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Sample records for activated carbon material

  1. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  2. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  4. Developments in carbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  5. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  6. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  7. The environmental applications of activated carbon/zeolite composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-02-17

    Over the past couple of years, the resurgence of placing an effective and sustainable amendment to combat against the auxiliary industrial entities, remains a highly contested agenda from a global point. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of zeolite composite, a prestigious advanced catalyst which formulates the enhancement of adsorption rate and hydrogen storage capability, has fore fronted to be a new growing branch in the scientific community. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of activated carbon/zeolite composite technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbon/zeolite composite represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental preservation.

  8. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested.

  9. Oil-containing waste water treating material consisting of modified active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Shigeta, S.; Takenaka, Y.

    1982-03-16

    An oil-containing waste water treating material comprises an active carbon upon whose surface is chemically bonded at least one nitrogenous compound which is an amine or a quaternarized derivative thereof.

  10. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Meyer III, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  11. Sustainable carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; White, Robin J; Brun, Nicolas; Budarin, Vitaliy L; Su, Dang Sheng; del Monte, Francisco; Clark, James H; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2015-01-07

    Carbon-based structures are the most versatile materials used in the modern field of renewable energy (i.e., in both generation and storage) and environmental science (e.g., purification/remediation). However, there is a need and indeed a desire to develop increasingly more sustainable variants of classical carbon materials (e.g., activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, carbon aerogels, etc.), particularly when the whole life cycle is considered (i.e., from precursor "cradle" to "green" manufacturing and the product end-of-life "grave"). In this regard, and perhaps mimicking in some respects the natural carbon cycles/production, utilization of natural, abundant and more renewable precursors, coupled with simpler, lower energy synthetic processes which can contribute in part to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions or the use of toxic elements, can be considered as crucial parameters in the development of sustainable materials manufacturing. Therefore, the synthesis and application of sustainable carbon materials are receiving increasing levels of interest, particularly as application benefits in the context of future energy/chemical industry are becoming recognized. This review will introduce to the reader the most recent and important progress regarding the production of sustainable carbon materials, whilst also highlighting their application in important environmental and energy related fields.

  12. Decontamination of textile wastewater via TiO2/activated carbon composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2010-09-15

    Water scarcity and pollution rank equal to climate change as the most urgent environmental turmoil for the 21st century. To date, the percolation of textile effluents into the waterways and aquifer systems, remain an intricate conundrum abroad the nations. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of titanium dioxide, a prestigious advanced photo-catalyst which formulates the new growing branch of activated carbon composites for enhancement of adsorption rate and discoloration capacity, has attracted stern consideration and supports worldwide. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of titanium dioxide/activated carbon composites technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbons composites material represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental conservation.

  13. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from a new raw lignocellulosic material: flamboyant (Delonix regia) pods.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alexandro M M; Cazetta, André L; Garcia, Clarice A; Moraes, Juliana C G; Nogami, Eurica M; Lenzi, Ervim; Costa, Willian F; Almeida, Vitor C

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from flamboyant pods by NaOH activation at three different NaOH:char ratios: 1:1 (AC-1), 2:1 (AC-2), and 3:1 (AC-3). The properties of these carbons, including BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter, were characterized from N(2) adsorption isotherms. The activated carbons obtained were essentially microporous and had BET surface area ranging from 303 to 2463 m(2) g(-1).(13)C (CP/MAS and MAS) solid-state NMR shows that the lignocellulosic structures were completely transformed into a polycyclic material after activation process, thermogravimetry shows a high thermal resistance, Boehm titration and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy allowed characterizing the presence of functional groups on the surface of activated carbons. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a high pore development. The experimental results indicated the potential use of flamboyant pods as a precursor material in the preparation of activated carbon.

  14. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  15. MOF@activated carbon: a new material for adsorption of aldicarb in biological systems.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Fernandes; da Silva, Fausthon Fred; Jimenez, George Chaves; Neto, José Ferreira da S; de Souza, Daniela Maria Bastos; de Souza, Ivone Antônia; Alves, Severino

    2013-07-25

    A new composite was synthesized by the hydrothermal method using a 3D coordination network [Ln2(C4H4O4)3(H2O)2]·H2O (Ln = Eu and Tb) and activated carbon. The coordination network is formed within the pores of the charcoal, allowing for the use of this material as a detoxifying agent.

  16. Trivalent chromium removal from wastewater using low cost activated carbon derived from agricultural waste material and activated carbon fabric cloth.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Singh, Kunwar P; Singh, Vinod K

    2006-07-31

    An efficient adsorption process is developed for the decontamination of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A low cost activated carbon (ATFAC) was prepared from coconut shell fibers (an agricultural waste), characterized and utilized for Cr(III) removal from water/wastewater. A commercially available activated carbon fabric cloth (ACF) was also studied for comparative evaluation. All the equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted at different temperatures, particle size, pHs, and adsorbent doses in batch mode. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied. The Langmuir model best fit the equilibrium isotherm data. The maximum adsorption capacities of ATFAC and ACF at 25 degrees C are 12.2 and 39.56 mg/g, respectively. Cr(III) adsorption increased with an increase in temperature (10 degrees C: ATFAC--10.97 mg/g, ACF--36.05 mg/g; 40 degrees C: ATFAC--16.10 mg/g, ACF--40.29 mg/g). The kinetic studies were conducted to delineate the effect of temperature, initial adsorbate concentration, particle size of the adsorbent, and solid to liquid ratio. The adsorption of Cr(III) follows the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics. From kinetic studies various rate and thermodynamic parameters such as effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy and entropy of activation were evaluated. The sorption capacity of activated carbon (ATFAC) and activated carbon fabric cloth is comparable to many other adsorbents/carbons/biosorbents utilized for the removal of trivalent chromium from water/wastewater.

  17. Catechol-modified activated carbon prepared by the diazonium chemistry for application as active electrode material in electrochemical capacitor.

    PubMed

    Pognon, Grégory; Cougnon, Charles; Mayilukila, Dilungane; Bélanger, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Activated carbon (Black Pearls 2000) modified with electroactive catechol groups was evaluated for charge storage application as active composite electrode material in an aqueous electrochemical capacitor. High surface area Black Pearls 2000 carbon was functionalized by introduction of catechol groups by spontaneous reduction of catechol diazonium ions in situ prepared in aqueous solution from the corresponding amine. Change in the specific surface area and pore texture of the carbon following grafting was monitored by nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. The electrochemical properties and the chemical composition of the catechol-modified carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Such carbon-modified electrode combines well the faradaic capacitance, originating from the redox activity of the surface immobilized catechol groups, to the electrochemical double layer capacitance of the high surface area Black Pearls carbon. Due to the faradaic contribution, the catechol-modified electrode exhibits a higher specific capacitance (250 F/g) than pristine carbon (150 F/g) over a potential range of -0.4 to 0.75 V in 1 M H(2)SO(4). The stability of the modified electrode evaluated by long-time charge/discharge cycling revealed a low decrease of the capacitance of the catechol-modified carbon due to the loss of the catechol redox activity. Nonetheless, it was demonstrated that the benefit of redox groups persists for 10, 000 constant current charge/discharge cycles.

  18. Biopolymer-Activated Graphitic Carbon Nitride towards a Sustainable Photocathode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanjian; Schnepp, Zoë; Cao, Junyu; Ouyang, Shuxin; Li, Ying; Ye, Jinhua; Liu, Songqin

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of solar light into chemical fuels is one of the most promising solutions to the challenge of sustainable energy. Graphitic carbon (IV) nitride polymer (g-CN) is an interesting sustainable photocathode material due to low-cost, visible-light sensitivity, and chemical stability up to 500°C in air. However, grain boundary effects and limited active sites greatly hamper g-CN activity. Here, we demonstrate biopolymer-activation of g-CN through simultaneous soft-templating of a sponge-like structure and incorporation of active carbon-dopant sites. This facile approach results in an almost 300% increase in the cathodic PEC activity of g-CN under simulated solar-irradiation. PMID:23831846

  19. Sorptive uptake of selenium with magnetite and its supported materials onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D; Sammynaiken, R

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium uptake studies of selenite in aqueous solution with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), goethite, activated carbon (AC), and a composite material containing 19% magnetite supported on activated carbon (CM-19) were investigated. Kinetic uptake studies used a one-pot setup at pH 5.26 at variable temperature. Sampling of unbound selenite in-situ was achieved with analytical detection by atomic absorbance. The sorptive uptake at equilibrium and kinetic conditions are listed in descending order: goethite>Mag-P>Mag-C>CM-19. Kinetic uptake parameters reveal that Mag-P showed apparent negative values for the activation energy (E(a)) and the enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), in agreement with a multi-step process for the kinetic uptake of selenite. By contrast, Mag-C, CM-19, and goethite showed positive values for E(a) and ΔH(‡). The uptake properties of the various sorbent materials with selenite are in accordance with the formation of inner- and out-sphere complexes. Leaching of iron from the composite material (CM-19) was attenuated due to the stabilizing effect of the magnetite within the pore sites and the surface of AC. Supported iron oxide nanomaterial composites represent a unique sorbent material with tunable uptake properties toward inorganic selenite in aqueous solution.

  20. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  1. Impedance spectroscopy study of a catechol-modified activated carbon electrode as active material in electrochemical capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cougnon, C.; Lebègue, E.; Pognon, G.

    2015-01-01

    Modified activated carbon (Norit S-50) electrodes with electrochemical double layer (EDL) capacitance and redox capacitance contributions to the electric charge storage were tested in 1 M H2SO4 to quantify the benefit and the limitation of the surface redox reactions on the electrochemical performances of the resulting pseudo-capacitive materials. The electrochemical performances of an electrochemically anodized carbon electrode and a catechol-modified carbon electrode, which make use both EDL capacitance of the porous structure of the carbon and redox capacitance, were compared to the performances obtained for the pristine carbon. Nitrogen gas adsorption measurements have been used for studying the impact of the grafting on the BET surface area, pore size distribution, pore volume and average pore diameter. The electrochemical behavior of carbon materials was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS data were discussed by using a complex capacitance model that allows defining the characteristic time constant, the global capacitance and the frequency at which the maximum charge stored is reached. The EIS measurements were achieved at different dc potential values where a redox activity occurs and the evolution of the capacitance and the capacitive relaxation time with the electrode potential are presented. Realistic galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements performed at different current rates corroborate the results obtained by impedance.

  2. Active 2D and carbon-based materials: physics and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-09-01

    In nanophotonics we create material-systems, which are structured at length scales smaller than the wavelength of light. When light propagates inside such effective materials numerous novel physics phenomena emerge including thresholdless lasing, atto-joule per bit efficient modulators, and exciton-polariton effects. However, in order to make use of these opportunities, synergistic device designs have to be applied to include materials, electric and photonic constrains - all at the nanoscale. In this talk, I present our recent progress in exploring 2D and TCO materials for active optoelectronics. I highlight nanoscale device demonstrations including their physical operation principle and performance benchmarks. Details include epsilon-bear-zero tuning of thin-film ITO, Graphene electro-static gating via Pauli-blocking, plasmonic electro-optic modulation, and hetero-integrated III-V and carbon-based plasmon lasers on Silicon photonics.

  3. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  4. Highly basic CaO nanoparticles in mesoporous carbon materials and their excellent catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Raja, Pradeep Kumar; Chokkalingam, Anand; Priya, Subramaniam V; Balasubramanian, Veerappan V; Benziger, Mercy R; Aldeyab, Salem S; Jayavell, Ramasamy; Ariga, Katsukiho; Vinu, Ajayan

    2012-06-01

    Highly basic CaO nanoparticles immobilized mesoporous carbon materials (CaO-CMK-3) with different pore diameters have been successfully prepared by using wet-impregnation method. The prepared materials were subjected to extensive characterization studies using sophisticated techniques such as XRD, nitrogen adsorption, HRSEM-EDX, HRTEM and temperature programmed desorption of CO2 (TPD of CO2). The physico-chemical characterization results revealed that these materials possess highly dispersed CaO nanoparticles, excellent nanopores with well-ordered structure, high specific surface area, large specific pore volume, pore diameter and very high basicity. We have also demonstrated that the basicity of the CaO-CMK-3 samples can be controlled by simply varying the amount of CaO loading and pore diameter of the carbon support. The basic catalytic performance of the samples was investigated in the base-catalyzed transesterification of ethylacetoacetate by aryl, aliphatic and cyclic primary alcohols. CMK-3 catalyst with higher CaO loading and larger pore diameter was found to be highly active with higher conversion within a very short reaction time. The activity of 30% CaO-CMK3-150 catalyst for transesterification of ethylacetoacetate using different alcohols increases in the following order: octanol > butanol > cyclohexanol > benzyl alcohol > furfuryl alcohol.

  5. Synthetic carbon precursor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Synthetic carbon precursor systems offer advantages over natural petroleum and coal-tar pitch precursors in that they can reproducibly provide a material with a known and uniform composition. They also permit controlled modifications of the derived carbon's properties through variations in the precursor's properties and processing conditions. Extensive research efforts at Oak Ridge have been directed toward the production and characterization of synthetic carbon precursors and the correlations that exist between carbon precursor properties and the properties of the ultimate carbon. This report describes how synthetic carbon precursors can be used to tailor and develop reproducible carbon structures for advanced materials applications. The potential and capability for performing carbon material development at Oak Ridge is also described.

  6. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  7. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  8. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste material in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, carbonaceous materials including activated carbon were proven to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste gasification in supercritical water. Using coconut shell activated carbon catalyst, complete decomposition of industrial organic wastes including methanol and acetic acid was achieved. During this process, the total mass of the activated carbon catalyst changes by two competing processes: a decrease in weight via gasification of the carbon by supercritical water, or an increase in weight by deposition of carbonaceous materials generated by incomplete gasification of the biomass feedstocks. The deposition of carbonaceous materials does not occur when complete gasification is realized. Gasification of the activated carbon in supercritical water is often favored, resulting in changes in the quality and quantity of the catalyst. To thoroughly understand the hazardous waste decomposition process, a more complete understanding of the behavior of activated carbon in pure supercritical water is needed. The gasification rate of carbon by water vapor at subcritical pressures was studied in relation to coal gasification and generating activated carbon.

  9. Metallic carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Crespi, Vincent Henry; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    1999-01-01

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  10. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  11. Sorption of mercury onto waste material derived low-cost activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Rana, Sukanta; Lahiri, Susmita; Munekage, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    The present study was performed to develop the low-cost activated carbon (AC) from some waste materials as potential mercury (Hg) sorbent to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. The ACs were prepared from banana peel, orange peel, cotton fiber and paper wastes by pyrolysis and characterized by analyzing physico-chemical properties and Hg sorption capacity. The Brunauer Emmett and Teller surface areas (cotton 138 m2/g; paper 119 m2/g), micropore surface areas (cotton 65 m2/g; paper 54 m2/g) and major constituent carbon contents (cotton 95.04 %; paper 94.4 %) were higher in ACs of cotton fiber and paper wastes than the rest two ACs. The Hg sorption capacities and removal percentages were greater in cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs compared to those of the banana and orange peels. The results revealed that elevated Hg removal ability of cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs is largely regulated by their surface area, porosity and carbon content properties. Therefore, ACs of cotton and paper wastes were identified as potential sorbent among four developed ACs to remove high amount of Hg from aqueous phase. Furthermore, easily accessible precursor material, simple preparation process, favorable physico-chemical properties and high Hg sorption capacity indicated that cotton and paper wastes-derived ACs could be used as potential and low-cost sorbents of Hg for applying in practical field to control the severe effect of Hg contamination in the aquatic environment to avoid its human and environmental health risks.

  12. Activated porous carbon wrapped sulfur sub-microparticles as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Yan, Y. L.; Ren, B.; Yang, R.; Zhang, W.; Xu, Y. H.

    2017-03-01

    The lithium-sulfur batteries holds a high theoretical capacity and specific energy, which is 4-5 times larger than that of today’s lithium-ion batteries, yet the low sulfur loading and large particles in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density. In the present paper, a liquid phase deposition method was introduced to synthesize sub-micro sulfur particles, which utilized as cathode materials after composed with activated porous carbon. Compared with common sublimed sulfur cathodes, as-obtained composite cathode shows an enhanced initial discharge capacity from 840.7 mAh/g to 1093 mAh/g at C/10. The reversible specific capacity after 50 cycles increased from 383 mAh/g to 504 mAh/g. The developed method has the advantages of simple process, convenient operation and low cost, and is suitable for the industrial preparation of lithium/sulfur batteries.

  13. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo-dye on TiO2/activated carbon composite material.

    PubMed

    Andriantsiferana, C; Mohamed, E F; Delmas, H

    2014-01-01

    A sequential adsorption/photocatalytic regeneration process to remove tartrazine, an azo-dye in aqueous solution, has been investigated. The aim ofthis work was to compare the effectiveness of an adsorbent/photocatalyst composite-TiO2 deposited onto activated carbon (AC) - and a simple mixture of powders of TiO2 and AC in same proportion. The composite was an innovative material as the photocatalyst, TiO2, was deposited on the porous surface ofa microporous-AC using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in fluidized bed. The sequential process was composed of two-batch step cycles: every cycle alternated a step of adsorption and a step of photocatalytic oxidation under ultra-violet (365 nm), at 25 degreeC and atmospheric pressure. Both steps, adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation, have been investigated during four cycles. For both materials, the cumulated amounts adsorbed during four cycles corresponded to nearly twice the maximum adsorption capacities qmax proving the photocatalytic oxidation to regenerate the adsorbent. Concerning photocatalytic oxidation, the degree of mineralization was higher with the TiO2/AC composite: for each cycle, the value of the total organic carbon removal was 25% higher than that obtained with the mixture powder. These better photocatalytic performances involved better regeneration than higher adsorbed amounts for cycles 2, 3 and 4. Better performances with this promising material - TiO2 deposited onto AC - compared with TiO2 powder could be explained by the vicinity of photocatalytic and AC adsorption sites.

  15. Carbon Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-14

    behavior, interfacial energies, and surface molecular orientation (surface anchoring states) for mesophase pitch on carbon fibers and other...Mochida (2) extended it to the production of mesophase pitch by dramatically raising Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution...involved i.e. it is a very insoluble material. Mochida, however, recognized that this material was liquid-crystalline mesophase pitch , which was

  16. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  17. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-07

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed.

  18. Activation and splitting of carbon dioxide on the surface of an inorganic electride material.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yoshitake; Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Torrisi, Antonio; Sushko, Peter V; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of carbon dioxide is the most important step in its conversion into valuable chemicals. Surfaces of stable oxide with a low work function may be promising for this purpose. Here we report that the surfaces of the inorganic electride [Ca24Al28O64](4+)(e(-))4 activate and split carbon dioxide at room temperature. This behaviour is attributed to a high concentration of localized electrons in the near-surface region and a corrugation of the surface that can trap oxygen atoms and strained carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide molecules. The [Ca24Al28O64](4+)(e(-))4 surface exposed to carbon dioxide is studied using temperature-programmed desorption, and spectroscopic methods. The results of these measurements, corroborated with ab initio simulations, show that both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide adsorb on the [Ca24Al28O64](4+)(e(-))4 surface at RT and above and adopt unusual configurations that result in desorption of molecular carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen upon heating.

  19. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of composite electrode from activated carbon/conductive materials/ruthenium oxide for supercapacitor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taer, E.; Awitdrus,; Farma, R.; Deraman, M. Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.; Omar, R.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Basri, N. H.; Othman, M. A. R.; Kanwal, S.

    2015-04-16

    Activated carbon powders (ACP) were produced from the KOH treated pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust. Different conductive materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) were added with a binder (polivinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) into ACP to improve the supercapacitive performance of the activated carbon (AC) electrodes. Symmetric supercapacitor cells, fabricated using these AC electrodes and 1 molar H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, were analyzed using a standard electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique. The addition of graphite, carbon black and CNTs was found effective in reducing the cell resistance from 165 to 68, 23 and 49 Ohm respectively, and increasing the specific capacitance of the AC electrodes from 3 to 7, 17, 32 F g{sup −1} respectively. Since the addition of CNTs can produce the highest specific capacitance, CNTs were chosen as a conductive material to produce AC composite electrodes that were added with 2.5 %, 5 % and 10 % (by weight) electro-active material namely ruthenium oxide; PVDF binder and CNTs contents were kept at 5 % by weight in each AC composite produced. The highest specific capacitance of the cells obtained in this study was 86 F g{sup −1}, i.e. for the cell with the resistance of 15 Ohm and composite electrode consists of 5 % ruthenium oxide.

  20. Facile and green synthesis of palladium nanoparticles-graphene-carbon nanotube material with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tai; Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Junwu; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-01

    We report a facile and green method to synthesize a new type of catalyst by coating Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite. An rGO-CNT nanocomposite with three-dimensional microstructures was obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide (GO) and CNTs. After the rGO-CNT composites have been dipped in K₂PdCl₄ solution, the spontaneous redox reaction between the GO-CNT and PdCl₄(2-) led to the formation of nanohybrid materials consisting rGO-CNT decorated with 4 nm Pd NPs, which exhibited excellent and stable catalytic activity: the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a catalyst was completed in only 20 s at room temperature, even when the Pd content of the catalyst was 1.12 wt%. This method does not require rigorous conditions or toxic agents and thus is a rapid, efficient, and green approach to the fabrication of highly active catalysts.

  1. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  2. Nano-sized Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel as electrode material for electrochemical capacitor: effect of activation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Park, Hai Woong; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    2012-07-01

    Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde, and a series of activated carbon aerogels (ACA-KOH-X, X = 0, 0.3, 0.7, 1, and 2) were then prepared by a chemical activation using different amount of potassium hydroxide (X represented weight ratio of KOH with respect to CA). Specific capacitances of activated carbon aerogels were measured by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Among the samples prepared, ACA-KOH-0.7 showed the highest specific capacitance (149 F/g). In order to combine excellent electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel with pseudocapacitive property of manganese oxide, 7 wt% Mn was doped on activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) by an incipient wetness impregnation method. For comparison, 7 wt% Mn was also impregnated on carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) by the same method. It was revealed that 7 wt% Mn-doped activated carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7) showed higher specific capacitance than 7 wt% Mn-doped carbon aerogel (Mn/ACA-KOH-0) (178 F/g vs. 98 F/g). The enhanced capacitance of Mn/ACA-KOH-0.7 was attributed to the outstanding electric properties of activated carbon aerogel as well as the faradaic redox reactions of manganese oxide.

