression in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines, where we had previously shown their oncogenic activity. We identify two separate distal regions upstream of miR-221/222 promoter which are bound by the NF-kB subunit p65 and drive efficient transcription in luciferase reporter assays; consistently, the site-directed mutagenesis disrupting p65 binding sites or the ectopical inhibition of NF-kB activity significantly reduce luciferase activity. In the most distal enhancer region, we also define a binding site for c-Jun, and we show that the binding of this factor cooperates with that of p65, fully accounting for the observed upregulation of miR-221/222. Thus our work uncovers an additional mechanism through which NF-kB and c-Jun, two transcription factors deeply involved in cancer onset and progression, contribute to oncogenesis, by inducing miR-221/222 transcription. PMID:21245048

  5. NF-kB and c-Jun induce the expression of the oncogenic miR-221 and miR-222 in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Galardi, Silvia; Mercatelli, Neri; Farace, Maria G.; Ciafrè, Silvia A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent negative regulators of gene expression involved in all aspects of cell biology. They finely modulate virtually all physiological pathways in metazoans, and are deeply implicated in all main pathologies, among which cancer. Mir-221 and miR-222, two closely related miRNAs encoded in cluster from a genomic region on chromosome X, are strongly upregulated in several forms of human tumours. In this work, we report that the ectopic modulation of NF-kB modifies miR-221/222 expression in prostate carcinoma and glioblastoma cell lines, where we had previously shown their oncogenic activity. We identify two separate distal regions upstream of miR-221/222 promoter which are bound by the NF-kB subunit p65 and drive efficient transcription in luciferase reporter assays; consistently, the site-directed mutagenesis disrupting p65 binding sites or the ectopical inhibition of NF-kB activity significantly reduce luciferase activity. In the most distal enhancer region, we also define a binding site for c-Jun, and we show that the binding of this factor cooperates with that of p65, fully accounting for the observed upregulation of miR-221/222. Thus our work uncovers an additional mechanism through which NF-kB and c-Jun, two transcription factors deeply involved in cancer onset and progression, contribute to oncogenesis, by inducing miR-221/222 transcription. PMID:21245048

  6. Growth hormone induces expression of c-jun and jun B oncogenes and employs a protein kinase C signal transduction pathway for the induction of c-fos oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, M C; de Groot, R P; Herrmann-Erlee, M P; Koornneef, I; Kruijer, W; Kramer, Y M

    1991-04-01

    Although the structure of several members of the GH receptor family has been defined, signal transduction following GH binding to its receptor has not been elucidated. Mouse osteoblasts were used to study the effect of GH on immediate early gene expression and, subsequently, the cellular signal(s) mediating this expression were analysed. GH rapidly and transiently induced the expression of c-jun and jun B in concert with the already reported expression of c-fos. The GH-induced expression of c-fos was completely blocked by the protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine and H7, indicating that the action of GH is mediated by one or several protein kinases. We next analysed the identity of the putative protein kinases in more detail by using a more specific protein kinase inhibitor, namely the ether-lipid 1-O-alkyl-2-O-methylglycerol, understood to be an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC). Data obtained from these studies revealed that GH-induced expression of c-fos is mediated by PKC. In addition, we observed a profound increase in formation of the PKC activator diacyglycerol upon addition of GH, a natural activator of PKC. In conclusion, upon binding of GH to mouse osteoblasts, the receptor-mediated cellular signal involves diacyglycerol formation and activation of PKC, leading to the induction of oncogene expression. Finally, the expression of c-fos, c-jun and jun B results in an increased binding of protein complexes to AP-1 binding sites.

  7. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin induces CCL5 secretion via the Toll-like receptor 2-NF-kappaB and -Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Trejo, Artemisa; Pérez, Aline

    2008-02-01

    In response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), CC chemokines are secreted from host cells to attract components of the innate and adaptive immune systems to the site of infection. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been shown to recognize M. bovis BCG and to initiate signaling pathways that result in enhanced secretion of CC chemokines. Despite the essential requirement of TLR2 in M. bovis BCG infection, the mechanisms by which it induces secretion of CC chemokines are not well defined. In this study, we report that stimulation of HEK293 cells expressing human TLR2 with M. bovis BCG resulted in increased CCL2 and CCL5 secretion, as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. M. bovis BCG infection resulted in the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the inhibition of JNK activity had a significant effect on M. bovis BCG-dependent CCL5 secretion in TLR2-expressing cells but no effect on M. bovis BCG-dependent CCL2 secretion from infected HEK293 cells expressing human TLR2. The M. bovis BCG-induced CCL5 release was attenuated by sulfasalazine (a well-described inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity), BAY 11-7082 (an IkappaB phosphorylation inhibitor), and ALLN (a well-described inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation that prevents degradation of IkappaB and eventually results in a lack of translocated NF-kappaB in the nucleus). In addition, stimulation of TLR2-expressing cells with M. bovis BCG resulted in translocation of NF-kappaB subunits from the cytoplasmic to the nuclear fraction, and stimulation of cells with M. bovis BCG activated IkappaB kinase alphabeta. These findings indicate that M. bovis BCG induces CCL5 production through mechanisms that include a TLR2-dependent component that requires JNK and NF-kappaB activities.

  8. N-terminal amino acid sequences and some characteristics of fibrinolytic/hemorrhagic metalloproteinases purified from Bothrops jararaca venom.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masugi; Sugiki, Masahiko; Anai, Keita; Yoshida, Etsuo

    2002-08-01

    We determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the fibrinolytic/hemorrhagic metalloproteinases (jararafibrases I, III and IV) purified from Bothrops jararaca venom. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of jararafibrase I and its degradation products were identical to those of jararhagin, another hemorrhagic metalloproteinase purified from the same snake venom. Together with enzymatic and immunological properties, we concluded that those two enzymes are identical. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of jararafibrase III was quite similar to C-type lectin isolated from Crotalus atrox, and the protein had a hemagglutinating activity on intact rat red blood cells. PMID:12165326

  9. Structure-activity relationships within the N-terminal short consensus repeats (SCR) of human CR1 (C3b/C4b receptor, CD35): SCR 3 plays a critical role in inhibition of the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Mossakowska, D; Dodd, I; Pindar, W; Smith, R A

