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Sample records for activated carbon catalysts

  1. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  2. Sulphate-activated growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes over copper catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jarrn-Horng; Chen, Ching-Shiun; Zeng, Zhi-Yan; Chang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Wei

    2012-07-01

    A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of sulphate ions in the preparation step for the two inert catalysts can activate their abilities for CNT growth with remarkable yields. Furthermore, Raman spectra analysis demonstrates a linear dependence between the concentration of sulphate ions in copper catalysts and the ratio of CNT-a-C in the as-grown carbon soot. The sulphate-activated effect on CNT growth over copper catalysts could be related to a three-way interaction of sulphate ions, copper nanoparticles and support. In situ TEM images of an as-grown CNT irradiated by electron beams without the inlet of carbon sources reveal a new pathway of carbon diffusion through the bulk of copper nanoparticles and an enlarged inner-wall thickness of the on-site CNT. This carbon diffusion model over copper catalysts can provide new insights into the CNT growth mechanism over non-magnetic metal catalysts.A sulphate-activated mechanism is proposed to describe the growth of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over copper catalysts using chemical vapour deposition with helium-diluted ethylene. Sulphate-assisted copper catalysts afford a high-yield growth of bamboo-like CNTs at a mild temperature, 800 °C however, non-sulphate-assisted copper catalysts, e.g., copper acetate and copper nitrate prepared catalysts, were inert to CNT growth and only gave amorphous carbons (a-C) surrounding copper nanoparticles under the same conditions. Nevertheless, the addition of

  3. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  4. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  5. Air Oxidation of Activated Carbon to Synthesize a Biomimetic Catalyst for Hydrolysis of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, Abhijit; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Oxygenated carbon catalyzes the hydrolysis of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass by utilizing the weakly acidic functional groups on its surface. Here we report the synthesis of a biomimetic carbon catalyst by simple and economical air-oxidation of a commercially available activated carbon. Air- oxidation at 450-500 °C introduced 2000-2400 μmol g(-1) of oxygenated functional groups on the material with minor changes in the textural properties. Selectivity towards the formation of carboxylic groups on the catalyst surface increased with the increase in oxidation temperature. The degree of oxidation on carbon catalyst was found to be proportional to its activity for hydrolysis of cellulose. The hydrolysis of eucalyptus in the presence of carbon oxidized at 475 °C afforded glucose yield of 77 % and xylose yield of 67 %. PMID:27115288

  6. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  8. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  9. Characterization of the surface chemical properties of activated carbons for catalyst preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The demands placed on activated carbon based technologies have outpaced fundamental studies of the relationship between the surface properties of carbons and their performance as adsorbents or as catalyst supports. This research is directed toward an understanding how the surface functionalities of activated carbons affect the catalytic phase impregnated onto the carbon support. The surface functionalities were characterized by acidity measurements employing gaseous base adsorption and aqueous base neutralization procedures. The results were examined with a simple amphoteric surface ionization model. An alternative technique to conventional potentiometric titration, designated mass titration, was developed. Employing this method, the point of zero charge (PZC) of the adsorbent was determined by the asymptotic pH value in the plot of pH vs. mass fraction of solid added to water. The methodology developed here for evaluating the PZC was used to investigate the effects of surface treatment with nitric acid on the PZC of carbons. The PZC decreased from 10 for the untreated carbon to 3.5 for the carbon receiving the most intense oxidation treatment. The carbon supported nickel precursors derived from the ion exchange procedures were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and their properties as a gasification catalyst were evaluated. The hydrogen consumption during TPR increased and the ignition temperature decreased as either the acidity of the carbon support increased or the PZC decreased. It is proposed that the PZC can be used as an index to characterize the carbon surface as a suitable support for a heterogeneous catalyst.

  10. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  11. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction. PMID:26508075

  12. Synthesis of highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Yue-Jiang; Yang, Hou-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2011-05-01

    Highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber (Pd/CNF) catalyst is synthesized by NaBH4 reduction with trisodium citrate as the stabilizing agent. The obtained Pd/CNF catalyst is characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of ca. 3.8 nm are highly dispersed on the CNF support even with a small ratio of citrate to Pd precursor, which is believed to be due to the pH adjustment of citrate stabilized colloidal Pd nanoparticles. The cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques show that the obtained Pd/CNF catalyst exhibits good catalytic activity and stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

  13. A packed bed membrane reactor for production of biodiesel using activated carbon supported catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baroutian, Saeid; Aroua, Mohamed K; Raman, Abdul Aziz A; Sulaiman, Nik M N

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel continuous reactor has been developed to produce high quality methyl esters (biodiesel) from palm oil. A microporous TiO2/Al2O3 membrane was packed with potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on palm shell activated carbon. The central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, catalyst amount and cross flow circulation velocity on the production of biodiesel in the packed bed membrane reactor. The highest conversion of palm oil to biodiesel in the reactor was obtained at 70 °C employing 157.04 g catalyst per unit volume of the reactor and 0.21 cm/s cross flow circulation velocity. The physical and chemical properties of the produced biodiesel were determined and compared with the standard specifications. High quality palm oil biodiesel was produced by combination of heterogeneous alkali transesterification and separation processes in the packed bed membrane reactor. PMID:20888219

  14. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst. PMID:27454194

  15. Enhanced activity of urea electrooxidation on nickel catalysts supported on tungsten carbides/carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Du, Tingting; Cheng, Jin; Xie, Xing; Yang, Bolun; Li, Mingtao

    2015-04-01

    Nickel nanoparticles with tungsten carbides supported on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, noted as Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst, is prepared through an impregnation method and used for the electrooxidation of urea in alkaline conditions. The micro-morphology and composition of the Ni-WC/MWCNT particles are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The electrooxidation activity and conductivity of the catalyst are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. Characterization results indicate that the Ni nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the WC/MWCNT framework, and the Ni-WC/MWCNT catalyst shows an improved activity for the urea electrooxidation. The current densities of Ni-WC/MWCNT are over 3 times and 15 times higher than those of the Ni-WC/C and Ni/C catalysts, respectively, and the electrochemical impedance also decreases markedly. The higher activity on Ni-WC/MWCNT is attributed to the support effect of MWCNT as well as the synergistic effect between Ni and WC.

  16. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  17. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1). PMID:20362394

  18. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component. PMID:24457909

  19. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  20. A new iron-based carbon monoxide oxidation catalyst: structure-activity correlation.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Roland; Huang, Heming; Schünemann, Volker; Bauer, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    A new iron-based catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation, as a potential substitute for precious-metal systems, has been prepared by using a facile impregnation method with iron tris-acetylacetonate as a precursor on γ-Al2 O3 . Light-off and full conversion temperatures as low as 235 and 278 °C can be reached. However, the catalytic activity strongly depends on the loading; lower loadings perform better than higher ones. The different activities can be explained by variations of the structures formed. The structures are thoroughly characterized by a multimethodic approach by using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas, and Mössbauer spectroscopy combined with diffuse reflectance UV/Vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Consequently, isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(3+) centers and phases of AlFeO3 are identified as structural requirements for high activity in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. PMID:25212843

  1. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste material in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, carbonaceous materials including activated carbon were proven to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste gasification in supercritical water. Using coconut shell activated carbon catalyst, complete decomposition of industrial organic wastes including methanol and acetic acid was achieved. During this process, the total mass of the activated carbon catalyst changes by two competing processes: a decrease in weight via gasification of the carbon by supercritical water, or an increase in weight by deposition of carbonaceous materials generated by incomplete gasification of the biomass feedstocks. The deposition of carbonaceous materials does not occur when complete gasification is realized. Gasification of the activated carbon in supercritical water is often favored, resulting in changes in the quality and quantity of the catalyst. To thoroughly understand the hazardous waste decomposition process, a more complete understanding of the behavior of activated carbon in pure supercritical water is needed. The gasification rate of carbon by water vapor at subcritical pressures was studied in relation to coal gasification and generating activated carbon.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  3. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  4. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  5. The influence of carbon support porosity on the activity of PtRu/Sibunit anode catalysts for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V.; Simonov, P. A.; Savinova, E. R.; Plaksin, G. V.; Cherepanova, S. V.; Kryukova, G. N.; Stimming, U.

    In this paper we analyse the promises of homemade carbon materials of Sibunit family prepared through pyrolysis of natural gases on carbon black surfaces as supports for the anode catalysts of direct methanol fuel cells. Specific surface area ( SBET) of the support is varied in the wide range from 6 to 415 m 2 g -1 and the implications on the electrocatalytic activity are scrutinized. Sibunit supported PtRu (1:1) catalysts are prepared via chemical route and the preparation conditions are adjusted in such a way that the particle size is constant within ±1 nm in order to separate the influence of support on the (i) catalyst preparation and (ii) fuel cell performance. Comparison of the metal surface area measured by gas phase CO chemisorption and electrochemical CO stripping indicates close to 100% utilisation of nanoparticle surfaces for catalysts supported on low (22-72 m 2 g -1) surface area Sibunit carbons. Mass activity and specific activity of PtRu anode catalysts change dramatically with SBET of the support, increasing with the decrease of the latter. 10%PtRu catalyst supported on Sibunit with specific surface area of 72 m 2 g -1 shows mass specific activity exceeding that of commercial 20%PtRu/Vulcan XC-72 by nearly a factor of 3.

  6. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.

  7. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A; Yang, Judith C; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper(+) species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper(+) is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  8. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  9. Potassium effects on activated-carbon-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2007-08-15

    The effect of potassium on the activity, selectivity, and distribution of products (hydrocarbons and oxygenates) was studied over iron catalysts supported on activated carbon (AC) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). This is part of a wider study on the incremental effects of components (including the support) of a multicomponent (Fe-Cu-Mo-K/AC) FTS catalyst. The range of potassium loading used was 0-2 wt%. A fixed-bed reactor was used under the conditions of 260-300{sup o}C, 300 psig, and 3 Nl/g cat/h, using syngas with a H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.9. Both FTS and water-gas shift activities increase after the addition of 0.9 wt % potassium, whereas an opposite trend is observed with the addition of 2 wt % potassium. This is shown to be the result of interaction between the decrease of both the activation energy (E{sub a}) and the pre-exponental factor (k{sub 0}) with the amount of potassium promoter added. Detectable hydrocarbons up to C{sub 34} and oxygenates up to C{sub 5} are formed on the Fe/AC catalysts with or without potassium. The potassium promoter significantly suppresses formation of methane and methanol and shifts selectivities to higher-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C{sub 5+}) and alcohols (C{sub 2}-C{sub 5}). Meanwhile, the potassium promoter changes paraffin and olefin distributions. At least for carbon numbers of 25 or less, increasing the K level to 0.9 wt % greatly decreases the amount of n-paraffins and internal olefins (i.e., those with the double bond in other than the terminal positions) and dramatically increases branched paraffins and 1-olefins, but a further increase in the K level shows little additional improvement. The addition of potassium changes the effect of temperature on the selectivity to oxygenates. In the absence of K, oxygenate selectivity decreases with temperature. However, when K is present, the selectivity is almost independent of the temperature. 71 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.; Vidic, R.D.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show that for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.

  11. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials. PMID:27416965

  12. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; et al

    2016-06-30

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides aremore » surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.« less

  13. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  14. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones.

  15. In situ oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanocapsules creates highly active cobalt oxide catalysts for hydrocarbon combustion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Yexin; Peng, Lixia; Ma, Song; Yang, Teng; Guo, Huaihong; Zhang, Zhidong; Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Combustion catalysts have been extensively explored to reduce the emission of hydrocarbons that are capable of triggering photochemical smog and greenhouse effect. Palladium as the most active material is widely applied in exhaust catalytic converter and combustion units, but its high capital cost stimulates the tremendous research on non-noble metal candidates. Here we fabricate highly defective cobalt oxide nanocrystals via a controllable oxidation of carbon-encapsulated cobalt nanoparticles. Strain gradients induced in the nanoconfined carbon shell result in the formation of a large number of active sites featuring a considerable catalytic activity for the combustion of a variety of hydrocarbons (methane, propane and substituted benzenes). For methane combustion, the catalyst displays a unique activity being comparable or even superior to the palladium ones. PMID:26074206

  16. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste materials in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, carbonaceous materials were proved to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste decomposition in supercritical water. Gasification of the carbonaceous catalyst itself is also expected, however, under supercritical conditions. Thus, it is essential to determine the gasification rate of the carbonaceous materials during this process to determine the active lifetime of the catalysts. For this purpose, the gasification characteristics of granular coconut shell activated carbon in supercritical water alone (600-650{degrees}C, 25.5-34.5 MPa) were investigated. The gasification rate at subatmospheric pressure agreed well with the gasification rate at supercritical conditions, indicating the same reaction mechanism. Methane generation under these conditions is via pyrolysis, and thus is not affected by the water pressure. An iodine number increase of 25% was observed as a result of the supercritical water gasification.

  17. Effect of surface oxidation of the support on the thiophene hydrodesulfurization activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts supported on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Calafat, A. |; Lopez-Agudo, A.; Palacios, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present investigation attempts to provide a better understanding of the influence of the nature of the carbon support on the HDS activity of Mo, Ni, and NiMo catalysts. For this purpose a high purity activated carbon was subjected to oxidative treatments with HNO{sub 3} to modify its surface properties. NiMo catalysts supported on the resulting activated carbons were prepared and characterized by TPR, XRD, and SEM-EDX, and their activity for HDS of thiophene at 30 bars and 375{degrees}C was evaluated. The results obtained showed that oxidation of the carbon surface does not affect the HDS activity and other characteristics of the supported Mo phase. In contrast, the HDS activity of the Ni catalysts is enhanced by acid treatments of the carbon support. In this case, introduction of oxygen-containing functional groups (O{sub (s)}) leads to a strong interaction of O{sub (s)}-Ni during impregnation, which becomes essential to achieving and preserving high nickel dispersion. This effect on NiMo/C catalysts. The synergistic effect of the bimetallic catalysts is observed only when oxygen functional groups are present on the carbon surface, which are necessary for a good HDS activity, mainly because they enhance Ni-Mo interactions that produce the highly active Ni-Mo-S phase. A NiMoO{sub 4}-like phase formed during impregnation seems to be the precursor for the active sulfide phase over the present NiMo/C catalysts. 34 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S.

    2007-07-01

    Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

  19. An in-depth understanding of the bimetallic effects and coked carbon species on an active bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 dry reforming catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Gerdts, Rihards; Parker, Stewart F; Chi, Lina; Zhao, Yongxiang; Hill, Martyn; Guo, Junqiu; Jones, Martin O; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-06-29

    Ni/Al2O3, Co/Al2O3 and bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared using an impregnation method and employed in CO2 dry reforming of methane under coking-favored conditions. The spent catalysts were carefully characterized using typical characterization technologies and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The bimetallic catalyst exhibited a superior activity and anti-coking performance compared to Ni/Al2O3, while the most resistant to coking behavior was Co/Al2O3. The enhanced activity of the Ni(Co)/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst is attributed to the reduced particle size of metallic species and resistance to forming stable filamentous carbon. The overall carbon deposition on the spent bimetallic catalyst is comparable to that of the spent Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, whereas the carbon deposited on the bimetallic catalyst is mainly less-stable carbonaceous species as confirmed by SEM, TPO, Raman and INS characterization. This study provides an in depth understanding of alloy effects in catalysts, the chemical nature of coked carbon on spent Ni-based catalysts and, hopefully, inspires the creative design of a new bimetallic catalyst for dry reforming reactions. PMID:27326792

  20. Fabrication of Pd-loaded carbon spheres with magnetic properties as active catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yulong; Xu, Zhizhen; Sun, Huanghui; Qiu, Qiaoli; Zhang, Lingfan; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Wenqing

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have constructed nano-sized hollow carbon spheres with large cavities and thin shells under hydrothermal conditions using ricinoleic acid as the soft template and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and hexamethylenetetramine as the sphere precursors. After being filled with Fe particles and loaded with Pd particles, the spheres became magnetic, allowing easy separation from the liquid phase by a magnet, and showed excellent catalytic performance in decomposing formic acid. The hollow carbon spheres and the magnetic catalysts were characterized by TEM, FE-SEM, XPS, and FTIR.

  1. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. PMID:24813567

  2. Toward Design of Synergistically Active Carbon-Based Catalysts for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of precious Pt catalyst with cost-effective alternatives would be significantly beneficial for hydrogen production via electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). All candidates thus far are exclusively metallic catalysts, which suffer inherent corrosion and oxidation susceptibility during acidic proton-exchange membrane electrolysis. Herein, based on theoretical predictions, we designed and synthesized nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) dual-doped graphene as a nonmetallic electrocatalyst for sustainable and efficient hydrogen production. The N and P heteroatoms could coactivate the adjacent C atom in the graphene matrix by affecting its valence orbital energy levels to induce a synergistically enhanced reactivity toward HER. As a result, the dual-doped graphene showed higher electrocatalytic HER activity than single-doped ones and comparable performance to some of the traditional metallic catalysts. PMID:24779586

  3. XPS studies of Pt catalysts supported on porous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Deepak; Varma, Salil; Bharadwaj, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    Pt catalysts supported on porous carbon were prepared by hard templating route and used for HI decomposition reaction of Sulfur Iodine thermochemical cycle. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for oxidation state of platinum as well as nature of carbon present in the catalysts. It was found that platinum is present in metallic state and carbon is present in both sp2 and sp3 hybridization states. The catalysts were evaluated for their activity and stability for liquid phase HI decomposition reaction and it was observed that mesoporous carbon based catalysts were more active and stable under the reaction conditions.

  4. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  5. Progress in Synthesis of Highly Active and Stable Nickel-Based Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Sibudjing; Kathiraser, Yasotha; Ni, Jun; Oemar, Usman; Li, Ziwei; Saw, Eng Toon

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CH4 ) have increased alarm due to escalating effects of global warming. The dry carbon dioxide reforming of methane (DRM) reaction is a sustainable way to utilize these notorious greenhouse gases. This paper presents a review of recent progress in the development of nickel-based catalysts for the DRM reaction. The enviable low cost and wide availability of nickel compared with noble metals is the main reason for persistent research efforts in optimizing the synthesis of nickel-based catalysts. Important catalyst features for the rational design of a coke-resistant nickel-based nanocatalyst for the DRM reaction are also discussed. In addition, several innovative developments based on salient features for the stabilization of nickel nanocatalysts through various means (which include functionalization with precursors, synthesis by plasma treatment, stabilization/confinement on mesoporous/microporous/carbon supports, and the formation of metal oxides) are highlighted. The final part of this review covers major issues and proposed improvement strategies pertaining to the rational design of nickel-based catalysts with high activity and stability for the DRM reaction. PMID:26440576

  6. Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotube as highly active catalyst for hydrogen generation from ammonia-borane.

    PubMed

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Ozkar, Saim

    2012-11-01

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ru(0)@MWCNT) were in situ formed during the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (AB) and could be isolated from the reaction solution by filtration and characterized by ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, and XPS techniques. The results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles of size in the range 1.4-3.0 nm are well-dispersed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They were found to be highly active catalyst in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of AB with a turnover frequency value of 329 min⁻¹. The reusability experiments show that Ru(0)@MWCNTs are isolable and redispersible in aqueous solution; when redispersed they are still active catalyst in the hydrolysis of AB exhibiting a release of 3.0 equivalents of H₂ per mole of NH₃BH₃ and preserving 41% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fourth run of hydrolysis. The lifetime of Ru(0)@MWCNTs was measured as 26400 turnovers over 29 h in the hydrolysis of AB at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here also includes the kinetic studies depending on the temperature to determine the activation energy of the reaction (E(a) = 33 ± 2 kJ/mol) and the effect of catalyst concentration on the rate of the catalytic hydrolysis of AB, respectively. PMID:23113804

  7. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  8. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  9. Particle size distribution and morphological changes in activated carbon-metal oxide hybrid catalysts prepared under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2016-03-01

    In catalysis processes, activated carbon (AC) and metal oxides (MOs) are widely used either as catalysts or as catalyst supports because of their unique properties. A combination of AC and a MO in a single hybrid material entails changes not only in the composition, microstructure and texture but also in the morphology, which may largely influence the catalytic behaviour of the resulting product. This work is aimed at investigating the modifications in the morphology and particle size distribution (PSD) for AC-MO hybrid catalysts as a result of their preparation under markedly different heating conditions. From a commercial AC and six MO (Al2 O3 , Fe2 O3 , ZnO, SnO2 , TiO2 and WO3 ) precursors, two series of such catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120ºC, and subsequent heat treatment at 200ºC or 850ºC in inert atmosphere. The resulting samples are characterized in terms of their morphology and PSD by scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ processing program. Obtained results indicate that the morphology, PSD and degree of dispersion of the supported catalysts are strongly dependent both on the MO precursor and the heat treatment temperature. With the temperature rise, trends are towards the improvement of crystallinity, the broadening of the PSD and the increase in the average particle size, thus suggesting the involvement of sintering mechanisms. Such effects are more pronounced for the Fe, Sn and W catalysts due to the reduction of the corresponding MOs by AC during the heat treatment at 850ºC. PMID:26457467

  10. Activity, short-term stability (poisoning tolerance) and durability of carbon supported Pt-Pr catalysts for ethanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Patricia G.; Antolini, Ermete; Perez, Joelma

    2014-04-01

    Pt-Pr/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a modified formic acid method, and their activity for carbon monoxide and ethanol oxidation, their short term stability and durability were compared to that of commercial Pt/C and Pt-Sn/C (3:1) catalysts. By derivative voltammetry (DV) it was found that ethanol electro-oxidation takes place by two main pathways at different potentials. It was observed that, in the presence of Pr, ethanol electro-oxidation takes place mostly through the pathway at lower potential, which is the most interesting for fuel cell application. The Pt-Pr/C catalysts were less tolerant to poisoning by ethanol oxidation intermediate species than Pt/C. Durability test by a repetitive potential cycling under Ar atmosphere revealed a good structural stability of Pt-Pr/C catalysts. A repetitive potential cycling under CO atmosphere carried out on the Pt-Pr/C (1:1) catalyst, instead, indicated a structural change, likely by formation of a core-shell structure.

  11. Highly Active and Robust Metalloporphyrin Catalysts for the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates from a Broad Range of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Chihiro; Shimonishi, Junta; Miyazaki, Ray; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    Bifunctional metalloporphyrins with quaternary ammonium bromides (nucleophiles) at the meta, para, or ortho positions of meso-phenyl groups were synthesized as catalysts for the formation of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide under solvent-free conditions. The meta-substituted catalysts exhibited high catalytic performance, whereas the para- and ortho-substituted catalysts showed moderate and low activity, respectively. DFT calculations revealed the origin of the advantage of the meta-substituted catalyst, which could use the flexible quaternary ammonium cation at the meta position to stabilize various anionic species generated during catalysis. A zinc(II) porphyrin with eight nucleophiles at the meta positions showed very high catalytic activity (turnover number (TON)=240 000 at 120 °C, turnover frequency (TOF)=31 500 h(-1) at 170 °C) at an initial CO2 pressure of 1.7 MPa; catalyzed the reaction even at atmospheric CO2 pressure (balloon) at ambient temperature (20 °C); and was applicable to a broad range of substrates, including terminal and internal epoxides. PMID:26990557

  12. Hydrodeoxygenation of prairie cordgrass bio-oil over Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts combined with different metals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shouyun; Wei, Lin; Zhao, Xianhui; Kadis, Ethan; Cao, Yuhe; Julson, James; Gu, Zhengrong

    2016-06-25

    Bio-oil can be upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Low-cost and effective catalysts are crucial for the HDO process. In this study, four inexpensive combinations of Ni based activated carbon synergistic catalysts including Ni/AC, Ni-Fe/AC, Ni-Mo/AC and Ni-Cu/AC were evaluated for HDO of prairie cordgrass (PCG) bio-oil. The tests were carried out in the autoclave under mild operating conditions with 500psig of H2 pressure and 350°C temperature. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that all synergistic catalysts had significant improvements on the physicochemical properties (water content, pH, oxygen content, higher heating value and chemical compositions) of the upgraded PCG bio-oil. The higher heating value of the upgraded bio-oil (ranging from 29.65MJ/kg to 31.61MJ/kg) improved significantly in comparison with the raw bio-oil (11.33MJ/kg), while the oxygen content reduced to only 21.70-25.88% from 68.81% of the raw bio-oil. Compared to raw bio-oil (8.78% hydrocarbons and no alkyl-phenols), the Ni/AC catalysts produced the highest content of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C6-C12) at 32.63% in the upgraded bio-oil, while Ni-Mo/AC generated the upgraded bio-oil with the highest content of gasoline blending alkyl-phenols at 38.41%. PMID:26902668

  13. Rationale of the effects from dopants on C-H bond activation for sp2 hybridized nanostructured carbon catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shanjun; Sun, Xiaoying; Li, Bo; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Doping has become an effective way to tune the catalytic properties of nanostructured carbon catalysts. Taking C-H activation as an example, first-principles calculations propose that the relative energy level and the BEP rule might be applicable to explain the observed doping effects. Moreover, boron doping is proposed as an effective way to enhance the catalytic performance.Doping has become an effective way to tune the catalytic properties of nanostructured carbon catalysts. Taking C-H activation as an example, first-principles calculations propose that the relative energy level and the BEP rule might be applicable to explain the observed doping effects. Moreover, boron doping is proposed as an effective way to enhance the catalytic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The computational setup, the doping positions for B, N and S doping, the definition of the binding energy and dissociation energy for C2H5 and C2H6 respectively, the transition state and dissociation state structures for the C-H bond activation of C2H6 in the undoped case, and the lengths of the C-H bond of C2H6 at the transition states for both the undoped and doped cases. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05759k

  14. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  15. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  16. Process optimization of preparation of ZnO-porous carbon composite from spent catalysts using one step activation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wen; Qu, Wen-Wen; Srinivasakannan, C; Peng, Jin-Hui; Duan, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Min

    2012-08-01

    The process parameters of one step preparation of ZnO/Activated Carbon (AC) composite materials, from vinyl acetate synthesis spent catalyst were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and the central composite rotatable design (CCD). Regeneration temperature, time and flow rate of CO2 were the process variables, while the iodine number and the yield were the response variables. All the three process variables were found to significantly influence the yield of the regenerated carbon, while only the regeneration temperature and CO2 flow rate were found to significantly affect the iodine number. The optimized process conditions that maximize the yield and iodine adsorption capacity were identified to be a regeneration temperature of 950 degrees C, time of 120 min and flow rate of CO2 of 600 ml/min, with the corresponding yield and iodine number to be in excess of 50% and 1100 mg/g. The BET surface area of the regenerated composite was estimated to be 1263 m2/g, with micropore to mesopore ratio of 0.75. The pore volume was found to have increased 6 times as compared to the spent catalyst. The composite material (AC/ZnO) with high surface area and pore volume coupled with high yield augur economic feasibility of the process. EDS and XRD spectrum indicate presence of ZnO in the regenerated samples. PMID:22962730

  17. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  18. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  19. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  20. Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

    2014-12-01

    The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 μm-0.8 μm which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 μm-3.0 μm in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

  1. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  2. Density functional theory study of C₂F₅I synthesis over activated carbon catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingjie; Xue, Mengwei; Yang, Guangchen; Pan, Renming

    2015-09-01

    Quantum chemistry calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) are carried out to investigate the reaction mechanism of C2F5I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon. The possible adsorption configurations of fluorocarbon intermediates are analyzed carefully. Also, the related transition states and reaction pathway are analyzed. According to calculation, firstly, the dehydrofluorination of C2HF5, as the rate-determining step, is catalyzed by the carboxyl acid groups. Secondly, the tetrafluoroethylidene radicals disproportionate on graphite (001) surface instead of rearrangement or dimerization. Next, the fluorine abstractions between fluorocarbon intermediates over graphite (001) surfaces proceed successfully. Finally, the desorbed pentafluoroethyl abstracts iodine atom from molecular iodine spontaneously to afford C2F5I. In adition, our calculations reveal that the carbon deposit in experiment is caused by the fluorine abstraction from fluoroethinyl. The suggested mechanism corresponds with our calculations and available experiments. PMID:26276012

  3. Mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticles with high specific surface area for cyclohexene hydrogenation: Outstanding catalytic activity of NaOH-treated catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskás, R.; Varga, T.; Grósz, A.; Sápi, A.; Oszkó, A.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Extremely high specific surface area mesoporous carbon-supported Pd nanoparticle catalysts were prepared with both impregnation and polyol-based sol methods. The silica template used for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon was removed by both NaOH and HF etching. Pd/mesoporous carbon catalysts synthesized with the impregnation method has as high specific surface area as 2250 m2/g. In case of NaOH-etched impregnated samples, the turnover frequency of cyclohexene hydrogenation to cyclohexane at 313 K was obtained ~ 14 molecules • site- 1 • s- 1. The specific surface area of HF-etched samples was higher compared to NaOH-etched samples. However, catalytic activity was ~ 3-6 times higher on NaOH-etched samples compared to HF-etched samples, which can be attributed to the presence of sodium and surface hydroxylgroups of the catalysts etched with NaOH solution.

  4. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  5. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  6. Fe/S doped granular activated carbon as a highly active heterogeneous persulfate catalyst toward the degradation of Orange G and diethyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mengjie; Ma, Yongwen; Wan, Jinquan; Wang, Yan; Huang, Mingzhi; Chen, Yangmei

    2014-03-15

    Fe/S doped granular activated carbon (Fe/SGAC) was synthesized with ferric nitrate, Na2S2O3 and (NH4)2S2O8 via an impregnation-precipitation, reduction-oxidation combining with aqueous-phase synthesis method treatment. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes as well as the chemical state inside Fe/SGAC catalyst were studied by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reactivity of the catalysts was tested by degrading Orange G (OG) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). The Fe/SGAC catalysts could significantly enhance the removal rate of OG as compared to persulfate alone and PS/GAC. And the catalytic capacity was also enhanced by S doping. But the degradation of DEP under the similar condition was inhibited by adsorption process because of the different hydrophobicities of OG and DEP molecule. Fe2O3/FeOOH (Fe(3+)) (represents ferrihydrite) together with FeO/Fe3O4 (Fe(2+)) and Fe2O3-satellite, which provide the new active site for persulfate catalyst was found to be the major components of iron element in Fe/SGAC catalyst; the existence of FeS2(S(-)) for sulfur element verified the assumption that the doped S element promoted the electron transfer between the persulfate species and iron oxide at the interface. COD removal experiment further confirmed that mostly contaminant removal was owed to the Fe/SGAC catalytic persulfate oxidation process. PMID:24461853

  7. Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified activated carbon as air-cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m(2), which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m(2)) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m(2)). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. PMID:23902951

  8. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  9. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using sewage sludge based activated carbon supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Sewage sludge of biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl₂ as activation agent, which supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts (including SBAC) to improve the performance of ozonation of real biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalysts significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal and the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. On the basis of positive effect of higher pH and significant inhibition of radical scavengers in catalytic ozonation, it was deduced that the enhancement of catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals and the possible reaction pathway was proposed. Moreover, the prepared catalysts showed superior stability and most of toxic and refractory compounds were eliminated at successive catalytic ozonation runs. Thus, the process with economical, efficient and sustainable advantages was beneficial to engineering application. PMID:24907577

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Bartosz; Terzyk, Artur P.; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A.; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2014-09-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices.

  11. Temperature dependence of oxygen reduction activity at Nafion-coated bulk Pt and Pt/carbon black catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Eiji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2006-08-24

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and H(2)O(2) formation at Nafion-coated film electrodes of bulk-Pt and Pt nanoparticles dispersed on carbon black (Pt/CB) were investigated in 0.1 M HClO(4) solution at 30 to 110 degrees C by using a channel flow double electrode method. We have found that the apparent rate constants k(app) (per real Pt active surface area) for the ORR at bulk-Pt (with and without Nafion-coating) and Nafion-coated Pt/CB (19.3 and 46.7 wt % Pt, d(Pt) = 2.6 to 2.7 nm) thin-film electrodes were in beautiful agreement with each other in the operation conditions of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), i.e., 30-110 degrees C and ca. 0.7 to 0.8 V vs RHE. The H(2)O(2) yield was 0.6-1.0% at 0.7-0.8 V on all Nafion-coated Pt/CB and bulk-Pt and irrespective of Pt-loading level and temperature. Nafion coating was pointed out to be a major factor for the H(2)O(2) formation on Pt catalysts modifying the surface property, because H(2)O(2) production was not detected at the bulk-Pt electrode without Nafion coating. PMID:16913788

  12. Nitrogen-doped graphene/carbon nanotube hybrids: in situ formation on bifunctional catalysts and their superior electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution/reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gui-Li; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Yu, Dingshan; Kong, Xiang-Yi; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2014-06-12

    There is a growing interest in oxygen electrode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), as they play a key role in a wide range of renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water splitting. Nevertheless, the development of highly-active bifunctional catalysts at low cost for both ORR and OER still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we report a new N-doped graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid (NGSH) material as an efficient noble-metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for both ORR and OER. NGSHs were fabricated by in situ doping during chemical vapor deposition growth on layered double hydroxide derived bifunctional catalysts. Our one-step approach not only provides simultaneous growth of graphene and SWCNTs, leading to the formation of three dimensional interconnected network, but also brings the intrinsic dispersion of graphene and carbon nanotubes and the dispersion of N-containing functional groups within a highly conductive scaffold. Thus, the NGSHs possess a large specific surface area of 812.9 m(2) g(-1) and high electrical conductivity of 53.8 S cm(-1) . Despite of relatively low nitrogen content (0.53 at%), the NGSHs demonstrate a high ORR activity, much superior to two constituent components and even comparable to the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts with much better durability and resistance to crossover effect. The same hybrid material also presents high catalytic activity towards OER, rendering them high-performance cheap catalysts for both ORR and OER. Our result opens up new avenues for energy conversion technologies based on earth-abundant, scalable, noble-metal-free catalysts. PMID:24574006

  13. Sulfur and carbon deposition on Claus catalysts examined

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.; Downing, J.C.; Fleming, H.L.

    1985-11-04

    The authors discuss Alcoa's study of the deactivation of Claus catalysts caused by sulfur and carbon deposits. Although these two deactivation mechanisms are primarily affected by operation a study of the causes, extent, avoidance and reversal of these mechanisms yields information useful to both catalyst manufacturers and users. As a result of these studies, the following procedures are recommended for extending catalyst life and to increase catalyst activity: Conduct heat soak, exceed 280/sup 0/C, high frequency in third bed; minimize toluene levels; use SP-100 for alkylated aromatics, COS and/or CS/sub 2/ decomposition.

  14. Iron-phthalocyanine immobilized on activated carbon black: A selective catalyst for alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, R.F.; Neys, P.E.; Jacobs, P.A.

    1996-12-01

    Carbon black is tested as a support for iron-phthalocyanine within the frame of the oxidation of hydrocarbons with t-butyl-hydroperoxide as oxygen donor. The increased hydrophobicity of the carrier surface, with respect to zeolite Y, changes the adsorption behavior of the components in the reaction mixture towards the alkane. A major improvement in the oxidation conversion and efficiency of cyclohexane has been established. Furthermore, the kinetic isotope effect and the reactivity order of secondary and tertiary carbon atoms measured with adamantane provide evidence for an {open_quotes}oxygen rebound{close_quotes} reaction mechanism, a non-free-radical oxidation pathway where the metallo-complex is responsible for the hydrogen abstraction. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Nickel as a co-catalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution on graphitic-carbon nitride (sg-CN): what is the nature of the active species?

    PubMed

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Kailasam, Kamalakannan; Hollmann, Dirk; Schröder, Marc; Thomas, Arne; Brückner, Angelika; Driess, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The nature of a nickel-based co-catalyst deposited on a sol-gel prepared porous graphitic-carbon nitride (sg-CN), for photocatalytic H2 production from water, has been investigated. The formation of the active catalytic species, charge separation and recombination of the photogenerated electrons and holes during photochemical H2 evolution has been determined for the first time using in situ EPR spectroscopy. PMID:26498497

  16. Anionic group 6B metal carbonyls as homogeneous catalysts for carbon dioxide/hydrogen activation: the production of alkyl formates

    SciTech Connect

    Darensbourg, D.J.; Ovalles, C.

    1984-06-27

    The production of alkyl formates from the hydrocondensation of carbon dioxide in alcohols utilizing anionic group 6B carbonyl hydrides as catalysts is herein reported. HM(CO)/sub 5//sup -/ (M = Cr, W; derived from ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/) and their products of carbon dioxide insertion, HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/, have been found to be effective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO/sub 2/ in alcohols under rather mild conditions (loading pressures of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/, 250 psi each, and 125/sup 0/C) to provide alkyl formates. The only metal carbonyl species detected in solution via spectroscopy, both at the end of a catalytic period and during catalysis, were M(CO)/sub 6/ and HCO/sub 2/M(CO)/sub 5//sup -/. The metal hexacarbonyls were independently shown to be catalytically inactive. A catalytic cycle is proposed which initially involves release of formic acid from the metal center, either by reductive elimination of the hydrido formato ligands or ligand-assisted heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen with loss of formic acid. In a rapid subsequent process HCOOH reacts with alcohols to yield HCOOR. The addition of carbon monoxide retards alkyl formate production, strongly implying CO/sub 2/ to be the primary source of the carboxylic carbon atom in HCOOR. This was verified by carrying out reactions in the presence of HCO/sub 2/W(/sup 13/CO)/sub 5//sup -/ which provided only H/sup 12/COOR after short reaction periods. However, in the absence of hydrogen and carbon dioxide ..mu..-H(M/sub 2/(CO)/sub 10/)/sup -/ species were observed to be effective catalyst precursors for converting CO and methanol into methyl formate. 36 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  18. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

    1984-05-25

    This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  1. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  2. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  3. Clean Donor Oxidation Enhances the H2 Evolution Activity of a Carbon Quantum Dot-Molecular Catalyst Photosystem.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Joliat, Evelyne; Bachmann, Cyril; Alberto, Roger; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are new-generation light absorbers for photocatalytic H2 evolution in aqueous solution, but the performance of CQD-molecular catalyst systems is currently limited by the decomposition of the molecular component. Clean oxidation of the electron donor by donor recycling prevents the formation of destructive radical species and non-innocent oxidation products. This approach allowed a CQD-molecular nickel bis(diphosphine) photocatalyst system to reach a benchmark lifetime of more than 5 days and a record turnover number of 1094±61 molH2  (molNi )(-1) for a defined synthetic molecular nickel catalyst in purely aqueous solution under AM1.5G solar irradiation. PMID:27355200

  4. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Sulfonated Carbon-Based Catalysts Derived From Rubber Tree Leaves and Pulp and Paper Mill Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Sinin, E.; Hiew, S. F.; Kong, A. M. T.; Lahin, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Sulfonated carbon-based catalysts derived from rubber tree leaves, and pulp and paper mill waste were synthesized and characterized. Three types of catalyst synthesized were sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL), pyrolysed sludge char (P-SC) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC). Sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC) were prepared through pyrolysis followed by functionalization via sulfonation process whereas, P- SC was only pyrolyzed without sulfonation. The characterization results indicated sulfonic acids, hydroxyl, and carboxyl moieties were detected in S-RTL and S-SC, but no sulfonic acid was detected in P-SC. Total acidity test showed S-RTL had the highest value followed by S-SC and P-SC. The thermal stability of S-RTL and S-SC were up to 230oC as the loss was associated with the decomposition of sulfonic acid group, whereas, P-SC showed higher stability than the S-RTL and S-SC. Morphology analysis showed that S-RTL consisted of an amorphous carbon structure, and a crystalline structure for P-SC and S-SC. Furthermore, traces of metal components were also detected on all of the catalysts. The catalyst catalytic activity was tested through esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The results showed that the reaction using S-RTL catalyst produced the highest conversion (99.9%) followed by P-SC (88.4%) and lastly S-SC (82.7%). The synthesized catalysts showed high potential to be used in biodiesel production.

  5. Mo-Fe catalysts supported on activated carbon for synthesis of liquid fuels by the Fischer-Tropsch process: effect of Mo addition on reducibility, activity, and hydrocarbon selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; James Wright; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2006-12-15

    The effects of Mo loading (0-12 wt %) on the properties of activated-carbon- (AC-) supported Fe-Cu-K catalysts and their performance for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are studied. Physicochemical properties studied include particle size, reducibility, and dispersion, and catalytic properties include activity, selectivity, and stability. Catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and CO chemisorption. Catalyst performance was studied at 310-320{sup o}C, 2.2 MPa, 3 Nl/g-cat/h, and H{sub 2}/CO = 0.9. Reaction results in a fixed-bed reactor show that addition of 6% Mo into the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalyst improves catalyst stability without sacrificing activity, but activity is suppressed dramatically on a 12% Mo-loaded catalyst. Detectable hydrocarbons of C{sub 1} to C{sub 34} are produced on the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalysts with or without Mo. However, the addition of Mo results in the production of more CH{sub 4} and less C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons. The Mo promoter greatly enhances secondary reactions of olefins, leading to a large amount of internal olefins (i.e., other than 1-olefins) in the product. TPR shows that a strong interaction between Fe and Mo oxides is present, and the extent of reduction of Fe is suppressed after addition of Mo to the Fe-Cu-K catalyst. CO-chemisorption and XRD studies show increased iron dispersion and decreased particle size of the iron carbide and iron oxide after the addition of Mo. Segregation of iron active sites, thereby preventing them from agglomerating, and a larger number of active sites on the 6% Mo catalyst are possible reasons for the improved stability and higher activity of Mo-promoted catalysts. 54 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst for dehydrogenation of propane to propylene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Qing-Fang; Agula, Bao; Zhao, Xu; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2011-08-01

    Metal-free ordered mesoporous carbons were demonstrated to be robust catalysts for direct dehydrogenation of propane to propylene, in the absence of any auxiliary steam, exhibiting high activity and selectivity, as well as long catalytic stability, in comparison with nanostructured carbons. PMID:21687889

  7. [Degradation of PCDD/Fs by the Mixture of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 Catalyst and Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Ji, Sha-sha; Yu, Ming-feng; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2015-09-01

    The mixture of V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst and two kinds of Activated Carbons (AC) (AC-1: based on lignite; AC-2: based on coconut shell) was used to destroy gas phase PCDD/Fs with high concentration (9. 80 ng.m-3, evaluated by international toxic equivalence quantity (I-TEQ) under low thermal temperature (160°C) based on a dioxin generating system. After mixing with AC, removal efficiency (RE) and destruction efficiency (DE) of PCDD/Fs increased by 20% compared with only catalyst condition. In comparison with mixture of AC based on coconut shell, mixture of AC based on lignite had lower RE-values and higher DE-values. The adjustments of the ratio of catalyst and AC could cause the different degradation effects, and RE-values increased and DE-values decreased with increasing proportions of catalyst. When the volume fraction of oxygen was 0% in experimental atmosphere, catalyst could lose its activity and most PCDD/Fs were not oxidized but adsorbed by the mixture. RE and DE-values increased with increasing content of oxygen. The addition of ozone (concentration of 200 mg.m-3) could improve catalytic oxidation effects to a certain degree. However, ozone might react with AC, which could influence the lifetime of the mixture. Under 200°C, the mixture with proportion of AC: catalyst = 1:1 and in the present of 200 mg.m-3 ozone conditions, the highest RE and DE-value were obtained with 98. 0% and 94. 8% respectively, and the concentration of PCDD/Fs residual in off-gas was only 0. 51 ng.m-3 evaluated by I-TEQ. PMID:26717717

  8. Degradation of flumequine in aqueous solution by persulfate activated with common methods and polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes catalysts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Sun, Ping; Sui, Yunxia; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-11-15

    In recent years, flumequine (FLU) has been ubiquitously detected in surface waters and municipal wastewaters. In light of its potential negative impacts to aquatic species, growing concern has been arisen for the removal of this antibiotic from natural waters. In this study, the kinetics, degradation mechanisms and pathways of aqueous FLU by persulfate (PS) oxidation were systematically determined. Three common activation methods, including heat, Fe(2+) and Cu(2+), and a novel heterogeneous catalyst, namely, polyhydroquinone-coated magnetite/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ), were investigated to activate PS for FLU removal. It was found that these three common activators enhanced FLU degradation obviously, while several influencing factors, such as solution pH, inorganic ions (especially HCO3(-) at 5 mmol/L) and dissolved organic matter extracts, exerted their different effects on FLU removal. The catalysts were characterized, and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability and excellent reusability were observed. The measured total organic carbon levels suggested that FLU can be effectively mineralized by using the catalysts. Radical mechanism was studied by combination of the quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. It was assumed that sulfate radicals predominated in the activation of PS with Fe3O4/MWCNTs/PHQ for FLU removal, while hydroxyl radicals also contributed to the catalytic oxidation process. In addition, a total of fifteen reaction intermediates of FLU were identified, from which two possible pathways were proposed involving hydroxylation, decarbonylation and ring opening. Overall, this study represented a systematical evaluation regarding the transformation process of FLU by PS, and showed that the heterogeneous catalysts can efficiently activate PS for FLU removal from the water environment. PMID:26281959

  9. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Bernhard C.; Baehtz, Carsten; Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C.; Goddard, Caroline J. L.