  3. Investigation of Nitrogen-Rich Carbon Nitride Networks as Redox-Active Metal Catalyst Support Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-29

    Equation 1),1 although for mass balance there may be trace amounts of chloramines or chlorine gas also produced. (C3N3)(NHCl)3 C3N4+x(H)y + (3-y...It is significant to realize that the carbon nitride (C3N4+x) materials are formed under very hot and corrosive acidic conditions, facts that bode

  4. Carbon materials for supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Frackowiak, Elzbieta

    2007-04-21

    The most commonly used electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors are activated carbons, because they are commercially available and cheap, and they can be produced with large specific surface area. However, only the electrochemically available surface area is useful for charging the electrical double layer (EDL). The EDL formation is especially efficient in carbon pores of size below 1 nm because of the lack of space charge and a good attraction of ions along the pore walls. The pore size should ideally match the size of the ions. However, for good dynamic charge propagation, some small mesopores are useful. An asymmetric configuration, where the positive and negative electrodes are constructed from different materials, e.g., activated carbon, transition metal oxide or conducting polymer, is of great interest because of an important extension of the operating voltage. In such a case, the energy as well as power is greatly increased. It appears that nanotubes are a perfect conducting additive and/or support for materials with pseudocapacitance properties, e.g. MnO(2), conducting polymers. Substitutional heteroatoms in the carbon network (nitrogen, oxygen) are a promising way to enhance the capacitance. Carbons obtained by one-step pyrolysis of organic precursors rich in heteroatoms (nitrogen and/or oxygen) are very interesting, because they are denser than activated carbons. The application of a novel type of electrolyte with a broad voltage window (ionic liquids) is considered, but the stability of this new generation of electrolyte during long term cycling of capacitors is not yet confirmed.

  5. Hierarchical porous carbon materials prepared using nano-ZnO as a template and activation agent for ultrahigh power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoran; Yu, Shukai; Xu, Bin

    2016-09-20

    Hierarchical porous carbon materials with high surface areas and a localized graphitic structure were simply prepared from sucrose using nano-ZnO as a hard template, activation agent and graphitization catalyst simultaneously, which exhibit an outstanding high-rate performance and can endure an ultrafast scan rate of 20 V s(-1) and ultrahigh current density of 1000 A g(-1).

  6. Nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon composite as an electrode material for asymmetric hybrid capacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ok; Lee, Joong Kee

    2012-02-01

    A nanostructured TiO2-coated activated carbon (TAC) composite was synthesized by a modified sol-gel reaction and employed it as a negative electrode active material for an asymmetric hybrid capacitor. The structural characterization showed that the TiO2 nano-layer was deposited on the surface of the activated carbon and the TAC composite has a highly mesoporous structure. The evaluation of electrochemical characteristics of the TAC electrode was carried out by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained specific capacitance of the TAC composite was 42.87 F/g, which showed by 27.1% higher than that of the activated carbon (AC). The TAC composite also exhibited an excellent cycle performance and kept 95% of initial capacitance over 500 cycles.

  7. Enhancement of ORR catalytic activity by multiple heteroatom-doped carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-wook; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-01-07

    Heteroatom-doped carbon matrices have been attracting significant attention due to their superior electrochemical stability, light weight and low cost. Hence, in this study, various types of heteroatom, including single dopants of N, B and P and multiple dopants of B-N and P-N with a carbon matrix were synthesized by an innovative method named the solution plasma process. The heteroatom was doped into the carbon matrix during the discharge process by continuous dissociation and recombination of precursors. The chemical bonding structure, ORR activity and electrochemical performance were compared in detail for each single dopant and multiple dopants. According to the Raman spectra, the carbon structures were deformed by the doped heteroatoms in the carbon matrix. In comparison with N-doped structures (NCNS), the ORR potential of PN-doped structures (PNCNS) was positively shifted from -0.27 V to -0.24 V. It was observed that doping with N decreased the bonding between P and C in the matrix. The multiple doping induced additional active sites for ORR which further enhanced ORR activity and stability. Therefore, PNCNS is a promising metal-free catalyst for ORR at the cathode in a fuel cell.

  8. Influence of carbons on the structure of the negative active material of lead-acid batteries and on battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Nikolov, P.; Rogachev, T.

    It has been established that addition of carbon additives to the lead negative active material (NAM) of lead-acid batteries increase battery charge acceptance in hybrid electric vehicle mode of operation. The present work studies three types of activated carbons and two types of carbon blacks with the aim to evaluate their efficiency in improving the charge acceptance of lead-acid batteries. It has been established that the size of carbon particles and their affinity to lead are essential. If carbon particles are of nanosizes, they are incorporated into the bulk of the skeleton branches of NAM and may thus increase the latter's ohmic resistance. Their content in NAM should not exceed 0.2-0.5 wt.%. At this loading level, carbon grains are adsorbed only on the surface of NAM contributing to the increase of its specific surface area and thus improving its charge acceptance. When carbon particles are of micron sizes and have high affinity to lead, they are integrated into the skeleton structure of NAM as a structural component and act as super-capacitors, i.e. electric charges are concentrated in them and then the current is distributed along the adjacent branches of the lead skeleton with the lowest ohmic resistance. This eventually improves the charge acceptance of the negative battery plates.

  9. Adsorption of CO{sub 2} on microporous materials. 1: On activated carbon and silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Berlier, K.; Frere, M.

    1997-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at temperatures ranging from 278 K to 328 K (seven temperatures) and at pressures up to 3300 kPa on activated carbon and on silica gel are presented. These experimental results are useful as they allow one to broaden, the T, P domain of CO{sub 2} adsorption. These data, together with more classical ones (obtained at low temperature and low pressure (Berlier and Frere, 1996)), will make possible the test of theoretical developments for the prediction of adsorption isotherms in a range of temperature and pressure conditions never studied before.

  10. The study of electrochemically active microbial biofilms on different carbon-based anode materials in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Harnisch, Falk; Fricke, Katja; Schröder, Uwe; Climent, Victor; Feliu, Juan Miguel

    2010-05-15

    In this communication we show that the achievable maximum current density for mature wastewater-based microbial biofilms is strongly dependent on the electrode material and the operation temperature. On graphite and polycrystalline carbon rods, the catalytic current of about 500 microA cm(-2) (projected surface area) at 30 degrees C was achieved. Carbon fiber veil or carbon-paper based materials, having a large microbially-accessible surface gave a projected current density approximately 40% higher than on graphite rod. In contrast, the biofilm cannot form well on graphite foil. Elevating the temperature from 30 to 40 degrees C increased current density by 80% on graphite rod anodes. Interestingly, the formal potential of the active site (-0.12 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE))) is similar to all electrocatalytically active microbial biofilms and to that found for Geobacter sulfurreducens in previous studies. In addition, the real surface area values measured by BET surface area technique cannot provide a reasonable explanation for suitability of an electrode material for the formation of electrochemically active biofilm.

  11. Removal of microcystin-LR from spiked water using either activated carbon or anthracite as filter material.

    PubMed

    Drogui, Patrick; Daghrir, Rimeh; Simard, Marie-Christine; Sauvageau, Christine; Blais, Jean François

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of cyanobacterial toxins (blue-green algae) in drinking water sources is a big concern for human health. Removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) from drinking water was evaluated at the laboratory pilot scale using either granular activated carbon (GAC) or powdered activated carbon (PAC) and compared with the treatment using anthracite as filter material. Virgin GAC was more effective at removing MC-LR (initial concentration ranging from 9 to 47 microg L(-1)) to reach the World Health Organization recommended level (1.0 microg L(-1)). When the GAC filter was colonized by bacteria, the filter became less effective at removing MC-LR owing to competitive reactions occurring between protein adsorption (released by bacteria) and MC-LR adsorption. Using PAC, the concentration of MC-LR decreased from 22 to 3 microg L(-1) (removal of 86% of MC-LR) by the addition of 100 mg PAC L(-1).

  12. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  13. Pb(II) adsorption by a novel activated carbon - alginate composite material. A kinetic and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Antonio; Milea, Demetrio; Muratore, Nicola; Pettignano, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption capacity of an activated carbon - calcium alginate composite material (ACAA-Ca) has been tested with the aim of developing a new and more efficient adsorbent material to remove Pb(II) ion from aqueous solution. The study was carried out at pH=5, in NaCl medium and in the ionic strength range 0.1-0.75molL(-1). Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (DP-ASV) technique was used to check the amount of Pb(II) ion removed during kinetic and equilibrium experiments. Different kinetic (pseudo first order, pseudo second order and Vermuelen) and equilibrium (Langmuir and Freundlich) models were used to fit experimental data, and were statistically compared. Calcium alginate (AA-Ca) improves the adsorption capacity (qm) of active carbon (AC) in the ACAA-Ca adsorbent material (e.g., qm=15.7 and 10.5mgg(-1) at I=0.25molL(-1), for ACAA-Ca and AC, respectively). SEM-EDX and thermogravimetric (TGA) measurements were carried out in order to characterize the composite material. The results of the speciation study on the Pb(II) solution and of the characterization of the ACAA-Ca and of the pristine AA-Ca and AC were evaluated in order to explain the specific contribution of AC and AA-Ca to the adsorption of the metal ion.

  14. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  15. Effects of activated carbon characteristics on the electrosorption capacity of titanium dioxide/activated carbon composite electrode materials prepared by a microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Po-I; Chung, Li-Ching; Ho, Chia-Hua; Shao, Hsin; Liang, Teh-Ming; Horng, Ren-Yang; Chang, Min-Chao; Ma, Chen-Chi M

    2015-05-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2)/ activated carbon (AC) composite materials, as capacitive deionization electrodes, were prepared by a two-step microwave-assisted ionothermal synthesis method. The electrosorption capacity of the composite electrodes was studied and the effects of AC characteristics were explored. These effects were investigated by multiple analytical techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, etc. The experimental results indicated that the electrosorption capacity of the TiO2/AC composite electrode is dependent on the characteristics of AC including the pore structure and the surface property. An enhancement in electrosorption capacity was observed for the TiO2/AC composite electrode prepared from the AC with higher mesopore content and less hydrophilic surface. This enhancement is due to the deposition of anatase TiO2 with suitable amount of Ti-OH. On the other hand, a decline in electrosorption capacity was observed for the TiO2/AC composite electrode prepared from the AC with higher micropore content and highly hydrophilic surface. High content of hydrogen bond complex formed between the functional group on hydrophilic surface with H2O, which will slow down the TiO2 precursor-H2O reaction. In such situation, the effect of TiO2 becomes unfavorable as the loading amount of TiO2 is less and the micropore can also be blocked.

  16. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  17. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste materials in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, carbonaceous materials were proved to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste decomposition in supercritical water. Gasification of the carbonaceous catalyst itself is also expected, however, under supercritical conditions. Thus, it is essential to determine the gasification rate of the carbonaceous materials during this process to determine the active lifetime of the catalysts. For this purpose, the gasification characteristics of granular coconut shell activated carbon in supercritical water alone (600-650{degrees}C, 25.5-34.5 MPa) were investigated. The gasification rate at subatmospheric pressure agreed well with the gasification rate at supercritical conditions, indicating the same reaction mechanism. Methane generation under these conditions is via pyrolysis, and thus is not affected by the water pressure. An iodine number increase of 25% was observed as a result of the supercritical water gasification.

  18. Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis as precursor material for preparation of activated carbon in fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jingli; He, Tao; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-09-01

    Corn stalks char from fast pyrolysis was activated by physical and chemical activation process in a fluidized bed reactor. The structure and morphology of the carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and SEM. Effects of activation time and activation agents on the structure of activation carbon were investigated. The physically activated carbons with CO2 have BET specific surface area up to 880 m(2)/g, and exhibit microporous structure. The chemically activated carbons with H3PO4 have BET specific surface area up to 600 m(2)/g, and exhibit mesoporous structure. The surface morphology shows that physically activated carbons exhibit fibrous like structure in nature with long ridges, resembling parallel lines. Whereas chemically activated carbons have cross-interconnected smooth open pores without the fibrous like structure.

  19. Preparation and electrochemical characterization of polyaniline/activated carbon composites as an electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Misoon; Kim, Seok

    2012-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI)/activated carbon (AC) composites were prepared by a chemical oxidation polymerization. To find an optimum ratio between PANI and AC which shows superior electrochemical properties, the preparation was carried out in changing the amount of added aniline monomers. The morphology of prepared composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The structural and thermal properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Composites showed a summation of capacitances that consisted of two origins. One is double-layer capacitance by ACs and the other is faradic capacitance by redox reaction of PANI. Fiber-like PANIs are coated on the surface of ACs and they contribute to the large surface for redox reaction. The vacancy among fibers provided the better diffusion and accessibility of ion. High capacitances of composites were originated from the network structure having vacancy made by PANI fibers. It was found that the composite prepared with 5 ml of aniline monomer and 0.25 g of AC showed the highest capacitance. Capacitance of 771 F/g was obtained at a scan rate of 5 mV/s.

  20. Removal of Pb, Cd, and Cr in a water purification system using modified mineral waste materials and activated carbon derived from waste materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. R.; Su, L. C.; Ruan, H. D.

    2016-08-01

    This study attempts to find out and optimize the removal efficiency of heavy metals in a water purification unit using a low-cost waste material and modified mineral waste materials (MMWM) accompanied with activated carbon (AC) derived from waste materials. The factors of the inner diameter of the purification unit (2.6-5cm), the height of the packing materials (5-20cm), the size of AC (200-20mesh), the size of MMWM (1-0.045mm), and the ratio between AC and MMWM in the packing materials (1:0 - 0:1) were examined based on a L18 (5) 3 orthogonal array design. In order to achieve an optimally maximum removal efficiency, the factors of the inner diameter of the purification unit (2.6-7.5cm), the height of the packing materials (10-30cm), and the ratio between AC and MMWM in the packing materials (1:4-4:1) were examined based on a L16 (4) 3 orthogonal array design. A height of 25cm, inner diameter of 5cm, ratio between AC and MMWM of 3:2 with size of 60-40mesh and 0.075-0.045mm, respectively, were the best conditions determined by the ICP-OES analysis to perform the adsorption of heavy metals in this study.

  1. Remarkable cycle-activated capacity increasing in onion-like carbon nanospheres as lithium battery anode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiajun; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Huafang; Liu, Ran; Yao, Mingguang; Liu, Bingbing

    2017-01-01

    Onion-like carbon nanospheres (OCNSs) with an average diameter of 43 nm were produced on a large scale via a combustion method and examined as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The OCNSs exhibit a remarkable electrochemical cycling behavior and a capacity much higher than that of graphite. The capacity increases significantly with increasing charge-discharge cycles and reaches a value of 178% of the initial value (from 586 mA h g-1to 1045 mA h g-1) after 200 cycles. Further investigation provides unambiguous experimental evidence that such a remarkable capacity increase is related to the stable onion-like structure of the OCNSs and to the existence of large numbers of disordered/short graphitic fragments, which gradually provide more active sites for Li ion storage. The unique electrochemical performance of OCNSs provides a new way to design a high-performance anode material for rechargeable batteries.

  2. Remarkable cycle-activated capacity increasing in onion-like carbon nanospheres as lithium battery anode material.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiajun; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Huafang; Liu, Ran; Yao, Mingguang; Liu, Bingbing

    2017-01-20

    Onion-like carbon nanospheres (OCNSs) with an average diameter of 43 nm were produced on a large scale via a combustion method and examined as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The OCNSs exhibit a remarkable electrochemical cycling behavior and a capacity much higher than that of graphite. The capacity increases significantly with increasing charge-discharge cycles and reaches a value of 178% of the initial value (from 586 mA h g(-1)to 1045 mA h g(-1)) after 200 cycles. Further investigation provides unambiguous experimental evidence that such a remarkable capacity increase is related to the stable onion-like structure of the OCNSs and to the existence of large numbers of disordered/short graphitic fragments, which gradually provide more active sites for Li ion storage. The unique electrochemical performance of OCNSs provides a new way to design a high-performance anode material for rechargeable batteries.

  3. High value carbon materials from PET recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, J. B.; Ania, C. O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    Poly(ethylene) terephthalate (PET), has become one of the major post-consumer plastic waste. In this work special attention was paid to minimising PET residues and to obtain a high value carbon material. Pyrolysis and subsequent activation of PET from post-consumer soft-drink bottles was performed. Activation was carried out at 925 °C under CO2 atmosphere to different burn-off degrees. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N2 adsorption isotherms at -196 °C. The obtained carbons materials were mainly microporous, presenting low meso and macroporosity, and apparent BET surface areas of upto 2500 m2 g-1. The capacity of these materials for phenol adsorption and PAHs removal from aqueous solutions was measured and compared with that attained with commercial active carbons. Preliminary tests also showed high hydrogen uptake values, as good as the results obtained with high-tech carbon materials.

  4. Carbon Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Hurley, P.M. Liu, and T.W. Owens, "The Surface Topography of Non-Shear Treated Pitch and PAN Carbon Fibers as viewed by the STM,” J Mat. Res., 6...Effects in Pitch Wetting,” Proceedings Carbon 2003, Oviedo, Spain , July 2003 5 K. M. Chioujones, W. Ho, P. C. Chau, B. Fathollahi, P. G...Wapner, and W. P. Hoffman, “Microstructural Studies of In-Situ Mesophase Transformation in the Fabrication of Carbon-Carbon Composites,” Proceedings

  5. N-doped carbon networks: alternative materials tracing new routes for activating molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Roggan, Stefan; Duca, Dario

    2015-02-23

    The fragmentation of molecular hydrogen on N-doped carbon networks was investigated by using molecular (polyaromatic macrocycles) as well as truncated and periodic (carbon nanotubes) models. The computational study was focused on the ergonicity analysis of the reaction and on the properties of the transition states involved when constellations of three or four pyridinic nitrogen atom defects are present in the carbon network. Calculations show that whenever N-defects are embedded in species characterized by large conjugated π-systems, either in polyaromatic macrocycles or carbon nanotubes, the corresponding H2 bond cleavage is largely exergonic. The fragmentation Gibbs free energy is affected by the final arrangement of the hydrogen atoms on the defect and by the extension of the π-electron cloud, but it is not influenced by the curvature of the system.

  6. Utilization of zinc chloride for surface modification of activated carbon derived from Jatropha curcas L. for absorbent material.

    PubMed

    Pratumpong, P; Toommee, S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this research is to produce the low-cost activated carbon from Jatropha curcas L. by chemical activation using zinc chloride ZnCl2. The effects of the impregnation ratio on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon were investigated. The impregnation ratio was selected at the range of 1:1-10:1 for investigation. The optimum conditions resulted in an activated carbon with a carbon content of 80% wt, while the specific surface area evaluated using nitrogen adsorption isotherm corresponds to 600 m(2)/g.

  7. Recent advances in carbon-carbon materials systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rummler, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    Carbon-carbon materials and new oxidation resistant coating developments are discussed. Potential areas of application are highlighted. A short bibliography of selected references is included that describe carbon-carbon materials and related technology in detail.

  8. Material Flows and Carbon Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrell, E.

    2003-12-01

    The industrial sector emits almost 43 percent of the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions to produce materials and products. Furthermore, energy is used to move materials and products and process the waste. Hence, a large amount of energy is consumed and CO2 is emitted to sustain our materials system. Until recently, studies investigating mitigation options focused on changes in the energy system. For industrial processes most studies evaluate how the current materials system can be maintained producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Three elements of a strategy to improve the long-term materials productivity are the reduction of dissipative uses of non-biodegradable materials, secondly, the re-design of products to use less material or design for re-use or recycling, and thirdly, develop more efficient technologies for material conversion and recycling. This will reduce or eliminate the need to extract virgin materials from the environment, and reduce CO2 emissions from the energy-intensive production processes. To assess measures to reduce materials consumption, fossil fuels consumption and CO2 emissions, detailed understanding of the material system is needed. The lifecycle of materials has to be investigated including all branches of industry with all the inputs and outputs. We start with a discussion of materials and the carbon cycle focusing on the contribution of materials to anthropogenic carbon flows. We discuss CO2 emissions from energy use in materials extraction and production, fossil (e.g. plastics) and biomass carbon (e.g. lumber, paper) used as feedstock of materials, and mineral sources (e.g. cement). We discuss opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions by improving the efficiency with which society uses materials through product design, material substitution, product reuse and material recycling.

  9. Yeast-based microporous carbon materials for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhong; He, Yue; Zhang, Shouchun; Li, Junfen; Fan, Weibin

    2012-07-01

    A hierarchical microporous carbon material with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of 1348 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.67 cm(3) g(-1) was prepared from yeast through chemical activation with potassium hydroxide. This type of material contains large numbers of nitrogen-containing groups (nitrogen content >5.3 wt%), and, consequently, basic sites. As a result, this material shows a faster adsorption rate and a higher adsorption capacity of CO(2) than the material obtained by directly carbonizing yeast under the same conditions. The difference is more pronounced in the presence of N(2) or H(2)O, showing that chemical activation of discarded yeast with potassium hydroxide could afford high-performance microporous carbon materials for the capture of CO(2).

  10. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  11. Materials chemistry: Cooperative carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Andrew I.

    2015-03-01

    Enzymes bind carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in a highly precise way, whereas synthetic materials just passively adsorb it. Or do they? A study of compounds called metal-organic frameworks now challenges this picture. See Article p.303

  12. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the differences of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to the behavior of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e. insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e. highly soluble regime).

  13. Classifying organic materials by oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio to predict the activation regime of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, M.; Shao, W.; Lebouteiller, R.; Martin, S. T.

    2013-05-01

    The governing highly soluble, slightly soluble, or insoluble activation regime of organic compounds as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was examined as a function of oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio (O : C). New data were collected for adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and pinonic acids. Secondary organic materials (SOMs) produced by α-pinene ozonolysis and isoprene photo-oxidation were also included in the analysis. The saturation concentrations C of the organic compounds in aqueous solutions served as the key parameter for delineating regimes of CCN activation, and the values of C were tightly correlated to the O : C ratios. The highly soluble, slightly soluble, and insoluble regimes of CCN activation were found to correspond to ranges of [O : C] > 0.6, 0.2 < [O : C] < 0.6, and [O : C] < 0.2, respectively. These classifications were evaluated against CCN activation data of isoprene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.69-0.72) and α-pinene-derived SOM (O : C = 0.38-0.48). Isoprene-derived SOM had highly soluble activation behavior, consistent with its high O : C ratio. For α-pinene-derived SOM, although CCN activation can be modeled as a highly soluble mechanism, this behavior was not predicted by the O : C ratio, for which a slightly soluble mechanism was anticipated. Complexity in chemical composition, resulting in continuous water uptake and the absence of a deliquescence transition that can thermodynamically limit CCN activation, might explain the difference in the behavior of α-pinene-derived SOM compared to that of pure organic compounds. The present results suggest that atmospheric particles dominated by hydrocarbon-like organic components do not activate (i.e., insoluble regime) whereas those dominated by oxygenated organic components activate (i.e., highly soluble regime) for typical atmospheric cloud life cycles.