    1999-06-01

    Genes coding for between one and four short consensus repeats (SCR) of the N-terminal region of human complement receptor 1 (CR1) were synthesized from oligonucleotides and those encoding SCR(1-2), SCR(1-3), SCR(1-4), SCR3 and SCR(3-4) were expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Following solubilization in urea, the proteins were partially purified and refolded and the activity of each protein was assessed in both classical and alternative pathway complement assays. All fragments showed a varying degree of activity with the general order being SCR(1-3) = SCR(1-4) > SCR(1-2). Addition of SCR3 to SCR(1-2) significantly improved potency, whereas the addition of SCR4 conferred no additional benefit. This observation, coupled with the ability of the single-domain SCR3 to inhibit classical pathway mediated lysis with an IH50% (inhibition of hemolysis by 50%) of 4.8 microM, demonstrates that SCR3 provides key binding interactions with activated complement components. SCR(1-3) was able to inhibit both classical and alternative pathways of complement activation, showing that the N-terminal SCR of CR1 retain the ability to interact with C3b. Assays for CR1-like cofactor activity for factor I using C4b-like C4 or C3b-like C3 as substrates showed that SCR(1-3) possessed such cofactor activity and that C4b-like C4 was a better substrate. When compared to full-length (30 SCR) soluble CR1 (sCR1), SCR(1-3) was significantly less potent in accord with a model involving multi-valent binding of C3b/C4b to CR1.

  10. H-ras transfection of the rat kidney cell line NRK-52E results in increased induction of c-fos, c-jun and hsp70 following sulofenur treatment.

    PubMed

    Gu, H; Smith, M W; Phelps, P C; Berezesky, I K; Merriman, R L; Boder, G B; Trump, B F

    1996-09-10

    The effect of the antineoplastic drug sulofenur on the induction of the immediate-early genes (IEG) c-fos and c-jun and the stress gene hsp70 was compared in the rat kidney epithelial-like cell line NRK-52E and a derivative H-ras-transfected (H/1.2NRK-52E) cell line. Fold induction for each gene after sulofenur (500 microM) treatment was greater in H/1.2NRK-52E. The maximum increases for NRK-2E and H/1.2NRK-52E were as follows: c-fos, approximately 10-fold and approximately 18-fold; c-jun, approximately 2.5-fold and approximately 3.6-fold; hsp70, approximately 13-fold and approximately 30-fold. In cells loaded with EGTA/AM or treated in low or no Ca2+ HBSS, c-fos induction was reduced similarly in both cell types. However, inhibition of protein kinases with staurosporin and calphostin C reduced c-fos by 80% in NRK-52E but by only 10-20% in H/1.2NRK.52E. These results indicate that sulofenur-induced IEG elevation is Ca(2+)-dependent and that the requirement for protein kinase C activation is bypassed in H-ras-transfected cells.

  11. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  12. Loss of STAT1 protects hair cells from ototoxicity through modulation of STAT3, c-Jun, Akt, and autophagy factors.

    PubMed

    Levano, S; Bodmer, D

    2015-01-01

    Hair cell damage is a side effect of cisplatin and aminoglycoside use. The inhibition or attenuation of this process is a target of many investigations. There is growing evidence that STAT1 deficiency decreases cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity; however, the role of STAT function and the molecules that act in gentamicin-mediated toxicity have not been fully elucidated. We used mice lacking STAT1 to investigate the effect of STAT1 ablation in cultured organs treated with cisplatin and gentamicin. Here we show that ablation of STAT1 decreased cisplatin toxicity and attenuated gentamicin-mediated hair cell damage. More TUNEL-positive hair cells were observed in explants of wild-type mice than that of STAT1(-/-) mice. Although cisplatin increased serine phosphorylation of STAT1 in wild-type mice and diminished STAT3 expression in wild-type and STAT1(-/-) mice, gentamicin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in STAT1(-/-) mice. The early inflammatory response was manifested in the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-6 in cisplatin-treated explants of wild-type and STAT1(-/-) mice. Expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was altered in cisplatin-treated explants, upregulated in wild-type explants, and downregulated in STAT1(-/-) explants. Cisplatin and gentamicin triggered the activation of c-Jun. Activation of Akt was observed in gentamicin-treated explants from STAT1(-/-) mice. Increased levels of the autophagy proteins Beclin-1 and LC3-II were observed in STAT1(-/-) explants. These data suggest that STAT1 is a central player in mediating ototoxicity. Gentamicin and cisplatin activate different downstream factors to trigger ototoxicity. Although cisplatin and gentamicin triggered inflammation and activated apoptotic factors, the absence of STAT1 allowed the cells to overcome the effects of these drugs.

  13. Predicting Virulence of Aeromonas Isolates Based-on Changes in Transcription of c-jun and c-fos in Human Tissue Culture Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess virulence of Aeromonas isolates based on the change in regulation of c-jun and c-fos in the human intestinal tissue culture cell line Caco-2. Methods and Results: Aeromonas cells were added to Caco-2 cells at approximately a one to one ratio. After 1, 2 and 3 ...

  14. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  15. The regulation of TIM-3 transcription in T cells involves c-Jun binding but not CpG methylation at the TIM-3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Yun, Su Jin; Jun, Ka-Jung; Komori, Kuniharu; Lee, Mi Jin; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon; Park, Sun

    2016-07-01

    Tim-3 is an immunomodulatory protein that is expressed constitutively on monocytes but is induced in activated T cells. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of TIM-3 transcription are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether methylation of the TIM-3 promoter is involved in regulatingTIM-3 transcription in T cells, and identified a transcription factor that regulates TIM-3 transcription by associating with the TIM-3 minimal promoter region. Pyrosequencing of the TIM-3 promoter up to -1440bp revealed 11 hypermethylated CpG sites and 4 hypomethylated CpG sites in human CD4(+) T cells as well as in CD11b(+) cells. Dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4), a mark of transcriptional activation, was predominantly found in the proximal TIM-3 promoter -954 to -34bp region, whereas trimethylation of H3K9 and H3K27, which are markers of transcriptional suppression, were mostly observed in the distal promoter -1549 to -1048bp region in human CD4(+) T cells and CD11b(+) cells. However, no change in the methylation status of CpG sites and the histone H3 in the TIM-3 promoter was found during induction of TIM-3 transcription in T cells. Finally, AP-1 involvement in TIM-3 transcription was shown in relation with the TIM-3 minimal promoter -146 to +144bp region. The present study defines the minimal TIM-3 promoter region and demonstrates its interaction with c-Jun during TIM-3 transcription in CD4(+) T cells.

  16. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1-208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27203582

  17. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor.

    PubMed

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y N; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine.