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  10. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  11. High activity of carbon nanotubes supported binary and ternary Pd-based catalysts for methanol, ethanol and formic acid electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuchun; Ma, Guanshui; Bai, Zhongchao; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we have synthesized a series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes supported Pd, PdCu(molar ratio 1:1), PdSn(1:1) and PdCuSn(1:1:1) catalysts by chemical reduction with NaBH4 as a reducing agent. These catalysts are characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. During the potential cycling activation, it is found that the additive Cu is prone to suffer leaching while the dissolution of Sn rarely occurs. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that, the co-alloying of Pd with Cu and Sn can trigger the best catalytic activity enhancement as compared with the binary PdCu/CNTs, PdSn/CNTs and mono-component Pd/CNTs catalysts. The PdCuSn/CNTs reveals the most excellent activities toward methanol, ethanol and formic acid electro-oxidation and the corresponding mass activity can attain to 395.94, 872.70 and 534.83 mA mg-1 Pd, respectively. The possible promotion effect of additive Sn or/and Cu on the electrocatalytic activity improvement is also analyzed.

  12. Non-directed, carbonate-mediated C-H activation and aerobic C-H oxygenation with Cp*Ir catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kerr, M E; Ahmed, I; Gunay, A; Venditto, N J; Zhu, F; Ison, E A; Emmert, M H

    2016-06-14

    The effect of oxidatively stable L- and X-type additives on the activity of Cp*Ir catalyst precursors in the C-H activation of arenes has been studied. Turnover numbers for C-H activation of up to 65 can thus be achieved, as determined by H/D exchange in MeOH-D4. In particular, carbonate additives are found to enhance the C-H activation reactivity of Cp*Ir(H2O)3(OTf)2 () more significantly than L-type ligands investigated in this study. Based on these studies, Cp*Ir/carbonate systems are developed that catalyze the aerobic Csp(3)-H oxygenation of alkyl arenes, employing air as oxidant. PMID:26979568

  13. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  14. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  15. Nickel supported carbon nanofibers as an active and selective catalyst for the gas-phase hydrogenation of 2-tert-butylphenol.

    PubMed

    Díaz, José Antonio; Díaz-Moreno, Rebeca; Silva, Luz Sánchez; Dorado, Fernando; Romero, Amaya; Valverde, José Luis

    2012-08-15

    Nickel supported fishbone carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been prepared by vacuum impregnation (VI) and homogeneous deposition-precipitation (HDP) methods with different nickel loadings (ca. 5%, 9% and 12%) with the aim to study the influence of the metal incorporation method and the nickel loading in the catalytic activity of gas-phase hydrogenation of 2-tert-butylphenol (2-TBP). Moreover, the influence of the nature of the support was also studied by preparing nickel catalysts supported on other carbon (active carbon (AC) and graphite (G)) and non-carbonaceous materials (alumina (AL) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)). Different techniques were employed to characterize both the supports and the final Ni catalysts: atomic absorption spectrometry, N(2) adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Catalytic results revealed that the nickel particle size and support properties affected directly to both the catalytic activity of hydrogenation of 2-TBP, and the rate of secondary reactions such as cis to trans isomerization and 2-tert-butylcyclohexanone (2-TBCN) hydrogenation. PMID:22682327

  16. Comparison of the performance of activated carbon-supported noble metal catalysts in the hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, A.; Sandt, E.J.A.X. van de; Hollander, M.A. den; Bekkum, H. van; Makkee, M.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1998-07-01

    The hydrogenolysis of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} over 1 wt% palladium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and rhenium on activated carbon has been studied in a micro-flow reactor, in a temperature range of 450--540 K, H{sub 2}/CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} feed ratios between 1.5 and 6, a pressure of 0.4 MPa, and a WHSV of 1 g/(g{center_dot}h). The main products of the reaction for all investigated catalysts were CHClF{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, and methane. According to their performance, the catalysts could be divided into four groups: rhenium showing no conversion of CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, palladium with a high selectivity for CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, iridium and ruthenium with a high selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}, and platinum and rhodium with moderate selectivity for CHClF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}. The adsorption of chlorine on the metal surface plays an important role in the selectivity. Strong chlorine adsorption leads to a higher selectivity for CHClF{sub 2}. These results are consistent with a reaction mechanism in which difluorocarbene is the key intermediate. Apparently, the same kinetic network applies to all metals studied. The performance of the catalysts changed as a function of time on stream. Palladium, rhodium, and especially ruthenium deactivated during reaction, whereas the activity of iridium and platinum increased. This can be explained by two opposite effects. On the one hand, the dispersion of all catalysts increased during reaction, which can explain an increase in activity as a function of time on stream. Apparently, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} hydrogenolysis conditions are suitable for dispersing noble metal catalysts on activated carbon. On the other hand, deactivation takes place by the adsorption of chlorine and deposits of heavy halogenated products.

  17. Effective catalytic conversion of cellulose into high yields of methyl glucosides over sulfonated carbon based catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dora, Sambha; Bhaskar, Thallada; Singh, Rawel; Naik, Desavath Viswanatha; Adhikari, Dilip Kumar

    2012-09-01

    An amorphous carbon based catalyst was prepared by sulfonation of the bio-char obtained from fast pyrolysis (N(2) atm; ≈ 550°C) of biomass. The sulfonated carbon catalyst contained high acidity of 6.28 mmol/g as determined by temperature programmed desorption of ammonia of sulfonated carbon catalyst and exhibited high catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Amorphous carbon based catalyst containing -SO(3)H groups was successfully tested and the complete conversion of cellulose in methanol at moderate temperatures with high yields ca. ≥ 90% of α, β-methyl glucosides in short reaction times was achieved. The methyl glucosides formed in methanol are more stable for further conversion than the products formed in water. The carbon catalyst was demonstrated to be stable for five cycles with slight loss in catalytic activity. The utilization of bio-char as a sulfonated carbon catalyst provides a green and efficient process for cellulose conversion. PMID:22776237

  18. Growth of carbon nanotubes using nanocrystalline carbon catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong Seob; Choi, Eun Chang; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-03-01

    The basic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) involves dissociation of hydrocarbon molecules over a metal layer as a catalyst. Generally, the metals used for the catalyst include nickel, cobalt, gold, iron, platinum, and palladium. However, the metal catalyst used with CNTs could have a harmful influence on the electrical properties of electronic devices. Therefore, we propose the use of nanocrystalline carbon (nc-C) as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs. We used a nc-C catalyst layer deposited by the closed-field unbalanced magnetron (CFUBM) sputtering method, and CNTs were grown by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) method with ammonia (NH 3) as a pretreatment and acetylene gas (C 2H 2) as a carbon source. The CNTs were grown on the nc-C layers pretreated with a variation of the pretreatment time. The characteristics of the pretreated nc-C layers and the grown CNTs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Also, the structural variation of the pretreated nc-C layers was investigated by Raman measurement. We used the nc-C catalyst without metal, and we confirmed that our CNTs were composed with only carbon elements through an EDS measurement. Also, the pretreatment time was attributed to the growth of CNTs.

  19. Synthesis of superparamagnetic carbon nanotubes immobilized Pt and Pd pincer complexes: highly active and selective catalysts towards cyclohexane oxidation with dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Machado, Kelly; Mishra, Jaya; Suzuki, Shinzo; Mishra, Gopal S

    2014-12-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Ni/Co have been prepared using an arc discharge technique and Ni/Co-carbon composite rods in an inert atmosphere and were surface modified using 3-aminophenyl trimethoxysilane. These NH2-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes have been used as a novel support for Pd((II)) and Pt((II)) pincer complexes immobilized as magnetic nano-catalysts. The morphology of the support and the catalysts have been characterized by IR, EPR, SEM, TGA, TEM, XRD, AAS and EDS analysis. These magnetic nano-catalysts have been tested on the industrially important cyclohexane (Cy-hx) oxidation with O2 and significantly high TONs of 1678 to 1946 were achieved under solvent free and relatively mild conditions. The SWNTs/Pd catalyst provided the best conversion, 22.7%, but the SWNTs/Pt system also provided a good conversion of 20.7%. PMID:25340475

  20. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  1. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  2. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu / ZrO2 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Israf Ud; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-01

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu - ZrO2/ CNF ) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO3). The CNF activated with 5% HNO3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m2/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  3. Carbon-supported and alumina-supported niobium sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Allali, N.; Marie, A.M.; Danot, M.

    1995-10-01

    Few studies deal with the properties of niobium sulfide as a hydrodesulfurization catalyst. In this paper, the preparation of carbon-supported niobium sulfide catalysts was optimized concerning (i) the nature of the soluble precursor, (ii) the drying process, and (iii) the sulfurizing treatment, which was always performed under atmospheric pressure but for different H{sub 2}S-based flows and reaction temperatures. The activities of the best samples prepared with niobium oxalate as the impregnation salt, drying at room temperature, and presulfurization with N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S at 400{degrees}C are superior to that of a supported MoS{sub 2} reference catalyst. Alumina-supported systems can be sulfurized only under more severe conditions (CS{sub 2} under pressure). After optimization of the sulfurization treatment (400{degrees}C, 10 h) the maximum activity obtained is significantly higher than that of a molybdenum sulfide reference catalyst. The catalytic activities of the various catalysts studied are related to their morphological and chemical characteristics using TPR and EXAFS measurements. The work illustrates the importance of the support and the sulfurization method on the genesis of a niobium sulfide active phase. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Carbon nanotube synthesis with different support materials and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Fatih; Yuca, Neslihan; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Having remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of interest. Their mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical properties make CNTs suitable for several applications such as electronic devices, hydrogen storage, textile, drug delivery etc. CNTs have been synthesized by various methods, such as arc discharge, laser ablation and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). In comparison with the other techniques, CCVD is widely used as it offers a promising route for mass production. High capability of decomposing hydrocarbon formation is desired for the selected catalysts. Therefore, transition metals which are in the nanometer scale are the most effective catalysts. The common transition metals that are being used are Fe, Co, Ni and their binary alloys. The impregnation of the catalysts over the support material has a crucial importance for the CNT production. In this study, the influence of the support materials on the catalytic activity of metals was investigated. CNTs have been synthesized over alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2) and magnesium oxide (MgO) supported Fe, Co, Fe-Co catalysts. Catalyst - support material combinations have been investigated and optimum values for each were compared. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced at 800°C. The duration of synthesis was 30 minutes for all support materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  6. Design and preparation of highly active carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and platinum catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huanqiao; Xiao, Pu; Qiu, Xinping; Zhu, Wentao

    A novel electrocatalyst structure of carbon nanotube-supported sulfated TiO 2 and Pt (Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT) is reported. The Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts are prepared by a combination of improved sol-gel and ethylene glycol reduction methods. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the sulfated TiO 2 is amorphous and is coated uniformly on the surface of the CNTs. Pt nanoparticles of about 3.6 nm in size are homogenously dispersed on the sulfated TiO 2 surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis proves that the CNT surfaces are modified with sulfated TiO 2 and a high concentration of SO x, and adsorbed OH species exist on the surface of the sulfated TiO 2. Electrochemical studies are carried out using chronoamperometry, cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate that Pt-S-TiO 2/CNT catalysts have much higher catalytic activity and CO tolerance for methanol electrooxidation than Pt/TiO 2/CNTs, Pt/CNTs and commercial Pt/C.

  7. Laser Synthesis of Supported Catalysts for Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Sherry, Leif J.; Hall, Lee J.; Schubert, Kathy (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Four methods of laser assisted catalyst generation for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis have been tested. These include pulsed laser transfer (PLT), photolytic deposition (PLD), photothermal deposition (PTD) and laser ablation deposition (LABD). Results from each method are compared based on CNT yield, morphology and structure. Under the conditions tested, the PLT was the easiest method to implement, required the least time and also yielded the best pattemation. The photolytic and photothermal methods required organometallics, extended processing time and partial vacuums. The latter two requirements also held for the ablation deposition approach. In addition to control of the substrate position, controlled deposition duration was necessary to achieve an active catalyst layer. Although all methods were tested on both metal and quartz substrates, only the quartz substrates proved to be inactive towards the deposited catalyst particles.

  8. Iron-nitrogen-activated carbon as cathode catalyst to improve the power generation of single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yajun; Mo, Xiaoping; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC), iron-nitrogen-activated carbon (Fe-N-C) as an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst was prepared here using commercial activated carbon (AC) as matrix and employed in single chamber MFC. In MFC, the maximum power density increased to 2437±55mWm(-2), which was 2 times of that with AC. The open circuit potential (OCP) of Fe-N-C cathode (0.47) was much higher than that of AC cathode (0.21V). The R0 of Fe-N-C decreased by 47% from 14.36Ω (AC) to 7.6Ω (Fe-N-C). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species were present, which played an important role in the ORR performance of Fe-N-C. These results demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe-N-C material provided a potential alternative to Pt in AC air cathode MFC for relatively desirable energy generation and wastewater treatment. PMID:26898678

  9. Characteristics of catalyst for carbon monoxide coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.H.; Ma, X.; He, F.; Chen, H.F.

    1995-07-01

    The use of carbon monoxide to produce organic compounds is an important research area for the future. In particular the carbon monoxide coupling reaction takes place at moderate reaction conditions,with low consumption of energy, to produce oxalic acid and oxalate. The chemicals are feedstocks for ethylene glycol synthesis by hydrogenation of oxalate, as well as for products such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, polymers, and fine chemicals. The carbon monoxide coupling reaction on supported metal catalysts Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pd-Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used to study the characteristics of the catalyst under different conditions. The results indicated that the catalytic activation temperature influenced the catalytic activity and that there was an optimum activation temperature. The characteristics of effective coupling catalysts were found to be smaller surface areas and bigger pores, for example the {alpha}-phase of aluminum oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis results show that the catalytic reaction of CO coupling occurs via a redox mechanism.

  10. Combinatorial Optimization of Heterogeneous Catalysts Used in the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Verma, Sunita; Delzeit, Lance; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2000-01-01

    Libraries of liquid-phase catalyst precursor solutions were printed onto iridium-coated silicon substrates and evaluated for their effectiveness in catalyzing the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The catalyst precursor solutions were composed of inorganic salts and a removable tri-block copolymer (EO)20(PO)70(EO)20 (EO = ethylene oxide, PO = propylene oxide) structure-directing agent (SDA), dissolved in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Sample libraries were quickly assayed using scanning electron microscopy after CVD growth to identify active catalysts and CVD conditions. Composition libraries and focus libraries were then constructed around the active spots identified in the discovery libraries to understand how catalyst precursor composition affects the yield, density, and quality of the nanotubes. Successful implementation of combinatorial optimization methods in the development of highly active, carbon nanotube catalysts is demonstrated, as well as the identification of catalyst formulations that lead to varying densities and shapes of aligned nanotube towers.

  11. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  12. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    1996-03-19

    A method and composition are disclosed for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, copper, cobalt, manganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  13. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  14. Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

  15. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  16. Altering the catalytic activity of thin metal catalyst films for controlled growth of chemical vapor deposited vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, Christopher M; Christen, Hans M; Cui, Hongtao; Eres, Gyula; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B

    2008-01-01

    The growth rate and terminal length of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs) grown by chemical vapor deposition have been dramatically improved through pulsed KrF-excimer laser pretreatments of multilayer metal catalyst films. Silicon wafers coated with Al, Mo, and Fe layers were laser processed in air with single laser shots of varying fluence through circular apertures, then heated to ~750C and exposed to acetylene and ferrocene-containing gas mixtures typically used to grow vertically-aligned nanotube arrays. In situ videography was used to record the growth kinetics of the nanotube arrays in both patterned and unpatterned regions to understand changes in catalytic activity, growth rates, and termination of growth. The height of the patterned regions varied with fluence, with the most successful treatment resulting in 1.4 cm-tall posts of nanotubes embedded in a 0.4 cm-tall nanotube carpet. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images from the nanotubes in the posts revealed fewer walls, smaller diameters, and a much narrower distribution of diameters compared to nanotubes grown in the carpet. This information, along with data obtained from weighing the material from each region, suggests that pulsed laser processing can also significantly increase the areal density of VANTAs.

  17. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  18. Growth of carbon nanotubes on surfaces: the effects of catalyst and substrate.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Angel Berenguer; Geng, Junfeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of synthesising air-stable, nearly monodispersed bimetallic colloids of Co/Pd and Fe/Mo of varying compositions as active catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Using these catalysts we have investigated the effects of catalyst and substrate on the carbon nanostructures formed in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. We will show how it is possible to assess the influence of both the catalyst and the support on the controlled growth of carbon nanotube and nanofiber arrays. The importance of the composition of the catalytic nuclei will be put into perspective with other results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of other synthetic parameters such as the nature of the nanoparticle catalysts will also be analysed and discussed in detail. PMID:23882847

  19. Enhancement of Nitrite Reduction Kinetics on Electrospun Pd-Carbon Nanomaterial Catalysts for Water Purification.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Durkin, David P; Hu, Maocong; Wang, Xianqin; Banek, Nathan A; Wagner, Michael J; Shuai, Danmeng

    2016-07-20

    We report a facile synthesis method for carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported Pd catalysts via one-pot electrospinning and their application for nitrite hydrogenation. A mixture of Pd acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and nonfunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce Pd/CNF-MWCNT catalysts. The addition of MWCNTs with a mass loading of 1.0-2.5 wt % (to PAN) significantly improved nitrite reduction activity compared to the catalyst without MWCNT addition. The results of CO chemisorption confirmed that the addition of MWCNTs increased Pd exposure on CNFs and hence improved catalytic activity. PMID:27387354

  20. Activity and stability studies of titanates and titanate-carbon nanotubes supported Ag anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Mokhtar; Khairy, M.; Eid, Salah

    2016-02-01

    Titanate-SWCNT; synthesized via exploiting the interaction between TiO2 anatase with oxygen functionalized SWCNT, supported Ag nanoparticles and Ag/titanate are characterized using XRD, TEM-EDX-SAED, N2 adsorption, Photoluminescence, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. These samples are tested for methanol electrooxidation via using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurements. It is shown that Ag/titanate nanotubes exhibited superior electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation (4.2 mA cm-2) than titanate-SWCNT, Ag/titanate-SWCNT and titanate. This study reveals the existence of a strong metal-support interaction in Ag/titanate as explored via formation of Ti-O-Ag bond at 896 cm-1 and increasing surface area and pore volume (103 m2 g-1, 0.21 cm3 g-1) compared to Ag/titanate-SWCNT (71 m2 g-1, 0.175 cm3 g-1) that suffers perturbation and defects following incorporation of SWCNT and Ag. Embedding Ag preferably in SWCNT rather than titanate in Ag/titanate-SWCNT disturbs the electron transfer compared to Ag/titanate. Charge transfer resistance depicted from Nyquist impedance plots is found in the order of titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate-SWCNT > Ag/titanate. Accordingly, Ag/titanate indicates a slower current degradation over time compared to rest of catalysts. Conductivity measurements indicate that it follows the order Ag/titanate > Ag/titanate-SWCNT > titanate > titanate-SWCNT declaring that SWCNT affects seriously the conductivity of Ag(titanate) due to perturbations caused in titanate and sinking of electrons committed by Ago through SWCNT.

  1. Renewable and metal-free carbon nanofibre catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bijandra; Asadi, Mohammad; Pisasale, Davide; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Rosen, Brian A.; Haasch, Richard; Abiade, Jeremiah; Yarin, Alexander L.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2013-12-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst system for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into energy-rich products is a major research topic. Here we report the catalytic ability of polyacrylonitrile-based heteroatomic carbon nanofibres for carbon dioxide reduction into carbon monoxide, via a metal-free, renewable and cost-effective route. The carbon nanofibre catalyst exhibits negligible overpotential (0.17 V) for carbon dioxide reduction and more than an order of magnitude higher current density compared with the silver catalyst under similar experimental conditions. The carbon dioxide reduction ability of carbon nanofibres is attributed to the reduced carbons rather than to electronegative nitrogen atoms. The superior performance is credited to the nanofibrillar structure and high binding energy of key intermediates to the carbon nanofibre surfaces. The finding may lead to a new generation of metal-free and non-precious catalysts with much greater efficiency than the existing noble metal catalysts.

  2. Graphite-Conjugated Rhenium Catalysts for Carbon Dioxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokjoon; Gallagher, James R; Miller, Jeffrey T; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-02-17

    Condensation of fac-Re(5,6-diamino-1,10-phenanthroline)(CO)3Cl to o-quinone edge defects on graphitic carbon surfaces generates graphite-conjugated rhenium (GCC-Re) catalysts that are highly active for CO2 reduction to CO in acetonitrile electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies establish the formation of surface-bound Re centers with well-defined coordination environments. GCC-Re species on glassy carbon surfaces display catalytic currents greater than 50 mA cm(-2) with 96 ± 3% Faradaic efficiency for CO production. Normalized for the number of Re active sites, GCC-Re catalysts exhibit higher turnover frequencies than that of a soluble molecular analogue, fac-Re(1,10-phenanthroline)(CO)3Cl, and turnover numbers greater than 12,000. In contrast to the molecular analogue, GCC-Re surfaces display a Tafel slope of 150 mV/decade, indicative of a catalytic mechanism involving rate-limiting one-electron transfer. This work establishes graphite-conjugation as a powerful strategy for generating well-defined, tunable, heterogeneous electrocatalysts on ubiquitous graphitic carbon surfaces. PMID:26804469

  3. Highly active carbon supported palladium catalysts decorated by a trace amount of platinum by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction for formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuopeng; Li, Muwu; Han, Mingjia; Wu, Xin; Guo, Yong; Zeng, Jianhuang; Li, Yuexia; Liao, Shijun

    2015-03-01

    Aimed at reducing platinum usage and improved catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, a series of Pt decorated Pd/C catalysts are prepared by an in-situ galvanic displacement reaction between freshly prepared Pd/C ink and H2PtCl6 in an aqueous solution. The catalysts with 4 nm particle sizes and 20 wt.% loadings have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical evaluations by cyclic voltammetry are conducted to test out the CO tolerance and catalytic activities. In addition to XPS analysis, a theoretical calculation has been attempted the first time to find out the surface Pd/Pt molar ratios. The decay rate of the catalysts has been evaluated by the percentage of the forward/backward peak current retained using the value at the 20th cycle divided by that in the first cycle. Compared with a Pd/C benchmark, all Pt decorated Pd/C register enhanced activity while the cost remains virtually unchanged. The optimized catalyst is found to have a Pd/Pt molar ratio of 75:1 but with 2.5 times activity relative to that of Pd/C.

  4. Understanding high-yield catalyst-free growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes nucleated by activated C60 species.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Grimm, Daniel; Popov, Alexey; Makharza, Sami; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-12-21

    Our understanding of the catalyst-free growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition is limited. Toward improving our knowledge base, we conducted systematic investigations into the initial preparation of C(60) fullerenes as nucleation precursors for single-wall and even double-wall carbon nanotube fabrication. The role of the dispersing media is shown to be crucial and is related to the initial fullerene cluster size. Oxygen-based groups, in particular, epoxy groups, are shown to be vital prior to actual growth. Moreover, the presence of oxygen groups during the growth phase is necessary for tube development. We also demonstrate the possibility of fabricating the tubes in crossbar configurations with bespoke crossing angles in a single synthesis step, unlike other routes which require at least two synthesis steps. The systematic studies significantly advance our understanding of the growth mechanisms involved in all-carbon catalyst-free growth of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:23186015

  5. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  6. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  7. Platinum particle size and support effects in NO(x) mediated carbon oxidation over platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villani, Kenneth; Vermandel, Walter; Smets, Koen; Liang, Duoduo; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A

    2006-04-15

    Platinum metal was dispersed on microporous, mesoporous, and nonporous support materials including the zeolites Na-Y, Ba-Y, Ferrierite, ZSM-22, ETS-10, and AIPO-11, alumina, and titania. The oxidation of carbon black loosely mixed with catalyst powder was monitored gravimetrically in a gas stream containing nitric oxide, oxygen, and water. The carbon oxidation activity of the catalysts was found to be uniquely related to the Pt dispersion and little influenced by support type. The optimum dispersion is around 3-4% corresponding to relatively large Pt particle sizes of 20-40 nm. The carbon oxidation activity reflects the NO oxidation activity of the platinum catalyst, which reaches an optimum in the 20-40 nm Pt particle size range. The lowest carbon oxidation temperatures were achieved with platinum loaded ZSM-22 and AIPO-11 zeolite crystallites bearing platinum of optimum dispersion on their external surfaces. PMID:16683615

  8. Production of biohydrogen by aqueous phase reforming of polyols over platinum catalysts supported on three-dimensionally bimodal mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Kim, Ho-Dong; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Chung, Young-Min; Park, Young-Kwon; Kim, Chul-Ung

    2012-04-01

    Now in 3D! Three-dimensionally bimodal carbons (3D-BMC) with mesopores of tunable size (controlled through the polymerization of the carbon precursor) are synthesized. After loading with platinum, the catalysts are used in aqueous phase reforming of polyols, and show superior performance in terms of carbon conversion, hydrogen yield, selectivity, and hydrogen production rate compared to platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon or two-dimensional CMK-3. PMID:22415941

  9. Reactions over catalysts confined in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiulian; Bao, Xinhe

    2008-12-21

    We review a new concept for modifying the redox properties of transition metals via confinement within the channels of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and thus tuning their catalytic performance. Attention is also devoted to novel techniques for homogeneous dispersion of metal nanoparticles inside CNTs since these are essential for optimization of the catalytic activity. PMID:19048128

  10. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Israf Ud E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S. E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  11. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X S

    2013-11-21

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in D-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. PMID:24072134

  12. Stable carbonous catalyst particles and method for making and utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    2005-06-14

    Stable carbonous catalyst particles composed of an inorganic catalytic metal/metal oxide powder and a carbonaceous binder material are formed having a basic inner substantially uniform-porous carbon coating of the catalytic powder, and may include an outer porous carbon coating layer. Suitable inorganic catalytic powders include zinc-chromite (ZnO/Cr.sub.2 03) and suitable carbonaceous liquid binders having molecular weight of 200-700 include partially polymerized furfuryl alcohol, which are mixed together, shaped and carbonized and partially oxidized at elevated temperature. Such stable carbonous catalyst particles such as 0.020-0.100 inch (0.51-2.54 mm) diameter extrudates, have total carbon content of 2-25 wt. % and improved crush strength of 1.0-5 1b/mn, 50-300 m.sup.2 /g surface area, and can be advantageously utilized in fixed bed or ebullated/fluidized bed reactor operations. This invention also includes method steps for making the stable carbonous catalyst particles having improved particle strength and catalytic activity, and processes for utilizing the active stable carbonous carbon-coated catalysts such as for syn-gas reactions in ebullated/fluidized bed reactors for producing alcohol products and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis liquid products.

  13. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X. S.

    2013-10-01

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal.Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03813k

  14. Investigation of carbon supported Pd-Cu nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmenyar, Gamze; Akın, Ayşe Nilgün

    2014-03-01

    Carbon supported Pd and bimetallic Pd-Cu nanoparticles with different compositions are prepared by a modified polyol method and used as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and fuel cell experiments. The results show that the carbon supported Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts have much higher catalytic activity for the direct oxidation of BH4- than the carbon supported pure nanosized Pd catalyst, especially the Pd50Cu50/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all as-prepared catalysts, and the DBFC using Pd50Cu50/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst gives the best performance, and the maximum power density is 98 mW cm-2 at a current density of 223 mA cm-2 at 60 °C.

  15. Obtaining Carbon Nanomaterials on a Ni-Mo-Bentonite Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sataeva, G. E.; Daurenbek, N. M.; Myrzakhmet, M. K.

    2014-05-01

    Investigations into obtaining granulated sorbents based on bentonite clays of the Kyngrack fi eld have been carried out. A pilot-production technology for obtaining carbon composite materials (sorbents and catalysts) has been proposed. The process of formation of catalytic carbon in composites based on Ni-Mo bentonite has been studied on a semicommercial continuous laboratory reactor. It has been established that tubular-fibrous nanosize particles are predominantly formed in the pyrolysis of methane with a Ni-Mo-bentonite catalyst. The efficiency of activation of these sorbents is influenced by the concentration of the clay in them and by their temperature, and also by the consumption of an acid and the time of contact between the solvent and the acid. The structure of the formed nanotubes and nanofibers has been determined with a scanning electron microscope. Optimum parameters and kinetic regularities of the process of obtaining nanotubes and nanofibers at the intermolecular level through their pyrolysis from methane have been obtained.

  16. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application. PMID:24658614

  17. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  18. Highly active carbon supported ternary PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7) catalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline and acid media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Fuchun; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Zhonghua; Ma, Zizai; Li, Ruixue

    2016-04-15

    A series of trimetallic PdSnPtx (x=0.1-0.7)/C catalysts with varied Pt content have been synthesized by co-reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. These catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The electrochemical results show that, after adding a minor amount of Pt dopant, the resultant PdSnPtx/C demonstrated more superior catalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation as compared with that of mono-/bi-metallic Pd/C or PdSn/C in alkaline solution and the PdSnPt0.2/C with optimal molar ratio reached the best. In acid solution, the PdSnPt0.2/C also depicted a superior catalytic activity relative to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The possible enhanced synergistic effect between Pd, Sn/Sn(O) and Pt in an alloyed state should be responsible for the as-revealed superior ethanol electro-oxidation performance based upon the beneficial electronic effect and bi-functional mechanism. It implies the trimetallic PdSnPt0.2/C with a low Pt content has a promising prospect as anodic electrocatalyst in fields of alkali- and acid-type direct ethanol fuel cells. PMID:26851453

  19. Direct imaging of copper catalyst migration inside helical carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lifeng; Yu, Liyan; Cui, Zuolin; Dong, Hongzhou; Ercius, Peter; Song, Chengyu; Duden, Thomas

    2012-01-27

    By using a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEM/TEM) at an acceleration voltage of only 80 kV, we demonstrate that, due to the low solubility of copper (Cu) in carbon and its affinity with oxygen (O), single-crystal Cu catalysts dissociate into small cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles after the growth of carbon nanofibers, and Cu2O nanoparticles ultimately localize on the fiber surfaces. This new finding is a step toward a better understanding of the interactions between Cu catalysts and carbon nanomaterials and could suggest a simple and effective method for eliminating Cu impurities from the fibers. PMID:22172975

  20. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  1. Hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol over rhenium catalyst supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ung Gi; Park, Hai Woong; Lee, Joongwon; Hwang, Sunhwan; Kwak, Jimin; Yi, Jongheop; Song, In Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Copper-containing mesoporous carbon (Cu-MC) was prepared by a single-step surfactant-templating method. For comparison, copper-impregnated mesoporous carbon (Cu/MC) was also prepared by a surfactant-templating method and a subsequent impregnation method. Rhenium catalysts supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon and copper-impregnated mesoporous carbon (Re/Cu-MC and Re/Cu/MC, respectively) were then prepared by an incipient wetness method, and they were applied to the liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol (BDO). It was observed that copper in the Re/Cu-MC catalyst was well incorporated into carbon framework, resulting in higher surface area and larger pore volume than those of Re/Cu/MC catalyst. Therefore, Re/Cu-MC catalyst showed higher copper dispersion than Re/Cu/MC catalyst, although both catalysts retained the same amounts of copper and rhenium. In the liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO, Re/Cu-MC catalyst showed a better catalytic activity than Re/Cu/MC catalyst. Fine dispersion of copper in the Re/Cu-MC catalyst was responsible for its enhanced catalytic activity. PMID:24245272

  2. Advanced Catalysts for the Ambient Temperature Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Eldridge, Christopher; Yu, Ping; Alpetkin, Gokhan; Graf, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary applications for ambient temperature carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysts include emergency breathing masks and confined volume life support systems, such as those employed on the Shuttle. While Hopcalite is typically used in emergency breathing masks for terrestrial applications, in the 1970s, NASA selected a 2% platinum (Pt) on carbon for use on the Shuttle since it is more active and also more tolerant to water vapor. In the last 10-15 years there have been significant advances in ambient temperature CO oxidation catalysts. Langley Research Center developed a monolithic catalyst for ambient temperature CO oxidation operating under stoichiometric conditions for closed loop carbon dioxide (CO2) laser applications which is also advertised as having the potential to oxidize formaldehyde (HCHO) at ambient temperatures. In the last decade it has been discovered that appropriate sized nano-particles of gold are highly active for CO oxidation, even at sub-ambient temperatures, and as a result there has been a wealth of data reported in the literature relating to ambient/low temperature CO oxidation. In the shorter term missions where CO concentrations are typically controlled via ambient temperature oxidation catalysts, formaldehyde is also a contaminant of concern, and requires specially treated carbons such as Calgon Formasorb as untreated activated carbon has effectively no HCHO capacity. This paper examines the activity of some of the newer ambient temperature CO and formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation catalysts, and measures the performance of the catalysts relative to the NASA baseline Ambient Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer (ATCO) catalyst at conditions of interest for closed loop trace contaminant control systems.

  3. Catalytic conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural over carbon solid acid catalyst in γ-valerolactone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingwei; Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Zhiping; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Ma, Longlong

    2016-06-01

    A novel carbon solid acid catalyst was synthesized by the sulfonation of carbonaceous material which was prepared by carbonization of sucrose using 4-BDS as a sulfonating agent. TEM, N2 adsorption-desorption, elemental analysis, XPS and FT-IR were used to characterize the catalyst. Then, the catalyst was applied for the conversion of xylose and corn stalk into furfural in GVL. The influence of the reaction time, temperature and dosage of catalyst on xylose dehydration were also investigated. The Brønsted acid catalyst exhibited high activity in the dehydration of xylose, with a high furfural yield of 78.5% at 170°C in 30min. What's more, a 60.6% furfural yield from corn stalk was achieved in 100min at 200°C. The recyclability of the sulfonated carbon catalyst was perfect, and it could be reused for 5times without the loss of furfural yields. PMID:26967333

  4. Synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea with gold-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A; Ab Rahim, Mohd Hasbi; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jenkins, Robert L; Carley, Albert F; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Knight, David W; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-04-21

    The reaction of glycerol with urea to form glycerol carbonate is mostly reported in the patent literature and to date there have been very few fundamental studies of the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, most previous studies have involved homogeneous catalysts whereas the identification of heterogeneous catalysts for this reaction would be highly beneficial. This is a very attractive reaction that utilises two inexpensive and readily available raw materials in a chemical cycle that overall, results in the chemical fixation of CO(2). This reaction also provides a route to up-grade waste glycerol produced in large quantities during the production of biodiesel. Previous reports are largely based on the utilisation of high concentrations of metal sulfates or oxides, which suffer from low intrinsic activity and selectivity. We have identified heterogeneous catalysts based on gallium, zinc, and gold supported on a range of oxides and the zeolite ZSM-5, which facilitate this reaction. The addition of each component to ZSM-5 leads to an increase in the reaction yield towards glycerol carbonate, but supported gold catalysts display the highest activity. For gold-based catalysts, MgO is the support of choice. Catalysts have been characterised by XRD, TEM, STEM and XPS, and the reaction has been studied with time-on-line analysis of products via a combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC, (13)C NMR and GC-MS analysis to evaluate the reaction pathway. Our proposed mechanism suggests that glycerol carbonate forms via the cyclization of a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl carbamate and that a subsequent reaction of glycerol carbonate with urea yields the carbamate of glycerol carbonate. Stability and reactivity studies indicate that consecutive reactions of glycerol carbonate can limit the selectivity achieved and reaction conditions can be selected to avoid this. The effect of the catalyst in the proposed mechanism is discussed. PMID:21258674

  5. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  6. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  7. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  8. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  9. Nanostructured polypyrrole/carbon composite as Pt catalyst support for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Li, Lei; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongming

    A novel catalyst support was synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on Vulcan XC-72 carbon in naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) solution containing ammonium persulfate as oxidant at room temperature. Pt nanoparticles with 3-4 nm size were deposited on the prepared polypyrrole-carbon composites by chemical reduction method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed that Pt particles were homogeneously dispersed in polypyrrole-carbon composites. The Pt nanoparticles-dispersed catalyst composites were used as anodes of fuel cells for hydrogen and methanol oxidation. Cyclic voltammetry measurements of hydrogen and methanol oxidation showed that Pt nanoparticles deposited on polypyrrole-carbon with NSA as dopant exhibit better catalytic activity than those on plain carbon. This result might be due to the higher electrochemically available surface areas, electronic conductivity and easier charge-transfer at polymer/carbon particle interfaces allowing a high dispersion and utilization of deposited Pt nanoparticles.

  10. Upgrading of coal-derived liquids. 1. Catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts and commercial HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, R.; Hara, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yokoyama, S.; Nakata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Maekawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of various zeolite catalysts and commercial hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts to the secondary hydrotreatment of coal-derived liquids was examined in relation to the chemical structure of upgraded liquids. The catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts for HI conversion is lower than are the activities of Ni-Mo, Ni-Co-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. However, as regards hydrogenation and the removal of nitrogen, zeolite catalysts such as natural clinoptilolite and mordenite have almost the same activity as do Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. As to the removal of oxygen, it was proved that zeolite catalysts had a functionality to remove oxygen as CO/sub x/ gas, and HDS catalysts had a high activity for hydrodeoxygenation. 10 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Influence of sp(3)-sp(2) Carbon Nanodomains on Metal/Support Interaction, Catalyst Durability, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Campos-Roldán, Carlos A; Ramos-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Huerta, Rosa G; Vargas García, Jorge R; Balbuena, Perla B; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, platinum nanoparticles were impregnated by two different techniques, namely the carbonyl chemical route and photodeposition, onto systematically surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The different interactions between platinum nanoparticles with sp(2)-sp(3) carbon nanodomains were investigated. The oxidation of an adsorbed monolayer of carbon monoxide, used to probe electronic catalytic modification, suggests a selective nucleation of platinum nanoparticles onto sp(2) carbon nanodomains when photodeposition synthesis is carried out. XPS attests the catalytic center electronic modification obtained by photodeposition. DFT calculations were used to determine the interaction energy of a Pt cluster with sp(2) and sp(3) carbon surfaces as well as with oxidized ones. The interaction energy and electronic structure of the platinum cluster presents dramatic changes as a function of the support surface chemistry, which also modifies its catalytic properties evaluated by the interaction with CO. The interaction energy was calculated to be 8-fold higher on sp(3) and oxidized surfaces in comparison to sp(2) domains. Accelerated Stability Test (AST) was applied only on the electronic-modified materials to evaluate the active phase degradation and their activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The stability of photodeposited materials is correlated with the surface chemical nature of supports indicating that platinum nanoparticles supported onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the highest sp(2) character show the higher stability and activity toward ORR. PMID:27494283

  12. Inhibition of carbon formation during steam reforming of methane using thiol-coated nickel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudghiri-Hassani, H.; Rakass, S.; Abatzoglou, N.; Rowntree, P.

    n-Butanethiol-impregnated, micrometric, pristine Ni powder (Ni-C 4S) was tested as a catalyst for use in the steam reforming of methane, using X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The catalytic activities of both the pristine Ni and the Ni-C 4S powders were measured at 700 °C, under conditions that favoured (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 2:1), and did not favour (molar CH 4:H 2O ratio of 1:2) formation of surface carbon. The results show that: (a) Ni-C 4S demonstrates both high catalytic activity and stability during the 21 h duration test; (b) under conditions favouring the deposition of surface carbon, the Ni-C 4S retained both its efficiency and structural integrity, while the catalytic activity of the Ni was reduced by ∼70% and the catalyst pellets lost their integrity; (c) the amount of deposited carbon in the case of the Ni-C 4S catalyst was significantly lower than that observed for the Ni catalyst, in spite of the longer testing duration. It was concluded that the thiols pre-treatment of Ni surfaces, to be subsequently used in the production of catalysts supported SOFC anodes, can considerably increase their "active life span" this being a critical attribute in respect of their eventual commercialization.

  13. Plasma restructuring of catalysts for chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cantoro, M.; Hofmann, S.; Pisana, S.; Parvez, A.; Fasoli, A.; Scardaci, V.; Ferrari, A. C.; Robertson, J.; Mattevi, C.; Ducati, C.

    2009-03-15

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers by catalytic chemical vapor deposition at lower temperatures is found to be aided by a separate catalyst pretreatment step in which the catalyst thin film is restructured into a series of nanoparticles with a more active surface. The restructuring is particularly effective when carried out by an ammonia plasma. The nature of the restructuring is studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman. We find that as the growth temperature decreases, there is a limiting maximum catalyst thickness, which gives any nanotube growth. Plasmas are found to restructure the catalyst by a combination of physical etching and chemical modification. Large plasma powers can lead to complete etching of thin catalyst films, and hence loss of activity. Ni is found to be the better catalyst at low temperatures because it easily reduced from any oxide form to the catalytically active metallic state. On the other hand, Fe gives the largest nanotube length and density yield at moderate temperatures because it is less easy to reduce at low temperatures and it is more easily poisoned at high temperatures.