  14. Microporous-mesoporous carbons for energy storage synthesized by activation of carbonaceous material by zinc chloride, potassium hydroxide or mixture of them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härmas, M.; Thomberg, T.; Kurig, H.; Romann, T.; Jänes, A.; Lust, E.

    2016-09-01

    Various electrochemical methods have been applied to establish the electrochemical characteristics of the electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) consisting of the 1 M triethylmethylammonium tetrafluoroborate solution in acetonitrile and activated carbon based electrodes. Activated microporous carbon materials used for the preparation of electrodes have been synthesized from the hydrothermal carbonization product (HTC) prepared via hydrothermal carbonization process of D-(+)-glucose solution in H2O, followed by activation with ZnCl2, KOH or their mixture. Highest porosity and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area (SBET = 2150 m2 g-1), micropore surface area (Smicro = 2140 m2 g-1) and total pore volume (Vtot = 1.01 cm3 g-1) have been achieved for HTC activated using KOH with a mass ratio of 1:4 at 700 °C. The correlations between SBET, Smicro, Vtot and electrochemical characteristics have been studied to investigate the reasons for strong dependence of electrochemical characteristics on the synthesis conditions of carbon materials studied. Wide region of ideal polarizability (ΔV ≤ 3.0 V), very short characteristic relaxation time (0.66 s), and high specific series capacitance (134 F g-1) have been calculated for the mentioned activated carbon material, demonstrating that this system can be used for completing the EDLC with high energy- and power densities.

  15. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  16. Performance of brazed graphite, carbon-fiber composite, and TZM materials for actively cooled structures; Qualification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Smid, I. ); Croessmann, C.D.; Watson, R.D. ); Linke, J. ); Cardella, A.; Bolt, H,. ); Reheis, N.; Kny, E. )

    1991-07-01

    The divertor of a near-term fusion device has to withstand high heat fluxes, heat shocks, and erosion caused by the plasma. Furthermore, it has to be maintainable through remote techniques. Above all, a good heat removal capability across the interface (low-Z armor/heat sink) plus overall integrity after many operational cycles are needed. To meet all these requirements, an active metal brazing technique is applied to bond graphite and carbon-fiber composite materials to a heat sink consisting of a Mo-41Re coolant tube through a TZM body. Plain brazed graphite and TZM tiles are tested for their fusion-relevant properties. The interfaces appear undamaged after thermal cycling when the melting point of the braze joint is not exceeded and when the graphite armor is {gt}4 mm thick. High heat flux tests are performed on three actively cooled divertor targets. The braze joints show no sign of failure after exposure to thermal loads {approximately}25% higher than the design value surface heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}.

  17. All-solid-state high performance asymmetric supercapacitors based on novel MnS nanocrystal and activated carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng; Tang, Yongfu; Qiao, Yuqing; Liu, Zhangyu; Guo, Wenfeng; Song, Jianzheng; Mu, Shichun; Yu, Shengxue; Zhao, Yufeng; Gao, Faming

    2016-03-29

    All-solid-state high-performance asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are fabricated using γ-MnS as positive electrode and porous eggplant derived activated carbon (EDAC) as negative electrode with saturated potassium hydroxide agar gel as the solid electrolyte. The laminar wurtzite nanostructure of γ-MnS facilitates the insertion of hydroxyl ions into the interlayer space, and the manganese sulfide nanowire offers electronic transportation channels. The size-uniform porous nanostructure of EDAC provides a continuous electron pathway as well as facilitates short ionic transportation pathways. Due to these special nanostructures of both the MnS and the EDAC, they exhibited a specific capacitance of 573.9 and 396 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1), respectively. The optimized MnS//EDAC asymmetric supercapacitor shows a superior performance with specific capacitance of 110.4 F g(-1) and 89.87% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles, a high energy density of 37.6 Wh kg(-1) at a power density of 181.2 W kg(-1) and remains 24.9 Wh kg(-1) even at 5976 W kg(-1). Impressively, such two assembled all-solid-state cells in series can light up a red LED indicator for 15 minutes after fully charged. These impressive results make these pollution-free materials promising for practical applications in solid aqueous electrolyte-based ASCs.

  18. All-solid-state high performance asymmetric supercapacitors based on novel MnS nanocrystal and activated carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Teng; Tang, Yongfu; Qiao, Yuqing; Liu, Zhangyu; Guo, Wenfeng; Song, Jianzheng; Mu, Shichun; Yu, Shengxue; Zhao, Yufeng; Gao, Faming

    2016-03-01

    All-solid-state high-performance asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are fabricated using γ-MnS as positive electrode and porous eggplant derived activated carbon (EDAC) as negative electrode with saturated potassium hydroxide agar gel as the solid electrolyte. The laminar wurtzite nanostructure of γ-MnS facilitates the insertion of hydroxyl ions into the interlayer space, and the manganese sulfide nanowire offers electronic transportation channels. The size-uniform porous nanostructure of EDAC provides a continuous electron pathway as well as facilitates short ionic transportation pathways. Due to these special nanostructures of both the MnS and the EDAC, they exhibited a specific capacitance of 573.9 and 396 F g‑1 at 0.5 A g‑1, respectively. The optimized MnS//EDAC asymmetric supercapacitor shows a superior performance with specific capacitance of 110.4 F g‑1 and 89.87% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles, a high energy density of 37.6 Wh kg‑1 at a power density of 181.2 W kg‑1 and remains 24.9 Wh kg‑1 even at 5976 W kg‑1. Impressively, such two assembled all-solid-state cells in series can light up a red LED indicator for 15 minutes after fully charged. These impressive results make these pollution-free materials promising for practical applications in solid aqueous electrolyte-based ASCs.

  19. Conversion of carbon-containing materials to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mcminn, T. D.; Rooks, C. W.

    1981-06-09

    Carbon-containing materials are gasified to produce high purity carbon monoxide in a three zone unified system (Oxidizer, reducer and gasifier) using a metal oxide as the oxygen and heat source for the gasification with carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide contacts the metal oxide prior to the gasification to release the oxygen and convert the carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide as the gasification medium.

  20. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  1. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  2. Carbon material for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bourlinos, Athanasios; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Miller, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to carbon based materials that are employed for hydrogen storage applications. The material may be described as the pyrolysis product of a molecular precursor such as a cyclic quinone compound. The pyrolysis product may then be combined with selected transition metal atoms which may be in nanoparticulate form, where the metals may be dispersed on the material surface. Such product may then provide for the reversible storage of hydrogen. The metallic nanoparticles may also be combined with a second metal as an alloy to further improve hydrogen storage performance.

  3. Methods for purifying carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dailly, Anne; Ahn, Channing; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-05-26

    Methods of purifying samples are provided that are capable of removing carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous impurities from a sample containing a carbon material having a selected structure. Purification methods are provided for removing residual metal catalyst particles enclosed in multilayer carbonaceous impurities in samples generate by catalytic synthesis methods. Purification methods are provided wherein carbonaceous impurities in a sample are at least partially exfoliated, thereby facilitating subsequent removal of carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous impurities from the sample. Methods of purifying carbon nanotube-containing samples are provided wherein an intercalant is added to the sample and subsequently reacted with an exfoliation initiator to achieve exfoliation of carbonaceous impurities.

  4. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  5. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  6. Enhanced electrochemical performance of porous activated carbon by forming composite with graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hang; Yang, Jia-Ying; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Jin-Gang; Wu, Yu-Ping

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a novel activated carbon containing graphene composite was developed using a fast, simple, and green ultrasonic-assisted method. Graphene is more likely a framework which provides support for activated carbon (AC) particles to form hierarchical microstructure of carbon composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectra analysis, XRD, and XPS were used to analyze the morphology and surface structure of the composite. The electrochemical properties of the supercapacitor electrode based on the as-prepared carbon composite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge/discharge, and cycling performance measurements. It exhibited better electrochemical performance including higher specific capacitance (284 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), better rate behavior (70.7% retention), and more stable cycling performance (no capacitance fading even after 2000 cycles). It is easier for us to find that the composite produced by our method was superior to pristine AC in terms of electrochemical performance due to the unique conductive network between graphene and AC.

  7. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M P

    2013-10-21

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg⁻¹ and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li₄Ti₅O₁₂ anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  8. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg−1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors. PMID:24141527

  9. Activated carbons derived from coconut shells as high energy density cathode material for Li-ion capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akshay; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Kumar, Palaniswamy Suresh; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2013-10-01

    In this manuscript, a dramatic increase in the energy density of ~ 69 Wh kg-1 and an extraordinary cycleability ~ 2000 cycles of the Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HEC) is achieved by employing tailored activated carbon (AC) of ~ 60% mesoporosity derived from coconut shells (CS). The AC is obtained by both physical and chemical hydrothermal carbonization activation process, and compared to the commercial AC powders (CAC) in terms of the supercapacitance performance in single electrode configuration vs. Li. The Li-HEC is fabricated with commercially available Li4Ti5O12 anode and the coconut shell derived AC as cathode in non-aqueous medium. The present research provides a new routine for the development of high energy density Li-HEC that employs a mesoporous carbonaceous electrode derived from bio-mass precursors.

  10. Photoconductivity of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity. 54 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  12. Fe2O3-loaded activated carbon fiber/polymer materials and their photocatalytic activity for methylene blue mineralization by combined heterogeneous-homogeneous photocatalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C.; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-Ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Fe2O3-supported activated carbon felts (Fe-ACFTs) were prepared by impregnating the felts consisted of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with either polyester fibers (PS-A20) or polyethylene pulp (PE-W15) in Fe(III) nitrate solution and calcination at 250 °C for 1 h. The prepared Fe-ACFTs with 31-35 wt% Fe were characterized by N2-adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The Fe-ACFT(PS-A20) samples with 5-31 wt% Fe were microporous with specific surface areas (SBET) ranging from 750 to 150 m2/g, whereas the Fe-ACFT(PE-W15) samples with 2-35 wt% Fe were mesoporous with SBET ranging from 830 to 320 m2/g. The deposition of iron oxide resulted in a decrease in the SBET and methylene blue (MB) adsorption capacity while increasing the photodegradation of MB. The optimum MB degradation conditions included 0.98 mM oxalic acid, pH = 3, 0.02-0.05 mM MB, and 100 mg/L photocatalyst. The negative impact of MB desorption during the photodegradation reaction was more pronounced for mesoporous PE-W15 samples and can be neglected by adding oxalic acid in cyclic experiments. Almost complete and simultaneous mineralization of oxalate and MB was achieved by the combined heterogeneous-homogeneous photocatalytic processes. The leached Fe ions in aqueous solution [Fe3+]f were measured after 60 min for every cycle and found to be about 2 ppm in all four successive cycles. The developed photocatalytic materials have shown good performance even at low content of iron oxide (2-5 wt% Fe-ACFT). Moreover, it is easy to re-impregnate the ACF when the content of iron oxide is reduced during the cyclic process. Thus, low leaching of Fe ions and possibility of cyclic usage are the advantages of the photocatalytic materials developed in this study.

  13. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  14. Carbon structural materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Virgiliev, Yu.S.; Kurolenkin, E.I.

    1993-12-31

    This report describes properties of several structural carbon materials being investigated as materials for fusion reactors. Materials include: graphite, graphite doped with boron and titanium; and C-C composites. Radiation effects and additive effects are described.

  15. Inhibition of catalytic oxidation of carbon/carbon composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianxian

    An investigation coupling experimental efforts with computational chemistry analysis was conducted to study the inhibition effects of phosphorous or boron on the oxidation of carbon/carbon composite materials catalyzed by potassium or calcium acetate (KAC or CaAC). Commercial aircraft brakes were used, which are exposed during use to K- or Ca-containing runway deicing agents. The reactivity of inhibitor-doped carbon materials was determined by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and isothermal oxidation in 1 atm O2. The structure and surface chemistry of inhibitor-doped samples were characterized, and the inhibition mechanisms were explored with the help of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The catalytic effects of KAC or CaAC were found to be dependent on catalyst loading, pretreatment procedure, temperature and O2 partial pressure. Experimental observations showed that K is a more effective catalyst for carbon composite oxidation than Ca as expected from prior studies of catalyzed carbon gasification. This was attributed to its ability to form and maintain good interfacial contact with carbon, as well as to its insensitivity to carbon structure because of its excellent wetting ability and mobility. The experimental results suggested that the interfacial catalyst/carbon contact is the critical factor determining the catalytic effectiveness. Thermally deposited phosphorus, upon heat treatment of P-containing compounds such as CH3OP(OH)2 and POCl3 at around 600°C in the presence of inert gas, exhibited a good inhibition effect in the oxidation of C/C composites used in aircraft brake systems. These P compounds were also effective inhibitors for Ca- or K-catalyzed oxidation. The P loading up to a certain amount (ca. 4.0 wt%) was found to suppress Ca-catalyzed oxidation completely. It also improved the resistance of carbon to K-catalyzed oxidation, but the effect was much less significant than in the case of Ca-catalyzed reaction. The characterization of P

  16. Preparation and Characterization of the Activated Carbon-Nylon Beads: Novel Material for In Situ Microbe Sampler and Microcosm Experiment in Groundwater Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The organic pollution of groundwater is a widespread problem in the word. It is significant to study the microbial community especially related to organic contaminant biodegradation and their variation with groundwater environment parameters, so as to evaluate the biodegradability of the organic contaminants and then make a right decision for bioremediation. One of good ways for this study is to build a microcosm in groundwater containing target contaminant, where microbes especially relating to biodegradation will grow in the microcosm and be collected for analysis. This research aims to prepare a novel material for in situ microbe sampler and microcosm experiment in groundwater environment. The novel material, namely, the activated carbon-nylon (AC-N) beads, was prepared using activated carbon and nylon as main raw materials. The material consists of 3-4mm diameter spherical beads (Fig.1A and Fig.2 A) which have an internal surface area greater than 500 m2 g-1. FT-IR spectra (Fig.3) indicated the composition of activated carbon and nylon due to the variation of the peaks at the near 1627 cm-1and 1558 -1538 cm-1 before and after complex reaction. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of benzene on the beads was 16.76 mg/g at the initial concentration of 100 mg/L. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (Fig.4). The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model. Camera and SEM images (Fig.1 B and Fig.2 A and B) showed that the beads had an open and channel pore structures, the microbes might enter into and grow up in the beads (Fig.1 C and Fig.2 C). All these results showed that the AC-N beads could form the in situ microcosm of organic pollutants and microbes, which provided a promising prospect for assessing the biodegradability of the organic pollutants by intrinsic microbes in the groundwater.

  17. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  18. Analysis of the Formation of Multi-Layer Carbon Nanotubes in the Process of Mechanical Activation of the Pyrolysis Products of Vegetable Raw Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, V. P.; Filatenkov, A. E.; Yagofarov, V. U.; Gulevskii, D. A.; Kuryavyi, V. G.; Mansurov, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotubes are formed by pyrolytic and mechanochemical technology. Amorphous carbon is produced at 950°C and then subjected to mechanochemical treatment in a planetary mill for 1-46 h. Analysis ofinfluence of duration of mechanical activation of amorphous carbon on the morphology of moldable multilayer carbon nanotubes. It is demonstrated that prolonged mechanical activation of carbon composite in a vario-planetary mill promotes to formation of aggregates and amorphous carbon and to loss of thermal stability of nanotubeswith furtherconduct of vacuum annealing.

  19. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, T. D.; Eatherly, W. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Strizak, J. P.

    1992-09-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER wilt produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.58 dpa (displacements per atom) at 600°C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models.

  20. Measurement Challenges for Carbon Nanotube Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Yowell, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    The advances in large scale applications of carbon nanotubes demand a reliable supply of raw and processed materials. It is imperative to have a consistent quality control of these nanomaterials to distinguish material inconsistency from the modifications induced by processing of nanotubes for any application. NASA Johnson Space Center realized this need five years back and started a program to standardize the characterization methods. The JSC team conducted two workshops (2003 and 2005) in collaboration with NIST focusing on purity and dispersion measurement issues of carbon nanotubes [1]. In 2004, the NASA-JSC protocol was developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA [2]. This protocol is routinely used by several researchers across the world as a first step in characterizing raw and purified carbon nanotubes. A suggested practice guide consisting of detailed chapters on TGA, Raman, electron microscopy and NIR absorption is in the final stages and is undergoing revisions with input from the nanotube community [3]. The possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be presented. Recent activities at ANSI and ISO towards implementing these protocols as nanotube characterization standards will be discussed.

  1. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  2. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  4. Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Lynn Margaret

    Fossil fuels can be burned to provide on-demand energy at any time, but cleaner renewable energy sources such as the sun and wind are intermittent. Energy storage systems, then, that are efficient and also economical and environmentally benign are key to a future fueled by renewable energy. Carbon-based materials are prototypical systems in all these aspects. Herein, three promising, novel carbon-based materials are presented. These include microporous carbon for supercapacitors produced by the condensation and carbonization of siloxane elastomers, porous graphitic carbon for supercapacitors produced by an aerosol route, and interpenetrating, binder-free carbon nanotube/vanadium nanowire composites for lithium ion battery electrodes produced by chemical crosslinking and aerogel fabrication. These materials syntheses are facile and can be easily scaled up, and their electrochemical performance, especially their energy densities and cycleability, are notable.

  5. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  6. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Menchhofer, Paul A [Clinton, TN; Montgomery, Frederick C [Oak Ridge, TN; Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  7. Characterization of porous carbon fibers and related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.

    1996-07-15

    This program was geared to support the Fossil Energy Material Sciences Program with respect to several areas of interest in efficient production and utilization of energy. Carbon molecular sieves have great potential for economically purifying gases; i.e. removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas without having to resort to cryogenic techniques. Microporous carbons can be tailored to serve as adsorbents for natural gas in on-board storage in automotive applications, avoiding high pressures and heavy storage tanks. This program is a laboratory study to evaluate production methodologies and activation processes to produce porous carbons for specific applications. The Carbon Materials Technology Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is engaged in developmental programs to produce activated carbon fibers (ACF) for applications in fixed beds and/or flowing reactors engineering applications.

  8. Electro-catalytic activity of multiwall carbon nanotube-metal (Pt or Pd) nanohybrid materials synthesized using microwave-induced reactions and their possible use in fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    V, Lakshman Kumar; Ntim, Susana Addo; Sae-Khow, Ornthida; Janardhana, Chelli; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Mitra, Somenath

    2012-01-01

    Microwave induced reactions for immobilizing platinum and palladium nanoparticles on multiwall carbon nanotubes are presented. The resulting hybrid materials were used as catalysts for direct methanol, ethanol and formic acid oxidation in acidic as well as alkaline media. The electrodes are formed by simply mixing the hybrids with graphite paste, thus using a relatively small quantity of the precious metal. We report Tafel slopes and apparent activation energies at different potentials and temperatures. Ethanol electro-oxidation with the palladium hybrid showed an activation energy of 7.64 kJmol−1 which is lower than those observed for other systems. This system is economically attractive because Pd is significantly less expensive than Pt and ethanol is fast evolving as a commercial biofuel. PMID:23118490

  9. Chemistry and materials options of sustainable carbon materials made by hydrothermal carbonization.

    PubMed

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Antonietti, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The production of functional nanostructured materials starting from cheap natural precursors using environmentally friendly processes is a highly attractive subject in material chemistry today. Recently, much attention has been focused on the use of plant biomass to produce functional carbonaceous materials, encompassing economic, environmental and social issues. Besides the classical route to produce activated carbons from agricultural side products, the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process shows clear advantages in that it can generate a variety of cheap and sustainable carbonaceous materials with attractive nanostructure and functionalization patterns for a wide range of applications. In this tutorial review we present the latest developments in this traditional but recently invigorated technique. It will be shown that HTC does not only access carbonaceous materials under comparatively mild hydrothermal conditions, but also replaces the more technical and structurally well-defined charring by a controlled chemical process. It will be shown that this makes it possible to tailor the final structure with the tools of colloid and polymer science, leading to very different morphologies with miscellaneous applications, including modern carbon nanocomposites and hybrids.

  10. Raman Scattering in a New Carbon Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, O. A.; Street, K. W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Samples of a new carbon material, Diamonite-B, were fabricated under high pressure from a commercial carbon black--identified as mixed fullerenes. The new material is neither graphite-like nor diamond-like, but exhibits electrical properties close to graphite and mechanical properties close to diamond. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational dynamics of this new carbon material and to provide structural characterization of its short-, medium- and long-range order is reported. We also provide the results of investigations of these samples by high-resolution electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hardness, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and other properties of this new material are compared with synthetic graphite-like and diamond-like materials, two other phases of synthetic bulk carbon.

  11. Carbon nanotube materials characterization and devices design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng

    The objective of this research is to characterize the electrical and mechanical properties of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) materials, and explore possible device applications for these materials. In order to achieve this goal, different forms of Carbon Nanotube materials---including Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Carbon Nanotube Ribbon, Carbon Nanotube Thread, and sub-micrometer Carbon Nanotube Thread---were tested under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) using a Micromanipulator (MM). Video and sound recording of the testing in the microscope provided new understanding how thread is formed and how nanotube materials fail. As-produced and thermally treated nanotubes were also tested. The main electrical parameters measured were electrical resistivity and maximum current density. The main mechanical property measured was strength. Together, these parameters are helping to determine the strongest and most conductive forms of CNT material. Putting nanotube materials into application is the ultimate goal of this continuing research. Several aggressive application ideas were investigated in a preliminary way in this work. In biomedical applications, a bundle of CNTs was formed for use as an electrode for accurate biosensing. A simple robot was designed using CNT electrical fiber. The robot was powered by two solenoids and could act as an in-body sensor and actuator to perform some impossible tasks from the viewpoint of current medical technology. In aerospace engineering, CNT materials could replace copper wire to reduce the weight of aircraft. Based on the excellent mechanical properties of CNT materials, a challenging idea is to use CNT material to build elevators to move payloads to outer space without using rockets. This dissertation makes contributions in the characterization of nanotube materials and in the design of miniature electromagnetic devices.