  18. Jun N-terminal kinase signaling makes a face

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, Deborah A.; Stultz, Brian G.; Park, Sung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT decapentaplegic (dpp), the Drosophila ortholog of BMP 2/4, directs ventral adult head morphogenesis through expression in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc. This dpp expressing domain exerts effects both on the peripodial epithelium, and the underlying disc proper epithelium. We have uncovered a role for the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in dpp-mediated ventral head development. JNK activity is required for dpp's action on the disc proper, but in the absence of dpp expression, excessive JNK activity is produced, leading to specific loss of maxillary palps. In this review we outline our hypotheses on how dpp acts by both short range and longer range mechanisms to direct head morphogenesis and speculate on the dual role of JNK signaling in this process. Finally, we describe the regulatory control of dpp expression in the eye-antennal disc, and pose the problem of how the various expression domains of a secreted protein can be targeted to their specific functions. PMID:27384866

  19. Jun N-terminal kinase signaling makes a face.

    PubMed

    Hursh, Deborah A; Stultz, Brian G; Park, Sung Yeon

    2016-10-01

    decapentaplegic (dpp), the Drosophila ortholog of BMP 2/4, directs ventral adult head morphogenesis through expression in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc. This dpp expressing domain exerts effects both on the peripodial epithelium, and the underlying disc proper epithelium. We have uncovered a role for the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in dpp-mediated ventral head development. JNK activity is required for dpp's action on the disc proper, but in the absence of dpp expression, excessive JNK activity is produced, leading to specific loss of maxillary palps. In this review we outline our hypotheses on how dpp acts by both short range and longer range mechanisms to direct head morphogenesis and speculate on the dual role of JNK signaling in this process. Finally, we describe the regulatory control of dpp expression in the eye-antennal disc, and pose the problem of how the various expression domains of a secreted protein can be targeted to their specific functions.

  20. Requirements for PKC-augmented JNK activation by MKK4/7

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Bergami, Pablo; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2008-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are activated in response to stress, DNA damage, and cytokines by MKK4 and MKK7. We recently demonstrated that PKC can augment the degree of JNK activation by phosphorylating JNK, which requires the adaptor protein RACK1. Here we report on the conditions required for PKC-dependent JNK activation. In vitro kinase assays reveal that PKC phosphorylation of JNK is not sufficient for its activation but rather augments JNK activation by canonical JNK upstream kinases MKK4 or MKK7 alone or in combination. Further, to enhance JNK activity, PKC phosphorylation of JNK should precede its phosphorylation by MKK4/7. Inhibition of PKC phosphorylation of JNK affects both early and late phases of JNK activation following UV-irradiation and reduces the apoptotic response mediated by JNK. These data provide important insight into the requirements for PKC activation of JNK signaling. PMID:18182317

  1. The N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa10 is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Rasmus; Myklebust, Line M.; Thiel, Puja; Foyn, Håvard; Fladmark, Kari E.; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation, catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the α-amino group of the first amino acid. Functions of N-terminal acetylation include protein degradation and sub-cellular targeting. Recent findings in humans indicate that a dysfunctional Nα-acetyltransferase (Naa) 10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major NAT, is associated with lethality during infancy. In the present study, we identified the Danio rerio orthologue zebrafish Naa 10 (zNaa10). In vitro N-terminal acetylation assays revealed that zNaa10 has NAT activity with substrate specificity highly similar to that of human Naa10. Spatiotemporal expression pattern was determined by in situ hybridization, showing ubiquitous expression with especially strong staining in brain and eye. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that naa10 morphants displayed increased lethality, growth retardation and developmental abnormalities like bent axis, abnormal eyes and bent tails. In conclusion, we identified the zebrafish Naa10 orthologue and revealed that it is essential for normal development and viability of zebrafish. PMID:26251455

  2. In vivo study on the effects of microcystin extracts on the expression profiles of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun and c-myc) in liver, kidney and testis of male Wistar rats injected i.v. with toxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiying; Xie, Ping; Li, Guangyu; Hao, Le; Xiong, Qian

    2009-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a potent liver tumor promoter, possessing potent tumor-promoting activity and weak initiating activity. Proto-oncogenes are known to be involved in the tumor-promoting mechanisms of microcystin-LR. However, few data are available on the effects of MCs on proto-oncogenes in the whole animal. To investigate the effects of MCs on the expression profile of the proto-oncogenes in different organs, male Wistar rats were injected intravenously with microcystin extracts at a dose of 86.7 mug MC-LR eq/kg bw (MC-LR eq, MC-LR equivalents). mRNA levels of three proto-oncogenes c-fos, c-jun and c-myc in liver, kidney and testis were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR at several time points post-injection. Significant induction of these genes at transcriptional level was observed in the three organs. In addition, the increase of mRNA expression of all three genes was much higher in liver than in kidney and testis. Meanwhile, the protein levels of c-Fos and c-Jun were investigated by western blotting. Both proteins were induced in the three organs. However, elevations of protein levels were much lower than those of mRNA levels. These findings suggest that the expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc might be one possible mechanism for the tumor-promoting activity and initiating activity of microcystins.

  3. Analytical cation-exchange chromatography to assess the identity, purity, and N-terminal integrity of human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-10-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLF) is an iron-binding glycoprotein involved in the innate host defense. The positively charged N-terminal domain of hLF mediates several of its activities by interacting with ligands such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), specific receptors, and other proteins. This cationic domain is highly susceptible to limited proteolysis, which impacts on the affinity of hLF for the ligand. An analytical method, employing cation-exchange chromatography on Mono S, was developed to assess the N-terminal integrity of hLF preparations. The method, which separates N-terminally intact hLF from hLF species lacking two (Gly(1)-Arg(2)) or three (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)) residues, showed that 5-58% of total hLF in commercially obtained preparations was N-terminally degraded. The elution profile of hLF on Mono S unequivocally differed from lactoferrins from other species as well as homologous and other whey proteins. Analysis of fresh human whey samples revealed two variants of N-terminally intact hLF, but not limitedly proteolyzed hLF. Mono S chromatography of 2 out of 26 individual human whey samples showed a rare polymorphic hLF variant with three N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Ser(5)-) instead of the usual variant with four N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Arg(5)-Ser(6)-). In conclusion, Mono S cation-exchange chromatography appeared a robust method to assess the identity, purity, N-terminal integrity, and the presence of polymorphic and intact hLF variants. PMID:12381362

  4. Top-down N-terminal sequencing of Immunoglobulin subunits with electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da; Pipes, Gary D; Hambly, David; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Treuheit, Michael J; Gadgil, Himanshu S

    2009-01-01

    An N-terminal top-down sequencing approach was developed for IgG characterization, using high-resolution HPLC separation and collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) on a single-stage LCT Premier time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Fragmentation of the IgG chains on the LCT Premier was optimized by varying the ion guide voltage values. Ion guide 1 voltage had the most significant effect on the fragmentation of the IgG chains. An ion guide 1 voltage value of 100 V was found to be optimum for the N-terminal fragmentation of IgG heavy and light chains, which are approximately 50 and 25 kDa, respectively. The most prominent ion series in this CAD experiment was the terminal b-ion series which allows N-terminal sequencing. Using this technique, we were able to confirm the sequence of up to seven N-terminal residues. Applications of this method for the identification of N-terminal pyroglutamic acid formation will be discussed. The method described could be used as a high-throughput method for the rapid N-terminal sequencing of IgG chains and for the detection of chemical modifications in the terminal residues.