  14. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  15. Development of highly active and stable hybrid cathode catalyst for PEMFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Won Suk

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are attractive power sources of the future for a variety of applications including portable electronics, stationary power, and automobile application. However, sluggish cathode kinetics, high Pt cost, and durability issues inhibit the commercialization of PEMFCs. To overcome these drawbacks, research has been focused on alloying Pt with transition metals since alloy catalysts show significantly improved catalytic properties like high activity, selectivity, and durability. However, Pt-alloy catalysts synthesized using the conventional impregnation method exhibit uneven particle size and poor particle distribution resulting in poor performance and/or durability in PEMFCs. In this dissertation, a novel catalyst synthesis methodology is developed and compared with catalysts prepared using impregnation method and commercial catalysts. Two approaches are investigated for the catalyst development. The catalyst durability was studied under U. S. DRIVE Fuel Cell Tech Team suggested protocols. In the first approach, the carbon composite catalyst (CCC) having active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is employed as a support for the synthesis of Pt/CCC catalyst. The structural and electrochemical properties of Pt/CCC catalyst are investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while RDE and fuel cell testing are carried out to study the electrochemical properties. The synergistic effect of CCC and Pt is confirmed by the observed high activity towards ORR for the Pt/CCC catalyst. The second approach is the synthesis of Co-doped hybrid cathode catalysts (Co-doped Pt/CCC) by diffusing the Co metal present within the CCC support into the Pt nanoparticles during heat-treatment. The optimized Co-doped Pt/CCC catalyst performed better than the commercial catalysts and the catalyst prepared using the impregnation method in PEMFCs and showed high

  16. Carbon nanotube patterning with capillary micromolding of catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Ryu, Choonghan; Lee, Sungwoo; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-11-01

    Patterning of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber has been achieved by catalyst patterning using capillary micromolding process. Iron acetate catalyst nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and mold was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The ethanol solution containing catalyst nanoparticles was filled into the microchannel formed between PDMS mold and Si-wafer by capillary force. The capillary action of different solvents was simulated by commercial CFD-ACE+ simulation code to determine optimal solvents. Simulated result shows that the choice of solvent was critical in this capillary filling process. After the catalyst patterning, MWNT was grown at 700 approximately 800 degrees C by PECVD process using CH4 and Ar gas in a scale of approximately 10 micro-meters in a tubular inductively coupled plasma reactor. Grown CNTs were analyzed by FE-SEM and Raman Spectroscopy. PMID:18047145

  17. Dinuclear Zinc Salen Catalysts for the Ring Opening Copolymerization of Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide or Anhydrides.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Arnaud; Garden, Jennifer A; White, Andrew J P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2015-12-21

    A series of four dizinc complexes coordinated by salen or salan ligands, derived from ortho-vanillin and bearing (±)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (L1) or 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (L2) backbones, is reported. The complexes are characterized using a combination of X-ray crystallography, multinuclear NMR, DOSY, and MALDI-TOF spectroscopies, and elemental analysis. The stability of the dinuclear complexes depends on the ligand structure, with the most stable complexes having imine substituents. The complexes are tested as catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of CO2/cyclohexene oxide (CHO) and phthalic anhydride (PA)/CHO. All complexes are active, and the structure/activity relationships reveal that the complex having both L2 and imine substituents displays the highest activity. In the ROCOP of CO2/CHO its activity is equivalent to other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 44 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 0.1 mol %, 30 bar of CO2, and 80 °C), while for the ROCOP of PA/CHO, its activity is slightly higher than other metal salen catalysts (TOF = 198 h(-1) at a catalyst loading of 1 mol % and 100 °C). Poly(ester-block-carbonate) polymers are also afforded using the most active catalyst by the one-pot terpolymerization of PA/CHO/CO2. PMID:26605983

  18. The synergistic effect in the Fe-Co bimetallic catalyst system for the growth of carbon nanotube forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hardeman, D.; Esconjauregui, S. Cartwright, R.; D'Arsié, L.; Robertson, J.; Bhardwaj, S.; Cepek, C.; Oakes, D.; Clark, J.; Ducati, C.

    2015-01-28

    We report the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotube forests employing an active-active bimetallic Fe-Co catalyst. Using this catalyst system, we observe a synergistic effect by which—in comparison to pure Fe or Co—the height of the forests increases significantly. The homogeneity in the as-grown nanotubes is also improved. By both energy dispersive spectroscopy and in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the catalyst particles consist of Fe and Co, and this dramatically increases the growth rate of the tubes. Bimetallic catalysts are thus potentially useful for synthesising nanotube forests more efficiently.

  19. Conversion of C2-C4 alcohols over copper-containing catalysts on carbon and fluorocarbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Roshchina, T. M.; Lunin, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon and fluorocarbon fibers were used as carriers for the preparation of copper catalysts from copper oxalate as precursor. The catalytic properties of catalyst were studied in the reaction of the dehydrogenation of C2-C4 alcohols by the pulsed microcatalytic method. The effect of the copper content in the catalyst, the reaction temperature on the degree of conversion, and the relation of the reaction channels were studied. The electron microphotographs were obtained, specific surfaces were measured, and X-ray pictures and infrared spectra of catalysts were taken. The activity of the catalysts on the carbon and fluorocarbon fibers in the dehydration-dehydrogenation reactions of C2-C4 alcohols was comparatively estimated. It was shown that the selectivity of the products from the dehydrogenation reaction is higher for the Cu-fluorocarbon fiber catalyst.

  20. Phosphorylated mesoporous carbon as effective catalyst for the selective fructose dehydration to HMF

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Schiavoni, Marco; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated mesoporous carbons (PMCs) have been synthesized using an already reported one pot methodology. These materials have been applied as acidic catalysts in the dehydration of fructose to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). PMCs showed better selectivity to HMF compared to sulfonated carbon catalyst (SC) despite lower activity. The concentration of P-O groups correlates to the activity/selectivity of the catalysts; the higher the P-O concentration the higher the activity. However, the higher the P-O content the lower the selectivity to HMF. Indeed a lower concentration of the P-O groups (and even the acidic groups) minimized the degradation of HMF to levulinic acid and the formation of by-products, such as humines. Stability tests showed that these systems deactivate due to the formation of humines, water insoluble by-products derived from the dehydration of fructose, blocking the active site of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of P-O groups, higher amount of humines are formed; therefore carbons containing lower amount of phosphorylated groups, such as P/N-0.25, are less prone to deactivation. Keywords: Phosphorylated mesoporous carbons; fructose dehydration; HMF

  1. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  2. Effect of lithium carbonate on nickel catalysts for direct internal reforming MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Yun, Jung-Sook; Kwon, Heock-Hoi; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Lee, Ho-In

    Despite many advantages of the direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) in producing electricity, there are many problems to solve before practical use. The deactivation of reforming catalyst by alkali like lithium is one of the major obstacles to overcome. A promising method is addition of TiO 2 into the Ni/MgO reforming catalyst, which resulted in the increased resistance to lithium poisoning as we previously reported. To understand how added titania worked, it is necessary to elucidate the deactivation mechanism of the catalysts supported on metal oxides such as MgO and MgO-TiO 2 composite oxide. Several supported nickel catalysts deactivated by lithium carbonate were prepared, characterized and evaluated. The Ni/MgO catalyst turned out to be most vulnerable to lithium deactivation among the employed catalysts. The activity of the Ni/MgO gradually decreased to zero with increasing amount of lithium addition. Deactivation by lithium addition resulted from the decrease of active site due to sintering of nickel particles as well as the formation of the Li yNi xMg 1- x- yO ternary solid solution. These were evidenced by H 2 chemisorption, temperature programmed reduction, and XRD analyses. As an effort to minimize Li-poisoning, titanium was introduced to MgO support. This resulted in the formation of Ni/Mg 2TiO 4, which seemed to increase resistance against Li-poisoning.

  3. Interaction of carbon and sulfur on metal catalysts: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.; Vajo, J.

    1989-02-17

    At high coverage, sulfur generally deactivates metal catalysts, but at low coverage, chemisorbed sulfur can have a more subtle effect on catalyst activity and selectivity. The general goal of the current project is to examine fundamental aspects of selective poisoning by fractional monolayers of chemisorbed sulfur on a variety of metal catalysts used for commercially important reactions such as hydrocarbon re-forming, light alkane steam re-forming, and hydrocarbon synthesis. Specific objectives of the research program are to experimentally measure as a function of coverage the influence of chemisorbed sulfur on the thermodynamics, reactivity, and structure of surface and bulk carbon occupying both dispersed and well-characterized metal catalyst surfaces. Special methods, such as reversible sulfur chemisorption on supported metals and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) characterization of catalyst carbon, have been developed that are well suited to examining the interaction of sulfur and carbon on metal surfaces. New analytical instruments with greatly improved sensitivity have been recently developed and applied: a helium discharge ionization detector (DID) is being used with a gas recirculation thermodynamic system, and the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) technique is used with surface carbon segregation systems.

  4. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on fly ash derived catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dunens, Oscar M; MacKenzie, Kieran J; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an allotrope of carbon with unique properties that make them potentially useful in a vast range of applications. However, CNTs are predominantly produced using expensive and/or nonrecyclable catalyst supports, e.g., mesoporous silica and alumina. In this work, coal combustion fly ash, a bulk waste product with limited uses, was impregnated with iron nitrate and successfully used as a substrate to produce industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition. CNTs were analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The most successful catalyst trialed at 650 degrees C using ethylene as a carbon source was a 5 wt % Fe fly ash catalyst, which produced a CNT yield in respect to metal loading of approximately 82.5%. The MWNTs had outer diameters of between 12 and 20 nm with a reasonable degree of wall graphitization (I(G)/I(D) of 1.17). Advantages of utilizing fly ash as a catalyst support are its availability at low cost at the megaton scale, its high thermal stability, and suitability for use in industrial fluidized bed reactors. Potential applications for the fly ash produced CNTs include use in composite materials. PMID:19921910

  5. Preparation of PdAg and PdAu nanoparticle-loaded carbon black catalysts and their electrocatalytic activity for the glycerol oxidation reaction in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Binh Thi Xuan; Chiku, Masanobu; Higuchi, Eiji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    PdAg and PdAu alloy nanoparticle catalysts for the glycerol oxidation reaction (GOR) were prepared at room temperature by a wet method. The molar ratio of the precursors controlled the bulk composition of the PdAg and PdAu alloys, and their surface composition was Ag-enriched and Pd-enriched, respectively. On PdAg-loaded carbon black (PdAg/CB) electrodes, the onset potential of GOR was 0.10-0.15 V more negative than on the Pd/CB electrode due to the electronic effect. The ratio of GOR peak current densities in the backward and forward sweeps of CVs (ib/if) was smaller because of the improved tolerance to the poisoning species. The ratio of the GOR current density at 60 and 5 min (i60/i5) for the PdAg/CB electrodes was higher for more negative potentials than the Pd/CB electrode. In contrast, the PdAu-loaded CB (PdAu/CB) electrodes had an onset potential of GOR similar to the Pd/CB electrode and a higher GOR peak current density owing to the bi-functional effect. However, the ib/if ratio was higher for PdAu/CB because of the increase in ib as the Pd surface was recovered, and the i60/i5 ratio was higher for more positive potentials, similar to the Pd/CB electrode.

  6. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  7. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br- afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  8. Development of heterogeneous catalysts for hydroformylation of 1-hexene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteel, Anne Eugenie

    The hydroformylation of alkenes is a major commercial process used for the production of oxygenated organic compounds. When the hydroformylation reaction is performed using a homogeneous catalyst, an organic or aqueous solvent is employed and a significant effort must be expended to recover the catalyst so it can be recycled. The hydroformylation of long-chain alkenes using homogeneous catalysts in aqueous solution is compromised because of the low-solubility of C5 alkenes and above. Development of a selective heterogeneous catalyst would allow simplification of the process design in an integrated system that minimizes waste generation. Recent studies have shown that a supercritical fluid may be used as a solvent for hydroformylation reactions. The use of carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent offers optimal environmental performance because it is non-toxic, non-flammable and plentiful, and presents advantages for ease of product separation. In particular, we have considered the conversion of 1-hexene to heptanal using rhodium-phosphine catalysts tethered to supports insoluble in supercritical carbon dioxide to demonstrate the advantages and understand the limitations of a solid-catalyzed process. One of the limitations of supported catalysts is the inability to control product selectivity. To remedy this problem, we have developed tethered rhodium-phosphine catalysts with modified silica and controlled-pore size MCM-41 and MCM-20 supports that provide improved selectivity and conversion relative to their nonporous equivalents. Platinum and palladium catalysts analogous to those of rhodium were also investigated. The synthesis and characterization of the rhodium, platinum and palladium complexes and evaluation of their catalytic activity and selectivity for hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide is described in this dissertation.

  9. Solar hydrogen production using carbon quantum dots and a molecular nickel catalyst.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Hutton, Georgina A M; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-05-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are established as excellent photosensitizers in combination with a molecular catalyst for solar light driven hydrogen production in aqueous solution. The inexpensive CQDs can be prepared by straightforward thermolysis of citric acid in a simple one-pot, multigram synthesis and are therefore scalable. The CQDs produced reducing equivalents under solar irradiation in a homogeneous photocatalytic system with a Ni-bis(diphosphine) catalyst, giving an activity of 398 μmolH2 (gCQD)(-1) h(-1) and a "per Ni catalyst" turnover frequency of 41 h(-1). The CQDs displayed activity in the visible region beyond λ > 455 nm and maintained their full photocatalytic activity for at least 1 day under full solar spectrum irradiation. A high quantum efficiency of 1.4% was recorded for the noble- and toxic-metal free photocatalytic system. Thus, CQDs are shown to be a highly sustainable light-absorbing material for photocatalytic schemes, which are not limited by cost, toxicity, or lack of scalability. The photocatalytic hybrid system was limited by the lifetime of the molecular catalyst, and intriguingly, no photocatalytic activity was observed using the CQDs and 3d transition metal salts or platinum precursors. This observation highlights the advantage of using a molecular catalyst over commonly used heterogeneous catalysts in this photocatalytic system. PMID:25864839

  10. Monolith catalysts for closed-cycle carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1994-01-01

    The general subject area of the project involved the development of solid catalysts that have high activity at low temperature for the oxidation of gases such as CO. The original application considered was CO oxidation in closed-cycle CO2 lasers. The scope of the project was subsequently extended to include oxidation of gases in addition to CO and applications such as air purification and exhaust gas emission control. The primary objective of the final phase grant was to develop design criteria for the formulation of new low-temperature oxidation catalysts utilizing Monte Carlo simulations of reaction over NASA-developed catalysts.

  11. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-01

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions. PMID:25191790

  12. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nanofibers using iron nanoparticles as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Ramana, G. Venkata; Padya, Balaji; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Jain, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    Amongst various carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have lately attracted considerable interest as a promising reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. CNFs are often synthesized using copper nanoparticles as catalysts and by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work iron (Fe) nanoparticles are used as catalysts to synthesize amorphous carbon nanofibers. This owes significance since Fe nanoparticles often lead to tubes rather than fibers. Fe nanoparticles (size ˜30-60nm) are prepared by first mixing an appropriate quantity of potassium sodium tartrate tetrahydrate salt with iron (II) chloride dehydrate to obtain iron tartrate and then dried and heated in vacuum oven at about 250°C to remove tartrate. In a subsequent step, CNFs are obtained by using CVD. Acetylene was used as the carbon source in the CVD process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show the formation of nanofibers whose diameter is dependent on the size of Fe catalysts. Raman scattering from the fibers show that they are made up of carbon and are amorphous.

  13. Role of Surface Cobalt Silicate in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis from Silica-Supported Cobalt Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Wang, X; Derrouiche, S; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    A silica-supported cobalt catalyst has been developed via incipient wetness impregnation for high-yield synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Co/SiO{sub 2}-impregnated catalysts have not been observed to be efficient for SWNT synthesis. Using an appropriately chosen precursor, we show that effective catalysts can be obtained for SWNT synthesis with yields up to 75 wt %. Detailed characterization indicates that the active sites for SWNT synthesis are small cobalt particles resulting from the reduction of a highly dispersed surface cobalt silicate species. The SWNTs produced by this catalyst are of high quality and easy to purify, and the process is simple and scalable.

  14. Single walled carbon nanotube growth and chirality dependence on catalyst composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbaek, Alvin W.; Owens, Andrew C.; Crouse, Christopher C.; Pint, Cary L.; Hauge, Robert H.; Barron, Andrew R.

    2013-09-01

    Vertical arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) were grown using bi-metallic nanoparticle pro-catalysts. Iron oxide particles were doped with varying quantities of first row transition metals (Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu) for a comparative study of the growth of nanotubes. VA-CNT samples were verified using scanning electron microscopy, and characterized using resonance Raman spectroscopy. The length of the VA-CNTs is used as a measure of catalyst activity: the presence of dopants results in a change in the CNT length and length distribution. Cross correlation of the Raman spectra reveal variations in the distribution of radial breathing mode peaks according to the pro-catalyst composition. The formation of various chirality nanotubes is constant between repetitive runs with a particular catalyst, but may be controlled by the identity and concentration of the metal dopants within the iron catalyst. These results demonstrate that the composition of the catalyst is a major driving force toward type selective growth of nanotubes.Vertical arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) were grown using bi-metallic nanoparticle pro-catalysts. Iron oxide particles were doped with varying quantities of first row transition metals (Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu) for a comparative study of the growth of nanotubes. VA-CNT samples were verified using scanning electron microscopy, and characterized using resonance Raman spectroscopy. The length of the VA-CNTs is used as a measure of catalyst activity: the presence of dopants results in a change in the CNT length and length distribution. Cross correlation of the Raman spectra reveal variations in the distribution of radial breathing mode peaks according to the pro-catalyst composition. The formation of various chirality nanotubes is constant between repetitive runs with a particular catalyst, but may be controlled by the identity and concentration of the metal dopants within the iron catalyst. These results demonstrate that the

  15. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  16. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using tin oxide based catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Jorgensen, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The preparation conditions for precious metal/tin oxide catalysts were optimized for maximum carbon monoxide/oxygen recombination efficiency. This was achieved by controlling the tin digestion, the peptization to form the sol, the calcination process and the method of adding the precious metals. Extensive studies of the tin oxide structure were carried out over the temperature range 20 to 500 C in air or hydrogen environments using Raman scattering and X ray diffraction. Adsorbed species on tin oxide, generated in an environment containing carbon monoxide, gave rise to a Raman band at about 1600 cm(exp -1) which was assigned to carbonaceous groups, possible carbonate.

  17. Copper-spent activated carbon as a heterogeneous peroxydisulfate catalyst for the degradation of Acid Orange 7 in an electrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lin, Heng; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The exhausted activated carbon generated from the adsorption of heavy metal wastewater needs further treatment/disposal. In this study, a new application of copper-spent activated carbon (Cu-AC) was proposed. Cu-AC was used to activate peroxydisulfate (PDS) for the decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and electrical current was introduced to enhance the process. The decolorization followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic pattern well (R(2) > 0.95). 92.4% of color removal at 60 min and 38.3% of total organic carbon removal at 180 min were achieved when initial pH value was 9.0, current density was 16 mA/cm(2), PDS concentration was 5 mM and Cu-AC dosage was 0.25 g/L. The radical scavengers including methanol, tert-butanol and phenol, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance test, were employed to investigate the oxidizing species responsible for AO7 decolorization. The stability of Cu-AC was confirmed by three recycle experiments. PMID:27120633

  18. Co@Co3O4 core-shell particle encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cage hybrids as active and durable oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Wen, Lixin; Li, Feng; Yin, Guanlin; Chen, Wanmin; An, Xingcai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt-based nanomaterials are promising candidates as efficient, affordable, and sustainable alternative electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, the catalytic efficiency of traditional nanomaterials is still far below what is expected, because of their low stability in basic solutions and poor active site exposure yield. Here a unique hybrid nanomaterial comprising Co@Co3O4 core-shell nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cages on reduced graphene oxide (denoted as Co@Co3O4@NMCC/rGO) is successfully synthesized via a carbonization and subsequent oxidation strategy of a graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-organic framework (MOF). Impressively, the special carbon cage structure is very important for not only leading to a large active surface area, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, and easy release of gas bubbles, but also preventing Co@Co3O4 NPs from aggregation and peeling off during prolonged electrochemical reactions. As a result, in alkaline media, the resulting hybrid materials catalyze the OER with a low onset potential of ∼1.50 V (vs. RHE) and an over-potential of only 340 mV to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for at least 25 h. In addition, metallic Co cores in Co@Co3O4 provide an alternative way for electron transport and accelerate the OER rate. PMID:26914166

  19. Effect of Pt and Fe catalysts in the transformation of carbon black into carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Myrseth, Velaug; Kosinski, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    In this research carbon nanotubes and carbon nano onion-like structures were synthesized from carbon black using metal catalysts at 400 °C and 700 °C. Platinum and iron-group metals were used as catalysts for the transformation of CB into graphitized nanocarbon and the effect of both metals was compared. The synthesized products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization shows that this process is very efficient in the synthesis of high quality graphitized products from amorphous carbon black, even though the process temperature was relatively low in comparison with previous studies. Distinguished graphitic walls of the newly formed carbon nanostructures were clearly visible in the HRTEM images. Possible growth difference related to the type of catalyst used is briefly explained with the basis of electron vacancies in d-orbitals of metals.

  20. Investigation of the electrospun carbon web as the catalyst layer for vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanjie; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2014-12-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) carbon nonwoven web consisting of 100-200 nm ultrafine fibers has been developed by electrospinning and subsequent carbonization process at 1000 °C for different times. The surface morphology, composition, structure, and electrical conductivity of the electrospun carbon webs (ECWs) as well as their electrochemical properties toward vanadium redox couples have been characterized. With the increasing of carbonization time, the electrochemical reversibility of the vanadium redox couples on the ECW is enhanced greatly. As the carbonization time increases up to 120 min, the hydrogen evolution is facilitated while the reversibility is promoted a little bit further. The excellent performance of ECW may be attributed to the conversion of fibers carbon structure and improvement of electrical conductivity. Due to the good electrochemical activity and freestanding 3-dimensional structure, the ECW carbonized for 90 min is used as catalyst layer in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and enhances the cell performance.

  1. Size and Promoter Effects on Stability of Carbon-Nanofiber-Supported Iron-Based Fischer–Tropsch Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis converts synthesis gas from alternative carbon resources, including natural gas, coal, and biomass, to hydrocarbons used as fuels or chemicals. In particular, iron-based catalysts at elevated temperatures favor the selective production of C2–C4 olefins, which are important building blocks for the chemical industry. Bulk iron catalysts (with promoters) were conventionally used, but these deactivate due to either phase transformation or carbon deposition resulting in disintegration of the catalyst particles. For supported iron catalysts, iron particle growth may result in loss of catalytic activity over time. In this work, the effects of promoters and particle size on the stability of supported iron nanoparticles (initial sizes of 3–9 nm) were investigated at industrially relevant conditions (340 °C, 20 bar, H2/CO = 1). Upon addition of sodium and sulfur promoters to iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers, initial catalytic activities were high, but substantial deactivation was observed over a period of 100 h. In situ Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that after 20 h time-on-stream, promoted catalysts attained 100% carbidization, whereas for unpromoted catalysts, this was around 25%. In situ carbon deposition studies were carried out using a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). No carbon laydown was detected for the unpromoted catalysts, whereas for promoted catalysts, carbon deposition occurred mainly over the first 4 h and thus did not play a pivotal role in deactivation over 100 h. Instead, the loss of catalytic activity coincided with the increase in Fe particle size to 20–50 nm, thereby supporting the proposal that the loss of active Fe surface area was the main cause of deactivation. PMID:27330847

  2. Optimization of carbon-supported platinum cathode catalysts for DMFC operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Brosha, E. L.; Zelenay, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe performance and optimization of carbon-supported cathode catalysts at low platinum loading. We find that at a loading below 0.6 mg cm-2 carbon-supported platinum outperforms platinum black as a DMFC cathode catalyst. A catalyst with a 1:1 volume ratio of the dry NafionTM to the electronically conducting phase (platinum plus carbon support) provides the best performance in oxygen reduction reaction. Thanks to improved catalyst utilization, carbon-supported catalysts with a platinum content varying from 40 wt% to 80 wt% deliver very good DMFC performance, even at relatively modest precious metal loadings investigated in this work.

  3. The role of carbon overlayers on Pt-based catalysts for H2-cleanup by CO-PROX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Sarria, F.; Garcia-Dali, S.; Palma, S.; Jimenez-Barrera, E. M.; Oliviero, L.; Bazin, P.; Odriozola, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the effect of the activation method on the catalytic activity of Pt-based catalysts supported on alumina in the PROX reaction. For this, model Pt/Al2O3 catalysts with variable amounts of acetic acid were prepared and their thermal evolution studied by FTIR spectroscopy. From the analysis of the nature of the platinum surface upon acetic acid decomposition and the gas phase evolved products, we have demonstrated the formation of partially hydrogenated carbon overlayers that tailor the activity of Pt-based catalysts in the PROX reaction.

  4. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  5. NiO/CeO2-ZnO nano-catalysts for direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Dong Baek; Jang, Boknam; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) (X = 0, 1, 5, 10, and 15) nano-catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method with a variation of NiO content (X, wt%). The prepared catalysts were then applied to the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. Successful formation of XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) nano-catalysts was confirmed by XRD and ICP-AES analyses. Acidity and basicity of XNiO/CeO2-ZnO were measured by NH3-TPD (temperature-programmed desorption) and CO2-TPD experiments, respectively, with an aim of elucidating the effect of acidity and basicity of the catalysts on the catalytic performance in the reaction. It was revealed that the catalytic activity of XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) was closely related to both acidity and basicity of the catalysts. The amount of dimethyl carbonate produced over XNiO/CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) increased with increasing acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Thus, both acidity and basicity of the catalysts played important roles in determining the catalytic performance in the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. PMID:25958586

  6. Effect of Pretreatment on Carbon-Supported Au/TiO2 Catalysts for Preferential Oxidation of CO

    SciTech Connect

    N Hammer; K Mathisen; T Zscherpe; D Chen; M Ronning

    2011-12-31

    The impact of thermal treatment at various preparation stages of carbon supported Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts prior to oxidation of CO in the presence and absence of hydrogen was studied. An increase in catalytic activity for thermally treated samples due to a more ordered structure of TiO{sub 2} was observed. A reversible deactivation of the catalysts occurred in the absence of hydrogen. However, the activity was restored at preferential CO oxidation conditions in presence of hydrogen.

  7. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Gleize, Jérôme; Lamura, Gianrico; Hérold, Claire; Vigolo, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel-yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni2+ ions, belonging to NiCl2 formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl2 compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature.

  8. Pd/MgO: Catalyst characterization and phenol hydrogenation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, P.; Berndt, H.; Mohr, C.; Radnik, J.; Shin, E.J.; Keane, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The gas-phase hydrogenation of phenol has been studied over a 1% w/w Pd/MgO catalyst prepared by impregnation of MgO with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}PdCl{sub 6}. The catalyst precursor was activated by precalcination in air at 473 K followed by reduction in hydrogen at 573 K. Temperature-programmed reduction/desorption has revealed the presence of ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium hydrogen carbonate on the active surface in addition to a metallic palladium component. Whereas the latter was not detectable by X-ray diffraction due to the high metal dispersion, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mean palladium particle diameter is 1.3 {+-} 0.2 nm, which corresponds to a palladium dispersion of D{sub Pd} = 71%. Impregnation followed by calcination is shown to transform MgO to Mg(OH){sub 2} while the additional reduction step generates a surface phase that is composed of both needle-like Periclase MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectrometric analyses of the activated catalyst has established the presence of zero-valent palladium which appears to be electron rich as a result of metal-support interaction; a degree of palladium charging is also evident as well as residual surface chlorine. The effects on fractional phenol conversion and reaction selectivity of varying such process variables as reaction time, temperature, and phenol molar feed rate are considered and the possibility of thermodynamic limitations is addressed. Hydrogenation was observed to proceed in a stepwise fashion with cyclohexanone as the partially hydrogenated product and cyclohexanol as the fully hydrogenated product. The catalyst delivered a 96% selectivity with respect to cyclohexanone production at 423 K but the cyclohexanone yield decreased at higher temperatures as conversion declined and cyclohexanol was increasingly preferred. Conversion and selectivity were both stable with prolonged catalyst use, i.e., time on stream in excess of 55 h.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported carbides catalysts for hydrous hydrazine decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnatsakanyan, Raman; Zhurnachyan, Alina R.; Matyshak, Valery A.; Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported Mo2C and WC nanomaterials was studied. Two different routes were utilized to prepare MoO3 (WO3) - C precursors that were then subjected to microwave irradiation in an inert atmosphere. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as irradiation time and gas environment, was investigated. The structure and formation mechanism of the carbide phases were explored. As-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited catalytic activity for hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) decomposition at 30-70 °C. It was shown that the catalyst activity significantly increases if microwave irradiation is applied during the decomposition process. Such conditions permit complete conversion of hydrazine to ammonia and nitrogen within minutes. This effect can be attributed to the unique nanostructure of the catalysts that includes microwave absorbing carbon and active carbide constituents.

  10. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  11. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  12. Effect of Iron and Cobalt Catalysts on The Growth of Carbon Nanotubes from Palm Oil Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriani, A. B.; Asli, N. A.; Salina, M.; Mamat, M. H.; Aziz, A. A.; Falina, A. N.; Maryam, M.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Nor, Roslan Md; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2013-06-01

    Catalysts which are typically a transition metal is mandatory and plays an important role in the production of CNT. In this work, the effect of iron (Fe) and cobalt (Co) nitrate catalyst on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) were systematically studied. Green bio-hydrocarbon precursor namely palm oil was used as a precursor. The synthesis was done using thermal chemical vapour deposition method at temperature of 750°C for 15 min synthesis time. The Fe and Co solution were spin-coated separately on silicon substrate at speed of 3000 rev.min-1. The CNT characteristics were analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that CNT properties were strongly affected by the catalyst type. CNT catalyzed by Co yields large diameter, crooked tube and lower quality, whereas CNT produced by Fe catalyst results in the smallest diameter and reasonably good graphitization. As a conclusion, Fe was considered as the optimum catalyst for better CNT structure and crystallinity. This was due to efficient, uniform and stable Fe catalytic activity as compared to Co catalyst in producing CNT.

  13. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  14. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity.

  15. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  16. Hydrolysis of Cellulose by a Mesoporous Carbon-Fe₂(SO₄)₃/γ-Fe₂O₃ Nanoparticle-Based Solid Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Watanabe, Koki; Fukumi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based solid acid catalysts have shown significant potential in a wide range of applications, and they have been successfully synthesized using simple processes. Magnetically separable mesoporous carbon composites also have enormous potential, especially in separation and adsorption technology. However, existing techniques have been unable to produce a magnetically separable mesoporous solid acid catalyst because no suitable precursors have been identified. Herein we describe a magnetically separable, mesoporous solid acid catalyst synthesized from a newly developed mesoporous carbon-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle composite. This material exhibits an equivalent acid density and catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose, to that of the cellulose-derived conventional catalyst. Since it is magnetically separable, this material can be readily recovered and reused, potentially reducing the environmental impact of industrial processes to which it is applied. PMID:26856604

  17. Robust bifunctional aluminium–salen catalysts for the preparation of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides

    PubMed Central

    Rulev, Yuri A; Gugkaeva, Zalina; Maleev, Victor I

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new one-component aluminium-based catalysts for the reaction between epoxides and carbon dioxide have been prepared. The catalysts are composed of aluminium–salen chloride complexes with trialkylammonium groups directly attached to the aromatic rings of the salen ligand. With terminal epoxides, the catalysts induced the formation of cyclic carbonates under mild reaction conditions (25–35 °C; 1–10 bar carbon dioxide pressure). However, with cyclohexene oxide under the same reaction conditions, the same catalysts induced the formation of polycarbonate. The catalysts could be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused. PMID:26664580

  18. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong S.; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  20. A trimodal porous carbon as an effective catalyst for hydrogen production by methane decomposition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Lua, Aik Chong

    2016-01-15

    A new type of porous carbon with an interconnected trimodal pore system is synthesized by a nanocasting method using nanoparticulated bimodal micro-mesoporous silica particles as the template. The synthesized template and carbon material are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission electron scanning microscopy (FESEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption test. The synthesized carbon material has an extremely high surface area, a large pore volume and an interconnected pore structure, which could provide abundant active sites and space for chemical reactions and minimize the diffusion resistance of the reactants. The resulting carbon is used as the catalyst for hydrogen production by the thermal decomposition of methane. The catalytic results show that the as-synthesized carbon in this study produces much higher methane conversion and hydrogen yield than the commercial carbon materials. PMID:26433477

  1. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells. PMID:26762466

  2. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells. PMID:26762466

  3. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-14

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizesmore » the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Here, owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells.« less

  4. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A.; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R.; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, high-performance platinum-group-metal-free hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell is hindered by the lack of a hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst at the anode. Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte. Although nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes are a very poor hydrogen oxidation catalyst, as a support, it increases the catalytic performance of nickel nanoparticles by a factor of 33 (mass activity) or 21 (exchange current density) relative to unsupported nickel nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the nitrogen-doped support stabilizes the nanoparticle against reconstruction, while nitrogen located at the edge of the nanoparticle tunes local adsorption sites by affecting the d-orbitals of nickel. Owing to its high activity and low cost, our catalyst shows significant potential for use in low-cost, high-performance fuel cells.

  5. Mesoporous Carbon Supported Rh Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Production of C2+ Alcohol from Syngas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Tae-Wan; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Kim, Jeong-Rang; Ha, Kyoung-Su

    2016-02-01

    Uniform rhodium nanoparticles (NP) with three different particle sizes (1.9, 2.4, and 3.6 nm) were prepared via a polyol method with rhodium (III) acetylacetonate, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with different concentrations of sodium citrate. The prepared Rh nanoparticles were impregnated into the ordered mesoporous carbon supports with two different pore structures (2D hexagonal and 3D cubic). The prepared Rh nanoparticle-supported ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) were introduced as catalysts for the CO hydrogenation of syngas to produce C2 higher alcohols. The characteristics of the Rh nanoparticle-supported ordered mesoporous carbons catalysts were analyzed through transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and N2 physisorption analysis. The catalytic tests of the catalyst were performed using a fixed-bed reactor. The results revealed that the catalysts exhibited the different catalytic activity and selectivity of higher alcohols, which could be attributed to the different OMC structures, the nanoparticle size of Rh, and aggregation of Rh nanoparticles during the reaction. PMID:27433718

  6. Preparation of glycerol carbonate esters by using hybrid Nafion-silica catalyst.

    PubMed

    Climent, María J; Corma, Avelino; Iborra, Sara; Martínez-Silvestre, Sergio; Velty, Alexandra

    2013-07-01

    Glycerol carbonate esters (GCEs), which are valuable biomass-derivative compounds, have been prepared through the direct esterification of glycerol carbonate and long organic acids with different chain lengths, in the absence of solvent, and with heterogeneous catalysts, including acidic-organic resins, zeolites, and hybrid organic-inorganic acids. The best results, in terms of activity and selectivity towards GCEs, were obtained using a Nafion-silica composite. A full reaction scheme has been established, and it has been demonstrated that an undesired competing reaction results in the generation of glycerol and esters derived from a secondary hydrolysis of the endocyclic ester group, which is attributed to water formed during the esterification reaction. The influence of temperature, substrate ratio, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, and the use of solvent has been studied and, under optimized reaction conditions and with the adequate catalyst, it was possible to achieve 95% selectivity for the desired product at 98% conversion. It was demonstrated that the reaction rate decreased as the number of carbon atoms in the linear alkyl chain of the carboxylic acid increased for both p-toluenesulfonic acid and Nafion-silica nanocomposite (Nafion SAC-13) catalysts. After fitting the experimental data to a mechanistically based kinetic model, the reaction kinetic parameters for Nafion SAC-13 catalysis were determined and compared for reactions involving different carboxylic acids. A kinetic study showed that the reduced reactivity of carboxylic acids with increasing chain lengths could be explained by inductive as well as steric effects. PMID:23754795

  7. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Suljo Linic

    2008-12-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  8. A nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon containing an embedded network of carbon nanotubes as a highly efficient catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Cheng; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Fang, Ruo-Pian; Liu, Chang; Liang, Ji; Luan, Jian; Shan, Xu-Yi; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2015-11-01

    A nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon containing a network of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was produced for use as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). SiO2 nanoparticles were decorated with clusters of Fe atoms to act as catalyst seeds for CNT growth, after which the material was impregnated with aniline. After polymerization of the aniline, the material was pyrolysed and the SiO2 was removed by acid treatment. The resulting carbon-based hybrid also contained some Fe from the CNT growth catalyst and was doped with N from the aniline. The Fe-N species act as active catalytic sites and the CNT network enables efficient electron transport in the material. Mesopores left by the removal of the SiO2 template provide short transport pathways and easy access to ions. As a result, the catalyst showed not only excellent ORR activity, with 59 mV more positive onset potential and 30 mV more positive half-wave potential than a Pt/C catalyst, but also much longer durability and stronger tolerance to methanol crossover than a Pt/C catalyst.A nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon containing a network of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was produced for use as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). SiO2 nanoparticles were decorated with clusters of Fe atoms to act as catalyst seeds for CNT growth, after which the material was impregnated with aniline. After polymerization of the aniline, the material was pyrolysed and the SiO2 was removed by acid treatment. The resulting carbon-based hybrid also contained some Fe from the CNT growth catalyst and was doped with N from the aniline. The Fe-N species act as active catalytic sites and the CNT network enables efficient electron transport in the material. Mesopores left by the removal of the SiO2 template provide short transport pathways and easy access to ions. As a result, the catalyst showed not only excellent ORR activity, with 59 mV more positive onset potential and 30 mV more positive half-wave potential than a Pt/C catalyst

  9. High-performance oxygen reduction catalyst derived from porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Cao, Yingjie; Zhu, Juntong; Jiang, Yining; Feng, Lai; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu

    2016-10-01

    A facile, self-foaming strategy is reported to synthesize porous, nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheets (N-CNSs) as a metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Benefiting from the synergistic functions of N-induced active sites, a highly specific surface area and continuous structure, the optimal N-CNS catalyst exhibits Pt-like ORR activity (positive onset potential of ∼0 V versus Ag/AgCl and limiting current density of 5 mA cm(-2)) through a four-electron transfer process in alkaline media with excellent cycle stability and methanol tolerance. This work not only provides a promising metal-free ORR catalyst but also opens up a new path for designing carbon-based materials towards broad applications. PMID:27575594

  10. N-type Cu2O doped activated carbon as catalyst for improving power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Kexun; Yan, Pengyu; Liu, Ziqi; Pu, Liangtao

    2015-01-01

    A novel n-type Cu2O doped activated carbon (AC) air cathode (Cu/AC) was developed as an alternative to Pt electrode for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum power density of MFCs using this novel air cathode was as high as 1390±76mWm(-2), almost 59% higher than the bare AC air cathode. Specifically, the resistance including total resistance and charge transfer resistance significantly decreased comparing to the control. Tafel curve also showed the faster electro-transfer kinetics of Cu/AC with exchange current density of 1.03×10(-3)Acm(-2), which was 69% higher than the control. Ribbon-like Cu2O was deposited on the surface of AC with the mesopore surface area increasing. Cubic Cu2O crystals exclusively expose (111) planes with the interplanar crystal spacing of 2.48Å, which was the dominate active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). N-type Cu2O with oxygen vacancies played crucial roles in electrochemical catalytic activity. PMID:25863207

  11. Hydrogenation of biofuels with formic acid over a palladium-based ternary catalyst with two types of active sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bingsen; Meng, Xiangju; Su, Dang Sheng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2014-06-01

    A composite catalyst including palladium nanoparticles on titania (TiO2) and on nitrogen-modified porous carbon (Pd/TiO2@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts, tetrabutyl titanate, and chitosan. N2 sorption isotherms show that the catalyst has a high BET surface area (229 m(2)  g(-1)) and large porosity. XPS and TEM characterization of the catalyst shows that palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed across the TiO2 and nitrogen-modified porous carbon, respectively. The Pd/TiO2@N-C catalyst is very active and shows excellent stability towards hydrogenation of vanillin to 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol using formic acid as hydrogen source. This activity can be attributed to a synergistic effect between the Pd/TiO2 (a catalyst for dehydrogenation of formic acid) and Pd/N-C (a catalyst for hydrogenation of vanillin) sites. PMID:24861954

  12. Continuous preparation of carbon-nanotube-supported platinum catalysts in a flow reactor directly heated by electric current

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antonio Rodolfo; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Summary In this contribution we present for the first time a continuous process for the production of highly active Pt catalysts supported by carbon nanotubes by use of an electrically heated tubular reactor. The synthesized catalysts show a high degree of dispersion and narrow distributions of cluster sizes. In comparison to catalysts synthesized by the conventional oil-bath method a significantly higher electrocatalytic activity was reached, which can be attributed to the higher metal loading and smaller and more uniformly distributed Pt particles on the carbon support. Our approach introduces a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for fuel cell catalyst preparation in a flow reactor which could be used at a large scale. PMID:22043252

  13. Chirality-specific growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on solid alloy catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Daqi; Yang, Juan; Luo, Da; Xu, Ziwei; Wei, Jiake; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Xu, Zhi; Peng, Fei; Li, Xuemei; Li, Ruoming; Li, Yilun; Li, Meihui; Bai, Xuedong; Ding, Feng; Li, Yan

    2014-06-26

    Carbon nanotubes have many material properties that make them attractive for applications. In the context of nanoelectronics, interest has focused on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) because slight changes in tube diameter and wrapping angle, defined by the chirality indices (n, m), will shift their electrical conductivity from one characteristic of a metallic state to one characteristic of a semiconducting state, and will also change the bandgap. However, this structure-function relationship can be fully exploited only with structurally pure SWNTs. Solution-based separation methods yield tubes within a narrow structure range, but the ultimate goal of producing just one type of SWNT by controlling its structure during growth has proved to be a considerable challenge over the last two decades. Such efforts aim to optimize the composition or shape of the catalyst particles that are used in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis process to decompose the carbon feedstock and influence SWNT nucleation and growth. This approach resulted in the highest reported proportion, 55 per cent, of single-chirality SWNTs in an as-grown sample. Here we show that SWNTs of a single chirality, (12, 6), can be produced directly with an abundance higher than 92 per cent when using tungsten-based bimetallic alloy nanocrystals as catalysts. These, unlike other catalysts used so far, have such high melting points that they maintain their crystalline structure during the chemical vapour deposition process. This feature seems crucial because experiment and simulation both suggest that the highly selective growth of (12, 6) SWNTs is the result of a good structural match between the carbon atom arrangement around the nanotube circumference and the arrangement of the catalytically active atoms in one of the planes of the nanocrystal catalyst. We anticipate that using high-melting-point alloy nanocrystals with optimized structures as catalysts paves the way for total chirality

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Water Vapor On the Performance of NASA's NMRO Catalysts for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, Jale F.; Ammons, Vaughnery; Battle, Taikelia; Gay, Amy; Bray, Kyle; Washington, Boe; Schryer, David (Technical Monitor); Jordan, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Noble Metal Reducible Oxide (NMRO) catalysts for the low temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide were developed by NASA for the reoxidation of carbon monoxide which forms by the dissociation of carbon dioxide during the operation of sealed carbon dioxide lasers. The NMRO catalyst, which consists of a noble metal in conjunction with a reducible metal oxide, was evaluated under conditions that will be encountered in a CO2 laser operation, namely temperatures in the range 298 to 373 K and no significant reaction gas components other than CO, CO2 and O2. The NMRO catalysts may have significant potential for spin-off applications such as the prevention of carbon monoxide build-up in closed spaces as in space vehicle cabins or submarines, and the elimination of the cold start-up problem of automobile exhaust catalysts. The most significant difference in the conditions of these possible future applications is the high moisture content of the gases to be processed. Lack of understanding of the effects of water vapor and high temperature on catalyst activity and operation for extended periods are currently the main stumbling blocks for the transfer of this NASA technology to be used for commercial purposes. In the original proposal the following objectives were stated: To obtain experimental data on the adsorption, desorption and reaction characteristics of CO and CO2 the catalysts under high moisture conditions; to collect evidence on the presence of carbonate and hydroxyl surface species and their involvement in the CO oxidation mechanism; and to model the reaction system using a Monte-Carlo simulation to gain insight on the various steps involved. After the work has commenced the NASA technical monitor Mr. David Scheyer informed us that there was increased interest in the possible use of the NMRO catalysts as automobile exhaust catalysts and therefore NASA wanted to know whether the catalysts can operate at high temperatures as well as with high moisture gases. At

  15. Quantum Chemical Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Nucleation on Al2O3 Catalysts via CH4 Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Saha, Supriya; Li, Hai-Bei; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-29

    We present quantum chemical simulations demonstrating how single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) form, or "nucleate", on the surface of Al2O3 nanoparticles during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using CH4. SWCNT nucleation proceeds via the formation of extended polyyne chains that only interact with the catalyst surface at one or both ends. Consequently, SWCNT nucleation is not a surface-mediated process. We demonstrate that this unusual nucleation sequence is due to two factors. First, the π interaction between graphitic carbon and Al2O3 is extremely weak, such that graphitic carbon is expected to desorb at typical CVD temperatures. Second, hydrogen present at the catalyst surface actively passivates dangling carbon bonds, preventing a surface-mediated nucleation mechanism. The simulations reveal hydrogen's reactive chemical pathways during SWCNT nucleation and that the manner in which SWCNTs form on Al2O3 is fundamentally different from that observed using "traditional" transition metal catalysts. PMID:26148208

  16. Carbon Deposition from the CO2-Steam Reforming of Methane Over Modified Ni/γ-Al2O3 Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong Kwan; Ok, Hye Jeong; Moon, Dong Ju; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the catalytic activity and suppression of carbon deposition in the CO2-Steam reforming of methane (SCR) to develop a high performance catalyst for GTL-FPSO application which is required to high pressure (20 bar) for F-T synthesis. Ni/La-X(6)/Al2O3 (X = Ce, Mg, Zr) catalysts were prepared by the impregnation method. The catalytic reaction was studied in a fixed bed reactor system at high pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET specific surface area and H2-temperature programmed reduction (TPR) were used to observe the characteristics of the prepared catalysts. The carbon deposition and the carbon amount in the used catalysts were examined by SEM and TGA, respectively. As a result, it was found that the Ni/La-Mg(6)/Al2O3 catalyst showed the highest activity and high carbon resistance. The highest activity in Ni/La-Mg(6)/Al2O3 was attributed to the proper Mg loading. It also had the lowest Ni particle and formed relatively stable MgAl2O4, which have an effect on the catalytic activity. PMID:26328367

  17. Size-controlled large-diameter and few-walled carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianliang; Li, Qing; Pan, Hengyu; Lin, Ye; Ke, Yujie; Sheng, Haiyang; Swihart, Mark T.; Wu, Gang

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new strategy for tuning the size of large-diameter and few-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) from 50 to 150 nm by varying the transition metal (TM = Fe, Co, Ni or Mn) used to catalyze graphitization of dicyandiamide. Fe yielded the largest tubes, followed by Co and Ni, while Mn produced a clot-like carbon morphology. We show that morphology is correlated with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A clear trend of Fe > Co > Ni > Mn for the ORR catalytic activity was observed, in both alkaline media and more demanding acidic media. The Fe-derived N-CNTs exhibited the highest BET (~870 m2 g-1) and electrochemically accessible (~450 m2 g-1) surface areas and, more importantly, the highest concentration of nitrogen incorporated into the carbon planes. Thus, in addition to the intrinsic high activity of Fe-derived catalysts, the high surface area and nitrogen doping contribute to high ORR activity. This work, for the first time, demonstrates size-controlled synthesis of large-diameter N-doped carbon tube electrocatalysts by varying the metal used in N-CNT generation. Electrocatalytic activity of the Fe-derived catalyst is already the best among studied metals, due to the high intrinsic activity of possible Fe-N coordination. This work further provides a promising route to advanced Fe-N-C nonprecious metal catalysts by generating favorable morphology with more active sites and improved mass transfer.We demonstrate a new strategy for tuning the size of large-diameter and few-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) from 50 to 150 nm by varying the transition metal (TM = Fe, Co, Ni or Mn) used to catalyze graphitization of dicyandiamide. Fe yielded the largest tubes, followed by Co and Ni, while Mn produced a clot-like carbon morphology. We show that morphology is correlated with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A clear trend of Fe > Co > Ni > Mn for the ORR catalytic

  18. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst. PMID:27483798

  19. N-doped mesoporous carbons supported palladium catalysts prepared from chitosan/silica/palladium gel beads.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Minfeng; Wang, Yudong; Liu, Qi; Yuan, Xia; Feng, Ruokun; Yang, Zhen; Qi, Chenze

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a heterogeneous catalyst including palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (Pd@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts as palladium precursor, colloidal silica as template, and chitosan as carbon source. N2 sorption isotherm results show that the prepared Pd@N-C had a high BET surface area (640m(2)g(-1)) with large porosity. The prepared Pd@N-C is high nitrogen-rich as characterized with element analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Raman spectroscopy characterization of the catalyst shows that the palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed on the nitrogen-containing mesoporous carbon. The Pd@N-C is high active and shows excellent stability as applied in Heck coupling reactions. This work supplies a successful method to prepare Pd heterogeneous catalysts with high performance from bulk biopolymer/Pd to high porous nitrogen-doped carbon supported palladium catalytic materials. PMID:27155234

  20. Growth of single and double walled carbon nanotubes over Co/V/MgO catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yujing; Qu, Meizhen; Zhou, Gumin; Lin, Haoqiang

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co/V/MgO has remarkable catalytic activity on the growth of SWCNTs and DWCNTs. {yields} The diameter of CNTs can be controlled by adjusting molar ratio of Co-V to MgO. {yields} The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} is critical to the synthesis of thin CNTs. -- Abstract: High quality single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were synthesized on Co/V/MgO catalysts by catalytic decomposition of CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2}. Raman spectroscopy data revealed that the diameters of as-prepared SWCNTs are 1.28 and 0.73 nm. The diameter value of DWCNTs from Raman analysis also showed a narrow diameter distribution. Using field emission transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it was found that the diameter of carbon nanotubes can be controlled mainly by adjusting the molar ratio of Co-V versus the MgO support. The structure properties of catalysts were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} may play an important role in preserving carbon in the catalyst particle and favoring the dissociation balance of CH{sub 4}.