  12. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Beltrán, B.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Cremonesi, O.; García, E.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pavan, M.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  13. Carbon-carbon composites: Emerging materials for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.

    1989-01-01

    An emerging class of high temperature materials called carbon-carbon composites are being developed to help make advanced aerospace flight become a reality. Because of the high temperature strength and low density of carbon-carbon composites, aerospace engineers would like to use these materials in even more advanced applications. One application of considerable interest is as the structure of the aerospace vehicle itself rather than simply as a protective heat shield as on Space Shuttle. But suitable forms of these materials have yet to be developed. If this development can be successfully accomplished, advanced aerospace vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and other hypersonic vehicles will be closer to becoming a reality. A brief definition is given of C-C composites. Fabrication problems and oxidation protection concepts are examined. Applications of C-C composites in the Space Shuttle and in advanced hypersonic vehicles as well as other applications are briefly discussed.

  14. Engineering carbon materials from the hydrothermal carbonization process of biomass.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Kan; Wu, Liheng; Yu, Shu-Hong; Antonietti, Markus; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2010-02-16

    Energy shortage, environmental crisis, and developing customer demands have driven people to find facile, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and nontoxic routes to produce novel functional materials that can be commercialized in the near future. Amongst various techniques, the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process of biomass (either of isolated carbohydrates or crude plants) is a promising candidate for the synthesis of novel carbon-based materials with a wide variety of potential applications. In this Review, we will discuss various synthetic routes towards such novel carbon-based materials or composites via the HTC process of biomass. Furthermore, factors that influence the carbonization process will be analyzed and the special chemical/physical properties of the final products will be discussed. Despite the lack of a clear mechanism, these novel carbonaceous materials have already shown promising applications in many fields such as carbon fixation, water purification, fuel cell catalysis, energy storage, CO(2) sequestration, bioimaging, drug delivery, and gas sensors. Some of the most promising examples will also be discussed here, demonstrating that the HTC process can rationally design a rich family of carbonaceous and hybrid functional carbon materials with important applications in a sustainable fashion.

  15. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  16. Four advances in carbon-carbon materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, Howard G.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Kowbel, Witold

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are a specialty class of materials having many unique properties making these composites attractive for a variety of demanding engineering applications. Chief among these properties are exceptional retention of mechanical properties at temperatures as high as 4000 F, excellent creep resistance, and low density (1.6 to 1.8 g/cu cm). Although carbon-carbon composites are currently in service in a variety of applications, much development work remains to be accomplished before these materials can be considered to be fully mature, realizing their full potential. Four recent technology advances holding particular promise for overcoming current barriers to the wide-spread commercialization of carbon-carbon composites are described. These advances are: markedly improved interlaminar strengths (more than doubled) of two dimensional composites achieved by whiskerization of the fabric reinforcing plies, simultaneously improved oxidation resistance and mechanical properties achieved by the incorporation of matrix-phase oxidation inhibitors based on carborane chemistry, improved oxidation resistance achieved by compositionally graded oxidation protective coatings, and markedly reduced processing times (hours as opposed to weeks or months) accomplished through a novel process of carbon infiltration and coatings deposition based on the use of liquid-phase precursor materials.

  17. Catalytic properties of carbon materials for wet oxidation of aniline.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helder T; Machado, Bruno F; Ribeiro, Andreia; Moreira, Ivo; Rosário, Márcio; Silva, Adrián M T; Figueiredo, José L; Faria, Joaquim L

    2008-11-30

    A mesoporous carbon xerogel with a significant amount of oxygen functional groups and a commercial activated carbon, were tested in the catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline at 200 degrees C and 6.9 bar of oxygen partial pressure. Both carbon materials showed high activity in aniline and total organic carbon removal, a clear increase in the removal efficiency relatively to non-catalytic wet air oxidation being observed. The best results in terms of aniline removal were obtained with carbon xerogel, an almost complete aniline conversion after 1h oxidation with high selectivity to non-organic compounds being achieved. The materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption, N(2) adsorption and scanning electron microscopy, in order to relate their performances to the chemical and textural characteristics. It was concluded that the removal efficiency, attributed to both adsorption and catalytic activity, is related to the mesoporous character of the materials and to the presence of specific oxygen containing functional groups at their surface. The effect of catalytic activity was found to be more important in the removal of aniline than the effect of adsorption at the materials surface. The results obtained indicate that mesoporous carbon xerogels are promising catalysts for CWAO processes.

  18. Electrochemical Properties of Nanoporous Carbon Material in Aqueous Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Rachiy, Bogdan I; Budzulyak, Ivan M; Vashchynsky, Vitalii M; Ivanichok, Nataliia Ya; Nykoliuk, Marian O

    2016-12-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the behavior of capacitor type electrochemical system in the К(+)-containing aqueous electrolytes. Nanoporous carbon material (NCM) was used as the electrode material, obtained by carbonization of plant raw materials with the following chemical activation. Optimization of pore size distribution was carried out by chemical-thermal method using potassium hydroxide as activator. It is shown that obtained materials have high values of capacitance which is realized by charge storage on the electrical double layer and by pseudocapacitive ion storage on the surface of the material. It is established that based on NCM, electrochemical capacitors are stable in all range of current density and material capacity essentially depends on appropriate choice of electrolyte.

  19. Electrochemical Properties of Nanoporous Carbon Material in Aqueous Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachiy, Bogdan I.; Budzulyak, Ivan M.; Vashchynsky, Vitalii M.; Ivanichok, Nataliia Ya.; Nykoliuk, Marian O.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the behavior of capacitor type electrochemical system in the K+-containing aqueous electrolytes. Nanoporous carbon material (NCM) was used as the electrode material, obtained by carbonization of plant raw materials with the following chemical activation. Optimization of pore size distribution was carried out by chemical-thermal method using potassium hydroxide as activator. It is shown that obtained materials have high values of capacitance which is realized by charge storage on the electrical double layer and by pseudocapacitive ion storage on the surface of the material. It is established that based on NCM, electrochemical capacitors are stable in all range of current density and material capacity essentially depends on appropriate choice of electrolyte.

  20. Experimental investigation of synthetic gas composition in a two-stage fluidized bed gasification process: effect of activated carbon as bed material.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jia-Hong; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Tsung-Jen; Weng, Wang-Chang; Liu, JingYong

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a two-stage fluidized bed gasifier was used to investigate the effect of the equivalence ratio (ER) and steam/biomass ratio (S/B) on the synthetic gas distribution while activated carbon (AC) was added as the bed material in secondary gasifier (Stage II). The experimental results showed that when the empty bed (without the bed material) was used for the Stage II reaction, the hydrogen (H2) content in the synthetic gas emitted from the Stage II reactor was 2-3 mol% higher than that from the first-stage gasifier (Stage I). It was supposed that using the Stage II reactor prolongs the reaction time and thereby increases the H2 production. Besides, when the AC was added in the Stage II gasifier, the H2 concentration, the total gas yield, and gas heating value reached their maximum (30 mol%) when ER and S/B were 0.3 and 1.5, respectively.

  1. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  2. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon.

  3. Heteroatom-Doped Carbon Materials for Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Asefa, Tewodros Teddy; Huang, Xiaoxi

    2017-04-11

    Fuel cells, water electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries are important energy systems that have started to play some roles in our renewable energy landscapes. However, despite much research works carried out on them, they have not yet found large-scale applications, mainly due to the unavailability of sustainable catalysts that can catalyze the reactions employed in them. Currently, noble metal-based materials are the ones that are commonly used as catalysts in most commercial fuel cells, electrolyzers, and metal-air batteries. Hence, there has been considerable research efforts worldwide to find alternative noble metal-free and metal-free catalysts composed of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements for use in the catalytic reactions employed in these energy systems. In this concept paper, catalysis in renewable energy systems, followed by the recent efforts to develop sustainable, heteroatom-doped carbon and non-noble metal-based electrocatalysts, the challenges to unravel their structure-catalytic activity relationships, and the authors' perspectives on these topics and materials, are discussed.

  4. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  5. Cocatalyst-Free Hybrid Ionic Liquid (IL)-Based Porous Materials for Efficient Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates through a Cooperative Activation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Sanjeevi; Li, He; Zhao, Yaopeng; Chen, Jian; Yang, Qihua

    2017-03-02

    Cocatalyst-free ionic liquid (IL)-based porous polymers (Px -Vy -OHz R) functionalized with an intermolecular hydroxyl group were prepared by means of radical copolymerization of 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide, (4-vinylphenyl)methanol (VBzOH), and divinylbenzene (DVB) under solvothermal conditions. As the ratio of 4-vinylphenylmethanol in the initial mixture increased, the content of the hydroxyl groups in the polymer increased from 3.35 to 5.35 mmol g(-1) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the polymer decreased sharply from 365 to 2.5 m(2)  g(-1) . In the carbonation of CO2 and epoxides, the turnover frequency (TOF) of Px -Vy -OHz R increased gradually from 25 to 67 h(-1) as the OH ratio increased irrespective of the sharp decrease in BET surface area, which suggests the existence of a cooperative activation effect between OH and ILs. To obtain a high OH content while still maintaining a high BET surface area, hybrid porous materials (SBA-[Vx OHy ]R-n) were prepared by means of copolymerization of 1-ethyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide and 4-vinylphenylmethanol in the mesopores of SBA-15. SBA-[Vx OHy ]R-n was more active than its polymer counterpart (TOF: 188 versus 71 h(-1) ) in the cycloaddition of CO2 with propyl oxide owing to the combined effect of the high BET surface area and the high OH content. The hybridization of mesoporous materials with polymers represents an efficient strategy for the preparation of high-performance solid catalysts for chemical transformations.

  6. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  7. Functional Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huihui

    The ability to harvest and convert solar energy has been associated with the evolution of human civilization. The increasing consumption of fossil fuels since the industrial revolution, however, has brought to concerns in ecological deterioration and depletion of the fossil fuels. Facing these challenges, humankind is forced to seek for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources, such as biofuels, hydraulic power, wind power, geothermal energy and other kinds of alternative energies. However, most alternative energy sources, generally in the form of electrical energy, could not be made available on a continuous basis. It is, therefore, essential to store such energy into chemical energy, which are portable and various applications. In this context, electrochemical energy-storage devices hold great promises towards this goal. The most common electrochemical energy-storage devices are electrochemical capacitors (ECs, also called supercapacitors) and batteries. In comparison to batteries, ECs posses high power density, high efficiency, long cycling life and low cost. ECs commonly utilize carbon as both (symmetric) or one of the electrodes (asymmetric), of which their performance is generally limited by the capacitance of the carbon electrodes. Therefore, developing better carbon materials with high energy density has been emerging as one the most essential challenges in the field. The primary objective of this dissertation is to design and synthesize functional carbon materials with high energy density at both aqueous and organic electrolyte systems. The energy density (E) of ECs are governed by E = CV 2/2, where C is the total capacitance and V is the voltage of the devices. Carbon electrodes with high capacitance and high working voltage should lead to high energy density. In the first part of this thesis, a new class of nanoporous carbons were synthesized for symmetric supercapacitors using aqueous Li2SO4 as the electrolyte. A unique precursor was adopted to

  8. Characterization of Porous Carbon Fibers and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A one-year subcontract sponsored by the Carbon Materials Technology Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the Department of Geological Sciences, University Of Tennessee, has been completed. A volumetric sorption system has been upgraded, in cooperation with commercial vendor, to allow the acquisition of data relevant to the program for the production of activated carbon molecular fiber sieves (ACFMS). The equipment and experimental techniques have been developed to determine the pore structure and porosity of reference materials and materials produced at ORNL as part of the development of methods for the activation of carbon fibers by various etching agents. Commercial activated coconut shell charcoal (ACSC) has been studied to verify instrument performance and to develop methodology for deducing cause and effects in the activation processes and to better understand the industrial processes (gas separation, natural gas storage, etc.). Operating personnel have been trained, standard operating procedures have been established, and quality assurance procedures have been developed and put in place. Carbon dioxide and methane sorption have been measured over a temperature range 0 to 200 C for both ACFMS and ACSC and similarities and differences related to the respective structures and mechanisms of interaction with the sorbed components. Nitrogen sorption (at 77 K) has been used to evaluate ''surface area'' and ''porosity'' for comparison with the large data base that exists for other activated carbons and related materials. The preliminary data base reveals that techniques and theories currently used to evaluate activated carbons may be somewhat erroneous and misleading. Alternate thermochemical and structural analyses have been developed that show promise in providing useful information related both to the activation process and to industrial applications of interest in the efficient and economical utilization of fossil fuels in a manner that is

  9. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  10. Heat Treated Carbon Fiber Material Selection Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, M.; Patel, B.; Koenig, J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used in a variety high temperature applications and materials. However, one limiting factor in their transition into additional applications is an understanding of their functional properties during component processing and function. The requirements on the fibers are governed by the nature of the materials and the environments in which they will be used. The current carbon fiber vendor literature is geared toward the polymeric composite industry and not the ceramic composite industry. Thus, selection of carbon fibers is difficult, since their properties change as a function of heat treatment, processing or component operational temperature, which ever is greatest. To enable proper decisions to be made, a program was established wherein multiple fibers were selected and heat treated at different temperatures. The fibers were then examined for their physical and mechanical properties which are reported herein.

  11. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  12. Materials design for electrocatalytic carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss our philosophy for implementation of the Materials Genome Initiative through an integrated materials design strategy, exemplified here in the context of electrocatalytic capture and separation of CO2 gas. We identify for a group of 1:1 X-N graphene analogue materials that electro-responsive switchable CO2 binding behavior correlates with a change in the preferred binding site from N to the adjacent X atom as negative charge is introduced into the system. A reconsideration of conductive N-doped graphene yields the discovery that the N-dopant is able to induce electrocatalytic binding of multiple CO2 molecules at the adjacent carbon sites.

  13. Carbon-based nanomaterials: multifunctional materials for biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-23

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), and extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications.

  14. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yinwei; Tse, John S.; Yang, Bai; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-03-01

    Guided by a simple strategy in search of new superconducting materials, we predict that high-temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. We examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited, and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned Mg B2 . Together with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) in the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the Tc of sodalitelike Na C6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. Owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.

  15. Adsorptive removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution using carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Li, Yong; Han, Sheng; Ma, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, an important type of environmental contamination, have attracted many researchers to the study of their removal from aqueous solutions. Adsorption technology is a fast, efficient, and economical physicochemical method that is extensively used in wastewater treatment. From original activated carbon and carbon nanotubes to the latest graphene-based materials, carbon-based materials have been widely used as highly effective adsorbents for contaminant removal from aqueous solution because of their large specific surface area, high porosity, and high reaction activity. In this article, adsorption removal methods for four major types of antibiotic (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, macrolides, and quinolones) are reviewed. We also provide an overview of the application development of carbon materials as adsorbents for antibiotic removal from aqueous solution. The most promising works are discussed, and the main challenges in preparing high-performance adsorbents and the development tendency of adsorbents are also analyzed. This work provides theoretical guidance for subsequent research in the design and modification of carbon materials for applications in the adsorption removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution.

  16. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  17. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  18. Thermionic Converters Based on Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeck, Franz A. M.; Wang, Yunyu; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermionic energy converters are based on electron emission through thermal excitation and collection where the thermal energy is directly converted into electrical power. Conventional thermionic energy converters based on emission from planar metal emitters have been limited due to space charge. This paper presents a novel approach to thermionic energy conversion by focusing on nanostructured carbon materials, sulfur doped nanocrystalline diamond and carbon nanotube films as emitters. These materials exhibit intrinsic field enhancement which can be exploited in lowering the emission barrier, i.e. the effective work function. Moreover, emission from these materials is described in terms of emission sites as a result of a non-uniform spatial distribution of the field enhancement factor. This phenomenon can prove advantageous in a converter configuration to mitigate space charge effects by reducing the transit time of electrons in the gap due to an accelerated charge carrier transport.

  19. Experimental Studies of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Space Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, MIchael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Craven, Paul D.; Hyers, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Game ]changing propulsion systems are often enabled by novel designs using advanced materials. Radiator performance dictates power output for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon fiber materials have the potential to offer significant improvements in thermal conductivity and mass properties. A test apparatus was developed to test advanced radiator designs. This test apparatus uses a resistance heater inside a graphite tube. Metallic tubes can be slipped over the graphite tube to simulate a heat pipe. Several sub ]scale test articles were fabricated using CNT cloth and pitch ]based carbon fibers, which were bonded to a metallic tube using an active braze material. The test articles were heated up to 600 C and an infrared (IR) camera captured the results. The test apparatus and experimental results are presented here.

  20. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  2. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  3. Mesoporous Carbon-based Materials for Alternative Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Kimberly Michelle

    Increasing concerns for the escalating issues activated by the effect of carbon dioxide emissions on the global climate from extensive use of fossil fuels and the limited amount of fossil resources has led to an in-depth search for alternative energy systems, primarily based on nuclear or renewable energy sources. Recent innovations in the production of more efficient devices for energy harvesting, storage, and conversion are based on the incorporation of nanostructured materials into electrochemical systems. The aforementioned nano-electrochemical energy systems hold particular promise for alternative energy transportation related technologies including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, and electrochemical supercapacitors. In each of these devices, nanostructured materials can be used to increase the surface area where the critical chemical reactions occur within the same volume and mass, thereby increasing the energy density, power density, electrical efficiency, and physical robustness of the system. Durable corrosion resistant carbon support materials for fuel cells have been designed by adding conductive low cost carbon materials with chemically robust ceramic materials. Since a strict control of the pore size is mandatory to optimize properties for improved performance, chemical activation agents have been utilized as porogens to tune surface areas, pore size distributions, and composition of carbon-based mesoporous materials. Through the use of evaporative self-assembly methods, both randomly disordered and surfactant-templated, ordered carbon-silica nanocomposites have been synthesized with controlled surface area, pore volume, and pore size ranging from 50-800 m2/g, 0.025-0.75 cm3/g, and 2-10 nm, respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) ranging from 0.05-1.0 wt. % were added to the aforementioned carbon-silica nanocomposites, which provided an additional increase in surface area and improved conductivity. Initially, a conductivity value of 0.0667 S

  4. Defects in Carbon-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Two distinctly different carbon based semiconducting materials were investigated as to how point defects can influence the electric properties. SiC is a high power electronic material with high bulk mobility. The interface between SiC and SiO2 is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced mobility of SiC devices compared to bulk SiC. We investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We come to the conclusion that the previously observed interface layer is due to the miscut and does not exhibit any stoichiometric change. The structure of the interface which is limiting the device performance is caused by the steps and facets at the interface introduced by the miscut. We observed a high number of carbon in the oxide right next to the interface. Aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy enabled the investigation of the atomic structure of this highly stepped interface and the impact of geometry and chemistry on the electronic properties of this material. Graphene is an emerging electronic material also with high mobility. We investigated the defects and dopants in graphene were investigated. We observed point and extended defects in this 2D material. Due to the clear observation of all atoms involved, this material can serve as a model material to study point defects directly. We observe a electronegativity doping of substitutional Si. We observed a remarkable resistance to oxidation of a variety of point defects of elements that readily oxidize in normal circumstances. Boron and nitrogen doped graphene was investigated and the exact nature of the dopant sites and interactions will be shown. Generally speaking modern electron microscopy can directly visualize the full atomic structures in geometrically simple materials like graphene. The knowledge of point defects can be the basis to understand the electronic property structure relationship of structurally complex materials like SiC.

  5. N-Modified Carbon-Based Materials: Nanoscience for Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Prati, Laura; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Campisi, Sebastiano; Villa, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Carbon-based materials constitute a large family of materials characterized by some peculiarities such as resistance to both acidic and basic environments, flexibility of structure, and surface chemical groups. Moreover, they can be deeply modified by simple organic reactions (acid-base or redox) to acquire different properties. In particular, the introduction of N-containing groups, achieved by post-treatments or during preparation of the material, enhances the basic properties. Moreover, it has been revealed that the position and chemical nature of the N-containing groups is important in determining the interaction with metal nanoparticles, and thus, their reactivity. The modified activity was addressed to a different metal dispersion. Moreover, experiments on catalysts, showing the same metal dispersion, demonstrated that the best results were obtained when N was embedded into the carbon structure and not very close to the metal active site.

  6. Emerging materials for lowering atmospheric carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Potter, Matthew E.; Jones, Christopher W.; Lokitz, Bradley S.

    2016-12-08

    CO2 emissions from anthropogenic sources and the rate at which they increase could have deep global ramifications such as irreversible climate change and increased natural disasters. Because greater than 50% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions come from small, distributed sectors such as homes, offices, and transportation sources, most renewable energy systems and on-site carbon capture technologies for reducing future CO2 emissions cannot be effectively utilized. This problem might be mediated by considering novel materials and technologies for directly capturing/removing CO2 from air. But, compared to materials for capturing CO2 at on-site emission sources, materials for capturing CO2 directly from air must be more selective to CO2, and should operate and be stable at near ambient conditions. Here, we briefly summarize the recent developments in materials for capturing carbon dioxide directly from air. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges in this field and offer a perspective for developing the current state-of-art and also highlight the potential of a few recent discoveries in materials science that show potential for advanced application of air capture technology.