  5. Nymphaea rubra ameliorates TNF-α-induced insulin resistance via suppression of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-κB in the rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Rahuja, Neha; Ishrat, Nayab; Asthana, R K; Mishra, D K; Maurya, Rakesh; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated insulin signaling and the anti-inflammatory effects by the chloroform fraction of ethanolic extract of Nymphaea rubra flowers in TNF-α-induced insulin resistance in the rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 myotubes) to dissect out its anti-hyperglycemic mechanism. N. rubra enhances the GLUT4-mediated glucose transport in a dose dependent manner and also increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of both IR-β and IRS-1, and the IRS-1 associated PI-3 kinase activity in TNF-α-treated L6 myotubes. Moreover, N. rubra decreases Ser(307) phosphorylation of IRS-1 by the suppression of JNK and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, N. rubra reverses the insulin resistance by the inhibition of c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase and Nuclear-κB.

  6. Nymphaea rubra ameliorates TNF-α-induced insulin resistance via suppression of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-κB in the rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Rahuja, Neha; Ishrat, Nayab; Asthana, R K; Mishra, D K; Maurya, Rakesh; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated insulin signaling and the anti-inflammatory effects by the chloroform fraction of ethanolic extract of Nymphaea rubra flowers in TNF-α-induced insulin resistance in the rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 myotubes) to dissect out its anti-hyperglycemic mechanism. N. rubra enhances the GLUT4-mediated glucose transport in a dose dependent manner and also increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of both IR-β and IRS-1, and the IRS-1 associated PI-3 kinase activity in TNF-α-treated L6 myotubes. Moreover, N. rubra decreases Ser(307) phosphorylation of IRS-1 by the suppression of JNK and NF-κB activation. In conclusion, N. rubra reverses the insulin resistance by the inhibition of c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase and Nuclear-κB. PMID:25234391

  7. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  8. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  9. Human TRPA1 is intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive with and without its N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain

    PubMed Central

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Survery, Sabeen; Kreir, Mohamed; Simonsen, Charlotte; Kjellbom, Per; Högestätt, Edward D.; Johanson, Urban; Zygmunt, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    We have purified and reconstituted human transient receptor potential (TRP) subtype A1 (hTRPA1) into lipid bilayers and recorded single-channel currents to understand its inherent thermo- and chemosensory properties as well as the role of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the N terminus in channel behavior. We report that hTRPA1 with and without its N-terminal ARD (Δ1–688 hTRPA1) is intrinsically cold-sensitive, and thus, cold-sensing properties of hTRPA1 reside outside the N-terminal ARD. We show activation of hTRPA1 by the thiol oxidant 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and that electrophilic compounds activate hTRPA1 in the presence and absence of the N-terminal ARD. The nonelectrophilic compounds menthol and the cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (C16) directly activate hTRPA1 at different sites independent of the N-terminal ARD. The TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 inhibited cold and chemical activation of hTRPA1 and Δ1–688 hTRPA1, supporting a direct interaction with hTRPA1 outside the N-terminal ARD. These findings show that hTRPA1 is an intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive ion channel. Thus, second messengers, including Ca2+, or accessory proteins are not needed for hTRPA1 responses to cold or chemical activators. We suggest that conformational changes outside the N-terminal ARD by cold, electrophiles, and nonelectrophiles are important in hTRPA1 channel gating and that targeting chemical interaction sites outside the N-terminal ARD provides possibilities to fine tune TRPA1-based drug therapies (e.g., for treatment of pain associated with cold hypersensitivity and cardiovascular disease). PMID:25389312

  10. X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) Regulation of Cyclin D1 Protein Expression and Cancer Cell Anchorage-independent Growth via Its E3 Ligase-mediated Protein Phosphatase 2A/c-Jun Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruowen; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Jingjie; Gao, Jimin; Chen, Jingyuan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a well known potent inhibitor of apoptosis; however, it is also involved in other cancer cell biological behavior. In the current study, we discovered that XIAP and its E3 ligase played a crucial role in regulation of cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells. We found that deficiency of XIAP expression resulted in a marked reduction in cyclin D1 expression. Consistently, cell cycle transition and anchorage-independent cell growth were also attenuated in XIAP-deficient cancer cells compared with those of the parental wild-type cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that E3 ligase activity within the RING domain of XIAP is crucial for its ability to regulate cyclin D1 transcription, cell cycle transition, and anchorage-independent cell growth by up-regulating transactivation of c-Jun/AP-1. Moreover, we found that E3 ligase within RING domain was required for XIAP inhibition of phosphatase PP2A activity by up-regulation of PP2A phosphorylation at Tyr-307 in its catalytic subunit. Such PP2A phosphorylation and inactivation resulted in phosphorylation and activation of its downstream target c-Jun in turn leading to cyclin D1 expression. Collectively, our studies uncovered a novel function of E3 ligase activity of XIAP in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, providing significant insight into the understanding of the biomedical significance of overexpressed XIAP in cancer development, further offering a new molecular basis for utilizing XIAP E3 ligase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:23720779

  11. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  12. Constitutive hypophosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 and down-regulation of c-Jun in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Joe Yiu; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, C.H.

    2008-08-22

    Hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to promote cancer cell proliferation. We therefore investigated the constitutive phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the expression of its downstream targets c-Fos, c-Jun, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in biopsied human gastric cancer tissues. Results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Jun expression were significantly lowered in gastric cancer compared with the non-cancer adjacent tissues. The expression of c-Fos, however, was not altered while COX-2 was significantly up-regulated. To conclude, we demonstrate that hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2 may occur in gastric cancer. Such discovery may have implication in the application of pathway-directed therapy for this malignant disease.