  1. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  2. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation over rhenium-iron oxide catalysts and their characterization by soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Komlyama, M.; Tsunoda, T.; Ogino, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Rhenium-iron oxide catalysts, prepared by the conventional impregnation technique and activated by reduction under various conditions, gave higher selectivities to oxygenates (mainly alcohols) in carbon monoxide hydrogenation than the control iron oxide (magnetite) catalysts. Bulk-sensitive soft X-ray spectroscopy (SXS) along with X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy found that in rhenium-iron oxide catalysts iron oxide is in the form of an intermediate phase represented as (1 - x)Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/.xFe/sub 8/3/O/sub 4/; between Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ and ..gamma..-Fe/sub 2//O/sub 3/. The extent of the formation of this intermediate phase was correlated with the oxygenate selectivities of the rhenium-iron oxide catalysts. The usefulness of SXS in characterizing bulk of solid catalysts was demonstrated.

  3. Development of a ruthenium/phosphite catalyst system for domino hydroformylation-reduction of olefins with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wu, Lipeng; Fleischer, Ivana; Selent, Detlef; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    An efficient domino ruthenium-catalyzed reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS)-hydroformylation-reduction reaction of olefins to alcohols is reported. Key to success is the use of specific bulky phosphite ligands and triruthenium dodecacarbonyl as the catalyst. Compared to the known ruthenium/chloride system, the new catalyst allows for a more efficient hydrohydroxymethylation of terminal and internal olefins with carbon dioxide at lower temperature. Unwanted hydrogenation of the substrate is prevented. Preliminary mechanism investigations uncovered the homogeneous nature of the active catalyst and the influence of the ligand and additive in individual steps of the reaction sequence. PMID:24811949

  4. Function of titanium oxide coated on carbon nanotubes as support for platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qiling; Naidoo, Sivapregasen; Vaivars, Guntars

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the outcome of the synthesis of laboratory-made (HM) Pt monometallic, binary and ternary catalysts supported on TiO2/CNT (carbon nanotubes) and based on using the dry-mix method of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD). These multicomponent catalysts were investigated and compared with commercial Johnson Matthey (JM) catalysts for electrochemical applications.

  5. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  6. Development of Cu xFe/Al 2O 3 catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide guided by magnetic methods, Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boellaard, E.; van Bruggen, J. M.; Geus, J. W.; van der Kraan, A. M.

    1993-04-01

    A copper-iron catalyst for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been prepared using a supported stoichiometric cyanide complex. Conversion of the cyanide precursor to a metallic catalyst appeared to be a precious process. Copper and iron in the bimetallic particles easily separate by thermal treatment and upon exposure to carbon monoxide, as revealed from Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy. During Fischer-Tropsch reaction the catalyst exhibits a rapid decline of activity. Magnetisation measurements on spent catalysts indicate that the deactivation is caused by a fast conversion of metallic iron to initially unstable carbides which transform ultimately to more stable carbides.

  7. Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon as effective metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yucheng; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Huang, Shaobin; Chen, Shaowei

    2015-04-14

    Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon was synthesized by a facile procedure based on simple pyrolysis of water hyacinth (eichhornia crassipes) at controlled temperatures (600-800 °C) with ZnCl2 as an activation reagent. The obtained porous carbon exhibited a BET surface area up to 950.6 m(2) g(-1), and various forms of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic and graphitic) were found to be incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton. Electrochemical measurements showed that the nitrogen self-doped carbons possessed a high electrocatalytic activity for ORR in alkaline media that was highly comparable to that of commercial 20% Pt/C catalysts. Experimentally, the best performance was identified with the sample prepared at 700 °C, with the onset potential at ca. +0.98 V vs. RHE, that possessed the highest concentrations of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogens among the series. Moreover, the porous carbon catalysts showed excellent long-term stability and much enhanced methanol tolerance, as compared to commercial Pt/C. The performance was also markedly better than or at least comparable to the leading results in the literature based on biomass-derived carbon catalysts for ORR. The results suggested a promising route based on economical and sustainable biomass towards the development and engineering of value-added carbon materials as effective metal-free cathode catalysts for alkaline fuel cells. PMID:25772220

  8. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  9. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Wells, Peter P; Chater, Philip A; Carter, James H; Morgan, David J; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M; Wagner, Jakob B; Davies, Thomas E; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Spencer, Michael S; Kiely, Christopher J; Kelly, Gordon J; Park, Colin W; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable--and hence little known and largely ignored--georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions--a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts. PMID:26878237

  10. Stable amorphous georgeite as a precursor to a high-activity catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, Simon A.; Smith, Paul J.; Wells, Peter P.; Chater, Philip A.; Carter, James H.; Morgan, David J.; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Wagner, Jakob B.; Davies, Thomas E.; Lu, Li; Bartley, Jonathan K.; Taylor, Stuart H.; Spencer, Michael S.; Kiely, Christopher J.; Kelly, Gordon J.; Park, Colin W.; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-03-01

    Copper and zinc form an important group of hydroxycarbonate minerals that include zincian malachite, aurichalcite, rosasite and the exceptionally rare and unstable—and hence little known and largely ignored—georgeite. The first three of these minerals are widely used as catalyst precursors for the industrially important methanol-synthesis and low-temperature water-gas shift (LTS) reactions, with the choice of precursor phase strongly influencing the activity of the final catalyst. The preferred phase is usually zincian malachite. This is prepared by a co-precipitation method that involves the transient formation of georgeite; with few exceptions it uses sodium carbonate as the carbonate source, but this also introduces sodium ions—a potential catalyst poison. Here we show that supercritical antisolvent (SAS) precipitation using carbon dioxide (refs 13, 14), a process that exploits the high diffusion rates and solvation power of supercritical carbon dioxide to rapidly expand and supersaturate solutions, can be used to prepare copper/zinc hydroxycarbonate precursors with low sodium content. These include stable georgeite, which we find to be a precursor to highly active methanol-synthesis and superior LTS catalysts. Our findings highlight the value of advanced synthesis methods in accessing unusual mineral phases, and show that there is room for exploring improvements to established industrial catalysts.

  11. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34

  12. Zinc recovery from spent ZnO catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hua-Ching; Lin, Chun-I.; Chen, Hsi-Kuei

    2004-02-01

    Zinc recovery from the spent zinc oxide catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate was studied using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spent zinc oxide catalyst was determined to be composed of 87.5 wt pct zinc oxide and 3.1 wt pct zinc sulfide. The results of X-ray diffractometry revealed that calcium carbonate decomposed to calcium oxide and carbon dioxide; zinc oxide and zinc sulfide were reduced to zinc vapor and carbon monoxide evolving from solid sample; and sulfur content was scavenged as calcium sulfide remained in the solid. Steps involved in this reaction system were summarized to explain the overall reaction. The experimental results of atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery can be increased by increasing either the sample height, the reaction temperature or the initial bulk density. Furthermore, they were found to increase with decrease in either the argon flow rate, the molar ratio of Zntotal/C, the molar ratio of Zntotal/CaCO3, the grain size of the spent catalyst, the agglomerate size of carbon, or the agglomerate size of calcium carbonate. Empirical expressions of the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery have been determined.

  13. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  14. Vapor Phase Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene to Aniline Over Carbon Supported Ruthenium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Chakravartula S; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    A series of Ru/Carbon catalysts (0.5-6.0 wt%) were prepared by impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), CO-chemisorption, surface area and pore-size distribution measurements. The catalytic activities were evaluated for the vapor phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. The dispersion measured by CO-uptake values suggests that a decrease of dispersion is observed with increasing Ru loading on carbon support. These findings are well supported by the crystallite size measured from XRD measurements. XPS study reveals the formation of Ru0 after reduction at 573 K for 3 h. The catalysts exhibit high conversion/selectivity at 4.5 wt% Ru loading during hydrogenation reaction. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are related to the TOF during the hydrogenation reaction. Ru/C catalysts are found to show higher conversion/selectivities during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline. PMID:26373150

  15. High Performance Heteroatoms Quaternary-doped Carbon Catalysts Derived from Shewanella Bacteria for Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Ren, Guangyuan; Jiang, Congcong; Lu, Xianyong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    A novel heteroatoms (N, P, S and Fe) quaternary-doped carbon (HQDC-X, X refers to the pyrolysis temperature) can be fabricated by directly pyrolyzing a gram-negative bacteria, S. oneidensis MR-1 as precursors at 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C under argon atmosphere. These HQDC-X catalysts maintain the cylindrical shape of bacteria after pyrolysis under high temperatures, while heteroatoms including N, P, S and Fe distribute homogeneously on the carbon frameworks. As a result, HQDC-X catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ORR via a dominant four-electron oxygen reduction pathway in alkaline medium, which is comparable with that of commercial Pt/C. More importantly, HQDC-X catalysts show better tolerance for methanol crossover and CO poisoning effects, long-term durability than commercial Pt/C, which could be promising alternatives to costly Pt-based electrocatalysts for ORR. The method may provide a promising avenue to develop cheap ORR catalysts from inexpensive, scalable and biological recursors. PMID:26602287

  16. High Performance Heteroatoms Quaternary-doped Carbon Catalysts Derived from Shewanella Bacteria for Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Ren, Guangyuan; Jiang, Congcong; Lu, Xianyong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Dai, Liming

    2015-11-01

    A novel heteroatoms (N, P, S and Fe) quaternary-doped carbon (HQDC-X, X refers to the pyrolysis temperature) can be fabricated by directly pyrolyzing a gram-negative bacteria, S. oneidensis MR-1 as precursors at 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C under argon atmosphere. These HQDC-X catalysts maintain the cylindrical shape of bacteria after pyrolysis under high temperatures, while heteroatoms including N, P, S and Fe distribute homogeneously on the carbon frameworks. As a result, HQDC-X catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ORR via a dominant four-electron oxygen reduction pathway in alkaline medium, which is comparable with that of commercial Pt/C. More importantly, HQDC-X catalysts show better tolerance for methanol crossover and CO poisoning effects, long-term durability than commercial Pt/C, which could be promising alternatives to costly Pt-based electrocatalysts for ORR. The method may provide a promising avenue to develop cheap ORR catalysts from inexpensive, scalable and biological recursors.

  17. Improving the durability of methanol oxidation reaction electro-catalysts through the modification of carbon architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin N.

    Carbon materials represent one of the largest areas of studied research today, having integrated applications stretching from energy production and storage to medical use and far beyond. One of these many intriguing applications is fuel cells, which offers the promise of clean electricity through a direct electrochemical energy conversion process. Unfortunately, at the present time the cost per watt-hour produced by fuel cells is more expensive than conventional methods of energy production/storage (i.e. combustion engines, batteries, etc.). Under the umbrella of fuel cell systems, methanol is a promising fuel source because of its high energy density and convenience of direct liquid fuel operation. In this field, recent advancements are bringing direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) closer to commercial viability. However, just as in other fuel cell systems, further improvements are greatly needed, particularly in the area of catalyst durability. This need for improved durability has led to increased research activity focused on improving catalyst stability and utilization. This thesis explores one of the most promising areas of enhancing catalyst-support interactions; namely, modification of carbon support architectures. Through the use of heteroatom modifiers, such as nitrogen, fuel cell support systems can be enhanced in such a way as to improve metal nucleation and growth, catalyst durability and catalytic activity. To this end, this thesis employs advanced characterization techniques to study the changes in catalyst particle morphology before and after nitrogen modification of the support structure. These results clearly show the beneficial effects of nitrogen moieties on carbon structures and help elucidate the effects of nitrogen on the stability of supported catalytic nanoparticles systems. Similarly, the novel concept of post-modifying commercially available supported catalysts with nitrogen ion implantation gives further insight into the behavior of

  18. Interaction of carbon and sulfur on metal catalysts. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.

    1988-01-21

    Goal is to study selective poisoning by fractional monolayers of chemisorbed sulfur on metal catalysts. A Pt catalyst on alumina support has been synthesized. Stabilized Fe catalysts without and with half monolayers of chemicsorbed S have been prepared. These catalysts, along with a Ni-alumina reference catalyst, will be used in experimental studies. 2 figs.

  19. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-12

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry--specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It is desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The goal is to produce shape-selective catalysts that have the potential to limit the formation of longchain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage'. This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. This activity report centers upon this first stage of experimentation with particulate FT catalysts. (For reference, a second experimental stage is under way to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes.) To date, experimentation has centered upon the evaluation of a sample of iron-based, spray-dried catalyst prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER) and samples of his catalyst onto which inorganic 'shells' were deposited. The reference CAER catalyst contained a high level of dispersed fine particles, a portion of which was removed by differential settling. Reaction conditions have been established using a FT laboratory unit such that reasonable levels of CO conversion can be achieved, where therefore a valid catalyst comparison can be made. A wide range of catalytic activities was observed with SiO{sub 2}-coated FT catalysts. Two techniques were used for SiO{sub 2}coating. The first involved a caustic precipitation of SiO{sub 2} from an

  20. Investigation of defectiveness of multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced with Fe-Co catalysts of different composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokova-Sirosh, Sofya N.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L.; Romanenko, Anatoly I.; Kazakova, Mariya A.; Krasnikov, Dmitry V.; Tkachev, Evgeniy N.; Yuzyuk, Yury I.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-01-01

    We have performed a study of CVD multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced with Fe-Co catalysts with a variable ratio of active metals. The Raman data were considered in combination with the temperature dependence of MWCNT conductivity. The data analysis is based on the point that the value of I2D/ID ratio correlates with the graphene fragment size. The fragments are considered as building blocks of MWCNTs. We showed that MWCNT defectiveness depends on the ratio of bimetallic active components in the Fe-Co catalyst. Thus, the ratio of I2D/ID increases and the D-mode intensity decreases while the Fe content in the catalyst increases. This also points to the reduction of defect number in the bigger graphene fragments. These results correlate with the data on conductivity temperature dependence. Namely, the increase of Fe content in the active component of the Fe-Co catalyst results in the increase of charge carrier concentration, which, in turn, indicates a decrease in MWCNT defectiveness.

  1. A palladium-doped ceria@carbon core-sheath nanowire network: a promising catalyst support for alcohol electrooxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2015-08-01

    A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique interconnected one-dimensional core-sheath structure is revealed to facilitate immobilization of the metal catalysts, leading to the improved durability. This core-sheath nanowire network opens up a new strategy for catalyst performance optimization for next-generation fuel cells.A novel palladium-doped ceria and carbon core-sheath nanowire network (Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN) is synthesized by a template-free and surfactant-free solvothermal process, followed by high temperature carbonization. This hierarchical network serves as a new class of catalyst support to enhance the activity and durability of noble metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation reactions. Its supported Pd nanoparticles, Pd/(Pd-CeO2@C CSNWN), exhibit >9 fold increase in activity toward the ethanol oxidation over the state-of-the-art Pd/C catalyst, which is the highest among the reported Pd systems. Moreover, stability tests show a virtually unchanged activity after 1000 cycles. The high activity is mainly attributed to the superior oxygen-species releasing capability of Pd-doped CeO2 nanowires by accelerating the removal of the poisoning intermediate. The unique

  2. Catalyst for the methanation of carbon monoxide in sour gas

    DOEpatents

    Kustes, William A.; Hausberger, Arthur L.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves the synergistic effect of the specific catalytic constituents on a specific series of carriers for the methanation of carbon monoxide in the presence of sulfur at relatively high temperatures and at low steam to gas ratios in the range of 0.2:1 or less. This effect was obtained with catalysts comprising the mixed sulfides and oxides of nickel and chromium supported on carriers comprising magnesium aluminate and magnesium silicate. Conversion of carbon monoxide to methane was in the range of from 40 to 80%. Tests of this combination of metal oxides and sulfides on other carriers and tests of other metal oxides and sulfides on the same carrier produced a much lower level of conversion.

  3. Optimization of Fe/Ni/Mg Trimetallic Catalyst for Carbon Nanotubes Growth by Using Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Fluidized floating catalyst method has been used for preparing carbon nanotubes with average size ˜11 nm which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C. Optimum concentration of the Fe/Ni/Mg metal alloy catalyst has been found to be at 2.133% for producing carbon nanotubes with high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. From the PXRD analyses, graphite layers detected which provide an indication of the degree of graphitic character. However, by using the Scherrer equation is not suitable for carbon nanotubes as the value is slightly different from the average diameter determine from FESEM micrographs. Since the metallic alloy was obtained by calcining the respective nitrates, it is expected to have residual entrapped nitrogen, which may bond with the depositing CNTs as observed from FTIR spectroscopy.

  4. Activation studies with a precipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. II. Reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Nowicki, L.; Manne, R.K.; Lang, Xiaosu

    1995-09-01

    Effects of pretreatment conditions on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity, and stability with time) during Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis were studied in a fixed-bed reactor using a commercial precipitated iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2K/25 SiO{sub 2} on a mass basis). The catalyst activity increased slightly with time-on-stream after hydrogen reductions, which was accompanied with conversion of metallic iron and part of iron oxides to {epsilon}{prime}-carbide ({epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 22}C). Initial activity of the H{sub 2}-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C for 8 or 24 h was markedly lower than that obtained in other tests. This is attributed to slow carburization of large oxide particles and partial poisoning of catalyst sites by migration of sulfur from the bulk to the surface of the catalyst during the reduction. Pretreatments with carbon monoxide and syngas resulted in partial conversion of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {chi}-carbide ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}). During FT synthesis the CO- and the syngas-pretreated catalyst deactivated slowly with time-on-stream, due to partial conversion of {chi}-carbide to less active iron oxide phases and buildup of carbonaceous deposits which block the active sites. The hydrogen-reduced catalyst at 280{degrees}C, for 1-24h, produced more methane and gaseous hydrocarbons than the CO- or the syngas-pretreated catalyst and favored secondary reactions (1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization, and readsorption). 41 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lucki, Stanley J.; Brennan, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

  6. Preparation of a novel structured catalyst based on aligned carbon nanotube arrays for a microchannel Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Ya-Huei; Hu, Jianli; Cao, Chunshe; Gao, Yufei; Wang, Yong

    2005-12-15

    A novel catalyst microstructure based on aligned multiwall carbon nanotube arrays was synthesized. Its advanced heat and mass transport characteristics coupled with high surface area led to superior performances for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a microchannel chemical reactor. The fabrication of such a novel catalyst structure first involved metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of a dense Al2O3 thin film over FeCrAlY foam substrate to enhance adhesion between catalyst layer and metal substrate. Aligned arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes were grown over the substrate by catalytic decomposition of ethylene. These nanotube bundles were directly attached to the FeCrAlY substrate through a thin layer of oxide thin film. When the outer surfaces of nanobundles were coated with a catalyst layer, a unique hierarchical catalyst structure with nanoporous interstitials between the bundles was created. Thus, engineered catalysts based on such a novel hierarchical structure minimizes mass transfer encountered in the gas-liquid-solid three phase reactions. In addition, high thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube and the direct attachment of these nanobundles to the metal foam allow efficient heat removal from catalytic sites. The advanced heat and mass transfer on this novel structured catalyst was demonstrated in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a microchannel fixed bed reactor. The presence of carbon nanotube arrays improved dispersion of active metals and reduced mass transfer limitation, leading to a factor of four enhancement of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity. The improved temperature control with the carbon nanotube arrays also allows the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis being operated at temperatures as high as 265 C without reaction runaway favoring methane formation.

  7. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  8. Comparison of the activities of fine-particle size catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of the fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETCs Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The standard procedures use Blind Canyon coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design with temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 400{degrees}C, reaction times from 20 to 60 minutes, and catalyst loadings up to 1 wt%. Catalytic activity is measured in terms of tetrahydrofuran conversion, heptane conversion, the amount of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene in the product, and the gas yield. Several catalysts have been evaluated including a commercially available pyrite, a sulfated iron oxide from the University of Pittsburgh, and several preparations of 6-line ferrihydrites from Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Results have demonstrated that significant differences in activity can be detected among these catalysts.

  9. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vera P; Wezendonk, Tim A; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A; Koeken, Ard C J; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation. PMID:25740709

  10. Metal organic framework-mediated synthesis of highly active and stable Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vera P.; Wezendonk, Tim A.; Jaén, Juan José Delgado; Dugulan, A. Iulian; Nasalevich, Maxim A.; Islam, Husn-Ubayda; Chojecki, Adam; Sartipi, Sina; Sun, Xiaohui; Hakeem, Abrar A.; Koeken, Ard C. J.; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Davidian, Thomas; Meima, Garry R.; Sankar, Gopinathan; Kapteijn, Freek; Makkee, Michiel; Gascon, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Depletion of crude oil resources and environmental concerns have driven a worldwide research on alternative processes for the production of commodity chemicals. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process for flexible production of key chemicals from synthesis gas originating from non-petroleum-based sources. Although the use of iron-based catalysts would be preferred over the widely used cobalt, manufacturing methods that prevent their fast deactivation because of sintering, carbon deposition and phase changes have proven challenging. Here we present a strategy to produce highly dispersed iron carbides embedded in a matrix of porous carbon. Very high iron loadings (>40 wt %) are achieved while maintaining an optimal dispersion of the active iron carbide phase when a metal organic framework is used as catalyst precursor. The unique iron spatial confinement and the absence of large iron particles in the obtained solids minimize catalyst deactivation, resulting in high active and stable operation.

  11. Highly active water-soluble olefin metathesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon Hyeok; Grubbs, Robert H

    2006-03-22

    A novel water-soluble ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst supported by a poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated saturated 1,3-dimesityl-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene ligand is reported. The catalyst displays improved activity in ring-opening metathesis polymerization, ring-closing metathesis, and cross-metathesis reactions in aqueous media. PMID:16536510

  12. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity. PMID:26606266

  13. Carbon Deposition Onto Ni-Based Catalysts for Combined Steam/CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-02-01

    The present study was performed to suppress carbon deposition by Ce and Fe onto Ni-based catalysts in combined steam/CO2 reforming of methane (CSCRM), which is a process for producing synthesis gas (H2:CO = 2:1) for gas-to-liquids (GTL). The catalytic reaction was evaluated at 900 degrees C and 20 bar with a reactant feed ratio CH4:CO2:H20:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and gas hourly space velocity GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Ce and Fe modified Ni/gamma-A120, catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), H2 chemisorption, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and SEM. Ce- and Fe-modified Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited remarkable activity and stability during the CSCRM over the course of 50 hours. It suggested that the Ni(12)-Ce(5)-Fe(5)/Al2O3 catalyst shows highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity. PMID:27433622

  14. What is below the support layer affects carbon nanotube growth: an iron catalyst reservoir yields taller nanotube carpets.

    PubMed

    Shawat, E; Mor, V; Oakes, L; Fleger, Y; Pint, C L; Nessim, G D

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate an approach to enhance the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by including a catalyst reservoir underneath the thin-film alumina catalyst underlayer. This reservoir led to enhanced CNT growth due to the migration of catalytic material from below the underlayer up to the surface through alumina pinholes during processing. This led to the formation of large Fe particles, which in turn influenced the morphology evolution of the catalytic iron surface layer through Ostwald ripening. With inclusion of this catalyst reservoir, we observed CNT growth up to 100% taller than that observed without the catalyst reservoir consistently across a wide range of annealing and growth durations. Imaging studies of catalyst layers both for different annealing times and for different alumina support layer thicknesses demonstrate that the surface exposure of metal from the reservoir leads to an active population of smaller catalyst particles upon annealing as opposed to a bimodal catalyst size distribution that appears without inclusion of a reservoir. Overall, the mechanism for growth enhancement we present here demonstrates a new route to engineering efficient catalyst structures to overcome the limitations of CNT growth processes. PMID:24323364

  15. Growth Mechanism Of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared By Fluidized Floating Catalyst Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes were synthesized by fluidized floating catalyst method which yielded high yield even at low temperature; 650° C using camphor oil as carbon source and Argon as carrier gas. Optimum concentration for trimetal alloy catalyst; Fe/Ni/Mg has been found to be the suitable catalyst for producing carbon nanotubes at high yield. Carbon nanotubes are formed by the evaporation of the camphor oil (precursor), which decomposes `in situ' and aggregates on the metal alloy catalyst particles present in the ceramic boat. The morphology of carbon nanotubes were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). This result demonstrates that fluidized floating catalyst method is suitable for effective formation of CNTs with average size ˜11.5 nm. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case.

  16. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  17. The role of catalyst activation on the activity and attrition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Harrington, M.S.; Coulter, K.E.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    The results of this work indicate that magnetite is not catalytically active for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in precipitated, unsupported iron catalysts, but the formation of the carbide phase is necessary to obtain FTS activity. The transformation of magnetite to carbide, though essential to obtain FTS activity, also causes the catalyst to break down. This can lead to severe problems during operation in a commercial slurry phase reactor. The results presented here imply that activation and attrition are simultaneous and complementary processes. In another study, we show that the catalyst can also under go attrition on a micron scale which is caused by lack of strength of the forces binding the catalyst primary particles in the agglomerates. Both these processes can make wax separation and product recovery extremely difficult. In this study, we have also shown that H{sub 2} reduction of this catalyst to metallic iron is detrimental to subsequent catalyst activity and causes a loss of surface area due to sintering of the iron crystallites. Reduction to metallic Fe also causes impurities such as S to segregate to the surface causing a complete loss of FTS activity. It has been shown that even submonolayer amounts of S can cause a dramatic decrease in FTS activity, hence reduction to metallic Fe should be avoided during activation of these catalysts. We have shown, however, that a mild H{sub 2} reduction to magnetite does not lead to S segregation to the surface, and is therefore acceptable.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Cobalt Catalyst Activation and Handling Through Wax Enclosure Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klettlinger, Jennifer L. S.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2016-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which converts syn-gas, a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions. Cobalt based catalysts are used in F-T synthesis and are the focus of this paper. One key concern with handling cobalt based catalysts is that the active form of catalyst is in a reduced state, metallic cobalt, which oxidizes readily in air. In laboratory experiments, the precursor cobalt oxide catalyst is activated in a fixed bed at 350 ?C then transferred into a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with inert gas. NASA has developed a process which involves the enclosure of active cobalt catalyst in a wax mold to prevent oxidation during storage and handling. This improved method allows for precise catalyst loading and delivery into a CSTR. Preliminary results indicate similar activity levels in the F-T reaction in comparison to the direct injection method. The work in this paper was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  19. Sulfonated mesoporous silica-carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B.

    2012-11-01

    The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica-carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica-carbon composites contain ˜30 wt % of carbonaceous matter with a high density of acidic groups attached to the deposited carbon (i.e.sbnd SO3H, sbnd COOH and sbnd OH). The structural characteristics of the parent silica are retained in the composite materials, which exhibit a high surface area, a large pore volume and a well-ordered porosity made up uniform mesopores. The high density of the sulfonic groups in combination with the mesoporous structure of the composites ensures that a large number of active sites are easily accessible to reactants. These sulfonated silica-carbon composites behave as eco-friendly, active, selective, water tolerant and recyclable solid acids. In this study we demonstrate the usefulness of these composites as solid acid catalysts for the esterification of maleic anhydride, succinic acid and oleic acid with ethanol. These composites exhibit a superior intrinsic catalytic activity to other commercial solid acids such as Amberlyst-15.

  20. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights

    SciTech Connect

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of purified catalyst-free single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaka, Mujtaba; Ito, Yasuhiro; Wang, Huiliang; Yan, Wenjing; Robertson, Alex; Wu, Yimin A; Rümmeli, Mark H; Staunton, David; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Morton, John J L; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H

    2010-12-28

    Electron paramagnetic resonance of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been bedevilled by the presence of paramagnetic impurities. To address this, SWCNTs produced by laser ablation with a nonmagnetic PtRhRe catalyst were purified through a multiple step centrifugation process in order to remove amorphous carbon and catalyst impurities. Centrifugation of a SWCNT solution resulted in sedimentation of carbon nanotube bundles containing clusters of catalyst particles, while isolated nanotubes with reduced catalyst particle content remained in the supernatant. Further ultracentrifugation resulted in highly purified SWCNT samples with a narrow diameter distribution and almost no detectable catalyst particles. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were detected only for samples which contained catalyst particles, with the ultracentrifuged SWCNTs showing no EPR signal at X-band (9.4 GHz) and fields < 0.4 T. PMID:21082779

  2. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-12-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

  3. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27365001

  4. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Catalyst for Gas-Phase Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Huang, Rui; Feng, Zhenbao; Liu, Hongyang; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-07-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were directly used as a sustainable and green catalyst to convert ethanol into acetaldehyde in the presence of molecular oxygen. The C=O groups generated on the nanocarbon surface were demonstrated as active sites for the selective oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde. The transformation of disordered carbon debris on the CNT surface to ordered graphitic structures induced by thermal-treatment significantly enhanced the stability of the active C=O groups, and thus the catalytic performance. A high reactivity with approximately 60 % ethanol conversion and 93 % acetaldehyde selectivity was obtained over the optimized CNT catalyst at 270 °C. More importantly, the catalytic performance was quite stable even after 500 h, which is comparable with a supported gold catalyst. The robust catalytic performance displayed the potential application of CNTs in the industrial catalysis field. PMID:27282126

  5. Monolith catalysts for closed-cycle carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.; Badlani, Ajay

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to explore ways of making a monolithic form of catalyst for CO2 lasers. The approach chosen was to pelletize the catalyst material, Au/MnO2 powder, and epoxy the pellets to stainless steel sheets as structural supports. The CO oxidation reaction over Au/MnO2 powder was found to be first overall, and the reaction rate constant at room temperature was 4.4 +/- 0.3 cc/(g x sec). The activation energy was 5.7 kcal/mol. The BET surface area of the pellets was found to vary from 125 to 140 sq m/g between different batches of catalyst. Pellets epoxied to stainless steel strips showed no sign of fracture or dusting when subjected to thermal tests. Pellets can be dropped onto hard surfaces with chipping of edges but no breakage of the pellets. Mechanical strength tests performed on the pellets showed that the crush strength is roughly one-fourth of the pelletizing force. The apparent activity and activation energy over the pellets were found to be less than over the powdered form of the catalyst. The lower apparent activity and activation energy of the pellets are due to the fact that the internal surface area of a pellet is not exposed to the reactant concentration present in the flowing gas as a result of intrapellet diffusion resistance. Effectiveness factors varied from 0.44, for pellets having thickness of 2 mm and attached with epoxy to a stainless steel strip. The epoxy and the stainless steel strip were found to simply block off one of the circular faces of the pellets. The epoxy did not penetrate the pellets and block the active sites. The values of the effective diffusivities were estimated to be between 2.3 x 10(exp -3) and 4.9 x 10(exp -3) sq cm/s. With measurements performed on one powder sample and one pellet configuration, reasonable accurate predictions can be made of conversions that would be obtained with other pellet thickness and configurations.

  6. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted. PMID:25855947

  7. Iron Catalyst Chemistry in High Pressure Carbon Monoxide Nanotube Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Povitsky, Alexander; Dateo, Christopher; Gokcen, Tahir; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) technique for producing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is analyzed using a chemical reaction model coupled with properties calculated along streamlines. Streamline properties for mixing jets are calculated by the FLUENT code using the k-e turbulent model for pure carbon monixide. The HiPco process introduces cold iron pentacarbonyl diluted in CO, or alternatively nitrogen, at high pressure, ca. 30 atmospheres into a conical mixing zone. Hot CO is also introduced via three jets at angles with respect to the axis of the reactor. Hot CO decomposes the Fe(CO)5 to release atomic Fe. Cluster reaction rates are from Krestinin, et aI., based on shock tube measurements. Another model is from classical cluster theory given by Girshick's team. The calculations are performed on streamlines that assume that a cold mixture of Fe(CO)5 in CO is introduced along the reactor axis. Then iron forms clusters that catalyze the formation of SWNTs from the Boudouard reaction on Fe-containing clusters by reaction with CO. To simulate the chemical process along streamlines that were calculated by the fluid dynamics code FLUENT, a time history of temperature and dilution are determined along streamlines. Alternative catalyst injection schemes are also evaluated.

  8. Effect of a carrier's nature on the activation of supported iron catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazak, V. O.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Pankina, G. V.; Khodakov, A. Y.; Ordomsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect a carrier's nature has on the activation of supported iron catalysts in a stream of pure carbon monoxide CO is investigated. It is shown that iron is mainly present in the form of magnetite Fe3O4 in case of carbon supports and in the form of hematite Fe2O3 for silica gel supports. It is shown that all activated samples are chiefly made up of the Hägg carbide χ-Fe5C2, but its concentration is higher for the carbon supports.

  9. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using a tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Gudde, Nicholas J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the steps involved in the development by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) of a catalytic device for the recombination of carbon monoxide and oxygen in a CO2 laser system. It contrasts the differences between CO oxidation for air purification and for laser environmental control, but indicates that there are similarities between the physical specifications. The principal features of catalytic devices are outlined and some experimental work described. This includes measurements concerning the structure and mechanical properties of the artifact, the preparation of the catalyst coating and its interaction with the gaseous environment. The paper concludes with some speculation about the method by which the reaction actually occurs.

  10. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  11. Ferromagnetic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by Fe catalyst arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Byeongchul; Yeom, Tae Ho; Lee, Soo Hyung

    2009-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were directly synthesized by a hydrogen arc discharge method using only Fe catalyst. The synthesized carbon materials indicated high-purity SWCNTs with Fe catalyst encapsulated with several graphite layers. The diameter of Fe catalysts encapsulated with graphene layers is 1.5-2.0 nm. From the ferromagnetic resonance measurements, the as-synthesized SWCNTs show the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. The ferromagnetic properties of SWCNTs would be attributed to Fe catalysts encapsulated by graphite layers.

  12. N-Co-O Triply Doped Highly Crystalline Porous Carbon: An Acid-Proof Nonprecious Metal Oxygen Evolution Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiliu; Zhan, Yi; Li, Jingfa; Lee, Jim Yang

    2016-02-10

    In comparison with nonaqueous Li-air batteries, aqueous Li-air batteries are kinetically more facile and there is more variety of non-noble metal catalysts available for oxygen electrocatalysis, especially in alkaline solution. The alkaline battery environment is however vulnerable to electrolyte carbonation by atmospheric CO2 resulting in capacity loss over time. The acid aqueous solution is immune to carbonation but is limited by the lack of effective non-noble metal catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). This is contrary to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid solution where a few good candidates exist. We report here the development of a N-Co-O triply doped carbon catalyst with substantial OER activity in acid solution by the thermal codecomposition of polyaniline, cobalt salt and cyanamide in nitrogen. Cyanamide and the type of cobalt precursor salt were found to determine the structure, crystallinity, surface area, extent of Co doping and consequently the OER activity of the final carbon catalyst in acid solution. We have also put forward some hypotheses about the active sites that may be useful for guiding further work. PMID:26795393

  13. Carbon nanofibers modified with heteroatoms as metal-free catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Marco, Yanila; Roldán, Laura; Muñoz, Edgar; García-Bordejé, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were modified with B and P by an ex situ approach. In addition, CNFs doped with N were prepared in situ using ethylenediamine as the N and C source. After calcination, the doped CNFs were used as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. For B-CNFs, the effects of boron loading and calcination temperature on B speciation and catalytic conversion were studied. For the same reaction temperatures and conversions, B- and P-doped CNFs exhibited higher selectivities to propene than pristine CNFs. The N-CNFs were the most active but the least selective of the catalysts tested here. Our results also show that the type of P precursor affects the selectivity to propene and that CNFs modified using triphenylphosphine as the precursor provided the highest selectivity at isoconversion. PMID:25138580

  14. Evaluation studies on carbon supported catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Vakula S.; Singer, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes tests designed to predict the performance of fuel cell electrodes, as applied to an alkaline oxygen-fuel cell having specially fabricated porous-carbon electrodes with various amounts of dispersed platinum or gold as active catalysts. The tests are based on information obtained from the techniques of cyclic voltammetry and polarization. The parameters obtained from cyclic voltammetry were of limited use in predicting fuel cell performance of the cathode. On the other hand, half-cell polarization measurements offered close simulation of the oxygen electrode, although a predictor of the electrode life is still lacking. The very low polarization of the Au-10 percent Pt catalytic electrode suggests that single-phase catalysts should be considered.

  15. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report heremore » a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A∙cm-3 at 0.9 V or 450 A∙cm-3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed.« less

  16. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A∙cm-3 at 0.9 V or 450 A∙cm-3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed.

  17. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal–organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A⋅cm−3 at 0.9 V or 450 A⋅cm−3 extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed. PMID:26261338

  18. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalyst prepared with metal-organic framework in a continuous carbon nanofibrous network.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jianglan; Chen, Chen; Grabstanowicz, Lauren; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Di-Jia

    2015-08-25

    Fuel cell vehicles, the only all-electric technology with a demonstrated >300 miles per fill travel range, use Pt as the electrode catalyst. The high price of Pt creates a major cost barrier for large-scale implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) represent attractive low-cost alternatives. However, a significantly lower turnover frequency at the individual catalytic site renders the traditional carbon-supported NPMCs inadequate in reaching the desired performance afforded by Pt. Unconventional catalyst design aiming at maximizing the active site density at much improved mass and charge transports is essential for the next-generation NPMC. We report here a method of preparing highly efficient, nanofibrous NPMC for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction by electrospinning a polymer solution containing ferrous organometallics and zeolitic imidazolate framework followed by thermal activation. The catalyst offers a carbon nanonetwork architecture made of microporous nanofibers decorated by uniformly distributed high-density active sites. In a single-cell test, the membrane electrode containing such a catalyst delivered unprecedented volumetric activities of 3.3 A ⋅ cm(-3) at 0.9 V or 450 A ⋅ cm(-3) extrapolated at 0.8 V, representing the highest reported value in the literature. Improved fuel cell durability was also observed. PMID:26261338

  19. Hydrogasification of carbon adsorbed on sulfur-poisoned dispersed metal catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J.G.; Wood, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    The temperature programmed reaction of 1- to 10-atom hydrogen (TPRH) with carbon deposited on alumina supported Ni, Ru, and Co and on fused Fe catalysts has been developed to examine the effect of sulfur poisoning on coking rates and the nature of the deposited carbon. A new procedure, passivation by carbon deposition on clean reduced metals and low temperature (20--50 C) exposure to recirculate dilute H{sub 2}S with moderate 0.1 atm partial pressure of CO{sub 2} was used to slow the rate of sulfur chemisorption. This method facilitated slow uniform sulfur chemisorption to fractional saturation coverages. Fractional sulfur poisoning generally blocked sites of active surface carbon (or hydrocarbon fragments) while suppressing rates of hydrogasification as shown by the increasing temperatures in the TPRH hydrogasification rate versus temperature spectra. Fractional sulfur poisoning (e.g., half saturation) appears to inhibit H{sub 2} gasification with surface carbon surprisingly without strongly affecting catalytic activity. Sulfur poisoning to saturation levels (defined here as {approximately}1 ppm H{sub 2}S in 1-atm H{sub 2} at 500 C) always results in complete loss of activity and is also marked by the growth of a very unreactive form of carbon.