  7. Emerging materials for lowering atmospheric carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; ...

    2016-12-08

    CO2 emissions from anthropogenic sources and the rate at which they increase could have deep global ramifications such as irreversible climate change and increased natural disasters. Because greater than 50% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions come from small, distributed sectors such as homes, offices, and transportation sources, most renewable energy systems and on-site carbon capture technologies for reducing future CO2 emissions cannot be effectively utilized. This problem might be mediated by considering novel materials and technologies for directly capturing/removing CO2 from air. But, compared to materials for capturing CO2 at on-site emission sources, materials for capturing CO2 directly from air mustmore » be more selective to CO2, and should operate and be stable at near ambient conditions. Here, we briefly summarize the recent developments in materials for capturing carbon dioxide directly from air. Furthermore, we discuss the challenges in this field and offer a perspective for developing the current state-of-art and also highlight the potential of a few recent discoveries in materials science that show potential for advanced application of air capture technology.« less

  8. Precursor polymers for the carbon coating of Au@ZnO multipods for application as active material in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oschmann, Bernd; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Mueller, Franziska; Bresser, Dominic; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Tremel, Wolfgang; Passerini, Stefano; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of statistical and block copolymers based on polyacrylonitrile, as a source for carbonaceous materials, and thiol-containing repeating units as inorganic nanoparticle anchoring groups is reported. These polymers are used to coat Au@ZnO multipod heteroparticles with polymer brushes. IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy prove the successful binding of the polymer onto the inorganic nanostructures. Thermogravimetric analysis is applied to compare the binding ability of the block and statistical copolymers. Subsequently, the polymer coating is transformed into a carbonaceous (partially graphitic) coating by pyrolysis. The obtained carbon coating is characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The benefit of the conformal carbon coating of the Au@ZnO multipods regarding its application as lithium-ion anode material is revealed by performing galvanostatic cycling, showing a highly enhanced and stabilized electrochemical performance of the carbon-coated particles (still 831 mAh g(-1) after 150 cycles) with respect to the uncoated ones (only 353 mAh g(-1) after 10 cycles).

  9. Carbon Nanotube-enhanced Carbon-phenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B.; Waid, M.; Maloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) is a thermal protection system (TPS) material developed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-90 s for Discovery missions. It was used on the Stardust return capsule heat shield which successfully executed the highest speed Earth entry to date on January 15, 2006. PICA is a porous fibrous carbon insulation infiltrated with phenolic resin, and is an excellent ablator that is effective for heating rates up to 1000 W/sq cm. It is one of several candidate TPS materials for the next generation of crewed spacecraft for Lunar and Mars missions. We will describe an ongoing research effort at NASA to improve mechanical properties of the phenolic matrix with carbon nanotubes. The aim is two-fold: to increase overall TPS strength during reentry and to improve Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) protection in space. The former requires at least a good dispersion of nanotubes in phenolic, while the latter also requires covalent bonding between them to couple and transfer impact energy effectively from matrix to nanotubes. We will discuss the required chemical functionalization of nanotubes, processing issues and test results.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon... Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials. (a) Identification. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon material is a device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon intended for...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon... Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials. (a) Identification. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon material is a device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon intended for...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon... Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials. (a) Identification. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon material is a device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon... Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials. (a) Identification. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon material is a device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3680 - Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon... Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon materials. (a) Identification. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon material is a device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vitreous carbon intended for...

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Functional Carbon Nano Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-05

    NO. 0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU 22-07-2014 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. SYNTHESIS ...CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OFFUNCTIONAL CARBON NANO MATERIALS The synthesis , characterizations and applications of carbon nanomaterials, including carbon...PR 00931 -1790 ABSTRACT SYNTHESIS , CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OFFUNCTIONAL CARBON NANO MATERIALS Report Title The synthesis , characterizations

  16. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Activities for this quarter include: method development -- investigation of selective fractionation. Three petroleum atmospheric still bottoms (ASBs) were separated by distillation and solubility fractionation to determine the homogeneity of the carbon isotope ratios of the separated fractions. These same three petroleum ASBs and three geographically distinct coals were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min and hydrogenated over a CoMo catalyst at 750{degree}F for 60 min to determine the effects of these treatments on the isotopic compositions of the produce fractions. Twelve coal liquefaction oils were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. These oils were derived from subbituminous and bituminous coals from the first- and second-stage reactors in the thermal/catalytic and modes; validation and application, analysis. Carbon isotope analyses of samples from HRI bench unit coprocessing run 238-2 (Taiheiyo coal/Maya VSB) were analyzed. A method to correct for selective isotopic fractionation was developed and applied to the data. Five coprocessing samples were analyzed at the request of SRI International. 12 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  17. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1989-06-01

    The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of the coprocessing community (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique is currently in routine use for other applications. Results achieved this quarter include: Feed and product fractions from a Kentucky 9 coal/Kentucky tar sand bitumen coprocessing bench unit run at the Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. Corrections were made to the coal carbon recoveries and selectivities from the products of HRI Run 227-53. Feeds (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) and products from two periods of HRI coprocessing Run 238-1 were analyzed. Three petroleum samples and three coal samples were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min to determine the effect of pyrolysis on the isotopic homogeneity of each petroleum and coal sample. Products from each pyrolysis test were separated into five fractions; an additional set of coprocessing samples and a set of two-stage coal liquefaction samples were obtained from HRI for future work; work performed by the Pennsylvania State University show that microscopy is a promising method for distinguishing coal and petroleum products in residual coprocessing materials; and coal and petroleums that have large differences in carbon isotope ratios were identified for Auburn University. 7 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction.

  19. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  20. Graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials and use as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tour, James M.; Zhu, Yu; Li, Lei; Yan, Zheng; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-27

    Provided are methods of making graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials. Such methods generally include: (1) associating a graphene film with a substrate; (2) applying a catalyst and a carbon source to the graphene film; and (3) growing carbon nanotubes on the graphene film. The grown carbon nanotubes become covalently linked to the graphene film through carbon-carbon bonds that are located at one or more junctions between the carbon nanotubes and the graphene film. In addition, the grown carbon nanotubes are in ohmic contact with the graphene film through the carbon-carbon bonds at the one or more junctions. The one or more junctions may include seven-membered carbon rings. Also provided are the formed graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid materials.

  1. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Thermal Diffusivity of Carbon Materials as Candidate Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, M.; Abe, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal-diffusivity measurements using the laser-flash method have been investigated in order to establish a thermal diffusivity standard. In many cases, thermal-conductivity values of bulk materials are calculated from the thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and bulk density. The thermal diffusivity is one of the transport properties. It depends on the material and is sensitive to the structure. So, it is important to measure the thermal diffusivity of each material. The laser-flash method is one of the most popular methods for thermal-diffusivity measurements of bulk materials above room temperature. Because the method realizes a short-time method and is a non-contact method, it is very suitable for practical use. And it is known as a highly reliable measurement since one-dimensional heat diffusion phenomena observed in these measurements are simple. On the other hand, more reliable values measured by the method are important in the view of thermal design. According to the background, there is a need of a standard for thermal-diffusivity measurements using the laser-flash method to obtain reliable thermal diffusivities. The National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in AIST has established reference materials for the laser-flash method and is supplying them. However, they are not sufficient to cover the whole range of thermal-diffusivity measurements. Thus, some candidate materials have been investigated to establish another reference material. Carbon materials are considered since it is preferable for the laser-flash method that the material is optically nontransparent and dark colored (ideally black). In this study, the thermal diffusivity of a pyrolytic graphite that is expected to be a candidate reference material for the laser-flash method is investigated. It was found that the intrinsic thermal diffusivities can be determined along the in-plane and cross-plane directions. The high thermal diffusivity of the in-plane direction, 1.19 × 10^{-3} m2

  3. Modified Activated Carbon Perchlorate Sorbents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-25

    nitrosodimethylamine precursors in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Environ. Sci. Technol., 2004. 38: p. 1445-1454. 15. Shmidt, V., K. Rybakov...Engineering and Management, 1994. 141: p. 12. 33. Walker, G. and L. Weatherley, Biological Activated Carbon Treatment of Industrial Wastewater in... Treatment with Ammonia (NAC), Urea-formaldehyde Resin (UAC), and Hydrogen (HAC). Data are Indicated by the Symbol and Least Squares Fit of the Langmuir

  4. Highly selective and stable carbon dioxide uptake in polyindole-derived microporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Kemp, K Christain; Yousuf, Muhammad; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-05-21

    Adsorption with solid sorbents is considered to be one of the most promising methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO₂) from power plant flue gases. In this study, microporous carbon materials used for CO₂ capture were synthesized by the chemical activation of polyindole nanofibers (PIF) at temperatures from 500 to 800 °C using KOH, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped carbon materials. The N-doped carbon materials were found to be microporous with an optimal adsorption pore size for CO₂ of 0.6 nm and a maximum (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) BET surface area of 1185 m(2) g(-1). The PIF activated at 600 °C (PIF6) has a surface area of 527 m(2) g(-1) and a maximum CO₂ storage capacity of 3.2 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 bar. This high CO₂ uptake is attributed to its highly microporous character and optimum N content. Additionally, PIF6 material displays a high CO₂ uptake at low pressure (1.81 mmol g(-1) at 0.2 bar and 25 °C), which is the best low pressure CO₂ uptake reported for carbon-based materials. The adsorption capacity of this material remained remarkably stable even after 10 cycles. The isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated to be in the range of 42.7-24.1 kJ mol(-1). Besides the excellent CO₂ uptake and stability, PIF6 also exhibits high selectivity values for CO₂ over N₂, CH₄, and H₂ of 58.9, 12.3, and 101.1 at 25 °C, respectively, and these values are significantly higher than reported values.

  5. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  6. Characterization of activated carbons from oil-palm shell by CO2 activation with no holding carbonization temperature.

    PubMed

    Herawan, S G; Hadi, M S; Ayob, Md R; Putra, A

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced.

  7. Modeling Mechanical Properties of Carbon Molecular Clusters and Carbon Nanostructural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014264 TITLE: Modeling Mechanical Properties of Carbon Molecular...Clusters and Carbon Nanostructural Materials DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 740 © 2003 Materials Research Society 17.2 Modeling mechanical properties of carbon molecular clusters and carbon

  8. Statistical characterization of carbon phenolic prepreg materials, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, Don A.; Stites, John, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to characterize several lots of materials used for carbon/carbon and carbon/phenol product manufacture. Volume one is organized into testing categories based on raw material of product form. Each category contains a discussion of the sampling plan, comments and observations on each test method utilized, and a summary of the results obtained each category.

  9. Three-dimensional helical carbon materials: Microcoiled carbon fibers, carbon nanocoils, carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jining

    Materials with a 3D-helical/spiral-structure in micron size have recently aroused a great deal of interests because of their helical morphology and unique properties. However, materials with a 3D helical structure are not commonly observed among industrially available materials. Researchers have been trying to synthesize various micro- and nano-sized 3D helical materials and are exploring the mechanisms, nature, and properties of these materials. Yet a systematic study on 3D helical carbon materials in micro- and nano-size has been missing. This research work is intended as a first step to fill this gap. Among various 3D helical materials, carbon element has stimulated great interests. Micro coiled carbon fibers, carbon nanocoils, and carbon nanotubes are major types of 3D helical carbon materials ranging from micron to nano size. Synthesis of these 3D helical carbon materials by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method is presented in this thesis. It involves a pyrolysis of hydrocarbon gas (e.g. acetylene) over transition metals, such as Ni, Fe, and Co, at high reaction temperature (500--1000°C). Besides the conventional thermal filament chemical vapor deposition method, a novel microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) method has been developed to synthesize micro- and nano-sized 3D helical carbon materials economically. The faster heating and cooling processes associated with microwave CVD have potential for large-scale production in the near future. Compared with previously reported microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWPECVD) method, this method does not require high vacuum and much higher deposition rate is another major advantage. It has been found in this work that microwave plays an important role on coil morphology formation for micro coiled carbon fibers and carbon nanocoils. The large temperature gradient around the catalytic particles could be the reason. Different reaction factors have been checked to optimize the deposition

  10. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  11. Nanoscale Electrochemistry of sp(2) Carbon Materials: From Graphite and Graphene to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Patrick R; Güell, Aleix G; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-09-20

    Carbon materials have a long history of use as electrodes in electrochemistry, from (bio)electroanalysis to applications in energy technologies, such as batteries and fuel cells. With the advent of new forms of nanocarbon, particularly, carbon nanotubes and graphene, carbon electrode materials have taken on even greater significance for electrochemical studies, both in their own right and as components and supports in an array of functional composites. With the increasing prominence of carbon nanomaterials in electrochemistry comes a need to critically evaluate the experimental framework from which a microscopic understanding of electrochemical processes is best developed. This Account advocates the use of emerging electrochemical imaging techniques and confined electrochemical cell formats that have considerable potential to reveal major new perspectives on the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon materials, with unprecedented detail and spatial resolution. These techniques allow particular features on a surface to be targeted and models of structure-activity to be developed and tested on a wide range of length scales and time scales. When high resolution electrochemical imaging data are combined with information from other microscopy and spectroscopy techniques applied to the same area of an electrode surface, in a correlative-electrochemical microscopy approach, highly resolved and unambiguous pictures of electrode activity are revealed that provide new views of the electrochemical properties of carbon materials. With a focus on major sp(2) carbon materials, graphite, graphene, and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), this Account summarizes recent advances that have changed understanding of interfacial electrochemistry at carbon electrodes including: (i) Unequivocal evidence for the high activity of the basal surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is at least as active as noble metal electrodes (e.g., platinum) for outer

  12. Antioxidative protective coatings for carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kravetskii, G.A.; Kostikov, V.I.; Demin, A.V.; Rodionova, V.V.

    1995-12-01

    A widespread use of carbon-carbon and carbon-ceramic materials (CCM) in the aerospace industry, metallurgy (crucibles for melting metals) and electrical engineering is limited because of the need for protecting CCM parts against oxidation at service temperatures above 500 to 700{degrees}C. At temperatures up to 1300-1400{degrees}C, the problem can be solved by volume siliconizing CCM parts, impregnating C-C substrates with organosilicon compounds or gas-phase depositing (CVD process) silicon-containing compounds (SiC or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). For CCM parts to be used at temperatures above 1500{degrees}C in oxidative environments (space structures; aircraft gas-turbine engine components in contact with a hot gas; crucibles for melting metals), the following techniques are being devised to apply protective coatings, as evident from a patent literature analysis: (1) Application of SiC coatings onto the surface of graphite or C-C parts by the CVD or CVR methods; such coatings can be quite efficient for parts operating short time at temperatures up to 2000{degrees}C, for example in rocket engines; (2) SiC coatings applied onto the surface of large-sized or intricately-shaped parts frequently experience cracking; this necessitates the application of multilayered or multicomponent coatings (by subsequent impregnation with various silicate compositions, covering with glass or glass-like compositions to {open_quotes}heal{close_quotes} cracks; applying surface oxide or silicate coatings); (3) Application on the surface of CCM parts of refractory, self-healing-in use coatings containing refractory borides and silicides; to this end the CVD method and plasma spraying in controlled atmospheres are employed. Given below are results of the investigations conducted at NIIGRA-FIT in the above-mentioned directions with the use of the slip-casting technology.

  13. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-03-01

    Research on coprocessing materials/products continued. Major topics reported here are described below. Microautoclave runs are described in which gases and insoluble organic matter produced from five coals and gases produced from three petroleum resids were analyzed to study feedstock/product selective isotopic fractionation. Selective isotopic fractionation was further explored through isotope analysis of the feed New Mexico coal and products from a continuous coal liquefaction run (HRI CC-10 or 227-68). Feeds (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and products from two HRI continuous coprocessing runs (227-54 and 238-12) were analyzed. The results were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation and carbon sourcing was performed for the product fractions. {sup 1}H-NMR and phenolic -OH determinations are reported for all continuous unit samples obtained under this contract. 13 refs., 17 figs., 40 tabs.

  14. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  15. Porous hollow carbon spheres for electrode material of supercapacitors and support material of dendritic Pt electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Huang, Zhong-Yuan; Jiang, Tong-Wu; Yao, Kai-Li; Han, Ran

    2015-04-01

    Porous hollow carbon spheres (PHCSs) are prepared through hydrothermal carbonization of alginic acid and subsequent chemical activation by KOH. The porosity of the alginic acid derived PHCSs can be finely modulated by varying activation temperature in the range of 600-900 °C. The PHCSs activated at 900 °C possess the largest specific surface area (2421 m2 g-1), well-balanced micro- and mesoporosity, as well as high content of oxygen-containing functional groups. As the electrode material for supercapacitors, the PHCSs exhibit superior capacitive performance with specific capacitance of 314 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1. Pt nanodendrites supported on the PHCSs are synthesized by polyol reduction method which exhibit high electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Moreover, CO-poisoning tolerance of the Pt nanodendrites is greatly enhanced owing to the surface chemical property of the PHCSs support.

  16. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  17. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  18. Carbon nanotube synthesis with different support materials and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, Fatih; Yuca, Neslihan; Karatepe, Nilgün

    2013-09-01

    Having remarkable characteristics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a lot of interest. Their mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical properties make CNTs suitable for several applications such as electronic devices, hydrogen storage, textile, drug delivery etc. CNTs have been synthesized by various methods, such as arc discharge, laser ablation and catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). In comparison with the other techniques, CCVD is widely used as it offers a promising route for mass production. High capability of decomposing hydrocarbon formation is desired for the selected catalysts. Therefore, transition metals which are in the nanometer scale are the most effective catalysts. The common transition metals that are being used are Fe, Co, Ni and their binary alloys. The impregnation of the catalysts over the support material has a crucial importance for the CNT production. In this study, the influence of the support materials on the catalytic activity of metals was investigated. CNTs have been synthesized over alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2) and magnesium oxide (MgO) supported Fe, Co, Fe-Co catalysts. Catalyst - support material combinations have been investigated and optimum values for each were compared. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were produced at 800°C. The duration of synthesis was 30 minutes for all support materials. The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  20. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  1. An overview of carbon materials for flexible electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    He, Yongmin; Chen, Wanjun; Gao, Caitian; Zhou, Jinyuan; Li, Xiaodong; Xie, Erqing

    2013-10-07

    Under the background of the quick development of lightweight, flexible, and wearable electronic devices in our society, a flexible and highly efficient energy management strategy is needed for their counterpart energy-storage systems. Among them, flexible electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have been considered as one of the most promising candidates because of their significant advantages in power and energy densities, and unique properties of being flexible, lightweight, low-cost, and environmentally friendly compared with current energy storage devices. In a common EC, carbon materials play an irreplaceable and principal role in its energy-storage performance. Up till now, most progress towards flexible ECs technologies has mostly benefited from the continuous development of carbon materials. As a result, in view of the dual remarkable highlights of ECs and carbon materials, a summary of recent research progress on carbon-based flexible EC electrode materials is presented in this review, including carbon fiber (CF, consisting of carbon microfiber-CMF and carbon nanofiber-CNF) networks, carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene coatings, CNT and/or graphene papers (or films), and freestanding three-dimensional (3D) flexible carbon-based macroscopic architectures. Furthermore, some promising carbon materials for great potential applications in flexible ECs are introduced. Finally, the trends and challenges in the development of carbon-based electrode materials for flexible ECs and their smart applications are analyzed.

  2. Nitrogen/Sulfur-Codoped Carbon Materials from Chitosan for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Han, Xianlong; Chang, Xiaoqing; Yin, Wenchao; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-08-01

    d-Methionine and chitosan have been used for fabrication of nitrogen/sulfur-codoped carbon materials by a hydrothermal process followed by carbonization at 750°C for 3 h. The as-prepared carbon materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, combining electrical double-layer capacitance with pseudocapacitance owing to the doping with sulfur and nitrogen. The specific capacitance of the obtained carbon material reached 135 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1, which is much higher than undoped chitosan (67 F g-1). The capacitance retention of the carbon material was almost 97.2% after 5000 cycles at current density of 1 A g-1. With such improved electrochemical performance, the nitrogen/sulfur-codoped carbon material may have promising potential for use in energy-storage electrodes of supercapacitors.

  3. Composites of manganese oxide with carbon materials as catalysts for the ozonation of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Orge, C A; Órfão, J J M; Pereira, M F R

    2012-04-30

    Manganese oxide and manganese oxide-carbon composites were prepared and tested as catalysts for the removal of oxalic acid by ozonation. Their performances were compared with the parent carbon material (activated carbon or carbon xerogel) used to prepare the composites. Oxalic acid degradation by carbon materials is slower than that attained with manganese oxide or manganese oxide-carbon composites. A complete degradation after 90 and 45 min of reaction was obtained for carbon materials and for the catalysts containing manganese, respectively. The ozonation in the presence of the prepared composites are supposed to occur mainly by surface reactions, following a direct oxidation mechanism by molecular ozone and/or surface oxygenated radicals.

  4. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  5. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  6. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  7. [Study on implant material of carbon/carbon composites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohui; Yu, Shu; Zhu, Shaihong; Liu, Yong; Miu, Yunliang; Huang, Boyun

    2010-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility and mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites. At first, carbon/carbon composites were prepared by chemical vapor deposition, and the mechanical property of carbon/carbon composites was tested. The biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites was evaluated by cytotoxicity test, sensitization test, micronucleus test and implantation test. Mechanical property test showed such carbon/carbon composites are of good compression property and tension property. Cytotoxicity test showed that the leaching liquor of samples has no effect on the growth and proliferation of L-929 cells. The medullary micronucleus frequency of mouse was 2.3 per thousand +/- 0.7 per thousand in experiment group. The sensitization test showed that the skin of the subjects of experiment group had slight erythema and edema, which was 0.188 +/- 0.40 according to Magnusson and Kligman classification. Implantation test revealed that there was slight inflammation around the tissue after the implantation of sample. At 12 weeks, scanning electron microscopy and histopathological exam indicated that the samples of experiment group were of good histocompatibility; and in comparison with control group, there was no significant differences (P > 0.05). So these kinds of samples have good biocompatibility, mechanical property and prospects of clinical application.

  8. Surface-functionalized mesoporous carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Gorka, Joanna; Mayes, Richard T.

    2016-02-02

    A functionalized mesoporous carbon composition comprising a mesoporous carbon scaffold having mesopores in which polyvinyl polymer grafts are covalently attached, wherein said mesopores have a size of at least 2 nm and up to 50 nm. Also described is a method for producing the functionalized mesoporous composition, wherein a reaction medium comprising a precursor mesoporous carbon, vinyl monomer, initiator, and solvent is subjected to sonication of sufficient power to result in grafting and polymerization of the vinyl monomer into mesopores of the precursor mesoporous carbon. Also described are methods for using the functionalized mesoporous carbon, particularly in extracting metal ions from metal-containing solutions.

  9. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis and processing of carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Maria E.