  13. Effect of estrogen and tamoxifen on the expression pattern of AP-1 factors in MCF-7 cells: role of c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1 in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Patil, Rajeshwari H; Devaraju, K S; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2013-08-01

    The activated transcription factor ERα plays an important role in the breast development and progression of cancer. In a non-classical pathway ER interacts with other transcription factors AP-1, NFkB, SP1, etc. AP-1 transcription factors control rapid responses of mammalian cells to stimuli that impact proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. AP-1 factors are leucine zipper proteins belonging to members of the Jun family (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) and Fos family (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, and Fra-2) proteins. Although AP-1 factors are well characterized, not much is known about the expression pattern of the AP-1 factors in breast cancer cells. Hence to determine which AP-1 factors are expressed and regulated by estrogen, we used human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as in vitro model system. The MCF-7 cells were treated with or without estradiol-17β (E2) or antiestrogen tamoxifen (TMX) and the cell proliferation and viability was assessed by MTT assay. The expression of different AP-1 factors was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The cells treated with E2 found to increase the cell proliferation by more than 35 % and TMX an antiestrogen decreased by 29 % compared to control. The E2 found to induce the expression of c-Jun, Fra-1, and c-Fos, while TMX decreased the expression. In addition TMX also decreased the mRNA levels of Jun-D and Fra-2. These results suggest that the AP-1 factors c-Jun, c-Fos, and Fra-1 may be involved in the proliferation and transformation of MCF-7 cells. E2 also found to induce cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 mRNA transcripts of cell cycle regulators while TMX significantly decreased compared to control. Further E2 induced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and TMX decreased mRNA transcripts. The data presented here support the E2-ERα-mediated MCF-7 cell proliferation and confirms the role of AP-1 factors in cell cycle regulation. PMID:23625206

  14. Attenuated neuroprotective effect of riboflavin under UV-B irradiation via miR-203/c-Jun signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Riboflavin (RF) or vitamin B2 is known to have neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we report the attenuation of the neuroprotective effects of RF under UV-B irradiation. Preconditioning of UV-B irradiated riboflavin (UV-B-RF) showed attenuated neuroprotective effects compared to that of RF in SH-SY5Y neuroblostoma cell line and primary cortical neurons in vitro and a rat model of cerebral ischemia in vivo. Results Results indicated that RF pretreatment significantly inhibited cell death and reduced LDH secretion compared to that of the UV-B-RF pretreatment in primary cortical neuron cultures subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro and cortical brain tissue subjected to ischemic injury in vivo. Further mechanistic studies using cortical neuron cultures revealed that RF treatment induced increased miR-203 expression which in turn inhibited c-Jun expression and increased neuronal cell survival. Functional assays clearly demonstrated that the UV-B-RF preconditioning failed to sustain the increased expression of miR-203 and the decreased levels of c-Jun, mediating the neuroprotective effects of RF. UV-B irradiation attenuated the neuroprotective effects of RF through modulation of the miR-203/c-Jun signaling pathway. Conclusion Thus, the ability of UV-B to serve as a modulator of this neuroprotective signaling pathway warrants further studies into its role as a regulator of other cytoprotective/neuroprotective signaling pathways. PMID:24884571

  15. Roles of stress-activated protein kinases in the replication of Singapore grouper iridovirus and regulation of the inflammatory responses in grouper cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; OuYang, Zhengliang; Cai, Jia; Yan, Yang; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-06-01

    Stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), are usually activated in response to different environmental stimuli, including virus infection. In the present study, the roles of SAPKs during Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection were investigated in fish cells. The results showed that increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK occurred during active replication of SGIV in grouper cell cultures. Moreover, downstream effectors (c-Jun, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2, p53, activator protein 1, Myc and nuclear factor of activated T cells) were activated after SGIV infection, suggesting that SGIV replication activated the JNK and p38 MAPK signalling pathways. Notably, using specific inhibitors, it was found that viral gene transcripts, protein expression and viral titres were not affected by inhibition of p38 MAPK but were suppressed significantly by inhibiting JNK1/2 activation. In addition, transcription of grouper immune genes including interferon regulatory factor 1, interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were regulated by JNK, whilst only TNF-α was regulated by p38 MAPK. It is proposed that the JNK pathway is important for SGIV replication and modulates the inflammatory responses during virus infection.

  16. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-12-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics.

  17. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O’Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-01-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics. PMID:26678960

  18. Expanding the Phenotype Associated with NAA10-Related N-Terminal Acetylation Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Chloé; Støve, Svein Isungset; Popp, Bernt; Gérard, Bénédicte; Blenski, Marina; AhMew, Nicholas; de Bie, Charlotte; Goldenberg, Paula; Isidor, Bertrand; Keren, Boris; Leheup, Bruno; Lampert, Laetitia; Mignot, Cyril; Tezcan, Kamer; Mancini, Grazia M S; Nava, Caroline; Wasserstein, Melissa; Bruel, Ange-Line; Thevenon, Julien; Masurel, Alice; Duffourd, Yannis; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Faivre, Laurence; Piton, Amélie; Reis, André; Arnesen, Thomas; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Zweier, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a common protein modification in eukaryotes associated with numerous cellular processes. Inherited mutations in NAA10, encoding the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetylation complex NatA have been associated with diverse, syndromic X-linked recessive disorders, whereas de novo missense mutations have been reported in one male and one female individual with severe intellectual disability but otherwise unspecific phenotypes. Thus, the full genetic and clinical spectrum of NAA10 deficiency is yet to be delineated. We identified three different novel and one known missense mutation in NAA10, de novo in 11 females, and due to maternal germ line mosaicism in another girl and her more severely affected and deceased brother. In vitro enzymatic assays for the novel, recurrent mutations p.(Arg83Cys) and p.(Phe128Leu) revealed reduced catalytic activity. X-inactivation was random in five females. The core phenotype of X-linked NAA10-related N-terminal-acetyltransferase deficiency in both males and females includes developmental delay, severe intellectual disability, postnatal growth failure with severe microcephaly, and skeletal or cardiac anomalies. Genotype-phenotype correlations within and between both genders are complex and may include various factors such as location and nature of mutations, enzymatic stability and activity, and X-inactivation in females. PMID:27094817