  20. Three powerful dinuclear metal-organic catalysts for converting CO2 into organic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Shi, Zhuang-Zhi; Zhu, Chen-Dan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Peng; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2016-09-28

    Developing efficient catalysts for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into varied organic carbonates is an important scientific goal. By using the NH2-functionalized tripodal ligand 2-((bis(2-aminoethyl)amino)methyl)phenol (HL), three dinuclear metal-organic complexes [Zn(L)]2·2ClO4 (1), [Cu(L)]2·2ClO4·2H2O (2) and [Cd(L)]2·2ClO4 (3) have been successfully isolated and structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Considering the dinuclear metal centers and the NH2-functional groups in the structures, 1-3 were investigated as catalysts for converting CO2 into organic carbonates, and the results show that 1-3 exhibit an outstanding ability for converting CO2 into varied organic carbonates at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). The catalytic system also displays a wide substrate scope and high catalytic activity, and the reaction mechanism has been proposed herein. PMID:27530724

  1. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  2. Identifying the role of N-heteroatom location in the activity of metal catalysts for alcohol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura

    2015-04-02

    Here, this work focuses on understanding how the bonding of nitrogen heteroatoms contained on/in a activated carbon support influence the stability and reactivity of a supported Pd catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in solution. The results show that simply adding N groups via solution chemistry is insufficient to improve catalytic properties. Instead a strongly bound N moiety is required to activate the catalyst and stabilize the metal particles.

  3. Identifying the Role of N-Heteroatom Location in the Activity of Metal Catalysts for Alcohol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Veith, Gabriel M; Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on understanding how the bonding of nitrogen heteroatoms contained on/in a activated carbon support influence the stability and reactivity of a supported Pd catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in solution. The results show that simply adding N groups via solution chemistry is insufficient to improve catalytic properties. Instead a strongly bound N moiety is required to activate the catalyst and stabilize the metal particles.

  4. Soybean-derived mesoporous carbon as an effective catalyst support for electrooxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianbao; Wang, Hui; Ji, Shan; Linkov, Vladimir; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-02-01

    In this work, a low cost and nitrogen-containing carbon (CS) with mesoporous structure and high surface area is synthesized by carbonizing soybean. It is found that the prepared CS has excellent textural properties such as high specific surface areas and large pore diameters. TEM images show that the Pt nano-sized dendrites are well formed on the surface of CS. Compared to Pt supported on Vulcan carbon XC-72, electrochemical results show that Pt supported on CS possesses a higher electrocatalytic activity and better durability in methanol oxidation reaction, which are mainly attributed to the support effect of CS resulting in the unique morphology of Pt particles and high content of Pt(0). These results indicate that CS has great potential as a high-performance catalyst support for fuel cell electrocatalysis.

  5. Adsorption and Deactivation Characteristics of Cu/ZnO-Based Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Howard, Bret H; Lekse, Jonathan W; Baltrus, John P; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-07-09

    The adsorption and deactivation characteristics of coprecipitated Cu/ZnO-based catalysts were examined and correlated to their performance in methanol synthesis from CO₂ hydrogenation. The addition of Ga₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ promoters is shown to increase the Cu surface area and CO₂/H₂ adsorption capacities of the catalysts and enhance methanol synthesis activity. Infrared studies showed that CO₂ adsorbs spontaneously on these catalysts at room temperature as both monoand bi-dentate carbonate species. These weakly bound species desorb completely from the catalyst surface by 200 °C while other carbonate species persist up to 500 °C. Characterization using N₂O decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis clearly indicated that Cu sintering is the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Ga and Y promotion improves the catalyst stability by suppressing the agglomeration of Cu and ZnO particles under pretreatment and reaction conditions.

  6. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer- Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.; Harrington, M.S.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1996-06-01

    This work has shown that the kaolin binder that has been used in commercial Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts doe not offer any significant attrition resistance. This is due in part to its morphology (plate-like) and to its particle size being much greater than the primary crystallite size of the iron oxide catalyst. From a microscopic examination of these catalysts, it appears that if the nanoscale attrition of the iron catalyst is to be avoided, the iron must be well dispersed on the binder, and the binder must provide an interlocking microstructure that provides strength and stability to the 30-70 {mu}m agglomerates. The study of Fe/SiO{sub 2} catalysts has shown that co-precipitation of the iron and silica leads to formation of an amorphous glassy phase which is difficult to reduce even at 723K. On the other hand, when the iron was precipitated on a preformed silica, 25-40% of the iron could be reduced and carbided. The supported iron catalyst, after reduction, formed 15-20 nm iron carbide particles that look very similar to those on the unsupported catalyst. The major difference is these nanometer sized particles are anchored on a support and therefore would not be expected to breakup further and contribute to the fines generated as catalyst attrition proceeds. However, since only a fraction of the silica-supported iron can be reduced to the active carbide phase, our present efforts are devoted to moderating the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interaction by introducing an interfacial oxide phase. We are also studying the role of added Cu on the ease of reducibility of Fe/SiO{sub 2}. The implication of this work is that other binder materials should be explored that have a morphology that can strengthen the agglomerates and minimize the Fe-SiO{sub 2} interfacial reactions. This work is presently underway in our laboratory.

  7. Rare-earth catalysts for carbon-carbon linkages of olefins: Cyclic oligomerization of ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, W.; Meltzow, W.; Chen, Z. ); Huang, Z. ); Shen, Z. )

    1992-10-01

    A novel cyclo-oligomerization of ethene to alkylcyclopropanes, alkylcyclopentanes, and alkylcyclohexanes using a Ziegler-Natta type catalyst consisting of rare earth salts such as YCl{sub 3}, LaCl{sub 3}, CeCl{sub 3}, PrCl{sub 3} NdCl{sub 3}, SmCl{sub 3}, GdCl{sub 3}, HoCl{sub 3} ErCl{sub 3}, YbCl{sub 3}, LuCl{sub 3} combined with EtAlCl{sub 2} is described. The addition of carbon monoxide or isonitriles is essential. The C{sub 6}-oligomers consist of n-propylcyclopropane and methylcyclopentane. The C{sub 8}-oligomers include n-pentylcyclopropane, n-propylcyclopentane, 1,1-methylethylcyclopentane, and ethylcyclohexane. The C{sub 10}-oligomers embrace n-heptylcyclopropane, n-pentylcyclopentane, 1-1-methylbutylcyclopentane, 1,1-ethylpropylcyclopentane, and n-butylcyclohexane. When the reaction is carried out with rare earth salts and Et{sub 2}-AlCl or Et{sub 3}Al, only open-chain oligomers are obtained. There is no significant influence observed on product selectivity using other rare earth salts. Only the activity is affected. To understand the products formed a metallacycloalkane mechanism is proposed.

  8. Design Principles for Heteroatom-Doped Carbon Nanomaterials as Highly Efficient Catalysts for Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenghang; Li, Mingtao; Zhang, Lipeng; Dai, Liming; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-11-18

    Oxygen reduction reaction/oxygen evolution reaction (ORR/OER) catalytic activities of p-orbital heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials are demonstrated to correlate to the combination of the electron affinity and electronegativity of doping elements, which serves as an activity descriptor for the entire family of p-block element dopants. Such a descriptor has predictive power and enables effective design of new bifunctional catalysts with enhanced ORR/OER activities. PMID:26418520

  9. Palladium nanoparticles on hierarchical carbon surfaces: A new architecture for robust nano-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijwani, Hema; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2012-12-01

    Surface activity of heterogeneous catalysts can be enhanced if their sizes are reduced to nanometers. However, loose nanomaterials pose potential health and environmental risks. This issue has been addressed by attachment of palladium nanoparticles on multi-scale hierarchical carbon supports that have exceptionally high surface area per volume. The supports consist of porous carbon foam whose surface has been either chemically functionalized, or morphologically altered by grafting of carbon-nanotubes. It is seen that whereas chemical functionalization does provide some increase in nano-catalyst loading, morphological modification is significantly more powerful. It has the potential to create orders of magnitude increase in catalytic activity within the same overall volume. The synthesis techniques have been investigated in sufficient detail to provide significant control over the density and size of nanoparticles. Abundant distribution of nanoparticles is observed even within the deeper pores of the microcellular foam. The nanoparticles are seen to be metallic Pd having face centered cubic structure. Additionally, the nano-particles and nanotubes are durable, and remain attached to the base support after long periods of rapid rotation in water. These robust hybrid structures show promise in future applications such as sensors, water purification systems, fuel cell electrodes and hydrogen storage sponges.

  10. Facile synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon from ionic liquid as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    She, Yiyi; Lu, Zhouguang; Ni, Meng; Li, Li; Leung, Michael K H

    2015-04-01

    Developing metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a great challenge in the development of fuel cells. Nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon with remarkably high nitrogen content up to 13.00 at % was successfully fabricated by pyrolysis of homogeneous mixture of exfoliated graphitic flakes and ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bimi][Tf2N]). The exfoliated graphite flakes served as a structure-directing substance as well as additional carbon source in the fabrication. It was demonstrated that the use of graphite flakes increased the nitrogen doping level, optimized the composition of active nitrogen configurations, and enlarged the specific surface area of the catalysts. Electrochemical characterizations revealed that the N and S codoped carbon fabricated by this method exhibited superior catalytic activities toward ORR under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Particularly in alkaline solution, the current catalyst compared favorably to the conventional 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst via four-electron transfer pathway with better ORR selectivity. The excellent catalytic activity was mainly ascribed to high nitrogen doping content, appropriate constitution of active nitrogen configurations, large specific surface area, and synergistic effect of N and S codoping. PMID:25781628

  11. Growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by using ceria as catalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojun; Peng, Fei; Yang, Feng; He, Xiaohui; Huang, Huixin; Luo, Da; Yang, Juan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Haichao; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Yan

    2014-02-12

    The growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) on flat substrates is essential for the application of SWNTs in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We developed a flexible strategy to selectively grow s-SWNTs on silicon substrates using a ceria-supported iron or cobalt catalysts. Ceria, which stores active oxygen, plays a crucial role in the selective growth process by inhibiting the formation of metallic SWNTs via oxidation. The so-produced ultralong s-SWNT arrays are immediately ready for building field effect transistors. PMID:24392872

  12. Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon as effective metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yucheng; Zhou, Weijia; Li, Ligui; Huang, Shaobin; Chen, Shaowei

    2015-03-01

    Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon was synthesized by a facile procedure based on simple pyrolysis of water hyacinth (eichhornia crassipes) at controlled temperatures (600-800 °C) with ZnCl2 as an activation reagent. The obtained porous carbon exhibited a BET surface area up to 950.6 m2 g-1, and various forms of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic and graphitic) were found to be incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton. Electrochemical measurements showed that the nitrogen self-doped carbons possessed a high electrocatalytic activity for ORR in alkaline media that was highly comparable to that of commercial 20% Pt/C catalysts. Experimentally, the best performance was identified with the sample prepared at 700 °C, with the onset potential at ca. +0.98 V vs. RHE, that possessed the highest concentrations of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogens among the series. Moreover, the porous carbon catalysts showed excellent long-term stability and much enhanced methanol tolerance, as compared to commercial Pt/C. The performance was also markedly better than or at least comparable to the leading results in the literature based on biomass-derived carbon catalysts for ORR. The results suggested a promising route based on economical and sustainable biomass towards the development and engineering of value-added carbon materials as effective metal-free cathode catalysts for alkaline fuel cells.Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon was synthesized by a facile procedure based on simple pyrolysis of water hyacinth (eichhornia crassipes) at controlled temperatures (600-800 °C) with ZnCl2 as an activation reagent. The obtained porous carbon exhibited a BET surface area up to 950.6 m2 g-1, and various forms of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic and graphitic) were found to be incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton. Electrochemical measurements showed that the nitrogen self-doped carbons possessed a high electrocatalytic activity for ORR in alkaline media

  13. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, G G

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu{sub 2}O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu{sub 2}O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu{sub 2}O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu{sub 2}O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  14. Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Wang, Shaoyun; Yan, Jun; Cong, Lijie; Chen, Ye; Xi, Hongyuan

    2014-02-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene (PNCN) was used as an alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here we report a novel, low-cost, scalable, synthetic method for preparation of PNCN via the carbonization of graphite oxide-polyaniline hybrid (GO-PANI), subsequently followed by KOH activation treatment. Due to its high concentration of nitrogen and high specific surface area, PNCN exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for ORR. As a result, the maximum power density of 1159.34mWm(-2) obtained with PNCN catalyst was higher than that of Pt/C catalyst (858.49mWm(-2)) in a MFC. Therefore, porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet could be a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs. PMID:24239870

  15. TiN@nitrogen-doped carbon supported Pt nanoparticles as high-performance anode catalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Li; Gan, Mengyu; Fu, Shenna; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, TiN@nitrogen-doped carbons (NDC) composed of a core-shell structure are successfully prepared through self-assembly and pyrolysis treatment using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as coupling agent, polyaniline as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Subsequently, TiN@NDC supporting Pt nanoparticles (Pt/TiN@NDC) are obtained by a microwave-assisted polyol process. The nitrogen-containing functional groups and TiN nanoparticles play a critical role in decreasing the average particle size of Pt and improving the electrocatalytic activity of Pt/TiN@NDC. Transmission electron microscope results reveal that Pt nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the TiN@NDC surface with a narrow particle size ranging from 1 to 3 nm in diameter. Moreover, the Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst shows significantly improved catalytic activity and high durability for methanol electrooxidation in comparison with Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, revealed by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Strikingly, this novel Pt/TiN@NDC catalyst reveals a better CO tolerance related to Pt/NDC and commercial Pt/C catalysts, which due to the bifunctional mechanism and strong metal-support interaction between Pt and TiN@NDC. In addition, the probable reaction steps for the electrooxidation of CO adspecies on Pt NPs on the basis of the bifunctional mechanism are also proposed. These results indicate that the TiN@NDC is a promising catalyst support for methanol electrooxidation.

  16. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  17. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  18. Highly Active Multidentate Ligand-Based Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Ya; Yang, Haishen; Zhu, Chengpu; Ortiz, Michael; Okochi, Kenji D; Shoemaker, Richard; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Alkyne metathesis catalysts composed of molybdenum(VI) propylidyne and multidentate tris(2-hydroxylbenzyl)methane ligands have been developed, which exhibit excellent stability (remains active in solution for months at room temperature), high activity, and broad functional-group tolerance. The homodimerization and cyclooligomerization of monopropynyl or dipropynyl substrates, including challenging heterocycle substrates (e.g., pyridine), proceed efficiently at 40-55 °C in a closed system. The ligand structure and catalytic activity relationship has been investigated, which shows that the ortho groups of the multidentate phenol ligands are critical to the stability and activity of such a catalyst system. PMID:27113640

  19. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S,; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-05-24

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are as follows: A fullerene soot (obtained from Ulvick Labs) and an extracted soot (obtained from MER) were treated with carbon dioxide to obtain high surface area soots of greater than 600 m{sup 2}/g; A palladium-C{sub 60} complex was synthesized and characterized by a surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) instrument; Fullerene soot and Norit-A carbon were tested as catalysts for methane activation and the order of reactivity was found to be Soot > Norit-A > no catalyst; Increases in surface area of the soot did not significantly alter the methane conversion activity; Hydrogen and helium were tested as diluents, with helium causing an increase in selectivity towards C{sub 2} hydrocarbons for the fullerene soot catalyzed reactions; and The MER extracted soot was found to be more reactive towards methane conversion, but less selective towards C{sub 2} hydrocarbons than the Ulvick fullerene soot.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Transition Metal Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Yura; Park, Eun-Sil; Mees, Karina; Park, Ho-Seon; Willert-Porada, Monika; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers were synthesized on transition metal (Fe, Co, Cu) catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The variations of thickness and surface of the fibers were investigated according to the concentration of the transition metal. In order to prepare the metal catalysts for synthesis, transition metal nitrate and copper nitrate at a weight ratio were dissolved in distilled water. The obtained catalyst precipitates were filtered and then dried for more than 24 hours at 110 degrees C. Carbon nanofibers were synthesized by using ethylene gas of carbon source by CVD after pulverization of the fully-dried catalyst precipitates. They were characterized by SEM, EDS, Raman, XRD, XPS and TG/DTA, and their specific surface area was measured by BET. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of the metal catalysts. Especially, uniform carbon nanofibers grew when the concentration ratio of Fe and Cu was 7:3, and that of Co and Cu was 6:4. Carbon nanofibers synthesized under such concentration conditions had the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts of different concentration ratios, and revealed high amorphicity as well as high specific surface area. PMID:26716326

  1. Growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes on glass substrate with an amorphous carbon catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Keun; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Dong; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Byungyou

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates with microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were used as a catalyst layer to grow metal-free CNTs. The a-C films were deposited on Corning glass substrates using RF magnetron sputtering with the use of a carbon target (99.99%) at room temperature. They were pretreated with hydrogen plasma using a microwave PECVD at 600 degrees C. Then, CNTs were prepared using microwave PECVD with a mixture of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The CNTs were grown at different substrate temperatures (400 degrees C, 500 degrees C, and 600 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Other conditions were fixed. The growth trends of CNTs against substrate temperature were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The structure of a-C catalyst layer and grown CNTs were measured by Raman spectroscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images showed that the CNTs had bamboo-like multi-walled structures. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed that the CNTs consisted of only carbon. PMID:22409050

  2. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  3. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2001-10-26

    There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx}1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

  4. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2000-11-17

    There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx} 1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

  5. Investigation of low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts. [for Spacelab atmosphere control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.; Katan, T.; Ray, C. D.; Lamparter, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon monoxide generation rates related to the use of commerical equipment in Spacelab, added to the normal metabolic and subsystem loads, will produce carbon monoxide levels in excess of the maximum allowable concentration. In connection with the sensitivity of carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts to poisoning at room temperature, catalysts for an oxidation of carbon monoxide at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that platinum and palladium are the only effective room temperature catalysts which are effective at 333 K. Hopcalite was ineffective at ambient temperatures, but converted CO with 100 percent efficiency at 333 K. Poisoning tests showed the noble metal catalysts to be very sensitive, and Hopcalite to be very resistant to poisoning.

  6. Composite catalysts supported on modified carbon substrates and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Branko N.; Subramanian, Nalini; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.

    2009-11-17

    A method of producing a composite carbon catalyst is generally disclosed. The method includes oxidizing a carbon precursor (e.g., carbon black). Optionally, nitrogen functional groups can be added to the oxidized carbon precursor. Then, the oxidized carbon precursor is refluxed with a non-platinum transitional metal precursor in a solution. Finally, the solution is pyrolyzed at a temperature of at least about 500.degree. C.

  7. An investigation of the effect of carbon support on ruthenium/carbon catalysts for lactic acid and butanone hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel R; Iqbal, Sarwat; Kondrat, Simon A; Lari, Giacomo M; Miedziak, Peter J; Morgan, David J; Parker, Stewart F; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-06-29

    A series of ruthenium catalysts supported on two different carbons were tested for the hydrogenation of lactic acid to 1,2-propanediol and butanone to 2-butanol. The properties of the carbon supports were investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and correlated with the properties of the ruthenium deposited onto the carbons by wet impregnation or sol-immobilisation. It was noted that the rate of butanone hydrogenation was highly dependent on the carbon support, while no noticeable difference in rates was observed between different catalysts for the hydrogenation of lactic acid. PMID:27079275

  8. Au/Ce0.72Zr0.18Pr0.1O2 nanodisperse catalyst for oxidation of carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, E. Yu.; Naumkin, A. V.; Mikhailichenko, A. I.; Batrakova, M. K.; Maslakov, K. I.; Revina, A. A.; Papkova, M. V.; Kon'kova, T. V.; Grunskii, V. N.; Gasparyan, M. D.; Karpovich, A. L.; Lizunova, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The nanodisperse Au/Ce0.72Zr0.18Pr0.1O2 catalysts for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide were synthesized. The compounds were identified by XRD, XPS, TEM, ISP-MS, and gas chromatography. The samples containing gold nanoparticles obtained by radiation chemical reduction in reverse micellar dispersion exhibited higher activity than the catalysts obtained by deposition-precipitation (DP) despite the higher content of the active component.

  9. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  10. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1994-11-28

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are summarized below. In addition, the authors recently presented work on the use of fullerene based catalysts for methane activation at the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC this Fall. The paper is found in Appendix A of this report.

  11. Effect of nitrogen post-doping on a commercial platinum-ruthenium/carbon anode catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, April R.; Wood, Kevin N.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Joghee, Prabhuram; Olson, Tim S.; Bender, Guido; Dinh, Huyen N.; Gennett, Thomas; Richards, Ryan M.; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    This work investigates the effects of after-the-fact chemical modification of a state-of-the-art commercial carbon-supported PtRu catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). A commercial PtRu/C (JM HiSPEC-10000) catalyst is post-doped with nitrogen by ion-implantation, where "post-doped" denotes nitrogen doping after metal is carbon-supported. Composition and performance of the PtRu/C catalyst post-modified with nitrogen at several dosages are evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), rotating disk electrode (RDE), and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for DMFC. Overall, implantation at high dosage results in 16% higher electrochemical surface area and enhances performance, specifically in the mass transfer region. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) results show that after 5000 cycles of accelerated durability testing to high potential, the modified catalyst retains 34% more electrochemical surface area (ECSA) than the unmodified catalyst. The benefits of nitrogen post-doping are further substantiated by DMFC durability studies (carried out for 425 h), where the MEA with the modified catalyst exhibits higher surface area and performance stability in comparison to the MEA with unmodified catalyst. These results demonstrate that post-doping of nitrogen in a commercial PtRu/C catalyst is an effective approach, capable of improving the performance of available best-in-class commercial catalysts.

  12. Decreased methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide using zeolite/cobalt-manganese oxide composite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Johns, M; Landon, P; Alderson, T; Hutchings, G J

    2001-12-01

    A composite catalyst comprising a physical mixture of a zeolite and a cobalt/manganese oxide Fischer-Tropsch catalyst decreases the formation of methane in the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide without significantly affecting conversion. PMID:12240011

  13. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times.

  14. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times. PMID:26578426

  15. Conversion of biomass-derived sorbitol to glycols over carbon-materials supported Ru-based catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingcui; Guan, Jing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xicheng; Mu, Xindong; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) supported on activated carbon (AC) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was carried out in the hydrogenolysis of sorbitol to ethylene glycol (EG) and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) under the promotion of tungsten (WOx) species and different bases. Their catalytic activities and glycols selectivities strongly depended on the support properties and location of Ru on CNTs, owning to the altered metal-support interactions and electronic state of ruthenium. Ru located outside of the tubes showed excellent catalytic performance than those encapsulated inside the nanotubes. Additionally, the introduction of WOx into Ru/CNTs significantly improved the hydrogenolysis activities, and a complete conversion of sorbitol with up to 60.2% 1,2-PD and EG yields was obtained on RuWOx/CNTs catalyst upon addition of Ca(OH)2. Stability study showed that this catalyst was highly stable against leaching and poisoning and could be recycled several times. PMID:26578426

  16. Growth of metal-catalyst-free nitrogen-doped metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Cheng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-10-21

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using SiOx nanoparticles as a catalyst and ethylenediamine as the source of both carbon and nitrogen. The N-doped SWCNTs have a mean diameter of 1.1 nm and a narrow diameter range, with 92% of them having diameters from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Multi-wavelength laser Raman spectra and temperature-dependent electrical resistance indicate that the SWCNT sample is enriched with metallic nanotubes. These N-doped SWCNTs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and highly selective and sensitive sensing ability for dopamine detection. PMID:25189467

  17. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1993-08-31

    The objectives of this project are to test novel fullerene based catalysts for application in methane activation. Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with the synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with the testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with the evaluation of the results and technical reporting requirements. This quarter we prepared fuuerene soot and metallized fullerene soot and rebuilt our experimental testing system to be more suitable for the evaluation of the catalysts. The results and accomplishments are presented.

  18. Influence of the ionomer/carbon ratio for low-Pt loading catalyst layer prepared by reactive spray deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haoran; Roller, Justin M.; Mustain, William E.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-06-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst layers (CLs) were fabricated by direct deposition of the catalyst onto Nafion® membranes using reactive spray deposition technique (RSDT) to reduce platinum (Pt) loading and reduce the number of catalyst synthesis and processing steps. Nitrogen adsorption, mercury porosimetry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the effects of ionomer/carbon ratio (I/C) on the surface area, pore structure and morphology of the CLs; cyclic voltammetry and polarization curves were used to determine the electrochemically active area (ECSA) and PEMFC performance. The BET surface area and pore volume of the CLs decreased continuously with increasing I/C ratio regardless of the catalyst loading. Bimodal distribution of pores with diameters ranging from 1.7 to 10 nm and from 30 to 100 nm were observed from the pore-size distribution of the CLs. The catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) with an I/C ratio of 0.3 showed the highest ECSA of 62 m2 gPt-1 and the best performance at 0.6 V for oxygen (1400 mA cm-2) and air (650 mA cm-2) among all RSDT samples. The optimum I/C ratio is lower compared to ink-based methods, and Pt nanoparticles showed improved distribution on the carbon surface. The RSDT process shows promise in achieving better ionomer coverage and penetration in the CL microstructure, enhancing the performance of low Pt-loading PEMFCs.

  19. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  20. Cationic zinc enolates as highly active catalysts for acrylate polymerization.

    PubMed

    Garner, Logan E; Zhu, Hongping; Hlavinka, Mark L; Hagadorn, John R; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2006-11-22

    Unprecedented cationic zinc enolates have been generated by a novel activation route involving the amido to imino ligand transformation with B(C6F5)3, structurally characterized, and utilized as highly active catalysts for the production of high molecular weight polyacrylates at ambient temperature. PMID:17105289

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Characterization of the activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Marcelo S.; Santos, Rudye K. S.; Assaf, Elisabete M.; Assaf, José M.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    This paper reports results of studies of the catalytic activity and stability of supported cobalt catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol. Co/Al 2O 3, Co/SiO 2, and Co/MgO catalysts were prepared by an impregnation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The results showed the presence of Co 3O 4 and CoO x species interacting with Al 2O 3 or MgO and formed after a calcination step. It was evident that only Co 0 sites are active for the steam reforming of ethanol. All materials showed high levels of ethanol conversion, with molar yields of about 70% of hydrogen and 30% of CO+CO 2+CH 4 in the gaseous mixture. The Co/Al 2O 3 catalyst also produced ethylene through a dehydration reaction of ethanol. It is proposed that the methane formation on Co/SiO 2 catalysts occurs by methanation of CO and by ethanol decomposition. After 9 h of reaction, 14-24% (w/w) of carbon was deposited on all catalysts, indicating that a well characterized deactivation of the materials is due to coke deposition.

  3. Hydrolysis of Cellulose by a Mesoporous Carbon-Fe2(SO4)3/γ-Fe2O3 Nanoparticle-Based Solid Acid Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Watanabe, Koki; Fukumi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    Carbon-based solid acid catalysts have shown significant potential in a wide range of applications, and they have been successfully synthesized using simple processes. Magnetically separable mesoporous carbon composites also have enormous potential, especially in separation and adsorption technology. However, existing techniques have been unable to produce a magnetically separable mesoporous solid acid catalyst because no suitable precursors have been identified. Herein we describe a magnetically separable, mesoporous solid acid catalyst synthesized from a newly developed mesoporous carbon-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle composite. This material exhibits an equivalent acid density and catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose, to that of the cellulose-derived conventional catalyst. Since it is magnetically separable, this material can be readily recovered and reused, potentially reducing the environmental impact of industrial processes to which it is applied.

  4. Hydrolysis of Cellulose by a Mesoporous Carbon-Fe2(SO4)3/γ-Fe2O3 Nanoparticle-Based Solid Acid Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Watanabe, Koki; Fukumi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based solid acid catalysts have shown significant potential in a wide range of applications, and they have been successfully synthesized using simple processes. Magnetically separable mesoporous carbon composites also have enormous potential, especially in separation and adsorption technology. However, existing techniques have been unable to produce a magnetically separable mesoporous solid acid catalyst because no suitable precursors have been identified. Herein we describe a magnetically separable, mesoporous solid acid catalyst synthesized from a newly developed mesoporous carbon-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle composite. This material exhibits an equivalent acid density and catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose, to that of the cellulose-derived conventional catalyst. Since it is magnetically separable, this material can be readily recovered and reused, potentially reducing the environmental impact of industrial processes to which it is applied. PMID:26856604

  5. Constant-distance mode SECM as a tool to visualize local electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Michaela; Erichsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidimensional shearforce-based constant-distance mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D SF/CD-SECM) was utilized for the investigation of the activity distribution of oxygen reduction catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt model catalyst powders have been immobilized in recessed microelectrodes and compared to a spot preparation technique. Microcavities serve as platform for the binder-free catalyst sample preparation exhibiting beneficial properties for constant-distance mode SECM imaging concerning modified surface area and catalyst loading. The integration of the redox competition mode of SECM into the detection scheme of the 4D SF/CD mode is demonstrated for specifically adapting high-resolution SECM experiments to powder-based catalyst preparations. PMID:24600538

  6. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  7. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  8. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanofiber Composite as an Efficient Metal-Free Cathode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Saito, Nagahiro; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon materials are currently considered at the forefront of potential alternative cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cell technology. Despite numerous efforts in this area over the past decade, rational design and development of a new catalyst system based on nitrogen-doped carbon materials via an innovative approach still present intriguing challenges in ORR catalysis research. Herein, a new kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle-carbon nanofiber (NCNP-CNF) composite with highly efficient and stable ORR catalytic activity has been developed via a new approach assisted by a solution plasma process. The integration of NCNPs and CNFs by the solution plasma process can lead to a unique morphological feature and modify physicochemical properties. The NCNP-CNF composite exhibits a significantly enhanced ORR activity through a dominant four-electron pathway in an alkaline solution. The enhancement in ORR activity of NCNP-CNF composite can be attributed to the synergistic effects of good electron transport from highly graphitized CNFs as well as abundance of exposed catalytic sites and meso/macroporosity from NCNPs. More importantly, NCNP-CNF composite reveals excellent long-term durability and high tolerance to methanol crossover compared with those of a commercial 20 wt % supported on Vulcan XC-72. We expect that NCNP-CNF composite prepared by this synthetic approach can be a promising metal-free cathode catalyst candidate for ORR in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26908214

  9. Preparation of Carbon-Platinum-Ceria and Carbon-Platinum-Cerium catalysts and its application in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell: Hydrogen, Methanol, and Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Blas, Rolando Pedro

    This thesis is focused on fuel cells using hydrogen, methanol and ethanol as fuel. Also, in the method of preparation of catalytic material for the anode: Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD) and impregnation method using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a chelating agent. The first part of the thesis describes the general knowledge about Hydrogen Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HPEMFC),Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) and Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell (DEFC), as well as the properties of Cerium and CeO2 (Ceria). The second part of the thesis describes the preparation of catalytic material by Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD). SFD was utilized to deposit Pt and ceria simultaneously onto gas diffusion layers. The Pt-ceria catalyst deposited by SFD exhibited higher methanol oxidation activity compared to the platinum catalyst alone. The linear sweep traces of the cathode made for the methanol cross over study indicate that Pt-Ceria/C as the anode catalyst, due to its better activity for methanol, improves the fuel utilization, minimizing the methanol permeation from anode to cathode compartment. The third and fourth parts of the thesis describe the preparation of material catalytic material Carbon-Platinum-Cerium by a simple and cheap impregnation method using EDTA as a chelating agent to form a complex with cerium (III). This preparation method allows the mass production of the material catalysts without additional significant cost. Fuel cell polarization and power curves experiments showed that the Carbon-Platinum-Cerium anode materials exhibited better catalytic activity than the only Vulcan-Pt catalysts for DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. In the case of Vulcan-20%Pt-5%w Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-20%Pt in DMFC. In the case of Vulcan-40% Pt-doped Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-40% Pt in DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. Finally, I propose a theory that explains the reason why the

  10. Green chemistry: Biodiesel made with sugar catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Masakazu; Takagaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Mai; Kondo, Junko N.; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Domen, Kazunari; Hara, Michikazu

    2005-11-01

    The production of diesel from vegetable oil calls for an efficient solid catalyst to make the process fully ecologically friendly. Here we describe the preparation of such a catalyst from common, inexpensive sugars. This high-performance catalyst, which consists of stable sulphonated amorphous carbon, is recyclable and its activity markedly exceeds that of other solid acid catalysts tested for `biodiesel' production.

  11. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature- staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1991-09-01

    The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation. Liquefaction experiments of solvent-treated and untreated Blind Canyon (DECS-6) and Texas lignite (DECS-1) have been performed using ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) and bis (dicarbonylcyclopentadienyl) iron (CPI) as catalyst precursors using temperature-staged conditions (275{degrees}C, 30 min; 425{degrees}C, 30 min). Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis was carried out for each coal and for selected residues. 12 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Sulfur, trace nitrogen and iron codoped hierarchically porous carbon foams as synergistic catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Jiang, Congcong; Teng, Chao; Ren, Guangyuan; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2014-12-10

    Sulfur, trace nitrogen and iron codoped, hierarchically porous carbon foams (HPCFs) were fabricated by directly pyrolyzing sulfur-enriched conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene)-polystyrenesulfonic acid (PEDOT-PSS) aerogels under argon atmosphere. This simple pyrolysis treatment results in the molecular rearrangement of heteroatom sulfur, adjacent carbons and trace nitrogen/iron from oxidants to form active catalytic sites of HPCFs. At the same time, the high porosity of HPCFs provides the large surface area for the uniform distribution of active sites, and allows rapid oxygen transport and diffusion. As a result, these HPCFs exhibit the enhanced catalytic performances for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) via a direct four-electron reduction pathway in alkaline electrolyte. Besides, they also display a higher stability and better methanol/CO tolerance than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which makes them promising low cost, non-precious-metal ORR catalysts for practical application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25402945

  13. Nickel-carbon nanocomposites prepared using castor oil as precursor: A novel catalyst for ethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, Neftalí L. V.; Garcia, Irene T. S.; Raubach, Cristiane W.; Krolow, Mateus; Santos, Cláudia C. G.; Probst, Luiz F. D.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    A novel and simple method to prepare nickel-based catalysts for ethanol steam reforming is proposed. The present method was developed using castor oil as a precursor. The results clarify that the nickel-carbon (Ni/C) catalyst has a high activity for ethanol steam reforming. It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be modified according to the experimental conditions employed. Moreover, it is interesting to note that the increase in the catalytic activity of the Ni/C nanocomposite over time, at 500 and 600 °C of reaction temperature, may be associated with the formation of filamentous carbon. The preliminary results indicate that the novel methodology used, led to the obtainment of materials with important properties that can be extended to applications in different catalytic process.

  14. Metal-free selenium doped carbon nanotube/graphene networks as a synergistically improved cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhiping; Nie, Huagui; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-09-01

    The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to synergistically improve ORR activity. More importantly, it is also suggested that the development of graphite materials doped with Se or other heteroatoms of large size will open up a new route to obtain ideal NPMCs with realistic value for fuel cell applications.The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to

  15. N,P-Codoped Carbon Networks as Efficient Metal-free Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Qu, Liangti; Shi, Gaoquan; Liu, Jiangyong; Chen, Jianfeng; Dai, Liming

    2016-02-01

    The high cost and scarcity of noble metal catalysts, such as Pt, have hindered the hydrogen production from electrochemical water splitting, the oxygen reduction in fuel cells and batteries. Herein, we developed a simple template-free approach to three-dimensional porous carbon networks codoped with nitrogen and phosphorus by pyrolysis of a supermolecular aggregate of self-assembled melamine, phytic acid, and graphene oxide (MPSA/GO). The pyrolyzed MPSA/GO acted as the first metal-free bifunctional catalyst with high activities for both oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution. Zn-air batteries with the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO air electrode showed a high peak power density (310 W g(-1) ) and an excellent durability. Thus, the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO is a promising bifunctional catalyst for renewable energy technologies, particularly regenerative fuel cells. PMID:26709954

  16. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media. PMID:27389659

  17. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  18. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  19. Electrocatalytic properties of carbon-supported Pt-Ru catalysts with the high alloying degree for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    A series of carbon-supported bimetallic Pt-Ru catalysts with high alloying degree and different Pt/Ru atomic ratio have been prepared by a chemical reduction method in the H 2O/ethanol/tetrahydrofuran (THF) mixture solvent. The structural and electronic properties of catalysts are characterized using X-ray reflection (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrooxidation of formic acid on these Pt-Ru nanoparticles are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and CO-stripping measurements. The results of electrochemical measurements illustrate that the alloying degree and Pt/Ru atomic ratio of Pt-Ru catalyst play an important role in the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Ru/C catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation due to the bifunctional mechanism and the electronic effect. Since formic acid is an intermediate in the methanol electrooxidation on Pt electrode in acidic electrolyte, the observation provides an additional fundamental understanding of the structure-activity relationship of Pt-Ru catalyst for methanol electrooxidation.

  20. Ultrafine Cobalt Catalysts on Covalent Carbon Nitride Frameworks for Oxygenic Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guigang; Zang, Shaohong; Lin, Lihua; Lan, Zhi-An; Li, Guosheng; Wang, Xinchen

    2016-01-27

    The rational cooperation of sustainable catalysts with suitable light-harvesting semiconductors to fabricate photosynthetic device/machinery has been regarded as an ideal technique to alleviate the current worldwide energy and environmental issues. Cobalt based species (e.g., Co-Pi, Co3O4, and Co-cubene) have attracted particular attentions because they are earth-abundant, cost-acceptable, and more importantly, it shows comparable water oxidation activities to the noble metal based catalysts (e.g., RuO2, IrO2). In this contribution, we compared two general cocatalysts modification strategies, based on the surface depositing and bulk doping of ultrafine cobalt species into the sustainable graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) polymer networks for oxygenic photosynthesis by splitting water into oxygen, electrons, and protons. The chemical backbone of g-C3N4 does not alter after both engineering modifications; however, in comparison with the bulk doping, the optical and electronic properties of the surface depositing samples are efficiently promoted, and the photocatalytic water oxidation activities are increased owing to much more exposed active sites, reduced overpotential for oxygen evolution and the accelerated interface charge mobility. This paper underlines the advantage of surface engineering to establish efficient advanced polymeric composites for water oxidation, and it opens new insights into the architectural design of binary hybrid photocatalysts with high reactivity and further utilizations in the fields of energy and environment. PMID:26728317

  1. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  2. Supporting PtRu catalysts on various types of carbon nanomaterials for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Masahiro; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Ue, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Kazuki; Muramoto, Hirokazu

    2013-04-01

    PtRu catalysts were supported on five types of carbon nanomaterials of various shapes, sizes, and graphitic properties and the catalyst supports evaluated. The carbon nanomaterial used included three types of nanoparticles: Arc Black (AcB), Vulcan XC-72 (Vulcan) and graphene oxide (GO), and two types of nanofibers: carbon nanocoil (CNC) and carbon nanotube (CNT). Pt and Ru were supported by the reduction method using sodium borohydride. The metal catalyst loading was confirmed by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and XRD revealed that the diameter of PtRu catalyst nanoparticles loaded on reduced GO (rGO) and AcB were ~2 nm and was the smallest among all the samples. Shifts in Pt (111) XRD peaks of CNC and CNT were larger than those of AcB, Vulcan, and rGO. These results suggest that the diameters of catalyst nanoparticles became smaller by loading on the carbon nanoparticles with a large surface area including rGO, AcB, and Vulcan. Loading onto the carbon nanofibers enhanced the degree of PtRu alloying.

  3. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Du, Y.; Wu, H.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon-based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with evaluation of the results and technical reporting. Due to money constraints we have not done any technical work during this period. However, we hope to continue our work and produce a final report including recommendations for future research when funds are available.

  4. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by High Melting Point Metal Oxide Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yang; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    We report on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from Co oxide catalysts. The concept is using the relatively lower mobility of metal oxide (than metal) to suppress catalyst aggregation at high temperatures. Compared to the SWNTs grown by pre-reduced catalysts, SWNTs grown from oxidized Co catalysts have shown narrower diameter distribution and smaller average diameter. Different growth parameters are discussed regarding the resulting morphology of SWNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the information that Co catalysts are transformed to Co3O4 after reduction-calcination process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicate that Co3O4 has decomposed to CoO before growth at a typical growth temperature (800 ºC) in Ar atmosphere. We propose that CoO has higher melting point than Co and thus is more stable during the growth. Our results indicate that besides the bimetallic catalysts, monometallic catalytic system could also be useful in stabilizing the catalysts to grow chirality-specific SWNTs by transforming the relatively low melting point metal catalysts to high melting point metal oxide catalysts. Yang Qian was supported through ``Global Leader Program for Social Design and Management''.

  5. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction. PMID:24020801

  6. Ceramic anode catalyst for dry methane type molten carbonate fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, T.; Yanase, A.; Goto, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kondo, M.

    Oxide catalyst materials for methane oxidation were examined in order to develop the anode electrode for molten carbonate type fuel cell (MCFC). As a primary selection, oxides such as lanthanum (La 2O 3) and samarium (Sm 2O 3) were selected from screening experiments of TPD, TG and tubular reactor. Composite materials of these oxides with titanium fine powder were assembled into a cell unit for MCFC as the anode electrode. Steady-state activities were observed with these anode electrode materials when hydrogen was used as a fuel. When methane was directly charged to anode as a fuel (dry methane operation), a power generation with steady state was observed on both lanthanum and samarium composites after gradual decrease of open circuit electromotive force (OCV) and closed circuit current (CCI). The steady-state activity held as long as 144 h of continuous operation.

  7. Fog-like fluffy structured N-doped carbon with a superior oxygen reduction reaction performance to a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

    PubMed

    You, Chenghang; Zen, Xiaoyuan; Qiao, Xiaochang; Liu, Fangfang; Shu, Ting; Du, Li; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2015-02-28

    A high-performance N-doped carbon catalyst with a fog-like, fluffy structure was prepared through pyrolyzing a mixture of polyacrylonitrile, melamine and iron chloride. The catalyst exhibits an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, with a half-wave potential 27 mV more positive than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst (-0.120 vs. -0.147 V) and a higher diffusion-limiting current density than that of Pt/C (5.60 vs. 5.33 mA cm(-2)) in an alkaline medium. Moreover, it also shows outstanding methanol tolerance, remarkable stability and nearly 100% selectivity for the four-electron ORR process. To our knowledge, it is one of the most active doped carbon ORR catalysts in alkaline media to date. By comparing catalysts derived from precursors containing different amounts of melamine, we found that the added melamine not only gives the catalyst a fluffy structure but also modifies the N content and the distribution of N species in the catalyst, which we believe to be the origins for the catalyst's excellent ORR performance. PMID:25648746

  8. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  9. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  10. Stack growth of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2015-04-01

    The Letter reports another approach to grow vertically aligned millimeter length multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapor deposition technique. In this stack growth, the first grown MWCNT layer is observe to have been lift-off from the substrate surface by the newly grown underneath layer as a result of the diffusion of iron catalyst and carbon source through the first layer. The first grown layer acts as a permeable membrane allowing the catalyst vapor and carbon to reach the bottom layer and the top surface of the substrate, resulting in the growth of another layer of MWCNT underneath it.