    2011-12-01

    Part I: Porous carbons are of interest in many applications because of their high surface areas and other physicochemical properties, and much effort has been directed towards developing new methods for controlling the porosity of carbons. Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) is an aerosol method suitable for large-scale, continuous synthesis of materials. Ultrasound is used to create aerosol droplets of a precursor solution which serve as micron-sized spherical reactors for materials synthesis. This work presents a precursor system for the template-free USP synthesis of porous carbons using low-cost precursors that do not evolve or require hazardous chemicals: sucrose was used as the carbon source, and sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium nitrate was added as a decomposition catalyst and porogen. The USP carbons had macroporous interiors and microporous shells with surface areas as high as 800 m2/g and a narrow pore size distribution. It was determined that the interior porosity was a result of the gas evolution from salt decomposition and not from the presence of a salt template. Porous carbon is frequently used as a catalyst support because it provides high surface area and it is chemically and physically stable under many anoxic reaction conditions. Typically, the preparation of supported catalysts requires multiple steps for carbonization and metal impregnation. In this work, iron-impregnated porous carbon microspheres (Fe-C) were prepared by a one-step USP process by incorporating both the carbon and metal sources into the precursor solution. Carbonization, pore formation, metal impregnation, and metal activation occurred simultaneously to produce Fe-C materials with surface areas as high as 800 m2/g and up to 10 wt% Fe incorporated as nanoparticles < 20 nm in diameter. Fe-C was used as a catalyst to reduce aqueous hexavalent chromium, which demonstrated the accessibility of the iron nanoparticles despite the fact that they are likely encapsulated in

  10. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity and the co-ordination of carbon partitioning during sucrose and amino acid accumulation in desiccation-tolerant leaf material of the C4 resurrection plant Sporobolus stapfianus during dehydration.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Anne; Martinelli, Tommaso; Farrant, Jill M; Bochicchio, Adriana; Vazzana, Concetta

    2007-01-01

    Both sucrose and amino acids accumulate in desiccation-tolerant leaf material of the C(4) resurrection plant, Sporobolus stapfianus Gandoger (Poaceae). The present investigation was aimed at examining sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and various metabolic checkpoints involved in the co-ordination of carbon partitioning between these competing pathways during dehydration. In the initial phase of dehydration, photosynthesis and starch content declined to immeasurable levels, whilst significant increases in hexose sugars, sucrose, and amino acids were associated with concomitant significant increases in SPS and pyruvate kinase (PK) activities, and maximal activity levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH), and NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT). The next phase of dehydration was characterized by changes in metabolism coinciding with net hexose sugar phosphorylation. This phase was characterized by a further significant increase in sucrose accumulation, with increased rates of net sucrose accumulation and maximum rates of SPS activity measured under both saturating and limiting (inhibitory) conditions. SPS protein was also increased. The stronger competitive edge of SPS for carbon entering glycolysis during hexose phosphorylation was also demonstrated by the further decrease in respiration and the simultaneous, significant decline in both PEPCase and PK activities. A decreased anabolic demand for 2-oxoglutarate (2OG), which remained constant, was shown by the co-ordinated decrease in GOGAT. It is proposed that the further increase in amino acids in this phase of dehydration may be in part attributable to the breakdown of insoluble proteins.

  11. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  12. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  13. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  14. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on activated carbon tin ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, A. B.; Iyuke, S. E.; Daud, W. R. W.; Kadhum, A. A. H.; Fisal, Z.; Al-Khatib, M. F.; Shariff, A. M.

    2000-09-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with 34.57% SnCl 2·2H 2O salt and then dried at 180°C to produce AC-SnO 2 to improve its adsorptive interaction with CO. Besides the fact that activated carbon has its original different pore sizes for normal gas phase CO adsorption (as in the case of pure carbon), the impregnated carbon has additional CO adsorption ability due to the presence of O -(ads) on the active sites. AC-SnO 2 proved to be a superior adsorber of CO than pure carbon when used for H 2 purification in a PSA system. Discernibly, the high adsorptive selectivity of AC-SnO 2 towards gas phase CO portrays a good future for the applicability of this noble adsorbent, since CO has become a notorious threat to the global ecosystem due to the current level of air pollution.

  15. Strongly coupled inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-04-07

    The global shift of energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources requires more efficient and reliable electrochemical energy storage devices. In particular, the development of electric or hydrogen powered vehicles calls for much-higher-performance batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells than are currently available. In this review, we present an approach to synthesize electrochemical energy storage materials to form strongly coupled hybrids (SC-hybrids) of inorganic nanomaterials and novel graphitic nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, through nucleation and growth of nanoparticles at the functional groups of oxidized graphitic nano-carbon. We show that the inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials represent a new approach to synthesize electrode materials with higher electrochemical performance than traditional counterparts made by simple physical mixtures of electrochemically active inorganic particles and conducting carbon materials. The inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials are novel due to possible chemical bonding between inorganic nanoparticles and oxidized carbon, affording enhanced charge transport and increased rate capability of electrochemical materials without sacrificing specific capacity. Nano-carbon with various degrees of oxidation provides a novel substrate for nanoparticle nucleation and growth. The interactions between inorganic precursors and oxidized-carbon substrates provide a degree of control over the morphology, size and structure of the resulting inorganic nanoparticles. This paper reviews the recent development of inorganic-nano-carbon hybrid materials for electrochemical energy storage and conversion, including the preparation and functionalization of graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes to impart oxygen containing groups and defects, and methods of synthesis of nanoparticles of various morphologies on oxidized graphene and carbon nanotubes. We then review the applications of the SC

  16. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application an authentic continuous-unit products. The experimental details used for stable carbon isotope analyses by the organization that performs most of those analyses under this contract are described. A method was developed previously under this contract to correct the carbon sourcing calculations performed from stable carbon isotope analyses for selective isotopic fractionation. The method relies on three assumptions. This quarter, a study was completed to define the sensitivity of the carbon sourcing results to errors in the assumptions. Carbon contents and carbon isotope ratios were determined for the available feeds and product fractions from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 238-10 (Texas lignite/Hondo vacuum still bottoms (VSB), Texas lignite/Cold Lake VSB and Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB). These data were used for carbon sourcing calculations and individual feedstock conversion calculations. A previously devised means for correcting for selective isotope fractionation was applied. 6 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  18. Development of highly porous carbon and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasuyuki

    The objectives of this thesis were to develop new methods for manufacturing highly porous and low-density carbon and ceramic materials by simple methods using low-cost precursors, which can exhibit high corrosion resistance and high-temperature performance with advantageous porous microstructure. Various types of porous carbon materials were manufactured using different techniques. These materials included porous carbons fabricated by paper making technology, foamed resin based carbons, resin powder based porous carbons and carbon bonded carbon fibre composites. Then, these different forms of porous carbon preforms were converted into lightweight and low-density ceramics by two main fabrication routes. In the first route, porous carbon-ceramic composites were manufactured by infiltration of a mixture of silica sol-gels and a resin carbon source into porous carbon preforms. The silica was subsequently converted into SiC or Si3N4 by carbothermal reduction or nitridation, respectively. Furthermore, boron oxide glass was impregnated in addition to SiC. However, the porous carbon-ceramic composites from this fabrication method exhibited poor high-temperature performance due to low oxidation resistance.In the second route, porous carbon preforms were directly converted into porous SiC materials by a reaction bonding technique with silicon vapour infiltration. The ceramics produced by this route were proved to have high potentiality as lightweight and low-density materials at elevated temperatures and corrosive atmospheres, with modified mechanical properties. Structural and morphological characterizations of the porous materials were carried out using optical and electron microscopy, diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Mechanical properties were also measured including flexural, tensile and compressive strength, and elastic modulus at room and elevated temperatures, and the results of mechanical properties were analyzed in relation to density/porosity values

  19. [Study on influence between activated carbon property and immobilized biological activated carbon purification effect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-zhi; Li, Wei-guang; He, Wen-jie; Han, Hong-da; Ding, Chi; Ma, Xiao-na; Qu, Yan-ming

    2006-10-01

    By means of immobilizing five kinds of activated carbon, we studied the influence between the chief activated carbon property items and immobilized bioactivated carbon (IBAC) purification effect with the correlation analysis. The result shows that the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.7 include molasses, abrasion number, hardness, tannin, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter; the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.5 include pH, iodine, butane and tetrachloride. In succession, the partial correlation analysis shows that activated carbon property items mostly influencing on IBAC purification effect include molasses, hardness, abrasion number, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter. The causation of these property items bringing influence on IBAC purification is that the activated carbon holes distribution (representative activated carbon property item is molasses) provides inhabitable location and adjust food for the dominance bacteria; the mechanical resist-crash property of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: abrasion number and hardness) have influence on the stability of biofilm; and the particle diameter size and distribution of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter) can directly affect the force of water in IBAC filter bed, which brings influence on the dominance bacteria immobilizing on activated carbon.

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide approach to nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiang-Rong

    Supercritical fluid technology is a novel and emerging strategy to generate nanomaterials in small areas, within high-aspect-ratio structures, on complicated surfaces and poor wettable substrates with high uniformity, high homogeneity and minimum environmental problems. In this dissertation, several strategies were developed for thin film deposition and nanocomposite fabrication. In developing supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID), supercritical or near supercritical CO2 was used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop Pd, Cu, Ag and other metal films on featured and non-featured Si substrates. Annealing of thin palladium films deposited by SFID can lead to the formation of palladium silicide in small features on Si substrates. Deposition of metal films on germanium substrates was also achieved through SFID. Through hydrogen reduction of metal-beta-diketone complexes in supercritical CO2, a rapid, convenient and environmentally benign approach has been developed to synthesize a variety of nanostructured materials: (1) Metal (Pd, Ni and Cu) nanowires and nanorods sheathed within multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) templates; (2) nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium decorated onto functionalized MWCNTs. These highly dispersed nanoparticles are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical or electrochemical reactions; (3) Cu, Pd or Cu-Pd alloy nanocrystals deposited onto SiO2 nanowires (NWs), SiO2 microfibers, or SiC NWs. Different types of nanostructures were achieved, including nanocrystal-NW, spherical aggregation-NW, shell-NW composites and "mesoporous" metals supported by the framework of NWs.

  1. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for the Analysis of Activated Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    impregnation procedures . It is believed that Sutcliffe-Speakman is currently using coconut - shell as the carbon precursor (instead of the New Zealand coal...microstructure facilitate the adsorption process whereby all the undesirable materials are retained. For military deployment, the activated carbon is...AD-A245 899 H.P ’ l N dI dUenm / DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY (DSC) FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by S.H.C. a and L.E. Cameron DTIC x

  2. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  3. Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Carbon Cryogels and Carbon Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nanofoams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  4. Carbon Cryogel and Carbon Paper-Based Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 6 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-5 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  5. Production and characterization of lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Namazi, A B; Jia, C Q; Allen, D G

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to establish the technical feasibility of producing activated carbon from pulp mill sludges. KOH chemical activation of four lignocellulosic biomass materials, two sludges from pulp mills, one sludge for a linerboard mill, and cow manure, were investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of KOH/biomass ratio (1/1, 1.5/1 and 2/1), activation temperature (400-600 °C) and activation time (1 to 2 h) on the development of porosity. The activation products were characterized for their physical and chemical properties using a surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out to establish the effectiveness of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon in removing methylene blue (MB), a surrogate of large organic molecules. The results show that the activated carbon are highly porous with specific surface area greater than 500 m²/g. The yield of activated carbon was greater than the percent of fixed carbon in the dry sludge, suggesting that the activation process was able to capture a substantial amount of carbon from the organic matter in the sludge. While 400 °C was too low, 600 °C was high enough to sustain a substantial rate of activation for linerboard sludge. The KOH/biomass ratio, activation temperature and time all play important roles in pore development and yield control, allowing optimization of the activation process. MB adsorption followed a Langmuir isotherm for all four activated carbon, although the adsorption capacity of NK-primary sludge-derived activated carbon was considerably lower than the rest, consistent with its lower specific surface area.

  6. The application of prepared porous carbon materials: Effect of different components on the heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Wei, Yuexing; Yu, Lei; Tang, Xinhong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, five typical municipal solid waste (MSW) components (tyres, cardboard, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), acrylic textile, toilet paper) were used as raw materials to prepare four kinds of MSW-based carbon materials (paperboard-based carbon materials (AC1); the tyres and paperboard-based carbon materials (AC2); the tyres, paperboard and PVC-based carbon materials (AC3); the tyres, paperboard, toilet paper, PVC and acrylic textile-based carbon materials (AC4)) by the KOH activation method. The characteristic results illustrate that the prepared carbon adsorbents exhibited a large pore volume, high surface area and sufficient oxygen functional groups. Furthermore, the application of AC1, AC2, AC3, AC4 on different heavy metal (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cr(3+)) removals was explored to investigate their adsorption properties. The effects of reaction time, pH, temperature and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capability of heavy metals were investigated. Comparisons of heavy metal adsorption on carbon of different components were carried out. Among the four samples, AC1 exhibits the highest adsorption capacity for Cu(2+); the highest adsorption capacities of Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) are obtained for AC2; that of Cr(3+) are obtained for AC4. In addition, the carbon materials exhibit better adsorption capability of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) than the other two kind of metal ions (Zn(2+) and Cr(3+)).

  7. [Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics as implant materials].

    PubMed

    Bader, R; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Siebels, W; Mittelmeier, W; Gradinger, R

    2003-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics have been used clinically as an implant material for different applications for over 20 years.A review of technical basics of the composite materials (carbon fibers and matrix systems), fields of application,advantages (e.g., postoperative visualization without distortion in computed and magnetic resonance tomography), and disadvantages with use as an implant material is given. The question of the biocompatibility of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics is discussed on the basis of experimental and clinical studies. Selected implant systems made of carbon composite materials for treatments in orthopedic surgery such as joint replacement, tumor surgery, and spinal operations are presented and assessed. Present applications for carbon fiber reinforced plastics are seen in the field of spinal surgery, both as cages for interbody fusion and vertebral body replacement.

  8. Dissociation of formaldehyde in nanostructured carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Aaron; Santiso, Erik; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco; Gubbins, K. E.

    2004-11-01

    Chemical reactions are frequently carried out in nano-structured media, such as micellar or colloidal solutions, nano-porous media, hydrogels or organogels, or in systems involving nano-particles. Nanostructured environments have been shown to enhance reaction rates through a variety of catalytic effects, such as high surface area, interactions with the nano-structure or confinement. However, at present there is little understanding of the role of the nano-structured material in such reactions and the mechanisms involved are subject of ongoing scientific debate. In this work, we have used state-of-the-art electronic structure techniques to study the prototypical example of the reaction of formaldehyde dissociation (H_2CO arrow H2 + CO) within various configurations of a graphitic pore. Using the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method for transition states analysis, we have found that the activation en ergy of the dissociation can be influenced by the presence of a graphitic pore. In particular, while a graphene surface reduces the activation barrier for the reaction, this catalytic effect is enhanced by the presence of two planar sheets, which mimic the geometry of a nano-pore. This can likewise induce a decrease of the activation energy, thus making the reaction more energetically favor able. The reaction activation energy has a dependence on the width of the pore (distance between sheets). A decrease is seen to a point of decreasing width, then a change in the favorable reaction path occurs. It is also found the presence of a vacancy can drastically change the reaction path. These conclusions will be discussed in terms of the charge transfer mechanism seen in the catalytic process.

  9. MOF-derived crumpled-sheet-assembled perforated carbon cuboids as highly effective cathode active materials for ultra-high energy density Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HECs).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhik; Upadhyay, Kush Kumar; Puthusseri, Dhanya; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-04-21

    Lithium ion hybrid capacitors (Li-HECs) have attracted significant attention for use in next generation advanced energy storage technologies to satisfy the demand of both high power density as well as energy density. Herein we demonstrate the use of very high surface area 3D carbon cuboids synthesized from a metal-organic framework (MOF) as a cathode material with Li₄Ti₅O₁₂ as the anode for high performance Li-HECs. The energy density of the cell is ∼65 W h kg(-1) which is significantly higher than that achievable with commercially available activated carbon (∼36 W h kg(-1)) and a symmetric supercapacitor based on the same MOF-derived carbon (MOF-DC ∼20 W h kg(-1)). The MOF-DC/Li₄Ti₅O₁₂ Li-HEC assembly also shows good cyclic performance with ∼82% of the initial value (∼25 W h kg(-1)) retained after 10,000 galvanostatic cycles under high rate cyclic conditions. This result clearly indicates that MOF-DC is a very promising candidate for future P-HEVs in a Li-HEC configuration.

  10. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report which was a thirty-four month project conducted to develop and demonstrate stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish the source of carbon in products of coal/petroleum coprocessing. The work included assessing precision, accuracy, the range of application and the significance of selective isotopic fractionation effects. A method was devised to correct for selective isotopic fractionation errors. The method was demonstrated through application with samples from twelve continuous-unit coprocessing tests. A data base of carbon isotope analyses is appended. 21 refs.

  11. Surface analysis of carbon black waste materials from tire residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Ko, Y. K.; Reucroft, P. J.; Zondlo, J. W.

    1999-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to obtain surface chemical state information on two carbon black waste materials in terms of the surface element distribution/concentration and chemical structure. Small amounts of sulfur in the form of CS 2 were detected on the surface (less than 1.7 mass %). C-H/C-C was the major carbon functional component on the surface of carbon black samples but other functional forms of carbon were also present such as CO and C-O. The surface of the carbon black obtained from a hydropyrolysis process was highly oxidized primarily in the form of carbon based oxygen groups. On the other hand, surface oxygen atoms on the surface of the carbon black obtained from a pyrolysis process in the absence of H 2 were in the form of both metal oxides and carbon based oxygen groups.

  12. Sink effect in activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, J.; Labady, M.; Severino, F.; Yunes, S.

    1997-03-01

    A synergistic effect has been proposed in previous papers, attempting to explain the higher activity of activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts with respect to conventional alumina-supported catalysts, reported earlier. However, activated carbon characteristics can be strongly affected by the raw material and the method of activation. Thus, previous work using Ni-Mo catalysts supported on two different activated carbons (one prepared by {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} and the other by {open_quotes}chemical{close_quotes} activation) showed different optimal Ni concentrations for higher HDS activity, such difference being attributed to the predominance of Topsoe`s Type I {open_quotes}NiMoS{close_quotes} phase in one carbon and the predominance of Type II in the other. Due to the lack of proper characterization of the activated carbon supported catalysts of the previous work, this paper presents further data suggesting that microporosity provided by the activated carbon may be the responsible for the above referred synergism. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Sorption of boron trifluoride by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Polevoi, A.S.; Petrenko, A.E.

    1988-01-10

    The sorption of born trifluoride on AG-3, SKT, SKT-3, SKT-7, SKT-4A, SKT-6A, and SKT-2B carbons was investigated. The sorption isotherms for both vapors and gas were determined volumetrically. The coefficients of two equations described the sorption of BF/sub 3/ in the sorption of BF/sub 3/ on active carbons. Heats of sorption of BF/sub 3/ on the activated carbons are shown and the sorption isotherms and temperature dependences of the equilibrium pressure of BF/sub 3/ for activated carbons were presented. The values of the heats of sorption indicated the weak character of the reaction of BF/sub 3/ with the surface of the carbons. The equations can be used for calculating the phase equilibrium of BF/sub 3/ on carbons in a wider range of temperatures and pressures.

  14. Carbonized material adsorbents for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, S.; Pulido, L.L.; Kajimoto, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although wood has essentially been excluded as a starting material for the production of granular activated carbon because of the poor strength and friability of the products, powdered wood based activated carbons are still being used in water treatment and other liquid phase applications. However, the capability of powdered wood-based charcoal which in itself porous has not been fully known. Few studies have been conducted in harnessing its potential for adsorption purposes especially in water treatment. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using wood based carbonized materials from Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) as adsorption materials in aqueous solutions of heavy metals like mercury, zinc, lead, cadmium and arsenic. However, of all the heavy metals investigated, mercury is considered to be the most toxic so this paper describes only the adsorption ability of the carbonized materials in adsorbing this metal from aqueous solutions of different concentrations.

  15. Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Firsich, David W.; Ingersoll, David; Delnick, Frank M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200.degree.-250.degree. C., followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300.degree. C., follows carbonization.

  16. Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials

    DOEpatents

    Firsich, D.W.; Ingersoll, D.; Delnick, F.M.

    1998-07-07

    A method is described for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200--250 C, followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300 C, follows carbonization. 1 fig.

  17. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol with functionalized carbon materials as catalysts: reaction mechanism and pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Fu, Wantao; He, Xuwen; Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2014-08-01

    The development of highly active carbon material catalysts in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) has attracted a great deal of attention. In this study different carbon material catalysts (multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers and graphite) were developed to enhance the CWAO of phenol in aqueous solution. The functionalized carbon materials exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the CWAO of phenol. After 60 min reaction, the removal of phenol was nearly 100% over the functionalized multi-walled carbon, while it was only 14% over the purified multi-walled carbon under the same reaction conditions. Carboxylic acid groups introduced on the surface of the functionalized carbon materials play an important role in the catalytic activity in CWAO. They can promote the production of free radicals, which act as strong oxidants in CWAO. Based on the analysis of the intermediates produced in the CWAO reactions, a new reaction pathway for the CWAO of phenol was proposed in this study. There are some differences between the proposed reaction pathway and that reported in the literature. First, maleic acid is transformed directly into malonic acid. Second, acetic acid is oxidized into an unknown intermediate, which is then oxidized into CO2 and H2O. Finally, formic acid and oxalic acid can mutually interconvert when conditions are favorable.

  18. Mechanics of soft active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    Soft active materials, mostly elastomers and polymeric gels, are being developed to mimic a salient feature of life: movement in response to stimuli. For example, when an electric voltage is applied across a layer of a dielectric elastomer, the layer reduces in thickness and expands in area, giving a strain greater than 100%. As another example, in response to a small change of pH or temperature, a hydrogel may absorb a large amount of water and increase its volume over 100 times. The mechanics involved in these processes is important, interesting, and not well understood. This thesis studies large deformations and instabilities in dielectric elastomers and polymeric gels. The thesis first presents a nonlinear field theory for deformable dielectrics. The theory uses measurable quantities to define field variables. The definitions lead to decoupled field equations, and electromechanical coupling enters the theory through material laws. We use the theory to study electromechanical instability and coexistent states in dielectric elastomers. A computational method is also developed to analyze inhomogeneous deformations in complicated structures of dielectric elastomers. The second part of the thesis discusses large deformation and mass transportation in polymeric gels. A gel can undergo large deformation of two modes: local rearrangement and long-range migration. We assume that the local rearrangement is instantaneous, and model the long-range migration by assuming that the solvent molecules diffuse inside the gel. We further study inhomogeneous and anisotropic deformations and instabilities in gels constrained by rigid materials.