  19. Expanding the Phenotype Associated with NAA10-Related N-Terminal Acetylation Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Chloé; Støve, Svein Isungset; Popp, Bernt; Gérard, Bénédicte; Blenski, Marina; AhMew, Nicholas; de Bie, Charlotte; Goldenberg, Paula; Isidor, Bertrand; Keren, Boris; Leheup, Bruno; Lampert, Laetitia; Mignot, Cyril; Tezcan, Kamer; Mancini, Grazia M S; Nava, Caroline; Wasserstein, Melissa; Bruel, Ange-Line; Thevenon, Julien; Masurel, Alice; Duffourd, Yannis; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Faivre, Laurence; Piton, Amélie; Reis, André; Arnesen, Thomas; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Zweier, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a common protein modification in eukaryotes associated with numerous cellular processes. Inherited mutations in NAA10, encoding the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetylation complex NatA have been associated with diverse, syndromic X-linked recessive disorders, whereas de novo missense mutations have been reported in one male and one female individual with severe intellectual disability but otherwise unspecific phenotypes. Thus, the full genetic and clinical spectrum of NAA10 deficiency is yet to be delineated. We identified three different novel and one known missense mutation in NAA10, de novo in 11 females, and due to maternal germ line mosaicism in another girl and her more severely affected and deceased brother. In vitro enzymatic assays for the novel, recurrent mutations p.(Arg83Cys) and p.(Phe128Leu) revealed reduced catalytic activity. X-inactivation was random in five females. The core phenotype of X-linked NAA10-related N-terminal-acetyltransferase deficiency in both males and females includes developmental delay, severe intellectual disability, postnatal growth failure with severe microcephaly, and skeletal or cardiac anomalies. Genotype-phenotype correlations within and between both genders are complex and may include various factors such as location and nature of mutations, enzymatic stability and activity, and X-inactivation in females.

  20. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  1. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y. N.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine. PMID:26191054

  2. Removal of N-terminal methionine from recombinant proteins by engineered E. coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Liao, You-Di; Jeng, Jen-Chong; Wang, Chiu-Feng; Wang, Sui-Chi; Chang, Shu-Ting

    2004-01-01

    The removal of N-terminal translation initiator Met by methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is often crucial for the function and stability of proteins. On the basis of crystal structure and sequence alignment of MetAPs, we have engineered Escherichia coli MetAP by the mutation of three residues, Y168G, M206T, Q233G, in the substrate-binding pocket. Our engineered MetAPs are able to remove the Met from bulky or acidic penultimate residues, such as Met, His, Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Leu, Ile, Tyr, and Trp, as well as from small residues. The penultimate residue, the second residue after Met, was further removed if the antepenultimate residue, the third residue after Met, was small. By the coexpression of engineered MetAP in E. coli through the same or a separate vector, we have successfully produced recombinant proteins possessing an innate N terminus, such as onconase, an antitumor ribonuclease from the frog Rana pipiens. The N-terminal pyroglutamate of recombinant onconase is critical for its structural integrity, catalytic activity, and cyto-toxicity. On the basis of N-terminal sequence information in the protein database, 85%–90% of recombinant proteins should be produced in authentic form by our engineered MetAPs. PMID:15215523

  3. The N-terminal Domain of the Drosophila Mitochondrial Replicative DNA Helicase Contains an Iron-Sulfur Cluster and Binds DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Stiban, Johnny; Farnum, Gregory A.; Hovde, Stacy L.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2014-01-01

    The metazoan mitochondrial DNA helicase is an integral part of the minimal mitochondrial replisome. It exhibits strong sequence homology with the bacteriophage T7 gene 4 protein primase-helicase (T7 gp4). Both proteins contain distinct N- and C-terminal domains separated by a flexible linker. The C-terminal domain catalyzes its characteristic DNA-dependent NTPase activity, and can unwind duplex DNA substrates independently of the N-terminal domain. Whereas the N-terminal domain in T7 gp4 contains a DNA primase activity, this function is lost in metazoan mtDNA helicase. Thus, although the functions of the C-terminal domain and the linker are partially understood, the role of the N-terminal region in the metazoan replicative mtDNA helicase remains elusive. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of Drosophila melanogaster mtDNA helicase coordinates iron in a 2Fe-2S cluster that enhances protein stability in vitro. The N-terminal domain binds the cluster through conserved cysteine residues (Cys68, Cys71, Cys102, and Cys105) that are responsible for coordinating zinc in T7 gp4. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal domain binds both single- and double-stranded DNA oligomers, with an apparent Kd of ∼120 nm. These findings suggest a possible role for the N-terminal domain of metazoan mtDNA helicase in recruiting and binding DNA at the replication fork. PMID:25023283

  4. The N-terminal domain of the Drosophila mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase contains an iron-sulfur cluster and binds DNA.

    PubMed

    Stiban, Johnny; Farnum, Gregory A; Hovde, Stacy L; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2014-08-29

    The metazoan mitochondrial DNA helicase is an integral part of the minimal mitochondrial replisome. It exhibits strong sequence homology with the bacteriophage T7 gene 4 protein primase-helicase (T7 gp4). Both proteins contain distinct N- and C-terminal domains separated by a flexible linker. The C-terminal domain catalyzes its characteristic DNA-dependent NTPase activity, and can unwind duplex DNA substrates independently of the N-terminal domain. Whereas the N-terminal domain in T7 gp4 contains a DNA primase activity, this function is lost in metazoan mtDNA helicase. Thus, although the functions of the C-terminal domain and the linker are partially understood, the role of the N-terminal region in the metazoan replicative mtDNA helicase remains elusive. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of Drosophila melanogaster mtDNA helicase coordinates iron in a 2Fe-2S cluster that enhances protein stability in vitro. The N-terminal domain binds the cluster through conserved cysteine residues (Cys(68), Cys(71), Cys(102), and Cys(105)) that are responsible for coordinating zinc in T7 gp4. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal domain binds both single- and double-stranded DNA oligomers, with an apparent Kd of ∼120 nm. These findings suggest a possible role for the N-terminal domain of metazoan mtDNA helicase in recruiting and binding DNA at the replication fork.

  5. Targeting of TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 inhibits chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 expression, tumor growth and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wen-Chun; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1) is a critical mediator in inflammation, immune response and cancer development. Our previous study demonstrated that activation of TAK1 increases the expression of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7) and promotes lymphatic invasion ability of breast cancer cells. However, the expression and association of activated TAK1 and CCR7 in breast tumor tissues is unknown and the therapeutic effect by targeting TAK1 is also unclear. We showed that activated TAK1 (as indicated by phospho-TAK1) and its binding protein TAB1 are strongly expressed in breast tumor tissues (77% and 74% respectively). In addition, increase of phospho-TAK1 or TAB1 is strongly associated with over-expression of CCR7. TAK1 inhibitor 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol (5Z-O) inhibited TAK1 activity, suppressed downstream signaling pathways including p38, IκB kinase (IKK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and reduced CCR7 expression in metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, 5Z-O repressed NF-κB- and c-JUN-mediated transcription of CCR7 gene. Knockdown of TAB1 attenuated CCR7 expression and tumor growth in an orthotopic animal study. More importantly, lymphatic invasion and lung metastasis were suppressed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that constitutive activation of TAK1 is frequently found in human breast cancer and this kinase is a potential therapeutic target for this cancer. PMID:25557171