  11. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m2 g-1) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates.

  12. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m2 g−1) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates. PMID:26912370

  13. Iridium nanoparticles supported on hierarchical porous N-doped carbon: an efficient water-tolerant catalyst for bio-alcohol condensation in water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Chen, Xiufang; Xu, Guoqiang; Guan, Jing; Cao, Quan; Dong, Bo; Qi, Yunfei; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbons were synthesized successfully by a controllable one-pot method using glucose and dicyandiamide as carbon source and nitrogen source via hydrothermal carbonization process. The nitrogen-doped materials, possessing high nitrogen content (up to 7 wt%), large surface area (>320 m(2) g(-1)) and excellent hierarchical nanostructure, were employed as catalyst supports for immobilization of iridium nanoparticles for bio-alcohol condensation in water. The introduction of nitrogen atoms into the carbon framework significantly improved iridium nanoparticles dispersion and stabilization. The novel iridium catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity in the aqueous phase condensation of butanol, offering high butanol conversion of 45% with impressive 2-ethylhexanol selectivity of 97%. The heterogeneous catalysts had great advantages of easy recovery and high catalytic stability. The outstanding catalytic performance could be attributed to excellent dispersion of iridium nanoparticles, stronger iridium-support interactions and interaction of nitrogen species with alcohol substrates. PMID:26912370

  14. A simple synthesis method of sulfur-free Fe-N-C catalyst witih high ORR activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhongfen; Johnston, Christina M; Zelenay, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    To try to deconvolute which factors affect the activity and durability of metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) type non-precious catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), M-N-C catalysts based on ion chloride, polyaniline (PANI) and Ketjen Black carbon support were synthesized using different synthetic conditions. The catalysts were characterized electrochemically and tested as cathodes for Hydrogen fuel cells. PANI is usually chemically oxidative polymerized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant. To eliminate sulfur in the synthesized catalysts, a simple synthesis method using ion chloride as oxidant for aniline polymerization was developed. Two different aniline polymerization conditions led to very different product morphologies. Synthesized at low initial proton concentration, the final product was composed of dense micrometer sized particles. A decomposable salt was found to be able to prohibit PANI cross linking during the drying and annealing process and thus led to porous product. The porous catalyst has much higher ORR activity than the dense product due to more accessible active sites. Synthesized at high proton concentration, the catalyst appeared to be porous. The decomposable salt treatment did not make too much improvement in the porous structure and electrochemical activity. However, fuel cell testing using air as cathode feeder indicates that the salt treatment improves mass transfer in the cathode layer. Catalyst synthesized using this simple method has performance comparable to our state-of-the art catalyst synthesized in a much more complicated procedure. The factor that sulfur sources are completely eliminated in the synthesis suggests that sulfur is not necessary for the ORR catalysis activity.

  15. Surface texture and physicochemical characterization of mesoporous carbon--wrapped Pd-Fe catalysts for low-temperature CO catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Han, Weiliang; Zhang, Guodong; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Gongxuan; Tang, Zhicheng

    2015-11-21

    In this paper, mesoporous carbon (meso-C) with three-dimensional mesoporous channels was synthesized through a nanocasting route using three-dimensional mesoporous silica KIT-6 as the template. Mesoporous carbon wrapped Pd-Fe nanocomposite catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The effects of the experimental conditions, such as pH value, Fe loading content and calcination temperature, on CO oxidation were studied in detail. The prepared Pd-Fe/meso-C catalysts showed excellent catalytic activity after optimizing the experimental conditions. The surface tetravalent Pd content, existing forms of Fe species, surface chemical adsorbed oxygen concentration, and pore channels of mesoporous carbon played vital roles in achieving the highest performance for the Pd-Fe/meso-C catalyst. The reaction pathway was conjectured according to the XPS analysis of the Pd-Fe/meso-C catalysts for CO oxidation, which maybe adhered to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood + redox mechanism. The effect of moisture on CO conversion was investigated, and the superior Pd-Fe/meso-C catalyst could maintain its activity beyond 12 h. This catalyst also showed excellent activity compared to the reported values in the existing literature. PMID:26456796

  16. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  17. An efficient hydrogenation catalyst in sulfuric acid for the conversion of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol: N-doped carbon with encapsulated molybdenum carbide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Dong, Zhen; Cai, Weimeng; Wang, Yongzheng; Fu, Teng; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Luming; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-23

    The transfer of catalytic function from molybdenum carbide to N-doped carbon has been tested by encapsulating molybdenum carbide with N-doped carbon using a one-pot preparation process. The outer layer of N-doped carbon, inert itself, exhibits high activity and excellent selectivity with molybdenum carbide as the catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol in sulfuric acid. PMID:27506592

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on Fe and Co catalysts during the first stages of ethanol chemical vapor deposition for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Oida, Satoshi; McFeely, Fenton R.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2011-03-15

    Optimized chemical vapor deposition processes for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can lead to the growth of dense, vertically aligned, mm-long forests of SWCNTs. Precise control of the growth process is however still difficult, mainly because of poor understanding of the interplay between catalyst, substrate and reaction gas. In this paper we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the interplay between Fe or Co catalysts, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates and ethanol during the first stages of SWCNT forest growth. With XPS we observe that ethanol oxidizes Fe catalysts at carbon nanotube (CNT) growth temperatures, which leads to reduced carbon nanotube growth. Ethanol needs to be decomposed by a hot filament or other technique to create a reducing atmosphere and reactive carbon species in order to grow vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from Fe catalysts. Furthermore, we show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, unlike SiO{sub 2}, plays an active role in CNT growth using ethanol CVD. From our study we conclude that metallic Fe on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most optimal catalyst/substrate combination for high-yield SWCNT forest growth, using hot filament CVD with ethanol as the carbon containing gas.

  19. Role of the catalyst in the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Perla B; Zhao, Jin; Huang, Shiping; Wang, Yixuan; Sakulchaicharoen, Nataphan; Resasco, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to analyze the physical state of the catalyst, and the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes under typical temperature and pressure conditions of their experimental synthesis, emphasizing the role of the catalyst/substrate interactions. It is found that a strong cluster/substrate interaction increases the cluster melting point, modifying the initial stages of carbon dissolution and precipitation on the cluster surface. Experiments performed on model Co-Mo catalysts clearly illustrate the existence of an initial period where the catalyst is formed and no nanotube growth is observed. To quantify the nature of the Co-Mo2C interaction, quantum density functional theory is applied to characterize structural and energetic features of small Co clusters deposited on a (001) Mo2C surface, revealing a strong attachment of Co-clusters to the Mo2C surface, which may increase the melting point of the cluster and prevent cluster sintering. PMID:16792351

  20. Nanoscale zirconia as a nonmetallic catalyst for graphitization of carbon and growth of single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Stephen A; Baumann, Theodore F; Bayer, Bernhard C; Blume, Raoul; Worsley, Marcus A; MoberlyChan, Warren J; Shaw, Elisabeth L; Schlögl, Robert; Hart, A John; Hofmann, Stephan; Wardle, Brian L

    2009-09-01

    We report that nanoparticulate zirconia (ZrO(2)) catalyzes both growth of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and graphitization of solid amorphous carbon. We observe that silica-, silicon nitride-, and alumina-supported zirconia on silicon nucleates single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes upon exposure to hydrocarbons at moderate temperatures (750 degrees C). High-pressure, time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of these substrates during carbon nanotube nucleation and growth shows that the zirconia catalyst neither reduces to a metal nor forms a carbide. Point-localized energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) confirms catalyst nanoparticles attached to CNTs are zirconia. We also observe that carbon aerogels prepared through pyrolysis of a Zr(IV)-containing resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer aerogel precursor at 800 degrees C contain fullerenic cage structures absent in undoped carbon aerogels. Zirconia nanoparticles embedded in these carbon aerogels are further observed to act as nucleation sites for multiwall carbon nanotube growth upon exposure to hydrocarbons at CVD growth temperatures. Our study unambiguously demonstrates that a nonmetallic catalyst can catalyze CNT growth by thermal CVD while remaining in an oxidized state and provides new insight into the interactions between nanoparticulate metal oxides and carbon at elevated temperatures. PMID:19663436

  1. Metal-free Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin as oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gyutae; Park, Joohyuk; Kim, Sun Tai; Shin, Dong-bin; Park, Noejung; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysts facilitating oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital components in advanced fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Here we report Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin and apply these easily scalable materials as metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR. These carbon nanosheets demonstrate highly comparable catalytic activity for ORR as well as better durability than commercial Vulcan carbon supported Pt catalysts in alkaline media. Physico-chemical characterization and theoretical calculations suggest that proper combination of graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen species with more exposed edge sites effectively facilitates a formation of superoxide, [O2(ad)](-), via one-electron transfer, thus increasing catalytic activities for ORR. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to expose more nitrogen doped edge sites by irregular stacked small sheets in developing better electrocatalysts for Zn-air batteries. These desirable architectures are embodied by an amphiphlilic gelatin mediated compatible synthetic strategy between hydrophobic carbon and aqueous water. PMID:24635744

  2. Tungsten Carbide Modified High Surface Area Carbon as Fuel Cell Catalyst Support

    SciTech Connect

    M Shao; B Merzougui; K Shoemaker; L Stolar; L Protsailo; Z Mellinger; I Hsu; J Chen

    2011-12-31

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  3. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  4. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Goldberg, Robert I.

    1987-04-07

    A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: and for olefinic hydrocarbons: where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  5. Iron encapsulated in boron and nitrogen codoped carbon nanotubes as synergistic catalysts for Fenton-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjin; Chen, Hao; Qin, Jiacheng; Wu, Guodong; Lian, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-09-15

    Iron nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated in B, N-codoped carbon nanotubes (Fe@C-BN) as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts were obtained by a simple and scalable pyrolysis method, and their performances were examined in the oxidative degradation of various organics in the presence of the different oxidants. The results showed that organic dyes can be effectively degraded by Fe@C-BN in the presence of peroxymonosulfate. Calcination temperature and mass of iron salt significantly affected the structures and performances of the catalysts. The effects of several reaction conditions, such as initial dye concentration, oxidant type (peroxymonosulfate, peroxydisulfate, and H2O2) and dosage, initial pH, inorganic anions, reaction temperature and dye types on oxidation as well as the stability of the composite were extensively evaluated in view of the practical applications. Through the investigation of reaction processes, HO(·) and SO4(·-) radicals were identified using quenching experiments. Owing to the synergistic effects between the iron NPs and B, N-doped carbon, Fe@C-BN catalysts intrinsically display an excellent catalytic activity for Fenton-like reaction. This study gives new insights into the design and preparation of iron NPs encapsulated in B, N-codoped carbon nanotubes as an effective strategy to enhance the overall catalytic activity. PMID:27267476

  6. Tip Growth Of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained By Pyrolyzation Of Camphor Oil With Zeolite Embedded With Fe/Ni/Mn Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Zainal, N. F. A.; Nik, S. F.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Highly efficient synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of camphor oil, on a zeolite support impregnated with Fe/Ni/Mn (molar ratio of Fe:Ni:Mn = 1:1:1) catalyst in the temperature range from 550-950° C by the thermal CVD method. Besides the surface fluidization of the catalyst nanoparticles themselves, assistance of the metal oxides embedded in zeolite supports is supposed to be responsible for high activity and selectivity of the Fe/Ni/Mn catalyst over which carbon source (camphor oil) successfully decomposes. The CNT yield was higher at 850° C and can be considered as the optimum deposition temperature. This result demonstrates that zeolite impregnated with the catalyst Fe/Ni/Mn is a suitable support for effective formation of CNTs. The morphological studies support `tip growth mechanism' for the growth of the CNT's in our case. The as-grown CNTs were characterized by FESEM and FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. N-doped carbon nanomaterials are durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Min; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, efficient, and durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a prerequisite for commercialization of the fuel cell technology. Along with intensive research efforts of more than half a century in developing nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to replace the expensive and scarce platinum-based catalysts, a new class of carbon-based, low-cost, metal-free ORR catalysts was demonstrated to show superior ORR performance to commercial platinum catalysts, particularly in alkaline electrolytes. However, their large-scale practical application in more popular acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells remained elusive because they are often found to be less effective in acidic electrolytes, and no attempt has been made for a single PEM cell test. We demonstrated that rationally designed, metal-free, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and their graphene composites exhibited significantly better long-term operational stabilities and comparable gravimetric power densities with respect to the best NPMC in acidic PEM cells. This work represents a major breakthrough in removing the bottlenecks to translate low-cost, metal-free, carbon-based ORR catalysts to commercial reality, and opens avenues for clean energy generation from affordable and durable fuel cells. PMID:26601132

  8. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1995-04-20

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that have been found to possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon-based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 deals with synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots, Task 2 with testing of the catalysts, and Task 3 with evaluation of the results and technical reporting. The results and accomplishments for this quarter are as follows: Reconstituted fullerene soot was prepared by adding C{sub 60} to a toluene-extracted Terrasimco fullerene soot; K-doped fullerene soots of different potassium concentrations were prepared; Fullerene soot doped with cesium was prepared by addition of cesium carbonate; The reconstituted fullerene soot was tested for methane activation. K-doped soots at different K concentrations were tested for methane activation. K-doped soot was examined for methane activation in the presence of co-feeds of either ethane or ethylene; a higher selectivity to C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons was observed for the K-soot than when these reactions were conducted using soot as a catalyst, or when thermally induced. The Cs-doped soot was tested for methane activation; the selectivity for hydrocarbons from the methane conversion catalyzed by this soot was found to be higher than catalyzed by fullerene soot but lower than by K-soot.

  9. Inkjet printing of carbon supported platinum 3-D catalyst layers for use in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, André D.; Kim, Edward Y.; Humes, Virgil P.; Kizuka, Jeremy; Thompson, Levi T.

    We present a method of using inkjet printing (IJP) to deposit catalyst materials onto gas diffusion layers (GDLs) that are made into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC). Existing ink deposition methods such as spray painting or screen printing are not well suited for ultra low (<0.5 mg Pt cm -2) loadings. The IJP method can be used to deposit smaller volumes of water based catalyst ink solutions with picoliter precision provided the solution properties are compatible with the cartridge design. By optimizing the dispersion of the ink solution we have shown that this technique can be successfully used with catalysts supported on different carbon black (i.e. XC-72R, Monarch 700, Black Pearls 2000, etc.). Our ink jet printed MEAs with catalyst loadings of 0.020 mg Pt cm -2 have shown Pt utilizations in excess of 16,000 mW mg -1 Pt which is higher than our traditional screen printed MEAs (800 mW mg -1 Pt). As a further demonstration of IJP versatility, we present results of a graded distribution of Pt/C catalyst structure using standard Johnson Matthey (JM) catalyst. Compared to a continuous catalyst layer of JM Pt/C (20% Pt), the graded catalyst structure showed enhanced performance.

  10. Nb-doped TiO2/carbon composite supports synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Keerthi; Neburchilov, Vladimir; Alzate, Vanesa; Baker, Ryan; Neagu, Roberto; Zhang, Jiujun; Campbell, Stephen; Ye, Siyu

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we report the use of both ultrasonic spray pyrolysis and microwave-assisted polyol reduction methods to synthesize Nb-doped TiO2/carbon (25 wt% Nb0.07Ti0.93O2/75 wt% carbon) composite supports and Pt0.62Pd0.38 alloy catalysts, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized supports and their Pt0.62Pd0.38 supported catalysts are evaluated using several methods including XRD, TEM, BET surface area analysis, TGA, as well as ICP-MS elemental analysis. The electronic conductivities and thermal/chemical stabilities of the supports are also evaluated with respect to their possible use as catalyst supports. Electrochemical measurements for oxygen reduction activity of the Pt0.62Pd0.38 alloy catalysts supported on oxide/carbon composites are also carried out in order to check their suitability for possible PEM fuel cell applications. The results show that 20wt%Pt0.62Pd0.38/25 wt%(Nb0.07Ti0.93O2)-75 wt%C catalysts exhibit enhanced mass activities compared to those of commercially available 48wt% Pt/C and home-made 20wt% Pt62Pd38/C catalysts.

  11. Removal of free fatty acid in Palm Fatty Acid Distillate using sulfonated carbon catalyst derived from biomass wastefor biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi; Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the esterification of PFAD using the sulfonatedcoconut shell biochar catalyst was studied. Carbon solid catalysts were prepared by a sulfonation of carbonized coconut shells. The performances of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of the reaction temperatures, the molar ratios of methanol to PFAD, the catalyst loading and the reaction times. The reusability of the solid acid carbon catalysts was also studied in this work. The results indicated that the FFA conversion was significantly increased with increasing catalyst loading and reaction times. It can be concluded that the optimal conditions were an PFAD to methanol molar ratio of 1:12, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60oC.At this optimum condition, the conversion to biodieselreached 88%.

  12. Active sites of ligand-protected Au25 nanoparticle catalysts for CO2 electroreduction to CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Dominic R.; Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental studies have reported the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into CO at atomically precise negatively charged Au25- nanoclusters. The studies showed CO2 conversion at remarkably low overpotentials, but the exact mechanisms and nature of the active sites remain unclear. We used first-principles density functional theory and continuum solvation models to examine the role of the cluster during electrochemical CO2 reduction and analyze the free energies of proposed intermediate species. Contrary to previous assumptions, our results show that the fully ligand protected cluster is not an active CO2 reduction catalyst because formation of the crucial carboxyl intermediate required very high electrochemical potentials. Instead, our calculations suggest that the reduction process likely occurs on a dethiolated gold site, and adsorbed carboxyl intermediate formation was significantly stabilized at dethiolated gold sites. These findings point to the crucial role of exposed metal sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction at gold nanocluster catalysts.

  13. Active sites of ligand-protected Au25 nanoparticle catalysts for CO2 electroreduction to CO.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Dominic R; Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher

    2016-05-14

    Recent experimental studies have reported the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into CO at atomically precise negatively charged Au25 (-) nanoclusters. The studies showed CO2 conversion at remarkably low overpotentials, but the exact mechanisms and nature of the active sites remain unclear. We used first-principles density functional theory and continuum solvation models to examine the role of the cluster during electrochemical CO2 reduction and analyze the free energies of proposed intermediate species. Contrary to previous assumptions, our results show that the fully ligand protected cluster is not an active CO2 reduction catalyst because formation of the crucial carboxyl intermediate required very high electrochemical potentials. Instead, our calculations suggest that the reduction process likely occurs on a dethiolated gold site, and adsorbed carboxyl intermediate formation was significantly stabilized at dethiolated gold sites. These findings point to the crucial role of exposed metal sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction at gold nanocluster catalysts. PMID:27179498

  14. Modeling of carbon monoxide oxidation kinetics over NASA carbon dioxide laser catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    The recombination of CO and O2 formed by the dissociation of CO2 in a sealed CO2 laser discharge zone is examined. Conventional base-metal-oxide catalysts and conventional noble-metal catalysts are not effective in recombining the low O2/CO ratio at the low temperatures used by the lasers. The use of Pt/SnO2 as the noble-metal reducible-oxide (NMRO), or other related materials from Group VIIIA and IB and SnO2 interact synergistically to produce a catalytic activity that is substantially higher than either componet separately. The Pt/SnO2 and Pd/SnO2 were reported to have significant reaction rates at temperatures as low as -27 C, conditions under which conventional catalysts are inactive. The gas temperature range of lasers is 0 + or - 40 C. There are three general ways in which the NMRO composite materials can interact synergistically: one component altering the properties of another component; the two components each providing independent catalytic functions in a complex reaction mechanism; and the formation of catalytic sites through the combination of two components at the atomic level. All three of these interactions may be important in low temperature CO oxidation over NMRO catalysts. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed first, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  15. Highly selective hydrogenation of arenes using nanostructured ruthenium catalysts modified with a carbon-nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjiang; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Junge, Kathrin; Topf, Christoph; Radnik, Jörg; Kreyenschulte, Carsten; Beller, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Selective hydrogenations of (hetero)arenes represent essential processes in the chemical industry, especially for the production of polymer intermediates and a multitude of fine chemicals. Herein, we describe a new type of well-dispersed Ru nanoparticles supported on a nitrogen-doped carbon material obtained from ruthenium chloride and dicyanamide in a facile and scalable method. These novel catalysts are stable and display both excellent activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of aromatic ethers, phenols as well as other functionalized substrates to the corresponding alicyclic reaction products. Furthermore, reduction of the aromatic core is preferred over hydrogenolysis of the C-O bond in the case of ether substrates. The selective hydrogenation of biomass-derived arenes, such as lignin building blocks, plays a pivotal role in the exploitation of novel sustainable feedstocks for chemical production and represents a notoriously difficult transformation up to now. PMID:27113087

  16. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production using Polymeric Carbon Nitride with a Hydrogenase and a Bioinspired Synthetic Ni Catalyst**

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CNx), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50 000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)−1 and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)−1 in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). PMID:25205168

  17. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production using Polymeric Carbon Nitride with a Hydrogenase and a Bioinspired Synthetic Ni Catalyst**

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CNx), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50 000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)−1 and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)−1 in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). PMID:26300567

  18. Photocatalytic hydrogen production using polymeric carbon nitride with a hydrogenase and a bioinspired synthetic Ni catalyst.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-10-20

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CN(x)), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50,000 mol H2(mol H2ase)(-1) and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)(-1) in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). PMID:25205168

  19. Easy conversion of protein-rich enoki mushroom biomass to a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial as a promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chaozhong; Liao, Wenli; Li, Zhongbin; Sun, Lingtao; Chen, Changguo

    2015-09-01

    The search for low-cost, highly active, and stable catalysts to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has recently become a topic of interest. Herein, we report a new strategy to design a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial for use as a metal-free ORR catalyst based on facile pyrolysis of protein-rich enoki mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) biomass at 900 °C with carbon nanotubes as a conductive agent and inserting matrix. We found that various forms of nitrogen (nitrile, pyrrolic and graphitic) were incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton of the product, which exhibited more excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity and better durability in alkaline medium than those in acidic medium. Remarkably, the ORR half-wave potential measured on our material was around 0.81 V in alkaline medium, slightly lower than that on the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst (0.86 V). Meanwhile, the ORR followed the desired 4-electron transfer mechanism involving the direct reduction pathway. The ORR performance was also markedly better than or at least comparable to the leading results in the literature based on biomass-derived carbon-based catalysts. Besides, we significantly proposed that the graphitic-nitrogen species that is most responsible for the ORR activity can function as the electrocatalytically active center for ORR, and the pyrrolic-nitrogen species can act as an effective promoter for ORR only. The results suggested a promising route based on economical and sustainable fungi biomass towards the large-scale production of valuable carbon nanomaterials as highly active and stable metal-free catalysts for ORR under alkaline conditions.The search for low-cost, highly active, and stable catalysts to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has recently become a topic of interest. Herein, we report a new strategy to design a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial for use as a metal-free ORR catalyst based on facile pyrolysis of

  20. Metal-free selenium doped carbon nanotube/graphene networks as a synergistically improved cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhiping; Nie, Huagui; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-10-21

    The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to synergistically improve ORR activity. More importantly, it is also suggested that the development of graphite materials doped with Se or other heteroatoms of large size will open up a new route to obtain ideal NPMCs with realistic value for fuel cell applications. PMID:22955444

  1. Enhanced electrochemical methanation of carbon dioxide with a dispersible nanoscale copper catalyst.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Karthish; Beberwyck, Brandon J; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-09-24

    Although the vast majority of hydrocarbon fuels and products are presently derived from petroleum, there is much interest in the development of routes for synthesizing these same products by hydrogenating CO2. The simplest hydrocarbon target is methane, which can utilize existing infrastructure for natural gas storage, distribution, and consumption. Electrochemical methods for methanizing CO2 currently suffer from a combination of low activities and poor selectivities. We demonstrate that copper nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon (n-Cu/C) achieve up to 4 times greater methanation current densities compared to high-purity copper foil electrodes. The n-Cu/C electrocatalyst also exhibits an average Faradaic efficiency for methanation of 80% during extended electrolysis, the highest Faradaic efficiency for room-temperature methanation reported to date. We find that the level of copper catalyst loading on the glassy carbon support has an enormous impact on the morphology of the copper under catalytic conditions and the resulting Faradaic efficiency for methane. The improved activity and Faradaic efficiency for methanation involves a mechanism that is distinct from what is generally thought to occur on copper foils. Electrochemical data indicate that the early steps of methanation on n-Cu/C involve a pre-equilibrium one-electron transfer to CO2 to form an adsorbed radical, followed by a rate-limiting non-electrochemical step in which the adsorbed CO2 radical reacts with a second CO2 molecule from solution. These nanoscale copper electrocatalysts represent a first step toward the preparation of practical methanation catalysts that can be incorporated into membrane-electrode assemblies in electrolyzers. PMID:25137433

  2. Detection of airborne carbon nanotubes based on the reactivity of the embedded catalyst.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, N; Kasper, G

    2015-01-01

    A previously described method for detecting catalyst particles in workplace air((1,2)) was applied to airborne carbon nanotubes (CNT). It infers the CNT concentration indirectly from the catalytic activity of metallic nanoparticles embedded as part of the CNT production process. Essentially, one samples airborne CNT onto a filter enclosed in a tiny chemical reactor and then initiates a gas-phase catalytic reaction on the sample. The change in concentration of one of the reactants is then determined by an IR sensor as measure of activity. The method requires a one-point calibration with a CNT sample of known mass. The suitability of the method was tested with nickel containing (25 or 38% by weight), well-characterized multi-walled CNT aerosols generated freshly in the lab for each experiment. Two chemical reactions were investigated, of which the oxidation of CO to CO2 at 470°C was found to be more effective, because nearly 100% of the nickel was exposed at that temperature by burning off the carbon, giving a linear relationship between CO conversion and nickel mass. Based on the investigated aerosols, a lower detection limit of 1 μg of sampled nickel was estimated. This translates into sampling times ranging from minutes to about one working day, depending on airborne CNT concentration and catalyst content, as well as sampling flow rate. The time for the subsequent chemical analysis is on the order of minutes, regardless of the time required to accumulate the sample and can be done on site. PMID:25271474

  3. Behavior of the Ru-bda water oxidation catalyst covalently anchored on glassy carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Matheu, Roc; Francàs, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-05-07

    Electrochemical reduction of the dizaonium complex, [RuII(bda)(NO)(N–N2)2]3+, 23+ (N–N22+ is 4-(pyridin-4-yl) benzenediazonium and bda2– is [2,2'-bipyridine]-6,6'-dicarboxylate), in acetone produces the covalent grafting of this molecular complex onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Multiple cycling voltammetric experiments on the GC electrode generates hybrid materials labeled as GC-4, with the corresponding Ru-aqua complex anchored on the graphite surface. GC-4 has been characterized at pH = 7.0 by electrochemical techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and has been shown to act as an active catalyst for the oxidation of water to dioxygen. This new hybrid material has a lower catalytic performance than its counterpartmore » in homogeneous phase and progressively decomposes to form RuO2 at the electrode surface. The resulting metal oxide attached at the GC electrode surface, GC-RuO2, is a very fast and rugged heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst with TOFis of 300 s–1 and TONs >45000. The observed performance is comparable to the best electrocatalysts reported so far, at neutral pH.« less

  4. Developing an approach for first-principles catalyst design: application to carbon-capture catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Heather J; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-02-01

    An approach to catalyst design is presented in which local potential energy surface models are first built to elucidate design principles and then used to identify larger scaffold motifs that match the target geometries. Carbon sequestration via hydration is used as the model reaction, and three- and four-coordinate sp(2) or sp(3) nitrogen-ligand motifs are considered for Zn(II) metals. The comparison of binding, activation and product release energies over a large range of interaction distances and angles suggests that four-coordinate short Zn(II)-Nsp(3) bond distances favor a rapid turnover for CO2 hydration. This design strategy is then confirmed by computationally characterizing the reactivity of a known mimic over a range of metal-nitrogen bond lengths. A search of existing catalysts in a chemical database reveals structures that match the target geometry from model calculations, and subsequent calculations have identified these structures as potentially effective for CO2 hydration and sequestration. PMID:24508957

  5. Behavior of the Ru-bda water oxidation catalyst covalently anchored on glassy carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matheu, Roc; Francàs, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-05-07

    Electrochemical reduction of the dizaonium complex, [RuII(bda)(NO)(N–N2)2]3+, 23+ (N–N22+ is 4-(pyridin-4-yl) benzenediazonium and bda2– is [2,2'-bipyridine]-6,6'-dicarboxylate), in acetone produces the covalent grafting of this molecular complex onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Multiple cycling voltammetric experiments on the GC electrode generates hybrid materials labeled as GC-4, with the corresponding Ru-aqua complex anchored on the graphite surface. GC-4 has been characterized at pH = 7.0 by electrochemical techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and has been shown to act as an active catalyst for the oxidation of water to dioxygen. This new hybrid material has a lower catalytic performance than its counterpart in homogeneous phase and progressively decomposes to form RuO2 at the electrode surface. The resulting metal oxide attached at the GC electrode surface, GC-RuO2, is a very fast and rugged heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst with TOFis of 300 s–1 and TONs >45000. The observed performance is comparable to the best electrocatalysts reported so far, at neutral pH.

  6. Revealing the Role of Catalysts in Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Zhong, Jun; Bai, Lili; Liu, Jinyin; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    The identification of effective components on the atomic scale in carbon nanomaterials which improve the performance in various applications remains outstanding challenges. Here the catalyst residues in individual carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) were clearly imaged with a concurrent characterization of their electronic structure by nanoscale scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Except for prominent catalyst nanoparticle at the tip, tiny catalyst clusters along the tube (fiber) were detected, indicating a migration of the catalysts with the growth of CNTs (CNFs). The observation provides the direct evidence on the atomic metal in CNT for oxygen reduction reported in the literature. Interaction between catalysts (Fe, Ni) and CNTs (CNFs) at the tip was also identified by comparing the X-ray absorption spectra. A deep understanding of catalyst residues such as Fe or Ni in carbon nanomaterials is very vital to growth mechanism development and practical applications. PMID:24398972

  7. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  8. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstratedmore » in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.« less

  9. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstrated in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.

  10. Synergistic bifunctional catalyst design based on perovskite oxide nanoparticles and intertwined carbon nanotubes for rechargeable zinc-air battery applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Un; Park, Hey Woong; Park, Moon Gyu; Ismayilov, Vugar; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-01-14

    Advanced morphology of intertwined core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (IT-CCBC) is introduced where perovskite lanthanum nickel oxide nanoparticles (LaNiO3 NP) are encapsulated by high surface area network of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) to produce highly active and durable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications. The unique composite morphology of IT-CCBC not only enhances the charge transport property by providing rapid electron-conduction pathway but also facilitates in diffusion of hydroxyl and oxygen reactants through the highly porous framework. Confirmed by electrochemical half-cell testing, IT-CCBC in fact exhibits very strong synergy between LaNiO3 NP and NCNT demonstrating bifunctionality with significantly improved catalytic activities of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Furthermore, when compared to the state-of-art catalysts, IT-CCBC outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C in terms of ORR and OER, respectively, and shows improved electrochemical stability compared to them after cycle degradation testing. The practicality of the catalyst is corroborated by testing in a realistic rechargeable zinc-air battery utilizing atmospheric air in ambient conditions, where IT-CCBC demonstrates superior charge and discharge voltages and long-term cycle stability with virtually no battery voltage fading. These improved electrochemical properties of the catalyst are attributed to the nanosized dimensions of LaNiO3 NP controlled by simple hydrothermal technique, which enables prolific growth of and encapsulation by highly porous NCNT network. The excellent electrochemical results presented in this study highlight IT-CCBC as highly efficient and commercially viable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications. PMID:25494945

  11. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes. PMID:26588826

  12. One-Pot synthesis of phosphorylated mesoporous carbon heterogeneous catalysts with tailored surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Bauer, Christopher; Wang, Xiqing; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Soft-templated phosphorylated mesoporous carbons with homogeneous distributions of phosphate groups were prepared by a 'one-pot' synthesis method using mixtures of phosphoric acid with hydrochloric, or nitric acids in the presence of Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. Adjusting the various ratios of phosphoric acid used in these mixtures resulted in carbons with distinct adsorption, structural and surface acidity properties. The pore size distributions (PSDs) from nitrogen adsorption at -196 C showed that mesoporous carbons exhibit specific surface areas as high as 551 m{sup 2}/g and mesopores as large as 13 nm. Both structural ordering of the mesopores and the final phosphate contents were strongly dependent on the ratios of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the synthesis gels, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The number of surface acid sites determined from temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) were in the range of 0.3-1.5 mmol/g while the active surface areas are estimated to comprise 5-54% of the total surface areas. Finally, the conversion temperatures for the isopropanol dehydration were lowered by as much as 100 C by transitioning from the least acidic to the most acidic catalysts surface.

  13. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. PMID:25973732

  14. Ni-SiO₂ catalysts for the carbon dioxide reforming of methane: varying support properties by flame spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Emma C; Scott, Jason; Amal, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Silica particles were prepared by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) as a support for nickel catalysts. The impact of precursor feed rate (3, 5 and 7 mL/min) during FSP on the silica characteristics and the ensuing effect on catalytic performance for the carbon dioxide, or dry, reforming of methane (DRM) was probed. Increasing the precursor feed rate: (i) progressively lowered the silica surface area from ≈340 m2/g to ≈240 m2/g; (ii) altered the silanol groups on the silica surface; and (iii) introduced residual carbon-based surface species to the sample at the highest feed rate. The variations in silica properties altered the (5 wt %) nickel deposit characteristics which in turn impacted on the DRM reaction. As the silica surface area increased, the nickel dispersion increased which improved catalyst performance. The residual carbon-based species also appeared to improve nickel dispersion, and in turn catalyst activity, although not to the same extent as the change in silica surface area. The findings illustrate both the importance of silica support characteristics on the catalytic performance of nickel for the DRM reaction and the capacity for using FSP to control these characteristics. PMID:25774491

  15. Sn-doped TiO2 modified carbon to support Pt anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yabei; Liu, Chuntao; Liu, Yanying; Feng, Bo; Li, Li; Pan, Hengyu; Kellogg, Williams; Higgins, Drew; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Catalyst supports are known to play important role in governing overall catalyst activity and durability. Here, a new type of SnO2-TiO2 solid solution (TixSn1-xO2) support was prepared via a solvothermal method with substitution of Ti4+ by Sn4+ in the TiO2 lattice. Furthermore, the TixSn1-xO2 was combined with conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) to prepare a hybrid support (TixSn1-xO2-C) for depositing Pt nanoparticles. The ratios of Sn vs. Ti in the solid-solution and TixSn1-xO2vs. XC-72 were systematically optimized in terms of their performance as supports for methanol oxidation. Compared to Pt/TiO2-C and commercial Pt/C catalysts, the best performing Pt/Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C catalyst exhibited the highest activity, evidenced by methanol oxidation and CO stripping experiments. The well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles (2-3 nm) are mostly deposited on the boundaries of Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 and carbon blacks. Formation of the special triple junction structure can play an important role in improving Pt utilization with increased electrochemical active surface areas (ESA) of Pt. In addition, the enhanced activity for Pt supported on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2-C is due to high content of OH group on Ti0.9Sn0.1O2 along with the strengthened metal-supports interactions. Both promote the oxidation of poisoning CO absorbed on Pt active sites.

  16. Graphene nanoribbons hybridized carbon nanofibers: remarkably enhanced graphitization and conductivity, and excellent performance as support material for fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaonan; Gao, Hongrong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yiren; Huang, Bowen; Zhao, Junhong; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Wang Zhang; Zhang, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for electrocatalysis. Through electrospinning and carbonization processes, GNR embedded carbon nanofibers (G-CNFs) with greatly enhanced graphitization and electronic conductivity were synthesized. Chemical deposition of Pt NPs onto G-CNFs generated a new Pt-G-CNF hybrid catalyst, with homogeneously distributed Pt NPs of ~3 nm. Compared to Pt-CNF (Pt on pristine CNFs) and Pt-M-CNF (Pt on MWCNT embedded CNFs), Pt-G-CNF hybrids exhibit significantly improved electrochemically active surface area (ECSA), better CO tolerance for electro-oxidation of methanol and higher electrochemical stability, testifying G-CNFs are promising support materials for high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells.High electronic conductivity of the support material and uniform distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) are extremely desirable for electrocatalysts. In this paper, we present our recent progress on electrocatalysts for fuel cells with simultaneously improved conductivity of the supporting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and distribution of platinum (Pt) NPs through facile incorporation of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Briefly, GNRs were obtained by the cutting and unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent thermal reduction and were first used as novel nanofillers in CNFs towards high performance support material for

  17. Hybrid catalyst containing nano-sized LaMnO{sub 3} and carbon black for high yield and selective ketonization of n-butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganiuk, Aleksandra; Klimkiewicz, Roman; Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P.

    2011-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The performed investigations demonstrated a very high catalytic activity of the synthesized hybrid (LaMnO{sub 3}/carbon black) catalyst towards ketonization of n-butanol. Both selectivity (ca. 60%) and yield (ca. 40%) towards heptanone-4 seem to be very promising especially for conversion run at temperatures close to 480 {sup o}C. These parameters were achieved for the hybrid catalyst containing only 10 weight percents of LaMnO{sub 3}. Research highlights: {yields} A novel biotechnological way of a hybrid carbon-based catalyst fabrication {yields} Effective (high yield and selectivity) n-butanol conversion to heptanone-4. {yields} Nano-sized LaMnO{sub 3} crystallites uniformly distributed in carbon matrix. {yields} Exploitation of Salix viminalis tolerance to heavy metal ions. -- Abstract: An attempt has been made to synthesize a two-component hybrid material for highly selective catalytic ketonization of n-butanol. The perovskite-type oxide nano-crystallites were synthesized in the presence of carbon black particles by thermal transformation of equimolar mixture of lanthanum and manganese hydroxides into the perovskite-type oxide. The two-component material was tested as a catalyst for unconventional conversion of n-butanol to heptanone-4. The catalyst exhibited very high selectivity and yield towards the products, despite low content of LaMnO{sub 3} in the two-component material (less than 10% by weight). The low oxide content led to the reduction of the cost of catalyst fabrication and is compensated by its high dispersion (grains ca. 20-30 nm in diameter) providing high conversion and yield comparable to pure-oxide catalysts. Catalyst fabrication is simple and environment friendly since it does not require organic solvents and excess amount of heavy metals (La and Mn).

  18. High Performance Fe- and N- Doped Carbon Catalyst with Graphene Structure for Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hongliang; Mo, Zaiyong; Liao, Shijun; Liang, Huagen; Yang, Lijun; Luo, Fan; Song, Huiyu; Zhong, Yiliang; Zhang, Bingqing

    2013-05-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are promising candidates for a clean and efficient energy conversion in the future, the development of carbon based inexpensive non-precious metal ORR catalyst has becoming one of the most attractive topics in fuel cell field. Herein we report a Fe- and N- doped carbon catalyst Fe-PANI/C-Mela with graphene structure and the surface area up to 702 m2 g-1. In 0.1 M HClO4 electrolyte, the ORR onset potential for the catalyst is high up to 0.98 V, and the half-wave potential is only 60 mV less than that of the Pt/C catalyst (Loadings: 51 μg Pt cm-2). The catalyst shows high stability after 10,000 cyclic voltammetry cycles. A membrane electrode assembly made with the catalyst as a cathode is tested in a H2-air single cell, the maximum power density reached ~0.33 W cm2 at 0.47 V.

  19. High Performance Fe- and N- Doped Carbon Catalyst with Graphene Structure for Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hongliang; Mo, Zaiyong; Liao, Shijun; Liang, Huagen; Yang, Lijun; Luo, Fan; Song, Huiyu; Zhong, Yiliang; Zhang, Bingqing

    2013-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are promising candidates for a clean and efficient energy conversion in the future, the development of carbon based inexpensive non-precious metal ORR catalyst has becoming one of the most attractive topics in fuel cell field. Herein we report a Fe- and N- doped carbon catalyst Fe-PANI/C-Mela with graphene structure and the surface area up to 702 m2 g−1. In 0.1 M HClO4 electrolyte, the ORR onset potential for the catalyst is high up to 0.98 V, and the half-wave potential is only 60 mV less than that of the Pt/C catalyst (Loadings: 51 μg Pt cm−2). The catalyst shows high stability after 10,000 cyclic voltammetry cycles. A membrane electrode assembly made with the catalyst as a cathode is tested in a H2-air single cell, the maximum power density reached ~0.33 W cm2 at 0.47 V.

  20. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  1. Ruthenium oxide modified titanium dioxide nanotube arrays as carbon and binder free lithium-air battery cathode catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Niu, Yanning; Zhang, Li; Sun, Kening

    2014-12-01

    RuO2 modified TiO2 nanotube arrays, growing on Ti foams, are used as carbon and binder free cathodes for Li-O2 batteries. The micrometer pores in Ti foams and nanometer pores in TiO2 nanotubes supply facilitated transport channels for oxygen diffusing into/out of the catalysts in discharge and charge processes. The RuO2 catalyst exhibits outstanding catalytic active toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which leads the charge voltage maintaining around 3.7 V all through the battery cycling. The stability of TiO2/Ti support, abundant oxygen transport path and favorable catalytic activity of RuO2 toward OER enable the Li-O2 batteries exhibiting 130 cycle discharge/charge.

  2. Phase-Transfer Activation of Transition Metal Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tuba, Robert; Xi, Zhenxing; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-11-01

    With metal-based catalysts, it is quite common that a ligand (L) must first dissociate from a catalyst precursor (L'n M-L) to activate the catalyst. The resulting coordinatively unsaturated active species (L'n M) can either back react with the ligand in a k-1 step, or combine with the substrate in a k2 step. When dissociation is not rate determining and k-1 [L] is greater than or comparable to k2 [substrate], this slows the rate of reaction. By introducing a phase label onto the ligand L and providing a suitable orthogonal liquid or solid phase, dramatic rate accelerations can be achieved. This phenomenon is termed "phase-transfer activation". In this Concept, some historical antecedents are reviewed, followed by successful applications involving fluorous/organic and aqueous/organic liquid/liquid biphasic catalysis, and liquid/solid biphasic catalysis. Variants that include a chemical trap for the phase-labeled ligands are also described. PMID:26338471

  3. PdCl2-loading mesoporous copper oxide as a novel and environmentally friendly catalyst for diethyl carbonate synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingbo; Zhou, Yan; Fan, Mingming; Jiang, Pingping

    2015-03-01

    PdCl2-loading mesoporous copper oxide (PdCl2/mCuO) catalysts were successfully synthesized via a hard template with copper carbonate basic (Cu2(OH)2CO3), cupric nitrate (Cu(NO3)2·3H2O) and copper citrate (Cu2C6H4O7·2.5H2O) as the copper(II) precursors, respectively. Their catalytic performances were investigated in the synthesis of diethyl carbonate (DEC) by oxidative carbonylation of ethanol with CO and O2. The catalysts were characterized by TGA, XRD, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis and SEM with the aim of establishing their composition, morphology and structure. It was observed that the catalysts all showed a good selectivity to diethyl carbonate. However, due to a better mesoporous structure such as a bigger surface area, more uniform particle size and less agglomeration, the PdCl2/mCuO-1 catalyst prepared with Cu2(OH)2CO3 precursor showed a better catalytic activity that the conversion of EtOH was about 4.8% and the STY of DEC was 97.1 mg g-1 h-1. This was because the highly developed mesoporous structure could generate a bigger surface area, which benefited the contact between reactants and active sites, improved the conversion of ethanol, and thus enhanced the catalytic performance. Furthermore, a synthetic procedure diagram about "wet impregnation" method of mesoporous CuO prepared with Cu2(OH)2CO3 precursor was given to illustrate these results intuitively.