  19. Comparison of carbon materials as electrodes for enzyme electrocatalysis: hydrogenase as a case study.

    PubMed

    Quinson, Jonathan; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Ash, Philip A; Dillon, Frank; Grobert, Nicole; Vincent, Kylie A

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of electrocatalysis by an enzyme adsorbed on a range of carbon materials, with different size, surface area, morphology and graphitic structure, which are either commercially available or prepared via simple, established protocols. We choose as our model enzyme the hydrogenase I from E. coli (Hyd-1), which is an active catalyst for H2 oxidation, is relatively robust and has been demonstrated in H2 fuel cells and H2-driven chemical synthesis. The carbon materials were characterised according to their surface area, surface morphology and graphitic character, and we use the electrocatalytic H2 oxidation current for Hyd-1 adsorbed on these materials to evaluate their effectiveness as enzyme electrodes. Here, we show that a variety of carbon materials are suitable for adsorbing hydrogenases in an electroactive configuration. This unified study provides insight into selection and design of carbon materials for study of redox enzymes and different applications of enzyme electrocatalysis.

  20. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  1. Catalytic activation of carbon-carbon bonds in cyclopentanones.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Lu, Gang; Liu, Peng; Dong, Guangbin

    2016-11-24

    In the chemical industry, molecules of interest are based primarily on carbon skeletons. When synthesizing such molecules, the activation of carbon-carbon single bonds (C-C bonds) in simple substrates is strategically important: it offers a way of disconnecting such inert bonds, forming more active linkages (for example, between carbon and a transition metal) and eventually producing more versatile scaffolds. The challenge in achieving such activation is the kinetic inertness of C-C bonds and the relative weakness of newly formed carbon-metal bonds. The most common tactic starts with a three- or four-membered carbon-ring system, in which strain release provides a crucial thermodynamic driving force. However, broadly useful methods that are based on catalytic activation of unstrained C-C bonds have proven elusive, because the cleavage process is much less energetically favourable. Here we report a general approach to the catalytic activation of C-C bonds in simple cyclopentanones and some cyclohexanones. The key to our success is the combination of a rhodium pre-catalyst, an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand and an amino-pyridine co-catalyst. When an aryl group is present in the C3 position of cyclopentanone, the less strained C-C bond can be activated; this is followed by activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond in the aryl group, leading to efficient synthesis of functionalized α-tetralones-a common structural motif and versatile building block in organic synthesis. Furthermore, this method can substantially enhance the efficiency of the enantioselective synthesis of some natural products of terpenoids. Density functional theory calculations reveal a mechanism involving an intriguing rhodium-bridged bicyclic intermediate.

  2. Characterization and electrochemical application of carbon materials based on poly(phenylene oxide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Hunter

    Carbon materials possess excellent electrical and surface properties for the next generation of energy storage devices. Polymers provide a carbon rich and tailorable precursor for the production of carbon materials. Therefore, activated carbons were prepared from poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) via a three step process: thermal oxidation, carbonization, and activation with KOH. The activated carbons are predominately microporous with BET specific surface areas up to 2638 m2/g. Impedance spectroscopy revealed these carbons possess electrical conductivities comparable to commercial carbon blacks and consequently were employed in thin-film composite electrodes in electrochemical double-layer capacitors. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed maximum specific capacitances of 13.23 F/g and 2.848 F/g for aqueous and organic electrolyte systems, respectively. Additionally, carbon nanotubes were synthesized from PPO and other polymers with a nickel catalyst via chemical vapor deposition as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. This is the first report of carbon nanotubes produced from PPO.

  3. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture. PMID:24367077

  4. Synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Y.Q.; Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Kimber, G.

    1994-12-31

    The production and application of low-cost, general purpose carbon fibers and activated fibers are emerging technologies with exciting potential, although at present their cost is too high to find widespread use. Production and R and D have been limited and to data, only a small range of precursors has been studied: petroleum pitches, coal extracts and coal tar pitches. Both processing costs and the properties of the fiber products are dependent on the nature of the starting material. Commercial precursors have been limited to the pitches produced from high temperature pyrolysis or cracking processes and are similar in composition and molecular structure. Suitable coal-based precursors can be produced with a wide range of composition, and at moderate cost, by methods such as low temperature carbonization, solvent extraction, hydropyrolysis and mild coal liquefaction. It is of interest to investigate the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from precursors of different origins to elucidate the influence of precursor materials on fiber formation and processing, and their structure and properties. It is also of practical importance to understand the relationships between the type of starting materials (for example, coals) and the processing methods, and the properties of fiber precursors that can be produced from them. In the present study, the authors describe the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from the products of the first stage of coal liquefaction.

  5. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-07-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of coprocessing research (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique currently is in routine use for other applications. Progress is discussed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Dynamics of nanopore structure formation in the carbonization of carbon-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    V.N. Antsiferov; V.N. Strel'nikov; V.F. Olontsev; I.A. Borisova

    2009-04-15

    The dynamics of nanopore structure formation in the carbonization of carbon-containing materials with various volatile matter contents was determined using physicochemical methods of analysis. The main stages of the formation of the nanopore structure of carbon adsorbents upon carbonization were demonstrated using black coals from the Kuznetsk Basin, brown coals from the Kansk-Achinsk Basin, Textolite wastes, nut shell wastes, woods and gazwarine.

  7. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for IR materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nir, D.; Swec, D. M.; Banks, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows in applications where it is important to maintain the integrity of the specular transmittance of these films on ZnS and ZnSe infrared transmitting windows. The films must be adherent and durable such that they protect the windows from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. In order to optimize the performance of these films, 0.1 micro m thick diamondlike carbon films were deposited on fused silica and silicon wafers, using three different methods of ion beam deposition. One method was sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8 cm ion source. The merits of hydrogen addition were experimentally evaluated in conjunction with this method. The second method used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/Argon gases to deposit diamondlike carbon films from the primary beam at 90 to 250 eV. The third method used a dual beam system employing a hydrocarbon/Argon 30 cm ion source and an 8 cm ion source. Films were evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, infrared transmittance between 2.5 and 50 micro m, and protection from particle erosion. An erosion test using a sandblaster was used to give quantitative values of the protection afforded to the fused silica by the diamondlike carbon films. The fused silica surfaces protected by diamondlike carbon films were exposed to 100 micro m diameter SiO particles at 60 mi/hr (26.8/sec) in the sandblaster.

  8. Ionic Liquids as Versatile Precursors for Functionalized Porous Carbon and Carbon-Oxide Composite Materials by Confined Carbonization

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of an ionic liquid (IL) gives no char residue, whereas heating the same IL trapped within an oxide framework affords high carbonization yields (see picture). This confinement method allows incorporation of heteroatoms from the parent IL in the final products, for the development of functionalized porous carbon and carbon-oxide composite materials.

  9. A poorly graphitised carbon contaminant in studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1985-03-01

    Poorly-graphitised carbon particles are formed during manufacture of sample substrates (holey carbon films) for Analytical Electron Microscopy studies of small particles. The particles form during heat treatment of cellulose acetobutyrate at about 975°C and 1050°C. In AEM studies of fine-grained carbonaceous extraterrestrial materials, these particles are easily recognised.

  10. Spectral reflectance properties of carbon-bearing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Moslow, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    The 0.3-2.6 micrometers spectral reflectance properties of carbon polymorphs (graphite, carbon black, diamond), carbides (silicon carbide, cementite), and macromolecular organic-bearing materials (coal, coal tar extract, oil sand, oil shale) are found to vary from sample to sample and among groups. The carbon polymorphs are readily distinguishable on the basis of their visible-near infrared spectral slopes and shapes. The spectra of macromolecular organic-bearing materials show increases in reflectance toward longer wavelengths, exceeding the reflectance rise of more carbon-rich materials. Reflectance spectra of carbonaceous materials are affected by the crystal structure, composition, and degree of order/disorder of the samples. The characteristic spectral properties can potentially be exploited to identify individual carbonaceous grains in meteorites (as separates or in situ) or to conduct remote sensing geothermometry and identification of carbonaceous phases on asteroids.

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetism in a phthalocyanine based carbon material

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Z. Sato, K.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.

    2014-02-07

    We report on a simple method to fabricate a magnetic carbon material that contains nitrogen-coordinated transition metals and has a large magnetic moment. Highly chlorinated iron phthalocyanine was used as building blocks and potassium as a coupling reagent to uniformly disperse nitrogen-coordinated iron atoms on the phthalocyanine based carbon material. The iron phthalocyanine based carbon material exhibits ferromagnetic properties at room temperature and the ferromagnetic phase transition occurs at T{sub c} = 490 ± 10 K. Transmission electron microscopy observation, X-ray diffraction analysis, and the temperature dependence of magnetization suggest that the phthalocyanine molecules form three-dimensional random networks in the iron phthalocyanine based carbon material.

  12. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  13. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the emphasis in space research has been shifting from space exploration to commercialization of space. In order to utilize space for commercial purposes it is necessary to understand the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment where most of the activities will be carried out. The studies on the LEO environment are mainly focused towards understanding the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on spacecraft materials. In the first few shuttle flights, materials looked frosty because they were actually being eroded and textured: AO reacts with organic materials on spacecraft exteriors, gradually damaging them. When a spacecraft travel in LEO (where crewed vehicles and the International Space Station fly), the AO formed from the residual atmosphere can react with the spacecraft surfaces, causing damage to the vehicle. Polymers are widely used in space vehicles and systems as structural materials, thermal blankets, thermal control coatings, conformal coatings, adhesives, lubricants, etc. Exposure of polymers and composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The major degradation effects in polymers are due to their exposure to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet and synergistic effects, which result in different damaging effects by modification of the polymer's chemical properties. In hydrocarbon containing polymers the main AO effect is the surface erosion via chemical reactions and the release of volatile reaction products associated with the mass loss. The application of a thin protective coating to the base materials is one of the most commonly used methods of preventing AO degradation. The purpose is to provide a barrier between base material and AO environment or, in some cases, to alter AO reactions to inhibit its diffusion. The effectiveness of a coating depends on its continuity, porosity, degree of

  14. Quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guannan; Guo, Mingxin

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a source material for generating activated carbon is a value-added and environmentally beneficial approach to recycling organic waste. In this study, the overall quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon was systematically evaluated based on its various physical and chemical properties. Granular activated carbon generated from pelletized poultry litter following a typical steam-activation procedure possessed numerous micropores in the matrix. The product exhibited a mean particle diameter of 2.59 mm, an apparent density of 0.45 g cm(-3), a ball-pan hardness of 91.0, an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1), and a BET surface area of 403 m(2) g(-1). It contained high ash, nitrogen, phosphorus contents and the trace elements Cu, Zn, and As. Most of the nutrients and toxic elements were solidified and solution-unextractable. In general, poultry litter-based activated carbon demonstrated overall quality comparable to that of low-grade commercial activated carbon derived from coconut shell and bituminous coal. It is promising to use poultry litter as a feedstock to manufacture activated carbon for wastewater treatment.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Superhard Materials of Crystalline Carbon Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    J 2 2 FEB 19% F49620-95-1-0384 PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERHARD MATERIALS OF CRYSTALLINE CARBON NITRIDE Final Technical Report...and Letters 3, 1597-1602 (1996). F49620-95-1-0384 4. Y. W. Chung, "Synthesis and properties of crystalline carbon nitride composite superhard ...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final Technical Report 1 Aus 97 to 31 Jul 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preparation and Characterization of Superhard Materials

  16. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  17. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  18. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine; Karra, Reddy

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  19. Carbon Nanotubes: Miracle of Materials Science?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Mayeaux, Brian M.

    1999-01-01

    Article to be sent to Advanced Materials and Processes, journal of ASM International, as attached. This is a news-type technical journal for a large organization of scientists, engineers, salesmen, and managers. The article is quite general, meant to be an introduction to the properties of nanotubes. This is a materials science organization, therefore the article is geared toward using nanotubes for materials uses. Pictures have not been included in this version.

  20. Thermal Conductivity Database of Various Structural Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Ransone, Philip O.; Tsou, Hwa-Tsu

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thermal protection materials envisioned for use on future hypersonic vehicles will likely be subjected to temperatures in excess of 1811 K (2800 F) and, therefore, will require the rapid conduction of heat away from the stagnation regions of wing leading edges, the nose cap area, and from engine inlet and exhaust areas. Carbon-carbon composite materials are candidates for use in advanced thermal protection systems. For design purposes, high temperature thermophysical property data are required, but a search of the literature found little thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon materials above 1255 K (1800 F). Because a need was recognized for in-plane and through-the-thickness thermal conductivity data for carbon-carbon composite materials over a wide temperature range, Langley Research Center (LaRC) embarked on an effort to compile a consistent set of thermal conductivity values from room temperature to 1922 K (3000 F) for carbon-carbon composite materials on hand at LaRC for which the precursor materials and thermal processing history were known. This report documents the thermal conductivity data generated for these materials. In-plane thermal conductivity values range from 10 to 233 W/m-K, whereas through-the-thickness values range from 2 to 21 W/m-K.

  1. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Solvent recovery improved with activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    A non-woven net of activated carbon fibers as absorbing media, representing a major advancement in vapor recovery technology, is presented. The carbon fiber exhibits mass transfer coefficients for adsorption description of up to 100 times that of conventional systems.

  3. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  4. Chemical activation of carbon mesophase pitches.

    PubMed

    Mora, E; Blanco, C; Pajares, J A; Santamaría, R; Menéndez, R

    2006-06-01

    This paper studies the chemical activation of mesophase pitches of different origins in order to obtain activated carbons suitable for use as electrodes in supercapacitors. The effect that the activating agent (NaOH, LiOH, and KOH), the alkaline hydroxide/pitch ratio, and the activation temperature had on the characteristics of the resultant activated carbons was studied. LiOH was found to be a noneffective activating agent, while activation with NaOH and KOH yielded activated carbons with high apparent surface areas and pore volumes. The increase of the KOH/pitch ratio caused an increase of the chemical attack on the carbon, producing higher burnoffs and development of porosity. Extremely high apparent surface areas were obtained when the petroleum pitch was activated with 5:1 KOH/carbon ratio. The increase of the activation temperature caused an increase of the burnoff, although the differences were not as significant as those derived from the use of different proportions of activating agent.

  5. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  6. Stability of Li-carbon materials: a molecular modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Dan V.

    2004-03-01

    Materials with exceptionally high content of carbon are used in technologies with various degrees of added value, from quasi-amorphous materials for carbon electrodes used in e.g. lithium batteries to highly-organized materials comprising e.g. nanotubes and fullerenes. The present study aims to test the feasibility of predicting the properties of carbon based materials using (i) molecular modeling and simulation techniques for prediction of compositional stability; and (ii) experimental data regarding materials used for lithium batteries as validation data. It has been found that a higher H/C atomic ratio has a complex influence on lithium uptake. The decrease of the number of the aromatic rings will limit the number of lithium ions allowed in the pore and the increase in pore flexibility will induce a more energetically favorable mechanism for lithium ions uptake (folding/house-of-cards formation against pore expansion).

  7. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  8. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  9. Structural features of carbon materials synthesized by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletskii, O. A.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Khvostov, V. V.; Savchenko, N. F.; Nishchak, O. Yu.; Aleksandrov, A. F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of three types of carbon structures synthesized by different methods, such as arc discharge plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon in a magnetic field, chemical dehydrohalogenation of the poly(vinyl chloride)/poly(vinylidene chloride) precursor, and pulsed plasma ion assisted deposition. It has been found that the samples prepared by different methods have a common feature, i.e., the presence of three-dimensional clusters based on sp 2- or sp 3-bonds surrounded by quasi-one-dimensional carbon chains. It has been shown that the structure of carbon materials changes depending on the synthesis conditions.

  10. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasachar, Srivats; Benson, Steven; Crocker, Charlene; Mackenzie, Jill

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  11. Laser irradiation of carbon-tungsten materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Marin, A.; Lungu, C. P.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Demitri, N.; Ursescu, D.; Porosnicu, C.; Osiceanu, P.; Kizane, G.; Grigoriu, C.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp2-sp3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses.

  12. Preparation of Fiber Based Binder Materials to Enhance the Gas Adsorption Efficiency of Carbon Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Rak; Lim, Dae Young; Lee, So Hee; Yeo, Sang Young

    2015-10-01

    Fiber binder adapted carbon air filter is prepared to increase gas adsorption efficiency and environmental stability. The filter prevents harmful gases, as well as particle dusts in the air from entering the body when a human inhales. The basic structure of carbon air filter is composed of spunbond/meltblown/activated carbon/bottom substrate. Activated carbons and meltblown layer are adapted to increase gas adsorption and dust filtration efficiency, respectively. Liquid type adhesive is used in the conventional carbon air filter as a binder material between activated carbons and other layers. However, it is thought that the liquid binder is not an ideal material with respect to its bonding strength and liquid flow behavior that reduce gas adsorption efficiency. To overcome these disadvantages, fiber type binder is introduced in our study. It is confirmed that fiber type binder adapted air filter media show higher strip strength, and their gas adsorption efficiencies are measured over 42% during 60 sec. These values are higher than those of conventional filter. Although the differential pressure of fiber binder adapted air filter is relatively high compared to the conventional one, short fibers have a good potential as a binder materials of activated carbon based air filter.

  13. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, when necessary, corrections are applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. Previously reported data on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Runs 227-53 (Texas lignite/Maya ASB and Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and 238-1 (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation. Carbon sourcing was performed on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 227-60 (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and samples from UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 26 (Illinois 6 coal/Lloydminster vacuum resid); the latter data were corrected for isotopic fractionation, though the former could not be corrected. A paper presented at the 1990 DOE Direct Liquefaction Contractor's Review Meeting is appended. 15 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Fabrication of Iron-Containing Carbon Materials From Graphite Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh

    1996-01-01

    Carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, iron oxide or iron halide were fabricated. Typical samples of these metals were estimated to contain 1 iron atom per 3.5 to 5 carbon atoms. Those carbon materials containing iron alloy, iron metal, and/or Fe3O4 were magnetic. The kinetics of the fabrication process were studied by exposing graphite fluoride (CF(0.68)) to FeCl3 over a 280 to 420 C temperature range. Between 280 and 295 C, FeCl3 quickly entered the structure of CF(0.68), broke the carbon-fluorine bonds, and within 10 to 30 min, completely converted it to carbon made up of graphite planes between which particles of crystalline FeF3 and noncrystalline FeCl3 were located. Longer reaction times (e.g., 28 hr) or higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 420 C) produced materials containing graphite, a FeCl3-graphite intercalation compound, FeCl2(center dot)4H2O, and FeCl2(center dot)2H2O. These products were further heat treated to produce iron-containing carbon materials. When the heating temperature was kept in the 750 to 850 C range, and the oxygen supply was kept at the optimum level, the iron halides in the carbon structure were converted to iron oxides. Raising the heat to temperatures higher than 900 C reduced such iron oxides to iron metal. The kinetics of these reactions were used to suggest processes for fabricating carbon materials containing iron alloy. Such processes were then tested experimentally. In one of the successful trial runs, commercially purchased CF(0.7) powder was used as the reactant, and NiO was added during the final heating to 1200 C as a source of both nickel and oxygen. The product thus obtained was magnetic and was confirmed to be a nickel-iron alloy in carbon.

  15. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  16. Physicochemical effect of activation temperature on the sorption properties of pine shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wasim, Agha Arslan; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin

    2017-03-01

    Activated carbons produced from a variety of raw materials are normally selective towards a narrow range of pollutants present in wastewater. This study focuses on shifting the selectivity of activated carbon from inorganic to organic pollutants using activation temperature as a variable. The material produced from carbonization of pine shells substrate was activated at 250°C and 850°C. Both adsorbents were compared with commercial activated carbon for the sorption of lead, cadmium, methylene blue, methyl blue, xylenol orange, and crystal violet. It was observed that carbon activated at 250°C was selective for lead and cadmium whereas the one activated at 850°C was selective for the organic dyes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study revealed that AC850 had less surface functional groups as compared to AC250. Point of zero charge and point of zero salt effect showed that AC250 had acidic groups at its surface. Scanning electron microscopy depicted that increase in activation temperature resulted in an increase in pore size of activated carbon. Both AC250 and AC850 followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Temkin isotherm model was a best fit for empirical data obtained at equilibrium. The model also showed that sorption process for both AC250 and AC850 was physisorption.

  17. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  18. Carbon reduction potential from recycling in primary materials manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    This study assesses the potential for energy savings and carbon emissions reduction by increasing the recycled content of energy-intensive materials. Aluminum, steel, paper, plastics, and container glass are considered. Government policies to encourage higher recycling rates and increased recycled materials content are proposed.

  19. Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicka, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Marek; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Roszek, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Bieniek, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of commercially available carbon materials (nanotubes and porous carbons) for the preparation of drug delivery systems is studied. We used two types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and two activated carbons as potential materials in so-called hot-melt drug deposition (HMDD). The materials were first studied using Raman spectroscopy. Paracetamol was chosen as a model drug. The performed thermal analysis, kinetics, and adsorption-desorption studies revealed that nanoaggregates are formed between carbon nanotubes. In contrast, in pores of activated carbon we do not observe this process and the drug adsorption phenomenon mechanism is simply the filling of small pores. The formation of nanoaggregates was confirmed by the results of GCMC (grand canonical Monte Carlo) simulations and the study of the surface area on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The application of carbon nanotubes in HMDD offers the possibility of controlling the rate of drug delivery. Performed MTT tests of nanotubes and drug-loaded nanotubes show that the observed decrease in cell viability number is caused by the influence of the cytostatic properties of nanotubes—they inhibit the proliferation of cells. The carbon nanotubes studied in this paper are essentially nontoxic.

  20. Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition.

    PubMed

    Bielicka, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Marek; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Roszek, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Bieniek, A

    2013-09-04

    The application of commercially available carbon materials (nanotubes and porous carbons) for the preparation of drug delivery systems is studied. We used two types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and two activated carbons as potential materials in so-called hot-melt drug deposition (HMDD). The materials were first studied using Raman spectroscopy. Paracetamol was chosen as a model drug. The performed thermal analysis, kinetics, and adsorption-desorption studies revealed that nanoaggregates are formed between carbon nanotubes. In contrast, in pores of activated carbon we do not observe this process and the drug adsorption phenomenon mechanism is simply the filling of small pores. The formation of nanoaggregates was confirmed by the results of GCMC (grand canonical Monte Carlo) simulations and the study of the surface area on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The application of carbon nanotubes in HMDD offers the possibility of controlling the rate of drug delivery. Performed MTT tests of nanotubes and drug-loaded nanotubes show that the observed decrease in cell viability number is caused by the influence of the cytostatic properties of nanotubes-they inhibit the proliferation of cells. The carbon nanotubes studied in this paper are essentially nontoxic.