  6. The neurotrophin-3 receptor TrkC directly phosphorylates and activates the nucleotide exchange factor Dbs to enhance Schwann cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Miyamoto, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Shooter, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    During the development of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glia, migrate along axons before initiating myelination. We previously demonstrated that endogenous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) acting through the TrkC tyrosine kinase receptor enhances migration of premyelinating Schwann cells. This signaling pathway is mediated by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade regulated by the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. However, missing is the link between TrkC and the GTPases. Here, we show that a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Dbl's big sister (Dbs), couples with TrkC to activate Cdc42 in Schwann cells. Furthermore, TrkC directly phosphorylates Dbs, thereby inducing the Cdc42-GEF activity. Taken together, activation of TrkC triggers Schwann cell migration by regulating Dbs upon direct tyrosine phosphorylation, providing a mechanism whereby a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase can induce the activation of Rho GTPase-GEFs. PMID:15758069

  7. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein. PMID:27317979

  8. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  9. Selective loss of PMA-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 in HaCaT keratinocytes is correlated with the inability to induce mitogen-activated protein family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Sudbeck, B D; Baumann, P; Ryan, G J; Breitkopf, K; Nischt, R; Krieg, T; Mauch, C

    1999-01-01

    Many cell types, including fibroblasts and primary keratinocytes, increase matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) production in response to agonists such as growth factors and phorbol esters. However, the spontaneously transformed human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT, although it increases MMP-1 production in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), does not respond similarly to stimulation with PMA. This phenomenon occurs even though HaCaT cells remain proliferatively responsive to both agonists, suggesting a HaCaT-specific defect in a PMA-mediated signal transduction pathway. Using an inside-out approach to elucidate the source of this defect, we found that EGF, but not PMA, stimulated MMP-1 promoter activity in transiently transfected HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, an assessment of fibroblast and HaCaT c-fos and c-jun gene expression after exposure to EGF and PMA showed that although both agonists increased the expression of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in fibroblasts, only EGF did so in HaCaT keratinocytes. Finally, we looked at the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) family kinases after stimulation with EGF or PMA and found that both agonists increased the phosphorylation and activation of fibroblast extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but only EGF activated the same kinase activities in HaCaT cells. Further, the EGF-mediated increase in MMP-1 gene expression was inhibited by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 and the p38 kinase-specific inhibitor SB203580. Our evidence indicates that although HaCaT MAP kinases are functional, they are not properly regulated in response to the activation of protein kinase C, and that the defect that bars HaCaT MMP-1 expression in response to stimulation with PMA lies before MAP kinase activation. PMID:10085241

  10. Catalase, but not MnSOD, inhibits glucose deprivation-activated ASK1-MEK-MAPK signal transduction pathway and prevents relocalization of Daxx: hydrogen peroxide as a major second messenger of metabolic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae J; Lee, Yong J

    2003-10-01

    Overexpression of catalase, but not manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), inhibited glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation in human prostate adenocarcinoma DU-145 cells. Suppression of JNK1 activation by catalase overexpression resulted from inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation by preventing dissociation of thioredoxin (TRX) from ASK1. Overexpression of catalase also inhibited relocalization of Daxx from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as well as association of Daxx with ASK1 during glucose deprivation. Taken together, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) rather than superoxide anion (O(2) (*-)) acts as a second messenger of metabolic oxidative stress to activate the ASK1-MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway.

  11. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  12. Substitution of lysine for arginine in the N-terminal 217th amino acid residue of the H gamma II of Staphylococcal gamma-hemolysin lowers the activity of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Sudo, K; Choorit, W; Asami, I; Kaneko, J; Muramoto, K; Kamio, Y

    1995-09-01

    The staphylococcal toxin gamma-hemolysin consists of two protein components, LukF and H gamma II. Staphylococcus aureus P83 was found to have five components, LukF, LukF-PV, LukM, LukS, and H gamma II for leukocidin or gamma-hemolysin. H gamma II of S. aureus P83 was demonstrated to be a naturally-occurring analogous molecule of H gamma II [H gamma II(P83)], in which the 217th arginine residue was replaced by lysine. The H gamma II(P83) showed about 50% of the hemolytic activity of normal H gamma II in the presence of LukF.

  13. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  14. mRNA Decapping Enzyme 1a (Dcp1a)-induced Translational Arrest through Protein Kinase R (PKR) Activation Requires the N-terminal Enabled Vasodilator-stimulated Protein Homology 1 (EVH1) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Reineke, Lucas C.; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that poliovirus infection disrupts cytoplasmic P-bodies in infected mammalian cells. During the infectious cycle, poliovirus causes the directed cleavage of Dcp1a and Pan3, coincident with the dispersion of P-bodies. We now show that expression of Dcp1a prior to infection, surprisingly, restricts poliovirus infection. This inhibition of infection was independent of P-body formation because expression of GFP-Dcp1a mutants that cannot enter P-bodies restricted poliovirus infection similar to wild-type GFP-Dcp1a. Expression of wild-type or mutant GFP-Dcp1a induced phosphorylation of eIF2α through the eIF2α kinase protein kinase R (PKR). Activation of PKR required the amino-terminal EVH1 domain of Dcp1a. This PKR-induced translational inhibition appears to be specific to Dcp1a because the expression of other P-body components, Pan2, Pan3, Ccr4, or Caf1, did not result in the inhibition of poliovirus gene expression or induce eIF2α phosphorylation. The translation blockade induced by Dcp1a expression suggests novel signaling linking RNA degradation/decapping and regulation of translation. PMID:24382890

  15. mRNA decapping enzyme 1a (Dcp1a)-induced translational arrest through protein kinase R (PKR) activation requires the N-terminal enabled vasodilator-stimulated protein homology 1 (EVH1) domain.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Jonathan D; Reineke, Lucas C; Lloyd, Richard E

    2014-02-14

    We have shown previously that poliovirus infection disrupts cytoplasmic P-bodies in infected mammalian cells. During the infectious cycle, poliovirus causes the directed cleavage of Dcp1a and Pan3, coincident with the dispersion of P-bodies. We now show that expression of Dcp1a prior to infection, surprisingly, restricts poliovirus infection. This inhibition of infection was independent of P-body formation because expression of GFP-Dcp1a mutants that cannot enter P-bodies restricted poliovirus infection similar to wild-type GFP-Dcp1a. Expression of wild-type or mutant GFP-Dcp1a induced phosphorylation of eIF2α through the eIF2α kinase protein kinase R (PKR). Activation of PKR required the amino-terminal EVH1 domain of Dcp1a. This PKR-induced translational inhibition appears to be specific to Dcp1a because the expression of other P-body components, Pan2, Pan3, Ccr4, or Caf1, did not result in the inhibition of poliovirus gene expression or induce eIF2α phosphorylation. The translation blockade induced by Dcp1a expression suggests novel signaling linking RNA degradation/decapping and regulation of translation. PMID:24382890