  4. Effect of a catalyst on the kinetics of reduction of celestite (SrSO{sub 4}) by active charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Sonawane, R.S.; Kale, B.B.; Apte, S.K.; Dongare, M.K.

    2000-02-01

    Reduction of celestite (SrSO{sub 4}) powder with particles of active charcoal has been studied extensively in the absence and presence of catalysts. The optimum temperature at the charging zone has been optimized to get a maximum water-soluble strontium sulfide value. The strontium value has been analyzed using a chemical method, which was verified by the instrumental method using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The conversion-time data have been analyzed by using a modified volume-reaction (MVR) model, and the effect of the catalyst on kinetic parameters has been elucidated. It was found that potassium carbonate, potassium dichromate, sodium carbonate, and sodium dichromate catalysts were found to enhance the reaction rate quite satisfactorily in the reduction of the celestite (SrSO{sub 4}).

  5. P-Doped Porous Carbon as Metal Free Catalysts for Selective Aerobic Oxidation with an Unexpected Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mehulkumar A; Luo, Feixiang; Khoshi, M Reza; Rabie, Emann; Zhang, Qing; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Garfunkel, Eric; Szostak, Michal; He, Huixin

    2016-02-23

    An extremely simple and rapid (seconds) approach is reported to directly synthesize gram quantities of P-doped graphitic porous carbon materials with controlled P bond configuration. For the first time, it is demonstrated that the P-doped carbon materials can be used as a selective metal free catalyst for aerobic oxidation reactions. The work function of P-doped carbon materials, its connectivity to the P bond configuration, and the correlation with its catalytic efficiency are studied and established. In direct contrast to N-doped graphene, the P-doped carbon materials with higher work function show high activity in catalytic aerobic oxidation. The selectivity trend for the electron donating and withdrawing properties of the functional groups attached to the aromatic ring of benzyl alcohols is also different from other metal free carbon based catalysts. A unique catalytic mechanism is demonstrated, which differs from both GO and N-doped graphene obtained by high temperature nitrification. The unique and unexpected catalytic pathway endows the P-doped materials with not only good catalytic efficiency but also recyclability. This, combined with a rapid, energy saving approach that permits fabrication on a large scale, suggests that the P-doped porous materials are promising materials for "green catalysis" due to their higher theoretical surface area, sustainability, environmental friendliness, and low cost. PMID:26751165

  6. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalysts towards oxygen reduction reaction based on three-dimensional porous carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, He; Fu, Shaofang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Developing a low cost, highly active, durable cathode towards an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the high-priority research directions for commercialization of low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs is still hindered by the high cost and insufficient durability of the traditional Pt-based cathode catalysts. Under these circumstances, the search for efficient alternatives to replace Pt for constructing highly efficient nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has been growing intensively and has received great interest. Combining with the compositional effects, the accurate design of NPMCs with 3D porous nanostructures plays a significant role in further enhancing ORR performance. These 3D porous architectures are able to provide higher specific surface areas and larger pore volumes, not only maximizing the availability of electron transfer within the nanosized electrocatalyst surface area but also providing better mass transport of reactants to the electrocatalyst. In this Tutorial Review, we focus on the rational design and synthesis of different 3D porous carbon-based nanomaterials, such as heteroatom-doped carbon, metal-nitrogen-carbon nanostructures and a series of carbon/nonprecious metal-based hybrids. More importantly, their enhanced ORR performances are also demonstrated by virtue of their favorably porous morphologies and compositional effects. Finally, the future trends and perspectives for the highly efficient porous NPMCs regarding the material design are discussed, with an emphasis on substantial development of advanced carbon-based NPMCs for ORR in the near future. PMID:26658546

  7. Effect of the functional groups of carbon on the surface and catalytic properties of Ru/C catalysts for hydrogenolysis of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Suarez, E.; Pérez-Cadenas, M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.; Arcoya, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ruthenium catalysts supported on activated carbons, original (AC) and treated with nitric acid (AC-Ox) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation from either chloride (Cl) or nitroxyl nitrate (n) precursors. These catalysts were characterized by TG, XPS, TEM, TPD-MS and CO adsorption microcalorimetry and evaluated in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol in the liquid phase, at 453 K and 8 MPa. Studies by TEM show that ruthenium particles supported on AC-Ox are larger than on AC, without any effect of the nature of the metal precursor. However, adsorption of CO on the ex-chloride catalysts is inhibited in comparison with that of the ex-nitroxyl nitrate catalysts. Catalysts characterization by TG, TPD-MS and XPS reveals that the nitric acid treatment and the nitroxyl nitrate precursor generate oxygenated groups on the carbon surface, which provide acid properties to the catalysts, although they are partly destroyed during the reduction treatment applied to the catalysts. The sequence of the overall TOF, Ru(Cl)/AC < Ru(n)/AC < Ru(Cl)/AC-Ox ≈ Ru(n)/AC-Ox, reasonably parallels the population increase of surface acid groups. Participation of the sbnd COOH groups in the transformation of glycerol into 1,2-propanediol is verified by using the admixture Ru(Cl)/AC+AC-Ox as catalyst. In this case, since AC-Ox was not thermally treated and no loss of oxygenated groups occurred, TOF and selectivity toward 1,2-propanediol improve in comparison with those of the more active catalysts.

  8. Characterization of platinum catalyst supported on carbon nanoballs prepared by solution plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ichin, Yoshimichi; Mitamura, Koji; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2009-07-15

    In order to improve the energy-conversion efficiency in fuel cells, the authors loaded Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanoballs (CNBs) by using solution plasma processing (SPP) involving CNB and Pt ion with a protection group. In this study, we employed poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to prepare Pt nanoparticles supported on CNB (Pt/CNB) by the SPP, and the electrochemical properties as a catalyst was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The carbon nanoballs were prepared by thermal decomposition process of ethylene and hydrogen gases. Color of the solution changed from yellow to dark brown as synthesis time. This change indicates the improvement of dispersibility of CNB. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy images and elemental mapping images showed the Pt nanoparticles supported on CNB. A catalytic activity of the Pt/CNB in use of SDS was shown to be higher than the Pt/CNB prepared with PVP system. The SDS-containing Pt/CNB also showed the higher activity than that obtained by the conventional method.

  9. Theoretical study of carbon dioxide activation by metals (Co, Cu, Ni) supported on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Van Khu, Le; Cam, Le Minh

    2015-12-01

    The activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by catalytic systems comprising a transition metal (Co, Cu,Ni) on an activated carbon (AC) support was investigated using a combination of different theoretical calculation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, DFT and DFT-D, molecular dynamics (MD), and a climbing image nudged elastic band (CI-NEB) method. The results obtained indicate that CO2 is easily adsorbed by AC or MAC (M: Cu, Co, Ni). The results also showed that the process of adsorbing CO2 does not involve a transition state, and that NiAC and CoAC are the most effective of the MAC catalysts at adsorbing CO2. Adsorption on NiAC led to the strongest activation of the C-O bond, while adsorption on CuAC led to the weakest activation. Graphical Abstract Models of CO2 activation on: a)- activated carbon; b)- metal supported activated carbon (M-AC), where M: Co, Cu, Ni. PMID:26637187

  10. A Simple Synthesis of an N-Doped Carbon ORR Catalyst: Hierarchical Micro/Meso/Macro Porosity and Graphitic Shells.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, David; Stroek, Wowa; Geels, Norbert J; Sandu, Cosmin S; Heller, Adam; Yan, Ning; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-01-11

    Replacing platinum as an oxygen reduction catalyst is an important scientific and technological challenge. Herein we report a simple synthesis of a complex carbon with very good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at pH 13. Pyrolysis of magnesium nitrilotriacetate yields a carbon with hierarchical micro/meso/macro porosity, resulting from in situ templating by spontaneously forming MgO nanoparticles and from etching by pyrolysis gases. The mesopores are lined with highly graphitic shells. The high ORR activity is attributed to a good balance between high specific surface area and mass transport through the hierarchical porosity, and to improved electronic conductivity through the graphitic shells. This novel carbon has a high surface area (1320 m(2) g(-1) ), and high nitrogen content for a single precursor synthesis (∼6 %). Importantly, its synthesis is both cheap and easily scalable. PMID:26574917

  11. Nitrogen-doped carbon onions encapsulating metal alloys as efficient and stable catalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chongyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Jing; Min, Huihua; Dong, Hui; Tong, Ling; Qasim, Khan; Li, Shengli; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    Designing a new class of non-noble metal catalysts with triiodide reduction activity and stability comparable to those of conventional Pt is extremely significant for the application of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we demonstrate newly designed counter electrode (CE) materials of onion-like nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating metal alloys (ONC@MAs) such as FeNi3 (ONC@FeNi3) or FeCo (ONC@FeCo), by a facile and scalable pyrolysis method. The resulting composite catalysts show superior catalytic activities towards the triiodide reduction and exhibit low charge transfer resistance between the electrode surfaces and electrolytes. As a result, the DSSCs based on ONC@FeCo and ONC@FeNi3 achieve outstanding power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 8.26% and 8.87%, respectively, which can rival the 8.28% of Pt-based DSSC. Moreover, the excellent electrochemical stabilities for both the two catalysts also have been corroborated by electrochemical impendence spectra and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Noticeably, TEM investigation further reveals that the N-doped graphitic carbon onions exhibit the high structural stability in iodine-containing medium even subject to hundreds of CV scanning. These results make ONC@MAs the promising candidates to supersede costly Pt as efficient and stable CEs for DSSCs.

  12. Fe, Co, Ni nanocrystals encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as Fenton-like catalysts for organic pollutant removal.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjin; Chen, Hao; Lian, Chao; Wei, Fengyu; Zhang, Dawei; Wu, Guodong; Chen, Benjin; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-08-15

    Magnetic metal M (M=Fe, Co, Ni) nanocrystals encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (M@N-C) were fabricated conveniently using dicyandiamide as a C/N precursor, and exhibited varying activities toward Fenton-like reaction. The surface morphology and structure of the M@N-C catalysts were characterized and an efficient catalytic degradation performance, high stability, and excellent reusability were observed. In addition, several operational factors, such as initial dye concentration, oxidant type (peroxymonosulfate, peroxydisulfate and H2O2) and dosage, reaction temperature, and dye type as well as stability of the composite were extensively evaluated in view of the practical applications. The results showed that various transition metals M significantly affected the structures and performances of the catalysts, and specially, their activity followed the order of Co>Fe>Ni in the presence of peroxymonosulfate. Moreover, HO⁡ and SO4(-) radicals participating in the process were evidenced using quenching experiments, and a rational mechanism was proposed based on a non-radical process and the free radical process. Control experiments revealed that the enhanced active sites were mainly ascribed to the synergistic effects between the metal nanocrystals and nitrogen-doped carbon. The findings of this study elucidated that encapsulation of nanocrystals in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes was an effective strategy to enhance the overall catalytic activity. PMID:27111426

  13. High-Performance Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysts Engineered for Carbon Dioxide Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Steven Dwayne

    1990-01-01

    The low-temperature CO oxidation activity of numerous materials has been evaluated in order to develop efficient catalysts for use in CO_2 lasers. The materials were screened for activity in small, stoichiometric concentrations of CO and O_2 at temperatures near 55^circC. An Au/MnO_{rm x} catalyst was synthesized which exhibited exceptional CO oxidation activity while maintaining negligible performance decay over a period of at least 70 days. The data suggest that Au/MnO_{rm x} has potential applications in air purification and CO gas sensing as well. Extensive surface characterization data from Pt/SnO _{rm x} and Au/MnO _{rm x} catalysts are reported which relate surface composition and chemical state information to corresponding CO oxidation activity data. Ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), angle-resolved Auger electron spectroscopy (ARAES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to observe the behavior of these surfaces as a function of numerous pretreatments which alter their catalytic activity. The results suggest that Pt(OH)_2 and Pt/Sn alloy formation may play a key role in the CO oxidation mechanism on Pt/SnO_{ rm x} surfaces. A Pt_3 Sn alloy was subsequently characterized before and after H_2 reduction to study its surface characteristics. Surface characterization of Au/MnO_ {rm x} and MnO_{ rm x} was performed in order to elucidate the CO oxidation mechanism. The spectral data yield evidence that the enhanced CO oxidation activity of Au/MnO _{rm x} is related to Mn present primarily as Mn_3O _4 with substantial amounts of water or hydroxyl groups. The spectra are consistent with very small Au particles which may exist in an oxidized state. The behavior of Au/MnO_{rm x} and MnO_{rm x} toward an inert pretreatment suggests the possibility of a Au -MnO_{rm x} interaction.

  14. Removal of carbon monoxide from hydrogen-rich fuels by selective low-temperature oxidation over base metal added platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Dong Jin; Kwak, Chan; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kwon, Se Mann; Park, Tae-Jin

    Various catalysts containing different catalytic materials, supports, and additives were tested for the preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide from a hydrogen-rich gas stream. The results were analyzed based on three reactions involved in the PROX: oxidation of carbon monoxide, H 2-O 2 reaction, and methanation. The PROX reactions were performed in two reaction systems, one for catalyst screening and kinetic study and the other for simulation of the catalytic performance under real reaction conditions. The performances of PROX on different catalysts, varying active components, supports, and additives, were ranked in terms of carbon monoxide conversion and hydrogen consumption. Base metal added platinum catalysts exhibited excellent ability for the carbon monoxide removal. TPR results indicated that a new active species was formed resulting in the enhancement of catalytic activity. PtCo/Al 2O 3 was tested with a simulated steam-reformed fuel for confirmation of its high activity. The effect of operating conditions was analyzed on the PtCo/Al 2O 3, and the optimum conditions for PROX were obtained.

  15. The effect of catalysts and underlayer metals on the properties of PECVD-grown carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuhui; Li, Ke; Wu, Raymond; Wilhite, Patrick; Saito, Tsutomu; Gao, Jing; Yang, Cary Y.

    2010-01-01

    The growth behaviors and contact resistances of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on different underlayer metals are investigated. The average diameter, diameter distribution, density, growth rate and contact resistance exhibit strong correlation with the choice of catalyst/underlayer combination. These observations are analyzed in terms of interactions between the catalyst and the underlayer metal. The CNT via test structure has been designed and fabricated to make current-voltage measurements on single CNTs using a nanomanipulator under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. By analyzing the dependence of measured resistance on CNT diameter, the CNT-metal contact resistance can be extracted. The contact resistances between as-grown CNTs and different underlayer metals are determined. Relationships between contact resistances and various combinations of catalysts and underlayer metals are investigated.

  16. The effect of catalysts and underlayer metals on the properties of PECVD-grown carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuhui; Li, Ke; Wu, Raymond; Wilhite, Patrick; Saito, Tsutomu; Gao, Jing; Yang, Cary Y

    2010-01-29

    The growth behaviors and contact resistances of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on different underlayer metals are investigated. The average diameter, diameter distribution, density, growth rate and contact resistance exhibit strong correlation with the choice of catalyst/underlayer combination. These observations are analyzed in terms of interactions between the catalyst and the underlayer metal. The CNT via test structure has been designed and fabricated to make current-voltage measurements on single CNTs using a nanomanipulator under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. By analyzing the dependence of measured resistance on CNT diameter, the CNT-metal contact resistance can be extracted. The contact resistances between as-grown CNTs and different underlayer metals are determined. Relationships between contact resistances and various combinations of catalysts and underlayer metals are investigated. PMID:20009172

  17. Utilization of iron oxide film obtained by CVD process as catalyst to carbon nanotubes growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzler, Mariane C.; Zarbin, Aldo J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Thin films of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were obtained on silica glass substrates through the thermal decomposition of ferrocene in air. These films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and subsequently used as catalyst on the growth of carbon nanotubes, using benzene or a benzene solution of [Fe{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] as precursor. A great amount of a black powder was obtained as product, identified as multi-walled carbon nanotubes by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The carbon nanotubes formed through the pyrolysis of the [Fe{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] solution were identified as structurally better than the one obtained by the pyrolysis of pristine benzene. - Graphical abstract: Thin films of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were obtained on silica glass substrates through the thermal decomposition of ferrocene in air, and subsequently used as catalyst on the growth of carbon nanotubes.

  18. A study of different polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes as a Pt-Co catalyst support for methanol oxidation fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jiping; Wei, Wei; Huang, Xiaobin; Tao, Yiming; Chen, Kuiyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    2012-07-01

    The composite of polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes is prepared by a simple and efficient synthesis method and regarded as an improved catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell. Catalyst of Pt-Co supported on polyphosphazene-coated carbon nanotubes is prepared using mixed reducing agents. The PZAF/MWCNTs, PZS/MWCNTs, Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs and Pt-Co/PZS-MWCNTs are measured by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs, Pt-Co/PZS-MWCNTs catalysts for methanol oxidation has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The composite of Pt-Co/PZAF-MWCNTs shows a good distribution, small particle size and high mass activity.

  19. Chiral Cobalt(III) Complexes as Bifunctional Brønsted Acid-Lewis Base Catalysts for the Preparation of Cyclic Organic Carbonates.

    PubMed

    Rulev, Yuri A; Larionov, Vladimir A; Lokutova, Anastasia V; Moskalenko, Margarita A; Lependina, Ol'ga L; Maleev, Victor I; North, Michael; Belokon, Yuri N

    2016-01-01

    Stereochemically inert cationic cobalt(III) complexes were shown to be one-component catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide at 50 °C and 5 MPa carbon dioxide pressure. The optimal catalyst possessed an iodide counter anion and could be recycled. A catalytic cycle is proposed in which the ligand of the cobalt complexes acts as a hydrogen-bond donor, activating the epoxide towards ring opening by the halide anion and activating the carbon dioxide for subsequent reaction with the halo-alkoxide. No kinetic resolution was observed when terminal epoxides were used as substrates, but chalcone oxide underwent kinetic resolution. PMID:26663897

  20. Carboxylic Group Embedded Carbon Balls as a New Supported Catalyst for Hydrogen Economic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Ankur

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic group functionalized carbon balls have been successfully synthesized by using a facile synthesis method and well characterized with different characterization techniques such as XPS, MAS NMR, SEM, ICP and N2 physi-sorption analysis. The synthesized material has been effectively utilized as novel support to immobilized ruthenium catalyst for hydrogen economic reactions. PMID:27455763

  1. Biosynthesis of Pd-Au alloys on carbon fiber paper: Towards an eco-friendly solution for catalysts fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zechao; Wang, Feifeng; Naidu, Ravendra; Chen, Zuliang

    2015-09-01

    Bimetallic nanomaterials with enhanced activity and stability have been extensively studied as emerging catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Expensive and environmentally unfriendly chemical synthesis routes inhibit their large-scale applications. In this work, we developed a facile and green synthesis of Pd-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plant-mediated bioreduction coupled with self-assembly. Engineering the morphology and composition of bimetallic catalysts synthesized by plant extracts on complex substrate is achieved. The resulting NPs are uniform in shape and have a spherical morphology with an average diameter of ∼180 nm, in which the molar ratio of Au/Pd is near 75:25 and the catalysts loading is about 0.5 mg cm-2. The Pd-Au/CFP hybrid electrode exhibits an excellent HER performance with a Tafel slope of 47 mV dec-1 and an exchange current density of 0.256 mA cm-2. Electrochemical stability tests through long-term potential cycles and potentiostatic electrolysis further confirm the high durability of the electrode. This development offers an efficient and eco-friendly catalysts synthesis route for constructing water-splitting cells and other electrocatalytic devices.

  2. Carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticles-iron phthalocyanine as alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jalal; Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Lihua; Kim, Sunghyun

    2012-06-01

    The high cost and limited resources of precious metals as oxygen reduction catalysts (ORR) hindered the widespread use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in practice. Here, the feasibility of metal oxide assisted metal macrocyclic complex was investigated as a catalyst for ORR in an air-cathode MFC. Electrochemical results revealed that cobalt oxide (CoOx) incorporation increased the ORR activity of iron phthalocyanine (FePc). In MFCs, the maximum power density of 654 ± 32 mW m-2 was achieved from the C-CoOx-FePc cathode, which was 37% higher than the power density of carbon supported FePc (C-FePc). The voltage output of the MFC only decreased to 85% of its initial voltage after 50 cycles, suggesting that the synthesized catalyst showed acceptable long-term stability. The voltage drop partially resulted from the covering of biofilm on the catalyst layer. This work provided a potential alternative to Pt in MFCs for sustainable energy generation.

  3. Tuning the acid/metal balance of carbon nanofiber-supported nickel catalysts for hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Geboers, Jan; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Eloy, Pierre; Dornez, Emmie; Seo, Jin Won; Courtin, Christophe M; Gaigneaux, Eric M; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2012-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are a class of graphitic support materials with considerable potential for catalytic conversion of biomass. Earlier, we demonstrated the hydrolytic hydrogenation of cellulose over reshaped nickel particles attached at the tip of CNFs. The aim of this follow-up study was to find a relationship between the acid/metal balance of the Ni/CNFs and their performance in the catalytic conversion of cellulose. After oxidation and incipient wetness impregnation with Ni, the Ni/CNFs were characterized by various analytical methods. To prepare a selective Ni/CNF catalyst, the influences of the nature of oxidation agent, Ni activation, and Ni loading were investigated. Under the applied reaction conditions, the best result, that is, 76 % yield in hexitols with 69 % sorbitol selectivity at 93 % conversion of cellulose, was obtained on a 7.5 wt % Ni/CNF catalyst prepared by chemical vapor deposition of CH(4) on a Ni/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst, followed by oxidation in HNO(3) (twice for 1 h at 383 K), incipient wetness impregnation, and reduction at 773 K under H(2). This preparation method leads to a properly balanced Ni/CNF catalyst in terms of Ni dispersion and hydrogenation capacity on the one hand, and the number of acidic surface-oxygen groups responsible for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis on the other. PMID:22730195

  4. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material's structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N−H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design. PMID:26443525

  5. Patched bimetallic surfaces are active catalysts for ammonia decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2015-10-07

    In this study, ammonia decomposition is often used as an archetypical reaction for predicting new catalytic materials and understanding the very reason of why some reactions are sensitive on material’s structure. Core–shell or surface-segregated bimetallic nanoparticles expose outstanding activity for many heterogeneously catalysed reactions but the reasons remain elusive owing to the difficulties in experimentally characterizing active sites. Here by performing multiscale simulations in ammonia decomposition on various nickel loadings on platinum (111), we show that the very high activity of core–shell structures requires patches of the guest metal to create and sustain dual active sites: nickel terraces catalyse N-H bond breaking and nickel edge sites drive atomic nitrogen association. The structure sensitivity on these active catalysts depends profoundly on reaction conditions due to kinetically competing relevant elementary reaction steps. We expose a remarkable difference in active sites between transient and steady-state studies and provide insights into optimal material design.

  6. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  7. Active and stable carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hoon T.; Won, Jong H.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays, Co3O4/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids and carbon nanotube–graphene complexes have shown respectable oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media. Although certainly promising, the performance of these materials does not yet warrant implementation in the energy conversion/storage devices utilizing basic electrolytes, for example, alkaline fuel cells, metal-air batteries and certain electrolysers. Here we demonstrate a new type of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube/nanoparticle composite oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst obtained from iron acetate as an iron precursor and from cyanamide as a nitrogen and carbon nanotube precursor in a simple, scalable and single-step method. The composite has the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalysts. When used at a sufficiently high loading, this catalyst also outperforms the most active platinum-based catalysts. PMID:23715281

  8. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of carbon deposited on the NiO/MgO solid solution catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.H.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1999-05-15

    The carbon deposition due to the CH{sub 4} decomposition at 790 C over NiO/MgO catalysts was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. While no deposits could be detected over the catalysts with a NiO content smaller than 9.1 wt%, they were detected over the catalysts with NiO contents of 23 and 50 wt%. The carbon deposits are composed of platelets located at distances of about 0.34 nm, corresponding to the graphitic carbon. Various structures of the deposited carbon were observed: (a) carbon consisting of platelets parallel to the surface of the particle, which covers a catalyst particle, (b) nanotubes composed of platelets parallel to their axis, and (c) carbon vortexes consisting of platelets parallel to their axis.

  9. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  10. Highly active composite catalysts for reforming of methane into syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.; Saigo, K.; Ichino, K.

    1997-12-31

    Development in highly active catalysts for the reforming of methane with H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2}, and partial oxidation of methane was conducted to produce hydrogen with high reaction rates. A Ni-based four component catalyst, Ni-Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Pt-Rh supported on an alumina wash-coated ceramic fiber in a plate shape was suitable for the objective reaction. By combining the catalytic combustion reaction, methane conversion was markedly enhanced. Furthermore, by combining the combustion of ethane or ethylene, significantly high space-time yields of hydrogen such as 6,731 mol/1-h or 6,907 mol/l{center_dot}h, respectively at 700{degrees}C. In a reaction of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2} on the four component catalyst, an extraordinary high space-time yield of hydrogen, 12,190 mol/l{center_dot}h was realized even under the very rapid operation conditions as 3 m-sec short contact time.

  11. Carbon-riveted Pt catalyst supported on nanocapsule MWCNTs-Al2O3 with ultrahigh stability for high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zheng-Zhi; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Qu, Wei-Li; Rivera, Harry; Gu, Da-Ming; Yin, Ge-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Pt catalyst supported on nanocapsule MWCNTs-Al2O3 (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNTs) catalyst has been prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process (MAPP). The results of electrochemical measurements show that the nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst has higher activity due to more uniform dispersion and smaller size of Pt nanoparticles, and higher stability ascribed to the stronger metal-support interaction (SMSI) between Pt nanoparticles and nanocapsule support than in Pt/MWCNTs. Furthermore, the carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst has been designed and synthesized on the basis of in situ carbonization of glucose. The physical characteristics such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have indicated that α-Al2O3 indeed entered into the inside of the MWCNTs and formed a nanocapsule support of MWCNTs with α-Al2O3 as stuffing. The accelerated potential cycling tests (APCT) show that carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 possesses 10 times the stability of Pt/C and has 4.5 times the life-span of carbon-riveted Pt/TiO2-C reported in our previous work. The significantly enhanced stability for carbon-riveted nanocapsule Pt/MWCNTs-Al2O3 catalyst is attributed to the reasons as follows: the inherently excellent mechanical resistance and stability of α-Al2O3 and MWCNTs in acidic and oxidative environments; SMSI between Pt nanoparticles and the nanocapsule support; the anchoring effect of the carbon layers formed during the carbon-riveting process (CRP); the increase of Pt(0) composition during CRP.

  12. Production of carbon nanotubes: Chemical vapor deposition synthesis from liquefied petroleum gas over Fe-Co-Mo tri-metallic catalyst supported on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Sudibandriyo, M.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes were produced by chemical vapor deposition method to meet the specifications for hydrogen storage. So far, the various catalyst had been studied outlining their activities, performances, and efficiencies. In this work, tri-metallic catalyst consist of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used. The catalyst was prepared by wet-impregnation method. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was used as carbon source. The synthesis was conducted in atmospheric fixed bed reactor at reaction temperature range 750 - 850 °C for 30 minutes. The impregnation method applied in this study successfully deposed metal component on the MgO support surface. It found that the deposited metal components might partially replace Mg(OH)2 or MgO molecules in their crystal lattice. Compare to the original MgO powder; it was significant increases in pore volume and surface area has occurred during catalyst preparation stages. The size of obtained carbon nanotubes is ranging from about 10.83 nm OD/4.09 nm ID up to 21.84 nm OD/6.51 nm ID, which means that multiwall carbon nanotubes were formed during the synthesis. Yield as much as 2.35 g.CNT/g.catalyst was obtained during 30 minutes synthesis and correspond to carbon nanotubes growth rate of 0.2 μm/min. The BET surface area of the obtained carbon nanotubes is 181.13 m2/g and around 50 % of which is contributed by mesopores. Micropore with half pore width less than 1 nm contribute about 10% volume of total micro and mesopores volume of the carbon nanotubes. The existence of these micropores is very important to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes.

  13. Sol immobilization technique: a delicate balance between activity, selectivity and stability for gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Sol immobilization is a widely used method to prepare gold catalysts. The presence of the protective layer can have a significant influence on catalyst properties by mediating metal-support and reactantmetal interactions. This paper details the effect of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) protecting groups on the activity of a supported gold catalysts as well as its selectivity towards glycerol oxidation.

  14. Hydrodechlorination of Silicon Tetrachloride to Trichlorosilane Over Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Catalysts: Effect of Pretreatment of Oxygen and Hydrochloric Acid.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Do-Hwan; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Kim, Ji Man; Yang, O Bong

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the catalytic reaction for the conversion of silicon tetrachloride (STC) to trichlorosilane (TCS) over pretreated ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) catalysts by oxygen (denoted as OMC-O2) and hydrochloric acid (denoted as OMC-HCl) at 300 degrees C under N2 atmosphere. The OMC-O2 shows significantly improved the surface area (1341.2 m2/g) and pore volume (1.65 cm3/g), which results in the highest conversion rate of 7.3% as compared to bare OMC (4.3%) and OMC-HCI (5.7%). It is found that the conversion rate of STC to TCS is proportional to the number of Si-O bond over OMC catalysts, which suggests that Si-O-C bond formation is crucial to the reaction as active sites. The O2 pretreatment seems to promote the generation of oxygenated species for the formation of Si-O-C. PMID:27433674

  15. Highly selective hydrogenation of phenol and derivatives over a Pd@carbon nitride catalyst in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yao, Jia; Li, Haoran; Su, Dangsheng; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Cyclohexanone is an important intermediate in the manufacture of polyamides in chemical industry, but direct selective hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone under mild conditions is a challenge. We report here a catalyst made of Pd nanoparticles supported on a mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride, Pd@mpg-C(3)N(4), which was shown to be highly active and promoted the selective formation of cyclohexanone under atmospheric pressure of hydrogen in aqueous media without additives. Conversion of 99% and a selectivity higher than 99% were achieved within 2 h at 65 °C. The reaction can be accelerated at higher temperature, but even at room temperature, 99% conversion and 96% selectivity could still be obtained. The generality of the Pd@mpg-C(3)N(4) catalyst for this reaction was demonstrated by selective hydrogenation of other hydroxylated aromatic compounds with similar performance. PMID:21294506

  16. Simultaneous formation of nitrogen and sulfur-doped transition metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction through pyrolyzing carbon-supported copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xin; Shi, Jingjing; Ma, Chengyu; Fan, Mengyang; Bai, Zhengyu; Chen, Zhongwei; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we report a spontaneous formation of copper (Cu-N-S/C) catalysts containing both nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) elements using a one-step pyrolysis of carbon supported copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuTSPc/C). The obtained catalysts exhibit high catalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. Through electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations, several observations are reached as follows: (1) different pyrolysis temperatures can result in different catalyst structures and performances, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature is found to be 700 °C; (2) the electron transfer number of the ORR process catalyzed by the unpyrolyzed catalyst is about 2.5, after the pyrolysis, this number is increased to 3.5, indicating that the pyrolysis process can change the ORR pathway from a 2-electron transfer dominated process to a 4-electron transfer dominated one; (3) increasing catalyst loading from 40 μg cm-2 to 505 μg cm-2 can effectively improve the catalytic ORR activity, under which the percentage of H2O2 produced decreases sharply from 39.5% to 7.8%; and (4) the Cu ion can bond on pyridinic-N, graphite-N and C-Sn-C to form Cu-N-S/C catalyst active sites, which play the key role in the ORR activity.

  17. Effects of ferrite catalyst concentration and water vapor on growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Cao, Thi; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Thanh Tam Ngo, Thi; Le, Trong Lu; Loc Nguyen, Thai; Tran, Dai Lam; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Phan, Ngoc Minh

    2014-12-01

    In this study Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used as catalysts for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The effect of catalyst concentration and water vapor during the CVD process on the properties of the VA-CNTs was investigated. Monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles (4.5-9.0 nm diameter) prepared by thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate compounds were spin-coated on clean silicon substrates which served as a platform for VA-CNTs growth. The results indicated that the length, density and growth rate of CNTs were strongly affected by the catalyst concentration. CNTs grown at 0.026 g ml-1 Fe3O4 catalyst had greater length, density and growth rates than those obtained at 0.01 and 0.033 g ml-1 Fe3O4 catalyst. Addition of water during the CVD process had drastically improved CNTs growth. The length and growth rate of obtained CNTs were 40 μm and 1.33 μm min-1, respectively. The results provided insights into the role of Fe3O4 catalyst and water vapor during VA-CNTs growth process by CVD method and the obtained information might serve as a starting point for further optimization of VA-CNTs synthesis.

  18. A novel Pt-Co alloy hydrogen anode catalyst with superlative activity, CO-tolerance and robustness.

    PubMed

    Shi, G Y; Yano, H; Tryk, D A; Watanabe, M; Iiyama, A; Uchida, H

    2016-08-01

    PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations. PMID:26952735

  19. Modification of isomerization activity and selectivity over sulfated zirconia catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, S.L.; Iglesia, E.; Kramer, G.M.; McVicker, G.B.

    1993-12-31

    The family of anion-modified oxide strong solid acid catalysts (oxides of Zr, Ti, Sn, or Fe, modified with sulfate) that have been recently reported in the literature were examined for the isomerization of C{sub 5}-C{sub 8} n-paraffins. Isomerization of C{sub 7+} feeds on conventional solid and liquid acids leads to extensive cracking; in particular, paraffins with seven or more carbon atoms are known to undergo acid cracking to undesirable light gases during isomerization over acid catalysts; thus, commercial isomerization practice is limited to C{sub 4}-C{sub 6} feeds. Cracking occurs because isobutane and propane are excellent leaving groups in carbonium ion rearrangements. Since both isomerization and cracking occur on strong acid sites it has been difficult to control one at the expense of the other. The authors have observed that low levels of that low levels of adamantane, a hydride transfer agent, added to a heptane or octain feed will double the isomerization rate while dramatically limiting cracking reactions. The adamantane enhances the rate determining hydride transfer step and limits the surface residence time of carbocation intermediates. This behavior contrasts with that of aromatic addition where poisoning of strong acid sites inhibits cracking but dramatically decreases the isomerization rate. This paper will suggest a mechanism that involves a nonfunctional acid catalyzed chain mechanism proceeding through intermolecular hydride transfer reactions. Finally we will discuss the remaining issues in obtaining a viable C{sub 7}+ isomerization process.

  20. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis. PMID:21711812

  1. Effective, selective coupling of propylene oxide and carbon dioxide to poly(propylene carbonate) using (salen)CrN3 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Darensbourg, Donald J; Phelps, Andrea L

    2005-06-27

    The copolymerization of propylene oxide and CO2 has been investigated employing Cr(salen)N3 complexes as catalysts. Unfortunately the reaction could not be studied in real time via in situ IR spectroscopy, thereby obtaining detailed kinetic data, because of the copolymer limited solubility in most solvents. Investigations employing batch reactor runs concentrating on varying the cocatalyst, the equivalents of cocatalyst, and the steric and electronic structure of the catalyst through modification of the salen ligand were undertaken. It was discovered that the optimal catalyst for copolymer selectivity vs the monomeric propylene carbonate was one that contained a salen ligand with an electron-withdrawing phenylene backbone and electron-donating tert-butyl groups in the phenolate rings. This catalyst was used to investigate the effect of altering the nature of the cocatalyst and its concentration, the three cocatalysts being tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3), PPN+ N3(-), and PPN+ Cl-, where PPN+ is the large very weakly interacting bis(triphenylphosphoramylidene)ammonium cation. By utilization of more or less than 1 equiv of PCy3 as cocatalyst, the yield of polymer was reduced. On the other hand, the PPN+ salts showed the best activity when 0.5 equiv was employed, and produced only cyclic when using over 1 equiv. PMID:15962970

  2. Understanding support mediated activity by investigating highly active, thermally stable, silica supported gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Rashkeev, Sergey; Pennycook, Stephen J; Schwartz, Viviane; Mullins, David R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    2.5 nm gold nanoparticles were grown on a fumed silica support using the physical vapor deposition technique magnetron sputtering. Combining electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and catalytic studies revealed that the silica supported gold catalysts are thermally stable when annealed in an oxygen containing environment up to at least 500oC. This surprising stability is attributed to the absence of residual halide impurities and a strong bond between gold and defects at the silica surface (2.7 - 3.8 eV), as estimated from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Au/SiO2 catalysts are slightly less active for CO oxidation than the prototypical Au/TiO2 catalysts, however they can be regenerated far more easily, fully recovering the activity of a freshly prepared catalyst after deactivation.

  3. Conversion of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol via dimethyl succinate over rhenium nano-catalyst supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ung Gi; Kim, Jeong Kwon; Lee, Joongwon; Lee, Jong Kwon; Yi, Jongheop; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Copper-containing mesoporous carbons (XCu-MC) with different copper content (X = 8.0, 12.7, 15.9, 23.3, and 26.8 wt%) were prepared by a single-step surfactant-templating method. Rhenium nano-catalysts supported on copper-containing mesoporous carbons (Re/XCu-MC) were then prepared by an incipient wetness method. Re/XCu-MC (X = 8.0, 12.7, 15.9, 23.3, and 26.8 wt%) catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm, HR-TEM, FT-IR, and H2- TPR analyses. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of succinic acid to 1,4-butanediol (BDO) via dimethyl succinate (DMS) was carried out over Re/XCu-MC catalysts in a batch reactor. The effect of copper content on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of Re/XCu-MC catalysts in the hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO was investigated. Re/XCu-MC catalysts retained different physicochemical properties depending on copper content. In the hydrogenation of succinic acid to BDO, yield for BDO showed a volcano-shaped trend with respect to copper content. Thus, an optimal copper content was required to achieve maximum catalytic performance of Re/XCu-MC. It was also observed that yield for BDO increased with increasing the amount of hydrogen consumption by copper in the Re/XCu-MC catalysts. PMID:25958619

  4. Studies on metal catalysts and carbon materials for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaixia

    As a potential candidate for an environmentally benign and highly efficient electric power generation technology, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are now attracting great interest for various applications. The main objective of this project has been to investigate the interfacial interaction of Pt nanoparticles with their carbon supports, so as to determine ways to optimise the catalyst electrode and to increase its catalytic activity, thereby enhancing PEM fuel cell performance. We first studied the interfacial interaction (leading to adhesion) of Pt nanoparticles evaporated onto untreated and Ar+-treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces, with, respectively, low and high surface defect densities; HOPG was used as a model for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon fibers. We found that those Pt nanoparticles have very weak interactions with their pristine carbon material supports, with no evidence of compound formation between them. Our analysis, however, indicated that the adhesion of Pt nanoparticles to their supports can be enhanced, using ion beams, plasmas, or other treatments to establish defects on the carbon substrate surface. In addition, by using multicomponent XPS analysis with symmetric lineshapes for each Pt4f spectral component (4f7/2,5/2), we attributed the component peaks to the existence of (i) surface oxidation on the platinum nanoparticles, and different electronic configurations of (ii) surface and (iii) bulk Pt atoms. One way of enhancing strong adhesion between them is by chemical functionalization of the support. Using mixed H2SO4/HNO3 acid treatments, we have characterized the surface chemistry of functionalized carbon fiber paper by combining infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, to give new insights into the often-used oxidation of graphene-containing materials. We have, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of transient O-, N- and S-containing species during the oxidation process, as well as

  5. On factors controlling activity of submonolayer bimetallic catalysts: Nitrogen desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2014-01-07

    We model N{sub 2} desorption on submonolayer bimetallic surfaces consisting of Co clusters on Pt(111) via first-principles density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that submonolayer structures are essential to rationalize the high activity of these bimetallics in ammonia decomposition. We show that the N{sub 2} desorption temperature on Co/Pt(111) is about 100 K higher than that on Ni/Pt(111), despite Co/Pt(111) binding N weaker at low N coverages. Co/Pt(111) has substantially different lateral interactions than single metals and Ni/Pt. The lateral interactions are rationalized with the d-band center theory. The activity of bimetallic catalysts is the result of heterogeneity of binding energies and reaction barriers among sites, and the most active site can differ on various bimetallics. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental data and demonstrate for the first time that the zero-coverage descriptor, used until now, for catalyst activity is inadequate due not only to lacking lateral interactions but importantly to presence of multiple sites and a complex interplay of thermodynamics (binding energies, occupation) and kinetics (association barriers) on those sites.

  6. Synthesis of 3D graphite oxide-exfoliated carbon nanotube carbon composite and its application as catalyst support for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailin; Kakade, Bhalchandra A.; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2014-08-01

    The restacking of graphene or reduced graphite oxide (r-GO) is commonly regarded as a severe obstacle for potential applications. We propose the application of exfoliated carbon nanotube (e-CNT) as an effective carbon spacer for fabricating a sandwich-like three-dimensional (3D) carbon composite with GO. The 3D carbon combination of GO + e-CNT is successfully prepared via homogenously mixing of GO and e-CNT in an aqueous dispersion in which carbon spacers are homogenously intercalated with graphene layers. With the addition of a carbon spacer, the BET surface area of 3D carbon (51.6 m2 g-1) is enhanced by a factor of three compared with r-GO (17.2 m2 g-1) after thermal reduction. In addition, the 3D GO + e-CNT supported PtPd catalyst (PtPd-GO + e-CNT) shows homogenous distribution of PtPd nanoparticles of 3.9 ± 0.6 nm in size, with an enlarged electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) value of 164 m2 g-1 and a mass activity of 690 mA mg-1 toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), which is the typical anode reaction for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC).

  7. Carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite-supported Pt catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingwei; Wei, Jiadi; Chai, Yuzheng; Zhang, Shuo

    2015-07-15

    Carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite (MWCNTs-SnO2) was obtained via the hydrolysis of SnCl4 in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and subsequent calcinations. And carbon nanotubes/tin oxide nanocomposite-supported Pt catalysts (Pt/MWCNTs-SnO2) were prepared by in-situ liquid phase reduction using H2PtCl6 as a metal precursor. As-prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their catalytic performances were evaluated by chronoamperometry (CA) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Desirable catalytic performance for methanol electro-oxidation was observed with a reduced size and an improved dispersion of Pt catalysts on the MWCNTs-SnO2 nanocomposite. The calcination temperature of MWCNTs-SnO2 nanocomposite was a key factor for controlling the catalytic performance of Pt/MWCNTs-SnO2 catalysts. PMID:25801135

  8. Insights into carbon nanotube nucleation: Cap formation governed by catalyst interfacial step flow

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rahul; Sharma, Renu; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.