  16. N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2013-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 expresses a 30 kDa manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) comprising a hydrophobic region (signal peptide + linker peptide) attached to a catalytic unit. Bioinformatics predicted cleavage of the signal peptide at (25)CQPQ by signal peptidase and of the linker peptide by an Arg-C-like protease at the Arg52/Arg59 residue. The three predicted forms of MnSOD were immunodetected in Anabaena, with the 30 kDa MnSOD found exclusively in the membrane and the shorter 27 and 24 kDa forms found both in the membrane and soluble fractions. The corresponding sodA gene was truncated for (a) the first eight residues, or, (b) the signal peptide, or (c) the entire hydrophobic region, or (d) the Arg52/Arg59 residues were modified to serine. Overexpression of these MnSOD variants in recombinant Anabaena strains revealed that (a) the 30 kDa membrane-targeted MnSOD was cleaved by membrane-localized signal peptidase either during or after its transport through the membrane to release the 27 kDa form, either in the cytosol or in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (b) the 27 kDa form was further cleaved to the 24 kDa form by Arg-C-like protease, both in the cytosol and in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (c) deletion of signal peptide localized the MnSOD forms in the cytosol, and (d) alteration of the signal/linker peptide cleavage sites interfered with MnSOD localization and processing. Homo/heterodimerization of the 24 and 27 kDa forms of MnSOD and the cytosolic iron-dependent SOD results in multiple SOD activities, from a single MnSOD gene (sodA), in different cellular compartments of Anabaena.

  17. Low Dose Cadmium Inhibits Proliferation of Human Renal Mesangial Cells via Activation of the JNK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaocui; Li, Jing; Cheng, Zuowang; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Xia; Li, Xiaorui; Xu, Dongmei; Kapron, Carolyn M.; Liu, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and environmental pollutant. The kidney is the principal target organ of Cd exposure. Previously, we found that low concentration of Cd damages the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. However, little is known about the effects of Cd on renal mesangial cells, which provide structural support for the glomerular capillary loops and regulate intraglomerular blood flow. In this study, human renal mesangial cells (HRMCs) were cultured in the presence of serum and treated with 4 μM Cd. We found that Cd activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and increases the protein levels of c-Jun and c-Fos. Cd treatment also induces a decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis of HRMCs, but only the decrease in HRMC proliferation was reversed by pretreatment with SP600125, an inhibitor of the JNK pathway. In addition, Cd does not change the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, the markers of mesangial cells, or the alignment of the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton of HRMCs. Our data indicate that the JNK pathway mediates the inhibitory effects of Cd on HRMC proliferation. PMID:27739415

  18. An unusual peptide deformylase features in the human mitochondrial N-terminal methionine excision pathway.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Giglione, Carmela; Sardini, Alessandro; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Meinnel, Thierry

    2003-12-26

    Dedicated machinery for N-terminal methionine excision (NME) was recently identified in plant organelles and shown to be essential in plastids. We report here the existence of mitochondrial NME in mammals, as shown by the identification of cDNAs encoding specific peptide deformylases (PDFs) and new methionine aminopeptidases (MAP1D). We cloned the two full-length human cDNAs and showed that the N-terminal domains of the encoded enzymes were specifically involved in targeting to mitochondria. In contrast to mitochondrial MAP1D, the human PDF sequence differed from that of known PDFs in several key features. We characterized the human PDF fully in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of the processed human enzyme with the plant mitochondrial PDF1A, to which it is phylogenetically related, showed that the human enzyme had an extra N-terminal domain involved in both mitochondrial targeting and enzyme stability. Mammalian PDFs also display non-random substitutions in the conserved motifs important for activity. Human PDF site-directed mutagenesis variants were studied and compared with the corresponding plant PDF1A variants. We found that amino acid substitutions in human PDF specifically altered its catalytic site, resulting in an enzyme intermediate between bacterial PDF1Bs and plant PDF1As. Because (i) human PDF was found to be active both in vitro and in vivo, (ii) the entire machinery is conserved and expressed in most animals, (iii) the mitochondrial genome expresses substrates for these enzymes, and (iv) mRNA synthesis is regulated, we conclude that animal mitochondria have a functional NME machinery that can be regulated. PMID:14532271

  19. RNA-binding protein HuR and the members of the miR-200 family play an unconventional role in the regulation of c-Jun mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Giorgia; De Vito, Francesca; Saunders, Sita J; Risi, Adele; Mannironi, Cecilia; Bozzoni, Irene; Presutti, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation is a fundamental step for coordinating cellular response in a variety of processes. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most important factors responsible for this regulation. Here we report that different components of the miR-200 family are involved in c-Jun mRNA regulation with the opposite effect. While miR-200b inhibits c-Jun protein production, miR-200a tends to increase the JUN amount through a stabilization of its mRNA. This action is dependent on the presence of the RBP HuR that binds the 3'UTR of c-Jun mRNA in a region including the mir-200a binding site. The position of the binding site is fundamental; by mutating this site, we demonstrate that the effect is not micro-RNA specific. These results indicate that miR-200a triggers a microRNA-mediated stabilization of c-Jun mRNA, promoting the binding of HuR with c-Jun mRNA. This is the first example of a positive regulation exerted by a microRNA on an important oncogene in proliferating cells.

  20. A novel synthetic derivative of the natural product berbamine inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells, associated with activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Zhao, Robin; Tian, Yan; Liu, Lucy; Horne, David A; Jove, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. There is a critical need to find more potent drugs for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease. Berbamine (BBM) is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plants. BBM and its derivatives have been shown to have antitumor effects in several cancers. Here, we report that a novel synthetic berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of G292, KHOS, and MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Induction of apoptosis in these tumor cells depends on activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Since pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and caspase-9 inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) could block the cleavage of PARP, the apoptosis induced by BBMD3 is through intrinsic signaling pathway. BBMD3 increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), resulting in increase of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos, the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. JNK inhibitor could partially suppress antitumor effect of BBMD3 on osteosarcoma cells. BBMD3 increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), could block the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun induced by BBMD3. BBMD3 increased the expression of the pro-apototic gene Bad,