    2014-01-01

    In order to accommodate an increasing demand for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with desirable characteristics one has to understand the origin of helicity of their structures. Here, through in situ microscopy we demonstrate that the nucleation of a carbon nanotube is initiated by the formation of the carbon cap. Nucleation begins with the formation of a graphene embryo that is bound between opposite step-edges on the nickel catalyst surface. The embryo grows larger as the step-edges migrate along the surface, leading to the formation of a curved carbon cap when the steps flow across the edges of adjacent facets. Further motion of the steps away from the catalyst tip with attached rims of the carbon cap generates the wall of the nanotube. Density Functional Theory calculations bring further insight into the process, showing that step flow occurs by surface self diffusion of the nickel atoms via a step-edge attachment-detachment mechanism. Since the cap forms first in the sequence of stages involved in growth, we suggest that it originates the helicity of the nanotube. Therefore, the angular distribution of catalyst facets could be exploited as a new parameter for controlling the curvature of the cap and, presumably, the helicity of the nanotube. PMID:25308821

  9. A Novel Catalyst Deposition Technique for the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, A.; Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a technique at NASA's Ames Research Center by which carbon nanotubes (NT) can be grown. The project had several goals which included: 1) scaleability, 2) ability to control single wall nanotube (SWNT) and multiwall nanotube (MWNT) formation, 3) ability to control the density of nanotubes as they grow, 4) ability to apply standard masking techniques for NT patterning. Information regarding the growth technique includes its use of a catalyst deposition process. SWNTs of varying thicknesses can be grown by changing the catalyst composition. Demonstrations are given of various methods of masking including the use of transmission electron microscopic (TEM) grids.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  11. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube as a potential metal-free catalyst for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Hsiang; Lu, Yu-Huan; Chen, Hsin-Tsung

    2016-04-28

    We elucidate the possibility of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube as a robust catalyst for CO oxidation. We have performed first-principles calculations considering the spin-polarization effect to demonstrate the reaction of CO oxidation catalyzed by the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube. The calculations show that O2 species can be partially reduced with charge transfer from the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube and directly chemisorbed on the C-N sites of the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube. The partially reduced O2 species at the C-N sites can further directly react with a CO molecule via the Eley-Rideal mechanism with the barriers of 0.45-0.58 eV for the different diameter of nanotube. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations were performed and showed that the oxidation of CO occurs by the Eley-Rideal mechanism. The relationship between the curvature and reactivity of the nitrogen doped carbon nanotube was also unraveled. It appears that the barrier height of the rate-limiting step depends on the curvature of the nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube in the trend of (3,3)-NCNT < (4,4)-NCNT < (5,5)-NCNT (decreases with increased curvature). Using this relationship, we can predict the barriers for other N-doped carbon nanotubes with different tube diameters. Our results reveal that the nitrogen doped carbon nanomaterials can be a good, low-cost, and metal-free catalyst for CO oxidation. PMID:27074831

  12. Lewis base activation of borane-dimethylsulfide into strongly reducing ion pairs for the transformation of carbon dioxide to methoxyboranes.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Marc-André; Courtemanche, Marc-André; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2014-10-01

    The hydroboration of carbon dioxide into methoxyboranes by borane-dimethylsulfide using different base catalysts is described. A non-nucleophilic proton sponge is found to be the most active catalyst, with TOF reaching 64 h(-1) at 80 °C, and is acting via the activation of BH3·SMe2 into a boronium-borohydride ion pair. PMID:25164269

  13. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces without an external catalyst and nanocomposite production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie

    The research work presented in this thesis deals with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), an allotrope of carbon with a cylindrical structure consisting of a rolled up graphene sheet. CNTs are generally produced by the decomposition of a carbon source in the presence of a metal catalyst at elevated temperatures. CNTs have outstanding properties and have attracted immense attention in both industry and academia. However, the development of commercial applications of CNTs is slow due to limitations in the large scale production of CNTs and their high cost. Another limitation is the interface resistance generated by external catalyst nanoparticles used in traditional CNT growth methods. In order to eliminate the interface resistance and simultaneously provide CNT growth over large surfaces and varying geometries, a method called direct CNT growth is established to enable the extraction of the CNT structure directly from the metal surface. The novel process for the production of CNTs developed in the present thesis is applied to planar surfaces and spherical particles made of stainless steel (SS) 304. The method is based on the establishment of nanometer scale structures at the surface which act as catalyst nanoparticles while at the same time being integral parts of the material. It uses first a mild chemical etching of the surface, followed by a specific heat treatment performed using either standard chemical vapour deposition (standard-CVD) or fluidized bed CVD (FBCVD) techniques. Acetylene (C2H2) is used as the carbon source and SS 304 acts as both the catalyst and the substrate in the growth process. This direct CNT growth with this substrate dual function eliminates the need of external catalyst nanoparticles deposited onto the surface. The active sites necessary for CNT growth are tailored on the SS itself by means of the two-step treatment process. MWNTs of 20-70 nm in diameter are produced. The CNTs are characterized by Raman Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA

  14. Catalytic dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride in liquid phase with methanol as H-donor over Ag/C catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mohong; Li, Xuebing; Chen, Bo; Li, Mingshi; Xin, Hongchuan; Song, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Catalytic hydrodechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an effective measure to remove CCl4 due to its pollutant character. The dechlorination of CCl4 to dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) and chloroform (CHCl3) with a molar ratio of 3:2 was catalyzed by carbon-supported silver (Ag/C) catalyst in methanol solution. It was proposed from the catalytic results and characterization (X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) data that, the chloride ion is abstracted from adsorbed CCl4 by Ag to form CCl3 and CCI2 radicals and silver chloride (AgCl), and meanwhile the dehydrogenation of methanol over Ag domains intrigues initial active Ag-H species and formaldehyde (HCHO); then the CCI3 and CCI, radicals are combined with Ag-H to generate reaction products (CHCl3 and CH2Cl2) and Ag, and the dehydrogenated product HCHO facilitates the regeneration of formed AgCl to Ag with formation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen chloride. The catalyst can be recovered and recycled, and there was no significant decrease in catalytic activity and selectivity after 4th recycling. PMID:25924408

  15. Ultrasound enhanced heterogeneous activation of peroxydisulfate by bimetallic Fe-Co/GAC catalyst for the degradation of Acid Orange 7 in water.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chun; Wang, Liguo; Gao, Hong; Hou, Liwei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Bimetallic Fe-Co/GAC (granular activated carbon) was prepared and used as heterogeneous catalyst in the ultrasound enhanced heterogeneous activation of peroxydisulfate (PS, S2O(2-)8) process. The effect of initial pH, PS concentration, catalyst addition and stirring rate on the decolorization of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) was investigated. The results showed that the decolorization efficiency increased with an increase in PS concentration from 0.3 to 0.5 g/L and an increase in catalyst amount from 0.5 to 0.8 g/L. But further increase in PS concentration and catalyst addition would result in an unpronounced increase in decolorization efficiency. In the range of 300 to 900 r/min, stirring rate had little effect on AO7 decolorization. The catalyst stability was evaluated by measuring decolorization efficiency for four successive cycles. PMID:25079835

  16. Platinum-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles on graphitic carbon nitride modified carbon black: A highly electroactive and durable catalyst for electrooxidation of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Huayu; Chen, Shouwen; Fu, Yongsheng; Wang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    A composite catalyst consisting of Pt-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) modified carbon black (CB) is designed and fabricated by a facile two-step approach. The resulting catalyst exhibits unprecedented high catalytic activity and excellent long-term stability for electrooxidation of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol and glycerol) in alkaline media. The superior electrochemical performance of the composite catalyst is attributed to the specific characteristics of the unique nanostructure and the synergistic effects of individual components, including the complementary roles of Pt (dehydrogenation site) and Pd (removal of CO-like species), the template effect of the planar amino group of g-C3N4 for the dispersed decoration of Pt-Pd NPs, the high specific surface area of CB for the rapid diffusion of electrolyte and removal of the carbonaceous intermediates, as well as the structural stability of the support based on covalent interaction between g-C3N4 and CB for maintaining the durability of the catalytic system.

  17. A rational design approach to nanostructured catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwacki, Christopher

    The extraordinary energetic properties of subnanometer (<10 nm) structures consisting of reduced metals, metal oxides, and graphitic carbons are emerging as the principal technologies involving catalytic reactions at ambient temperatures, for such applications as respiratory protection, pollution abatement, chemical synthesis, sensors, and energy conversion. Gold nanoparticles (Au NP) possess unique reactive properties not present in the bulk state and have served in the past decade as a model for the nanosciences, where molecular species are synthesized, scaled, and engineered into functional materials. Gold nanoparticles as isolated structures are not useful as real catalysts and must co-exist with supports that provide enhanced stability and activity. Support oxides such as TiO2, Fe2O 3, CeO2, SiO2, Al2O3, ZrO 2, and graphitic (active) carbons have been shown to increase the active nature of AuNP and have been the subject of several thousand publications in the past decade. Zirconia compared to titania as a support for Au NP catalysis has been studied with limited success. In fact, the majority of observations show that zirconia is one of the lowest performing metal oxide supports involving Au NP oxidation catalysis. The likely reason for these observations is a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and surface functionality as it pertains to ambient temperature oxidation catalysis (ATOC). Furthermore, virtually all substrate and catalyst preparations in earlier work were performed at high temperatures, typically 400--900°C, thus forming progressively monomorphic structures containing larger crystals with reduced surface functionality and porosity. In this research, I established the hypothesis based on a structural model that surface functional hydroxides are important to sustained hydrolytic reactions, such as those involving Au NP for the oxidation of CO to CO 2. Theoretical calculations by Ignatchenko, Vittadini, et al. show that

  18. High performance low temperature carbon composite catalysts for flexible dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Syed Ghufran; Halme, Janne; Saukkonen, Tapio; Rautama, Eeva-Leena; Lund, Peter

    2013-10-28

    Roll-to-roll manufacturing of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) requires efficient and low cost materials that adhere well on the flexible substrates used. In this regard, different low temperature carbon composite counter electrode (CE) catalyst ink formulations for flexible DSSCs were developed that can be simply and quickly coated on plastic substrates and dried below 150 °C. The CEs were investigated in terms of photovoltaic performance in DSSCs by current-voltage measurements, mechanical adhesion properties by bending and tape tests, electro-catalytic performance by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructure by electron microscopy. In the bending and tape tests, PEDOT-carbon composite catalyst layers exhibited higher elasticity and better adhesion on all the studied substrates (ITO-PET and ITO-PEN plastic, and FTO-glass), compared to a binder free carbon composite and a TiO2 binder enriched carbon composite, and showed lower charge transfer resistance (1.5-3 Ω cm(2)) than the traditional thermally platinized CE (5 Ω cm(2)), demonstrating better catalytic performance for the tri-iodide reduction reaction. Also the TiO2 binder enriched carbon composite showed good catalytic characteristics and relatively good adhesion on ITO-PET, but on ITO-PEN its adhesion was poor. A DSSC with the TiO2 binder enriched catalyst layer reached 85% of the solar energy conversion efficiency of the reference DSSC based on the traditional thermally platinized CE. Based on the aforementioned characteristics, these carbon composites are promising candidates for replacing the platinum catalyst in a high volume roll-to-roll manufacturing process of DSSCs. PMID:24042582

  19. Phosphorus-doped carbon nanotubes supported low Pt loading catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziwu; Shi, Qianqian; Zhang, Rufan; Wang, Quande; Kang, Guojun; Peng, Feng

    2014-12-01

    To develop low-cost and efficient cathode electrocatalysts for fuel cells in acidic media, phosphorus-doped carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) supported low Pt loading catalyst (0.85% Pt) is designed. The as-prepared Pt/P-CNTs exhibit significantly enhanced electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and long-term stability due to the stronger interaction between Pt and P-CNTs, which is proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the as-prepared Pt/P-CNTs also display much better tolerance to methanol crossover effects, showing a good potential application for future proton exchange membrane fuel cell devices.

  20. On the design of Pt based catalysts. Combining porous architecture with surface modification by Sn for electrocatalytic activity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez-Montaño, Jonathan; García, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José L.; Pastor, Elena; Cappellari, Paula; Planes, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-01

    Metallic mesoporous (MP) catalysts with large surface area can be obtained in-situ, in a single step, by electrochemical reduction. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of MPPt and Sn modified mesoporous Pt (MPPt/Sn) was studied and compared with commercial carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1). The electrochemical activity toward carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, whereas X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition and oxidation state of the atoms in the top layers of the catalysts. The analysis of methanol conversion to CO2 was performed with aid of differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). Results reveal a better performance of the MPPt/Sn, which shows higher current density and energy conversion efficiency of fuel to CO2 than conventional carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1).

  1. Cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) ruthenium complexes as remarkably active catalysts for ethenolysis.

    PubMed

    Marx, Vanessa M; Sullivan, Alexandra H; Melaimi, Mohand; Virgil, Scott C; Keitz, Benjamin K; Weinberger, David S; Bertrand, Guy; Grubbs, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    An expanded family of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts bearing cyclic alkyl amino carbene (CAAC) ligands was prepared. These catalysts exhibited exceptional activity in the ethenolysis of the seed-oil derivative methyl oleate. In many cases, catalyst turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 100,000 were achieved, at a catalyst loading of only 3 ppm. Remarkably, the most active catalyst system was able to achieve a TON of 340,000, at a catalyst loading of only 1 ppm. This is the first time a series of metathesis catalysts has exhibited such high performance in cross-metathesis reactions employing ethylene gas, with activities sufficient to render ethenolysis applicable to the industrial-scale production of linear α-olefins (LAOs) and other terminal-olefin products. PMID:25522160

  2. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  3. Flame synthesis of carbon nano onions using liquefied petroleum gas without catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Vivek; Prasad, J Sarada; Rao, M Venkateswara; Bharadwaj, S; Anjaneyulu, Y; Jain, Pawan Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Densely agglomerated, high specific surface area carbon nano onions with diameter of 30-40 nm have been synthesized. Liquefied petroleum gas and air mixtures produced carbon nano onions in diffusion flames without catalyst. The optimized oxidant to fuel ratio which produces carbon nano onions has been found to be 0.1 slpm/slpm. The experiment yielded 70% pure carbon nano onions with a rate of 5 g/h. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectrum reveal the densely packed sp(2) hybridized carbon with (002) semi-crystalline hexagonal graphite reflection. The carbon nano onions are thermally stable up to 600 °C. PMID:25427484

  4. Fast and selective sugar conversion to alkyl lactate and lactic acid with bifunctional carbon-silica catalysts.

    PubMed

    de Clippel, Filip; Dusselier, Michiel; Van Rompaey, Ruben; Vanelderen, Pieter; Dijkmans, Jan; Makshina, Ekaterina; Giebeler, Lars; Oswald, Steffen; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M; Pescarmona, Paolo P; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2012-06-20

    A novel catalyst design for the conversion of mono- and disaccharides to lactic acid and its alkyl esters was developed. The design uses a mesoporous silica, here represented by MCM-41, which is filled with a polyaromatic to graphite-like carbon network. The particular structure of the carbon-silica composite allows the accommodation of a broad variety of catalytically active functions, useful to attain cascade reactions, in a readily tunable pore texture. The significance of a joint action of Lewis and weak Brønsted acid sites was studied here to realize fast and selective sugar conversion. Lewis acidity is provided by grafting the silica component with Sn(IV), while weak Brønsted acidity originates from oxygen-containing functional groups in the carbon part. The weak Brønsted acid content was varied by changing the amount of carbon loading, the pyrolysis temperature, and the post-treatment procedure. As both catalytic functions can be tuned independently, their individual role and optimal balance can be searched for. It was thus demonstrated for the first time that the presence of weak Brønsted acid sites is crucial in accelerating the rate-determining (dehydration) reaction, that is, the first step in the reaction network from triose to lactate. Composite catalysts with well-balanced Lewis/Brønsted acidity are able to convert the trioses, glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone, quantitatively into ethyl lactate in ethanol with an order of magnitude higher reaction rate when compared to the Sn grafted MCM-41 reference catalyst. Interestingly, the ability to tailor the pore architecture further allows the synthesis of a variety of amphiphilic alkyl lactates from trioses and long chain alcohols in moderate to high yields. Finally, direct lactate formation from hexoses, glucose and fructose, and disaccharides composed thereof, sucrose, was also attempted. For instance, conversion of sucrose with the bifunctional composite catalyst yields 45% methyl lactate in

  5. New route toward building active ruthenium nanoparticles on ordered mesoporous carbons with extremely high stability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Sun, Chengjun; Ren, Yang; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang

    2014-01-01

    Creating highly active and stable metal catalysts is a persistent goal in the field of heterogeneous catalysis. However, a real catalyst can rarely achieve both of these qualities simultaneously due to limitations in the design of the active site and support. One method to circumvent this problem is to fabricate firmly attached metal species onto the voids of a mesoporous support formed simultaneously. In this study, we developed a new type of ruthenium catalyst that was firmly confined by ordered mesoporous carbons through the fabrication of a cubic Ia3d chitosan-ruthenium-silica mesophase before pyrolysis and silica removal. This facile method generates fine ruthenium nanoparticles (ca. 1.7 nm) that are homogeneously dispersed on a mesoporous carbonaceous framework. This ruthenium catalyst can be recycled 22 times without any loss of reactivity, showing the highest stability of any metal catalysts; this catalyst displays a high activity (23.3 mol(LA)h(-1)g(metal)(-1)) during the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) when the metal loading is 6.1 wt%. Even at an ultralow loading (0.3 wt%), this catalyst still outperforms the most active known Ru/C catalyst. This work reveals new possibilities for designing and fabricating highly stable and active metal catalysts by creating metal sites and mesoporous supports simultaneously. PMID:24687047

  6. Metal and precursor effect during 1-heptyne selective hydrogenation using an activated carbon as support.

    PubMed

    Lederhos, Cecilia R; Badano, Juan M; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX>PdNRX>PtClRX≫RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX=PdNRX>RuClRX>PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  7. New route toward building active ruthenium nanoparticles on ordered mesoporous carbons with extremely high stability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Sun, Chengjun; Ren, Yang; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang

    2014-01-01

    Creating highly active and stable metal catalysts is a persistent goal in the field of heterogeneous catalysis. However, a real catalyst can rarely achieve both of these qualities simultaneously due to limitations in the design of the active site and support. One method to circumvent this problem is to fabricate firmly attached metal species onto the voids of a mesoporous support formed simultaneously. In this study, we developed a new type of ruthenium catalyst that was firmly confined by ordered mesoporous carbons through the fabrication of a cubic Ia3d chitosan-ruthenium-silica mesophase before pyrolysis and silica removal. This facile method generates fine ruthenium nanoparticles (ca. 1.7 nm) that are homogeneously dispersed on a mesoporous carbonaceous framework. This ruthenium catalyst can be recycled 22 times without any loss of reactivity, showing the highest stability of any metal catalysts; this catalyst displays a high activity (23.3 molLAh−1gmetal−1) during the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) when the metal loading is 6.1 wt%. Even at an ultralow loading (0.3 wt%), this catalyst still outperforms the most active known Ru/C catalyst. This work reveals new possibilities for designing and fabricating highly stable and active metal catalysts by creating metal sites and mesoporous supports simultaneously. PMID:24687047

  8. Immobilisation of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts. Factors influencing activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Severn, John R; Chadwick, John C

    2013-07-01

    The activity and stability of homogeneous olefin polymerisation catalysts, when immobilised on a support, are dependent on both chemical and physical effects. Chemical factors affecting catalyst activity include the ease of formation of the active species, which is strongly dependent on the transition metal. Catalyst productivity is dependent on the balance between activity and stability. Immobilisation can lead to a lower proportion of active species and therefore lower initial polymerisation activity, but nevertheless give higher polymer yields in cases where increased catalyst stability is obtained. Important physical factors are support porosity and the ability of a support to undergo progressive fragmentation during polymerisation, facilitating monomer diffusion through the growing catalyst/polymer particle. This article illustrates the importance of these factors in olefin polymerisation with both early- and late-transition metal catalysts, with particular reference to the use of silica and magnesium chloride supports as well as to effects of immobilisation on polymer structure and properties. PMID:23467461

  9. Structurally inhomogeneous nanoparticulate catalysts in cobalt-catalyzed carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kohigashi, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Takeda, S.; Homma, Y.

    2014-08-18

    The structure of nanoparticulate catalysts involved in cobalt-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). In contrast to previous studies, the analyses of ETEM images showed that the nanoparticulate catalysts were structurally inhomogeneous during CNT growth in the source gas of acetylene at a rate of pressure increase of about 3 Pa/h and at 550 °C. The lattice fringes observed in the nanoparticulate catalysts can be accounted for by not a single crystalline structure but by several possible pairs of structures including pure Co and cobalt carbides. The inhomogeneous structures were unstable with time. The possible origin of the inhomogeneous structures is discussed.

  10. Effect of Catalyst Concentration on the Growth of Palm oil Based Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriani, A. B.; Mohamad, F.; Azira, A. A.; Hajar, Nadya; Mamat, M. H.; Sarah, M. S. P.; Musa, M. Z.; Nor, Roslan Md; Rusop, M.

    2010-07-01

    The effects of catalyst concentration on the synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) using ferrocene as catalyst and palm oil as bio-hydrocarbon source in thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method were studied. The CVD reaction took 30 minutes followed by 10 minutes annealing process at various ferrocene concentration; 0.66, 1.33, 2.66, 3.99, 5.33, 6.66 and 7.99 wt% at fixed synthesis temperature 750 °C. The VACNTs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The growth rate, the diameters, and the degree of crystalinity of the VACNTs were found to be dependent on the catalyst concentration.

  11. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Goldberg, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  12. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

    1985-11-06

    A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  13. Functionalization effect on a Pt/carbon nanotube composite catalyst: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae; Park, Mina

    2016-08-10

    Chemical interactions between Pt and both pristine and defective carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that were functionalized with various surface functional groups, including atomic oxygen (-O), atomic nitrogen (-N), hydroxyl (-OH) and amine (-NH2) groups, were investigated through first-principles calculations. Our calculations suggest that the oxygen or nitrogen of the surface functional group can promote better structural stability of a Pt/CNT complex in terms of the binding energy enhancement between Pt and CNTs. Enhanced binding of the Pt/CNT complex would improve the long-term durability of the complex and thus enhance the catalytic activity of Pt catalysts supported on CNTs. Among the functional groups investigated, atomic nitrogen resulted in the most consistent increase in the Pt binding energies on pristine or defective CNTs. Moreover, atomic nitrogen decoration on the surface of CNTs rather than substitution into the CNTs appears to be more desirable. A d-band centre analysis and H2 adsorption calculations also revealed that the catalytic activity of Pt can be improved via efficient functionalization of the CNT support. PMID:27478884

  14. Promotion of oxygen reduction reaction durability of carbon-supported PtAu catalysts by surface segregation and TiO₂ addition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Wei; Chen, Hong-Shuo; Lai, Chien-Ming; Lin, Jiunn-Nan; Tsai, Li-Duan; Wang, Kuan-Wen

    2014-02-12

    Highly effective carbon supported-Pt75Au25 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are prepared though titanium dioxide modification and post heat treatment. After accelerated durability test (ADT) of 1700 cycles, the ORR activity of PtAu/C catalysts modified by TiO2 and air heat treatment is 3 times higher than that of the commercial Pt/C. The enhancement of ORR activity is attributed to surface and structural alteration by air-induced Pt surface segregation and lower unfilled d states. On the contrary, for TiO2 modified and H2 treated PtAu/C catalysts, the deterioration of the ORR activity may be due to the loss of electrochemical surface area after ADT and the increase of d-band vacancy. PMID:24447040

  15. Direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide over CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Hyuk; Joe, Wangrae; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Mieock; Kim, Dong Baek; Jang, Boknam; Song, In Kyu

    2013-12-01

    CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) (X = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and 1.0) nano-catalysts were prepared by a co-precipitation method with a variation of CeO2 content (X, mol%), and they were applied to the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. Successful formation of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts was well confirmed by XRD analysis. The amount of DMC produced over CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) catalysts exhibited a volcano-shaped curve with respect to CeO2 content. Acidity and basicity of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts were measured by NH3-TPD and CO2-TPD experiments, respectively, to elucidate the effect of acidity and basicity on the catalytic performance in the reaction. It was revealed that the catalytic performance of CeO2(X)-ZnO(1-X) nano-catalysts was closely related to the acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Amount of dimethyl carbonate increased with increasing both acidity and basicity of the catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, CeO2(0.7)-ZnO(0.3) with the largest acidity and basicity showed the best catalytic performance in the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and carbon dioxide. PMID:24266202

  16. Support chemistry, surface area, and preparation effects on sulfided NiMo catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Sandoval, R.S.

    1996-06-01

    Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials which contain a homogeneous distribution of ion exchangeable alkali cations that provide charge compensation to the metal-oxygen framework. In terms of the major types of inorganic ion exchangers defined by Clearfield, these amorphous HMO materials are similar to both hydrous oxides and layered oxide ion exchangers (e.g., alkali metal titanates). For catalyst applications, the HMO material serves as an ion exchangeable support which facilitates the uniform incorporation of catalyst precursor species. Following catalyst precursor incorporation, an activation step is required to convert the catalyst precursor to the desired active phase. Considerable process development activities at Sandia National Laboratories related to HMO materials have resulted in bulk hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)- and silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si)-supported NiMo catalysts that are more active in model reactions which simulate direct coal liquefaction (e.g., pyrene hydrogenation) than commercial {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported NiMo catalysts. However, a fundamental explanation does not exist for the enhanced activity of these novel catalyst materials; possible reasons include fundamental differences in support chemistry relative to commercial oxides, high surface area, or catalyst preparation effects (ion exchange vs. incipient wetness impregnation techniques). The goals of this paper are to identify the key factors which control sulfided NiMo catalyst activity, including those characteristics of HTO- and HTO:Si-supported NiMo catalysts which uniquely set them apart from conventional oxide supports.

  17. Effect of halide-modified model carbon supports on catalyst stability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kevin N; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Olson, Tim S; Dameron, Arrelaine A; O'Neill, Kevin; Christensen, Steven T; Dinh, Huyen N; Gennett, Thomas; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Modification of physiochemical and structural properties of carbon-based materials through targeted functionalization is a useful way to improve the properties and performance of such catalyst materials. This work explores the incorporation of dopants, including nitrogen, iodine, and fluorine, into the carbon structure of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its potential benefits on the stability of PtRu catalyst nanoparticles. Evaluation of the changes in the catalyst nanoparticle coverage and size as a function of implantation parameters reveals that carbon supports functionalized with a combination of nitrogen and fluorine provide the most beneficial interactions, resulting in suppressed particle coarsening and dissolution. Benefits of a carefully tuned support system modified with fluorine and nitrogen surpass those obtained with nitrogen (no fluorine) modification. Ion implantation of iodine into HOPG results in a consistent amount of structural damage to the carbon matrix, regardless of dose. For this modification, improvements in stability are similar to nitrogen modification; however, the benefit is only observed at higher dose conditions. This indicates that a mechanism different than the one associated with nitrogen may be responsible for the improved durability. PMID:23194033

  18. Novel catalysts for methane activation. Quarterly report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Du, Y.; Wu, H.J.; Malhotra, R.; Wilson, R.B.

    1995-06-10

    Fullerenes are a recently discovered allotrope of carbon that possess unusual properties, some of which may be ideal for methane activation. This project is designed to evaluate these carbon-based materials for conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. The project is divided into three technical tasks: synthesis and characterization of the fullerenes and fullerene soots; testing of catalysts; and evaluation of the results and technical reporting. The authors had two objectives for this quarter. The first objective was to complete their study of the K-doped fullerene soots to include the selectivity of these materials as a function of methane conversion. The second objective was to identify and evaluate other metal promoters, and the combination of transition and alkali metals to enhance the selectivity of the methane conversion process and hopefully reduce the temperature of reaction. Results from these two tasks are discussed.

  19. Highly durable and active non-precious air cathode catalyst for zinc air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Haijiang; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhongwei

    The electrochemical stability of non-precious FeCo-EDA and commercial Pt/C cathode catalysts for zinc air battery have been compared using accelerated degradation test (ADT) in alkaline condition. Outstanding oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) stability of the FeCo-EDA catalyst was observed compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The FeCo-EDA catalyst retained 80% of the initial mass activity for ORR whereas the commercial Pt/C catalyst retained only 32% of the initial mass activity after ADT. Additionally, the FeCo-EDA catalyst exhibited a nearly three times higher mass activity compared to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst after ADT. Furthermore, single cell test of the FeCo-EDA and Pt/C catalysts was performed where both catalysts exhibited pseudolinear behaviour in the 12-500 mA cm -2 range. In addition, 67% higher peak power density was observed from the FeCo-EDA catalyst compared with commercial Pt/C. Based on the half cell and single cell tests the non-precious FeCo-EDA catalyst is a very promising ORR electrocatalyst for zinc air battery.

  20. Visible-Light-Responsive Catalyst Development for Volatile Organic Carbon Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Hintze, Paul E.; Coutts, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalysis is a process in which light energy is used to 'activate' oxidation/reduction reactions. Unmodified titanium dioxide (TiO2), a common photocatalyst, requires high-energy UV light for activation due to its large band gap (3.2 eV). Modification of TiO2 can reduce this band gap, leading to visible-light-responsive (VLR) photocatalysts. These catalysts can utilize solar and/or visible wavelength LED lamps as an activation source, replacing mercury-containing UV lamps, to create a "greener," more energy-efficient means for air and water revitalization. Recently, KSC developed several VLR catalysts that, on preliminary evaluation, possessed high catalytic activity within the visible spectrum; these samples out-performed existing commercial VLR catalysts.

  1. Effect of nitriding/nanostructuration of few layer graphene supported iron-based particles; catalyst in graphene etching and carbon nanofilament growth.

    PubMed

    Baaziz, Walid; Melinte, Georgian; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Janowska, Izabela

    2014-08-14

    Stable, highly faceted and dispersed iron nitride particles supported on few layer graphene are obtained by ammonia decomposition on iron-based particles at the temperature commonly used for the synthesis of N-doped CNTs and graphene etching. The TEM/EELS analysis reveals nitrogen diffusion in a bulk of the particles. The resulting facet FeNx catalyst exhibits high activity in the etching of graphene, which is assisted by catalyst reorganization. Ammonia decomposition is used for the first time for graphene etching, while the highly faceted catalyst has an impact on the etched channels structures. According to the shape of the active planes of the catalyst, the etching results in sharp "V" channel ends and often "step-like" edges. The FeNx morphology proves previously reported triangularisation of arches in highly N-doped carbon nanotubes. The conditioning of the catalyst by its shaping and nitrogen incorporation is investigated additionally in the carbon nanostructure formation, for decomposition of ethane. The herringbone CNFs, "hollow" bamboo-like CNFs/CNTs or CNTs are effectively observed. PMID:24964374

  2. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) for the production of liquid hydrocarbons from coal-based synthesis gas has been the subject of renewed interest for conversion of coal to liquid fuels. The use of synthesis gas from modem energy-efficient gasifiers requires catalysts that can operate under low H{sub 2}/CO ratios, typically 0.7-0.9. Since the FTS stoichiometry requires a H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 2.0, catalysts that operate at lower ratios must catalyze the water gas shift reaction to make up the deficit in H{sub 2}. The use of iron-based catalysts for the process is attractive in view of their low cost, ready availability and high water-gas shift reactivity. Furthermore, iron catalysts at elevated pressures (10-15 atmospheres) produce the desired range of liquid hydrocarbons. AU these features make the use of Fe as an F-T catalyst extremely desirable. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, the preferred reactor type for industrial operation is the slurry bubble column reactor. The catalyst for this reactor is precipitated iron oxide which is spray dried to yield particles with diameter of 30-70 {mu}m. One major limitation of these catalysts is that they tend to undergo attrition during use, leading to problems in catalyst separation and recovery of liquid products from the reactor.

  3. Preparation of fibrous titania oxynitride - carbon catalyst and oxygen reduction reaction analysis in both acidic and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinumoto, Taro; Sou, Yoshinori; Ono, Kohei; Matsuoka, Miki; Arai, Yasuhiko; Tsumura, Tomoki; Toyoda, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    A fibrous catalyst of titania oxynitride and carbon is prepared and its catalytic behavior in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are investigated in both HClO4 and KOH aqueous solutions. TiO2 particles are successfully deposited on activated carbon fibers by a liquid phase deposition technique using (NH4)2TiF6 and H3BO3. The catalyst obtained after subsequent ammonia nitridation at 1273 K had a fibrous structure with TiOxNy and TiN components. Interestingly, the product demonstrates catalytic activity for the ORR in not only HClO4 but also KOH aqueous solution. The onset potential in HClO4 solution is assumed to be moderate, at 0.85 V; on the other hand, that in KOH solution is relatively high at 0.95 V. Furthermore, it is considered from the Tafel plot analysis of the KOH solution result that the ORR mechanism follows a peroxide intermediate pathway and the rate-determining step would be a one-electron-transfer reaction to oxygen molecules adsorbed on the active site.

  4. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers – aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Moughton, Adam O.; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. This allows carbon-carbon bond forming reactions to be performed in water with reduced catalyst loadings and enhanced activity. PMID:23539324

  5. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt−1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt−1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support. PMID:27302135

  6. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2016-06-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt‑1 as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt‑1 under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support.

  7. Synthesizing 2D MoS2 Nanofins on carbon nanospheres as catalyst support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-01-01

    Highly dense 2D MoS2 fin-like nanostructures on carbon nanospheres were fabricated and formed the main catalyst support structure in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These nanofins were observed growing perpendicular to the carbon nanosphere surface in random orientations and high resolution transmission electron microscope confirmed 2D layers. The PEM fuel cell test showed enhanced electrochemical activity with good stability, generating over 8.5 W.mgPt(-1) as compared to standard carbon black of 7.4 W.mgPt(-1) under normal operating conditions. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy confirmed that the performance improvement is highly due to the excellent water management of the MoS2 lamellar network, which facilitates water retention at low current density and flood prevention at high current density. Reliability test further demonstrated that these nanofins are highly stable in the electrochemical reaction and is an excellent ORR catalyst support. PMID:27302135

  8. Nanoparticles of Ag with a Pt and Pd rich surface supported on carbon as a new catalyst for the oxygen electroreduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech-Pech, I. E.; Gervasio, Dominic F.; Godínez-Garcia, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Pérez-Robles, J. F.

    2015-02-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles enriched with platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) on their surfaces (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1) are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon (C) to form a new catalyst (Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes. This catalyst is prepared in one pot by reducing Ag and then Pt and Pd metal salts with sodium borohydride in the presence of trisodium citrate then adding XC-72 while applying intense ultrasound. The metallic Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1 nanoparticles contain 2 weight percent of Pt, are spherical and have an average size less than 10 nm as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At the ORR potentials, Ag nanoparticles on carbon (Ag/C) rapidly lose Ag by dissolution and show no more catalytic activity for the ORR than the carbon support, whereas Ag@Pt0.1Pd0.1/C is a stable catalyst and exhibits 1.4 and 1.6 fold greater specific activity, also 3.6 and 2.8 fold greater mass activity for ORR in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution than comparable Pt/C and Pt0.5Pd0.5/C catalysts with the same Pt loading as determined for thin-films of these catalysts on a rotating-disk electrode (TF-RDE). Using silver nanoparticles increases Pt utilization and therefore decreases Pt-loading and cost of a catalyst for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode.

  9. Effects of the catalyst and substrate thickness on the carbon nanotubes/nanofibers as supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Pandey, G. P.; Turner, J.; Westgate, C.; Sammakia, B.

    2012-12-01

    The different growth conditions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/carbon nanofibers (CNFs) which lead to different characteristics when used as supercapacitor electrodes are reported. A layer of SiO2 was coated onto the Si substrate and then a layer of Ti was evaporated as a current collector. CNTs/CNFs were synthesized on the Ti surface via a water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method at 800 °C and at atmospheric pressure utilizing iron (Fe) nanoparticles as catalysts, ethylene (C2H4) as the precursor gas and argon (Ar) and hydrogen (H2) as the carrier gases. The effects of different thicknesses of the catalyst (5 and 10 nm) and Ti substrate layer (10, 30 and 150 nm) on the specific capacitance of the CNFs were studied and the capacitance of the CNTs/CNFs-based device was dependent on CNT/CNF morphology of the CNFs that varied for different combinations of the catalyst and Ti layer thicknesses. The characterization of CNTs/CNFs was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The specific capacitance was measured using cyclic voltammetry via a three-electrode system. The highest specific capacitance (60 F g-1) was obtained in the sample grown with 5 nm of Fe catalyst onto 10 nm of Ti substrate.

  10. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane). PMID:26233751

  11. Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride: its application in the C–H activation of amines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic graphitic carbon nitride, Fe@g-C3N4, has been synthesized by adorning graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) support with iron oxide via non-covalent interaction. The magnetically recyclable catalyst showed excellent reactivity for expeditious C-H activation and cyanation of ...

  12. Nanosized carbon black combined with Ni2O3 as "universal" catalysts for synergistically catalyzing carbonization of polyolefin wastes to synthesize carbon nanotubes and application for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Chen, Xuecheng; Tian, Nana; Gong, Jiang; Liu, Jie; Rümmeli, Mark H; Chu, Paul K; Mijiwska, Ewa; Tang, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic carbonization of polyolefin materials to synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a promising strategy for the processing and recycling of plastic wastes, but this approach is generally limited due to the selectivity of catalysts and the difficulties in separating the polyolefin mixture. In this study, the influence of nanosized carbon black (CB) and Ni2O3 as a novel combined catalyst system on catalyzing carbonization of polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS) and their blends was investigated. We showed that this combination was efficient to promote the carbonization of these polymers to produce CNTs with high yields and of good quality. Catalytic pyrolysis and model carbonization experiments indicated that the carbonization mechanism was attributed to the synergistic effect of the combined catalysts rendered by CB and Ni2O3: CB catalyzed the degradation of PP, PE, and PS to selectively produce more aromatic compounds, which were subsequently dehydrogenated and reassembled into CNTs via the catalytic action of CB together with Ni particles. Moreover, the performance of the synthesized CNTs as the electrode of supercapacitor was investigated. The supercapacitor displayed a high specific capacitance as compared to supercapacitors using commercial CNTs and CB. This difference was attributed to the relatively larger specific surface areas of our synthetic CNTs and their more oxygen-containing groups. PMID:24611910

  13. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  14. Stabilizing a Platinum1 Single-Atom Catalyst on Supported Phosphomolybdic Acid without Compromising Hydrogenation Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jiaguang; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-07-11

    In coordination chemistry, catalytically active metal complexes in a zero- or low-valent state often adopt four-coordinate square-planar or tetrahedral geometry. By applying this principle, we have developed a stable Pt1 single-atom catalyst with a high Pt loading (close to 1 wt %) on phosphomolybdic acid(PMA)-modified active carbon. This was achieved by anchoring Pt on the four-fold hollow sites on PMA. Each Pt atom is stabilized by four oxygen atoms in a distorted square-planar geometry, with Pt slightly protruding from the oxygen planar surface. Pt is positively charged, absorbs hydrogen easily, and exhibits excellent performance in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and cyclohexanone. It is likely that the system described here can be extended to a number of stable SACs with superior catalytic activities. PMID:27240266

  15. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. PMID:26763714

  16. Modeling carbon nanotube growth on the catalyst-substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma [

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2014-06-15

    The paper presents a theoretical model to study the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on the catalyst substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma. The charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of electron, ions and neutral atoms, the growth rate of the CNT because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle inclusion of the issue of the plasma sheath is undertaken in the present model. Numerical calculations on the effect of ion density and temperature and the substrate bias on the growth of the CNT have been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that the height of CNT increases with the ion density of carbon ions and radius of CNT decreases with hydrogen ion density. The substrate bias also affects the growth rate of the CNT. The field emission characteristics from the CNTs can be analyzed from the results obtained.

  17. Hepatic oxidative stress and catalyst metals accumulation in goldfish exposed to carbon nanotubes under different pH levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Huang, Qingguo; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three different carbon nanotubes [single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs), and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs)] on antioxidant parameters and metals accumulation in the liver of Carassius auratus. A semi-static test system was used to expose C. auratus to either a freshwater control, 0.1, or 0.5mg/L CNTs at three pH levels (5.0, 7.25, and 9.0) for 3 and 12 days. The activities of three antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), together with the level of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined in liver on the 3rd and 12th day. The results showed that there was a significant increase in MDA concentration and SOD activity in fish exposed to CNTs, indicating that CNTs exposure induces an oxidative stress response in fish. According to integrated biomarker response (IBR) index, the effect of these three CNTs on liver can be ordered as SWCNTs>OH-MWCNTs>COOH-MWCNTs and they are more toxic to fish in an alkaline environment. Moreover, the concentrations of catalyst metals (Co, Ni, and Mo) and bioelements (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se) in liver were changed, depending on the CNTs concentration, the pH level, and the exposure duration. Generally, all CNTs groups showed that catalyst metals could be concentrated significantly into the liver of fish, and changes in hepatic Cu, Zn, Fe, and Se contents are consistent with the activity of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25625523

  18. Immobilization of a molecular catalyst on carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electro-catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Fusheng; Li, Lin; Tong, Lianpeng; Daniel, Quentin; Göthelid, Mats; Sun, Licheng

    2014-11-21

    Electrochemically driven water oxidation has been performed using a molecular water oxidation catalyst immobilized on hybrid carbon nanotubes and nano-material electrodes. A high turnover frequency (TOF) of 7.6 s(-1) together with a high catalytic current density of 2.2 mA cm(-2) was successfully obtained at an overpotential of 480 mV after 1 h of bulk electrolysis. PMID:25265253

  19. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. I. Hydrogen activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays only minor variations in activity with activation conditions. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure reactor has been used to measure the surface compositions of these catalysts following various hydrogen activation procedures. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in H[sub 2] results in rapid reduction of iron to the metallic state, and segregation of sulfur to the catalyst surface. The sulfur arises from bulk sulfate impurities present in the metal nitrates used to prepare the catalyst. Sulfur coverage increases with both activation time and temperature, due to an increase in the rate of sulfur diffusion with temperature. F-T activity of this catalyst varies inversely with sulfur coverage, consistent with the well-known poisoning effect of sulfur on F-T synthesis. For the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst no significant variations in surface composition are observed as a function of hydrogen activation temperature, consistent with the absence of any variations in catalyst activity. Only partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4] is observed for this catalyst for all activation conditions investigated. Using electron beam effects to remove potassium and silica shows that one or both of these components inhibits reduction of iron to the metallic state in the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst. 48 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Carbon nitride nanosheet-supported porphyrin: a new biomimetic catalyst for highly efficient bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shengyuan; Yuan, Peixin; Ji, Xubo; Shan, Dan; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-14

    A highly efficient biomimetic catalyst was fabricated based on ultrathin carbon nitride nanosheets (C3N4)-supported cobalt(II) proto-porphyrin IX (CoPPIX). The periodical pyridinic nitrogen units in C3N4 backbone could serve as electron donors for great affinity with Co(2+) in PPIX, which resembled the local electronic structure as vitamin B12 and heme cofactor of hemoglobin. UV-vis kinetics and electrochemistry revealed its competitive (electro)catalysis with conventional peroxidase, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations suggest that the rehybridization of Co 3d with N orbitals from the backside can result in significant changes in enthalpy and charge density, which greatly promoted the activity of CoPPIX. The prepared nanocatalyst was further conjugated with streptavidin via multiple amines on the edge plane of C3N4 for facile tagging. Using biotinylated molecular beacon as the capture probe, a sensitive electrochemiluminescence-based DNA assay was developed via the electroreduction of H2O2 as the coreactant after the hairpin unfolded by the target, exhibiting linearity from 1.0 fM to 0.1 nM and a detection limit of 0.37 fM. Our results demonstrate a new paradigm to rationally design inexpensive and durable biomimics for electrochemiluminescence quenching strategy, showing great promise in bioanalytical applications. PMID:25495667