  1. LOW COST PRODUCTION OF CARBON FIBERS FROM LIGNIN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Darren A; Baker, Frederick S

    2009-01-01

    The DOE Vehicle Technologies-funded work at ORNL is directed to the development of processes for the low cost production of carbon fibers. The objective of the project is to develop more energy-efficient, cost-effective processes for production of carbon fibers for use in composite materials for vehicles, which would substantially reduce vehicle weight, increase vehicle fuel economy, and result in lower CO2 emissions. Carbon fibers have the potential for substantial weight saving in vehicles because of their remarkable high strength, high modulus, and low density. However, carbon fibers are currently too expensive for large scale automotive use, which necessitates a large reduction in the cost of commercial grade fiber from about $20/lb to $5-7/lb. Lignin, a renewable resource material, has significant potential as a precursor material for low cost carbon fiber production. In this paper we report on progress to demonstrate the melt-spinning of precursor fibers from various lignin sources, the subsequent processing of the lignin precursor fibers into carbon fibers, and carbon fiber properties.

  2. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. ); Engle, G.B. ); Hollenberg, G.W. )

    1992-10-01

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  4. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    1. Lin, Y., Zhi, Z. and Sodano, 2012, “Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers for Multifunctional Structural Capacitors...Multifunctional Structural Capacitors Consisting of Barium Titanate and Barium Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Fibers, 18 th International Conference on... Strontium Titanate Coated SiC Fibers,” Electronic Materials and Applications 2011, Jan. 19 th –21 st Orlando, FL (Invited). 9. Lin, Y., Shaffer

  5. Radiation Exposure Effects and Shielding Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Richard; Armendariz, Lupita (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotube materials promise to be the basis for a variety of emerging technologies with aerospace applications. Potential applications to human space flight include spacecraft shielding, hydrogen storage, structures and fixtures and nano-electronics. Appropriate risk analysis on the properties of nanotube materials is essential for future mission safety. Along with other environmental hazards, materials used in space flight encounter a hostile radiation environment for all mission profiles, from low earth orbit to interplanetary space.

  6. Computer-Aided Process Model For Carbon/Phenolic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letson, Mischell A.; Bunker, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Computer program implements thermochemical model of processing of carbon-fiber/phenolic-matrix composite materials into molded parts of various sizes and shapes. Directed toward improving fabrication of rocket-engine-nozzle parts, also used to optimize fabrication of other structural components, and material-property parameters changed to apply to other materials. Reduces costs by reducing amount of laboratory trial and error needed to optimize curing processes and to predict properties of cured parts.

  7. Covalent Crosslinking of Carbon Nanotube Materials for Improved Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted much interest in recent years due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Currently, the tensile properties of bulk carbon nanotube-based materials (yarns, sheets, etc.) fall far short of those of the individual nanotube elements. The premature failure in these materials under tensile load has been attributed to inter-tube sliding, which requires far less force than that needed to fracture individual nanotubes.1,2 In order for nanotube materials to achieve their full potential, methods are needed to restrict this tube-tube shear and increase inter-tube forces.Our group is examining covalent crosslinking between the nanotubes as a means to increase the tensile properties of carbon nanotube materials. We are working with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet and yarn materials obtained from commercial sources. Several routes to functionalize the nanotubes have been examined including nitrene, aryl diazonium, and epoxide chemistries. The functional nanotubes were crosslinked through small molecule or polymeric bridges. Additionally, electron beam irradiation induced crosslinking of the non-functional and functional nanotube materials was conducted. For example, a nanotube sheet material containing approximately 3.5 mol amine functional groups exhibited a tensile strength of 75 MPa and a tensile modulus of 1.16 GPa, compared to 49 MPa and 0.57 GPa, respectively, for the as-received material. Electron beam irradiation (2.2x 1017 ecm2) of the same amine-functional sheet material further increased the tensile strength to 120 MPa and the modulus to 2.61 GPa. This represents approximately a 150 increase in tensile strength and a 360 increase in tensile modulus over the as-received material with only a 25 increase in material mass. Once we have optimized the nanotube crosslinking methods, the performance of these materials in polymer matrix composites will be evaluated.

  8. Screening of laccase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase activities of the genus Pleurotus in media with some raw plant materials as carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Stajic, Mirjana; Persky, Limor; Cohen, Emanuel; Hadar, Yitzhak; Brceski, Ilija; Wasser, Solomon P; Nevo, Eviatar

    2004-06-01

    Species of the genus Pleurotus are among the most efficient natural species in lignin degradation belonging to the subclass of ligninolytic organisms that produce laccase (Lac), Mn-dependent peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and the H2O2-generating enzyme aryl-alcohol oxidase, but not lignin peroxidases. Production of Lac and oxidation of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) in the presence and absence of Mn2+ were detected both in submerged fermentation (SF) of dry ground mandarine peels and in solid-state fermentation (SSF) of grapevine sawdust in all investigated Pleurotus species and strains. Evidence of cultivation methods having a distinct influence on the level of enzyme activities has been demonstrated. Most of the species and strains had higher Lac activity under SSF conditions than under SF conditions. DMP oxidation in the presence and absence of Mn2+ was detected in all investigated species and strains, but was lower under SF conditions than under SSF conditions for most of them. However, relative activities of DMP oxidation in the absence of Mn2+, as percentages of activity against DMP in the presence of Mn2+, were higher under conditions of SF than in SSF cultures in most of the investigated species and strains. The obtained results showed that strains of different origins have different efficiently ligninolytic systems and that conditions of SSF are more favorable for ligninolytic activity than those in SF owing to their similarity to natural conditions on wood substrates.

  9. Exposure to carbon nanotube material: aerosol release during the handling of unrefined single-walled carbon nanotube material.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Andrew D; Baron, Paul A; Foley, Michael; Shvedova, Anna A; Kisin, Elena R; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-01-09

    Carbon nanotubes represent a relatively recently discovered allotrope of carbon that exhibits unique properties. While commercial interest in the material is leading to the development of mass production and handling facilities, little is known of the risk associated with exposure. In a two-part study, preliminary investigations have been carried out into the potential exposure routes and toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotube material (SWCNT)--a specific form of the allotrope. The material is characterized by bundles of fibrous carbon molecules that may be a few nanometers in diameter, but micrometers in length. The two production processes investigated use-transition metal catalysts, leading to the inclusion of nanometer-scale metallic particles within unrefined SWCNT material. A laboratory-based study was undertaken to evaluate the physical nature of the aerosol formed from SWCNT during mechanical agitation. This was complemented by a field study in which airborne and dermal exposure to SWCNT was investigated while handling unrefined material. Although laboratory studies indicated that with sufficient agitation, unrefined SWCNT material can release fine particles into the air, concentrations generated while handling material in the field were very low. Estimates of the airborne concentration of nanotube material generated during handling suggest that concentrations were lower than 53 microg/m(3) in all cases. Glove deposits of SWCNT during handling were estimated at between 0.2 mg and 6 mg per hand.

  10. Advertising Content in Physical Activity Print Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the advertising content contained in physical activity print materials. Analysis of print materials obtained from 80 sources (e.g., physicians' offices and fitness events) indicated that most materials contained some form of advertising. Materials coming from commercial product vendors generally contained more advertising than materials…

  11. Highly magnetic nanoporous carbon/iron-oxide hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Alam, Sher; Anand, Chokkalingam; Lakhi, Kripal Singh; Choy, Jin-Ho; Cha, Wang Soo; Elzhatry, Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ohya, Yutaka; Vinu, Ajayan

    2014-11-10

    The preparation of size-controllable Fe2O3 nanoparticles grown in nanoporous carbon with tuneable pore diameters is reported. These hybrid materials exhibit strong non-linear magnetic properties and a magnetic moment of approximately 229 emu g(-1), which is the highest value ever reported for nanoporous hybrids, and can be attributed to the nanosieve effect and the strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the carbon walls.

  12. Surface Chemistry and Water Dispersability of Carbon Black Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Formulation of water-stable carbon black dispersions is a double-sided task, which requires selection of a proper dispersing agents and matching it with the properties of a specific carbon black. Among other properties that affect water dispersability of carbon blacks (particle size, surface area, and aggregate structure), surface chemistry plays a prime-order role. We have characterized physical and chemical properties of several carbon black materials, and correlated them with the stability of dispersions formed with ionic and non-ionic surfactants. In particular, chemical characterization of surface functional groups on carbon blacks based on potentiometric titration measurements (pKa spectra) provided a comprehensive picture of pH effects on dispersion stability. The results obtained were complemented by information from physical characterization methods, such as XPS and FTIR. The selection of a suitable dispersing agent able to withstand large pH variations will be discussed.

  13. Adsorption of SO2 on bituminous coal char and activated carbon fiber prepared from phenol formaldehyde

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBarr, Joseph A.; Lizzio, Anthony A.; Daley, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are used commercially to remove SO2 from coal combustion flue gases. Historically, these materials have consisted of granular activated carbons prepared from lignite or bituminous coal. Recent studies have reported that activated carbon fibers (ACFs) may have potential in this application due to their relatively high SO2 adsorption capacity. In this paper, a comparison of SO2 adsorption for both coal-based carbons and ACFs is presented, as well as ideas on carbon properties that may influence SO2 adsorption

  14. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  15. 76 FR 67142 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...-activation chemical treatment (chemical or water washing, chemical impregnation or other treatment), or... dehydrates molecules in the raw material, and results in the formation of water that is removed from the raw... analysis memoranda. \\13\\ CCT submitted Active Carbon India Private Limited's (``Active Carbon'')...

  16. Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori; Rios, Orlando; Johs, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Li-ion battery technology into electric and hybrid electric vehicles and portable electronic devices such as smart phones, laptops and tablets, creates a demand for efficient, economic and sustainable materials for energy storage. However, the high cost and long processing time associated with manufacturing battery-grade anode and cathode materials are two big constraints for lowering the total cost of batteries and environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Lignin, a byproduct of the pulp and paper industry and biorefinery, is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fibers with optimal properties for use as anode materials. Recent developments in the preparation of lignin precursors and conversion to carbon fiber-based anode materials have created a new class of anode materials with excellent electrochemical characteristics suitable for immediate use in existing Li- or Na-ion battery technologies.

  17. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of complex organic waste with carbon-based conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yan; Holmes, Dawn E; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Woodard, Trevor L; Zhang, Yaobin; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the methanogenic metabolism of dog food, a food waste surrogate, in laboratory-scale reactors with different carbon-based conductive materials. Carbon cloth, carbon felt, and granular activated carbon all permitted higher organic loading rates and promoted faster recovery of soured reactors than the control reactors. Microbial community analysis revealed that specific and substantial enrichments of Sporanaerobacter and Methanosarcina were present on the carbon cloth surface. These results, and the known ability of Sporanaerobacter species to transfer electrons to elemental sulfur, suggest that Sporanaerobacter species can participate in direct interspecies electron transfer with Methanosarcina species when carbon cloth is available as an electron transfer mediator.

  18. MgO-templated carbon as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Yuya; Soneda, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, MgO-templated carbon with different pore structures was investigated as a negative electrode material for Na-ion capacitors. With increasing the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, the irreversible capacity increased, and the coulombic efficiency of the 1st cycle decreased because of the formation of solid electrolyte interface layers. MgO-templated carbon annealed at 1000 °C exhibited the highest capacity and best rate performance, suggesting that an appropriate balance between surface area and crystallinity is imperative for fast Na-ion storage, attributed to the storage mechanism: combination of non-faradaic electric double-layer capacitance and faradaic Na intercalation in the carbon layers. Finally, a Na-ion capacitor cell using MgO-templated carbon and activated carbon as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, exhibited an energy density at high power density significantly greater than that exhibited by the cell using a commercial hard carbon negative electrode.

  19. Migration Mechanism for Atomic Hydrogen in Porous Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, B.; Zhao, Y. F.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2012-05-14

    To explain the fast kinetics of H in porous carbon, we propose that the migration relies on H hopping from a carbon nanotube (CNT) to another. Using density functional theory, we have found that the barrier for H hopping becomes smaller than that for diffusion along a tube for certain CNT separations, decreasting to less than 0.5 eV for separations of -3.1 {angstrom}. Such significant reduction occurs irrespective of radius, chirality, registry, and orientation of the two CNTs: the diffusion is thus facilitated by the porous nature of the material itself. The mechanism proposed is applicable for any porous carbon-based nanomaterials.

  20. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  1. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  2. Engineering hybrid nanostructures of active materials: Applications as electrode materials in lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan

    Aiming to significantly improve the electrochemical properties of electroactive materials for lithium ion batteries, three novel hybrid nanostructures were developed in this thesis. These include nanostructure A: V2O 5 coated on polymer electrolyte-grafted carbon black, nanostructure B: electrode materials incorporated into an electronically conductive carbon web, and nanostructure C: electrode materials dispersed in a conductive porous carbon matrix. Nanocomposites possessing nanostructure A are fast electronic and ionic transport materials. The improved kinetic properties are due to the incorporated carbon core and the grafted polymer electrolyte in the unique structure. The V2O5 xerogel coated polymer electrolyte-grafted carbon blacks, or V2O5/C-PEG, can reach a capacity as high as 320 mAh/g, and exhibit outstanding rate sustainability (e.g. 190 mAh/g at 14C). This class of nanostructured composites is promising for high power/current applications. Nanostructure B was extremely successful when applied to very poorly conductive active materials, such as LiFePO4 and Li3V 2(PO4)3. In this nanostructure, the web-like carbon framework not only supplies a facile electron transport path, but also provides excellent electronic contact between carbon and the insulating active materials. At room temperature, the LiFePO4/C nanocomposite successfully reaches almost full capacity, along with greatly improved rate sustainability and excellent cycling stability. At elevated temperatures (e.g. 40°C and 60°C), the full capacity is readily accessible over a wide rate range, even at a very fast rate of 2C or 5C. The Li3V2(PO4) 3/C nanocomposite can extract all three lithium in the formula at a rate of 1C, resulting in a high capacity of 200 mAh/g. Therefore, through designing hybrid nanostructures with nanostructure B, we can make insulating active materials into good cathode materials. Nanostructure C was employed for Sn-based anode materials, in order to improve their cycling

  3. Fibrous Carbon-Metallic Materials and a Method of Manufacturing Carbon-Metallic Fibrous Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-12

    fibers associated with a carbon binder and an additive in the form of boron nitride, boron silicide and heat-resistant metal borides. On the other hand...Great Britain patent description No. 1302331 refers to metal parts reinforced by carbon fibers with a galvanized coating or as a result of a...carbon fibers, a carbonaceous binder and additives such as boron, niobium , silicon, tantalum and others. United States patent deocription No. 3622283

  4. Deposition of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Activated Carbons and Preparation of Magnetic Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahani, S. A.; Hamadanian, M.; Vandadi, O.

    2007-08-01

    Magnetic activated carbons (MACs) for gold recovery from alkaline cyanide solutions have been developed by mixing a magnetic precursor with a carbon source, and treating the mixture under controlled conditions. As would be expected, these activated carbons have high specific surface areas due to their microporous structure. In addition, the small particle size of the MACs produced allows rapid adsorption of gold in solution, and the magnetic character of these MACs enables recovery from suspension by magnetic separation.

  5. Carbon-based supercapacitors produced by activation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanwu; Murali, Shanthi; Stoller, Meryl D; Ganesh, K J; Cai, Weiwei; Ferreira, Paulo J; Pirkle, Adam; Wallace, Robert M; Cychosz, Katie A; Thommes, Matthias; Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-06-24

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp(2)-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  6. Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  7. Carbon-Based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Su, D.; Murali, S.; Stoller, M.D.; Ganesh, K.J.; Cai, W.; Ferreira, P.J.; Pirkle, A.; Wallace, R.M.; Cychosz, K.A., Thommes, M.; Stach, E.A.; Ruoff, R.S.

    2011-06-24

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  8. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  9. Organic active materials for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Abouimrane, Ali; Weng, Wei; Amine, Khalil

    2016-08-16

    A rechargeable battery includes a compound having at least two active sites, R.sup.1 and R.sup.2; wherein the at least two active sites are interconnected by one or more conjugated moieties; each active site is coordinated to one or more metal ions M.sup.a+ or each active site is configured to coordinate to one or more metal ions; and "a" is 1, 2, or 3.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen-functionalized carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Kevin N.; Christensen, Steven T.; Nordlund, Dennis; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Ngo, Chilan; Dinh, Huyen; Gennett, Thomas; O'Hayre, Ryan; Pylypenko, Svitlana

    2016-04-07

    Carbon materials are used in a diverse set of applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to catalysis. Nitrogen modification of carbon powders has shown to be an effective method for enhancing both surface and bulk properties of as-received material for a number of applications. Unfortunately, control of the nitrogen modification process is challenging and can limit the effectiveness and reproducibility of N-doped materials. Additionally, the assignment of functional groups to specific moieties on the surface of nitrogen-modified carbon materials is not straightforward. Herein, we complete an in-depth analysis of functional groups present at the surface of ion-implanted Vulcan and Graphitic Vulcan through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Our results show that regardless of the initial starting materials used, nitrogen ion implantation conditions can be tuned to increase the amount of nitrogen incorporation and to obtain both similar and reproducible final distributions of nitrogen functional groups. The development of a well-controlled/reproducible nitrogen implantation pathway opens the door for carbon supported catalyst architectures to have improved numbers of nucleation sites, decreased particle size, and enhanced catalyst-support interactions.

  11. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles dispersed in carbon nanotube networks as anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Leigang; Xu, Guanjie; Li, Ying; Li, Shuli; Fu, Kun; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2013-01-01

    Si has the highest theoretical capacity among all known anode materials, but it suffers from the dramatic volume change upon repeated lithiation and delithiation processes. To overcome the severe volume changes, Si nanoparticles were first coated with a polymer-driven carbon layer, and then dispersed in a CNT network. In this unique structure, the carbon layer can improve electric conductivity and buffer the severe volume change, whereas the tangled CNT network is expected to provide additional mechanical strength to maintain the integrity of electrodes, stabilize the electric conductive network for active Si, and eventually lead to better cycling performance. Electrochemical test result indicates the carbon-coated Si nanoparticles dispersed in CNT networks show capacity retention of 70% after 40 cycles, which is much better than the carbon-coated Si nanoparticles without CNTs.

  12. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  13. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-05

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  14. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  15. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    SciTech Connect

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  16. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Materials: Sensing, Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongqiang; Wang, Qian; Wu, Haishan; Chen, Yingmei; Lu, Chun-Hua; Chi, Yuwu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides (g-C3 N4 ) are a class of 2D polymeric materials mainly composed of carbon and nitrogen atoms. g-C3 N4 are attracting dramatically increasing interest in the areas of sensing, imaging, and therapy, due to their unique optical and electronic properties. Here, the luminescent properties (mainly includes photoluminescence and electrochemiluminescence), and catalytic and photoelectronic properties related to sensing and therapy applications of g-C3 N4 materials are reviewed. Furthermore, the fabrication and advantages of sensing, imaging and therapy systems based on g-C3 N4 materials are summarized. Finally, the future perspectives for developing the sensing, imaging and therapy applications of the g-C3 N4 materials are discussed.

  17. Activated carbon coated palygorskite as adsorbent by activation and its adsorption for methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Cheng, Liping; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Yingzhao; Wu, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    An activation process for developing the surface and porous structure of palygorskite/carbon (PG/C) nanocomposite using ZnCl2 as activating agent was investigated. The obtained activated PG/C was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis (BET) techniques. The effects of activation conditions were examined, including activation temperature and impregnation ratio. With increased temperature and impregnation ratio, the collapse of the palygorskite crystal structure was found to accelerate and the carbon coated on the surface underwent further carbonization. XRD and SEM data confirmed that the palygorskite structure was destroyed and the carbon structure was developed during activation. The presence of the characteristic absorption peaks of CC and C-H vibrations in the FTIR spectra suggested the occurrence of aromatization. The BET surface area improved by more than 11-fold (1201 m2/g for activated PG/C vs. 106 m2/g for PG/C) after activation, and the material appeared to be mainly microporous. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue onto the activated PG/C reached 351 mg/g. The activated PG/C demonstrated better compressive strength than activated carbon without palygorskite clay.

  18. Graphitic Carbon Materials Tailored for the Rapid Adsorption of Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescatore, Nicholas A.

    Sepsis is an overactive inflammatory response to an infection, with 19 million cases estimated worldwide and causing organ dysfunction if left untreated. Three pro-inflammatory cytokines are seen from literature review as vital biomarkers for sepsis and are interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which have the potential to be removed by hemoperfusion. This thesis examines carbon nanomaterials for their adsorption capabilities in the search for an optimal material for blood cleansing hemoperfusion application, such as mediating the effects of sepsis. Non-porous and porous carbon polymorphs and their properties are investigated in this thesis for their protein adsorption capabilities. Polymer-derived mesoporous carbons were compared to non-porous graphene nanoplatelets (GNP's) to observe changes in adsorption capacity for cytokines between porous and non-porous materials. GNP's were functionalized via high temperature vacuum annealing, air oxidation, acid oxidation and amination treatments to understand the effect of surface chemistry on adsorption. For practical use in a hemoperfusion column, polymer-derived carbon beads and composite materials such as cryogel and PTFE-GNP composites were designed and tested for their adsorption capacity. At concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha seen in septic patients, these cytokines were completely removed from the blood after 5 minutes of incubation with GNP's. Overall, a low-cost, scalable carbon adsorbent was found to provide a novel approach of rapidly removing pro-inflammatory cytokines from septic patients.

  19. Method of producing pyrolysis gases from carbon-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Mudge, Lyle K.; Brown, Michael D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Baker, Eddie G.

    1989-01-01

    A gasification process of improved efficiency is disclosed. A dual bed reactor system is used in which carbon-containing feedstock materials are first treated in a gasification reactor to form pyrolysis gases. The pyrolysis gases are then directed into a catalytic reactor for the destruction of residual tars/oils in the gases. Temperatures are maintained within the catalytic reactor at a level sufficient to crack the tars/oils in the gases, while avoiding thermal breakdown of the catalysts. In order to minimize problems associated with the deposition of carbon-containing materials on the catalysts during cracking, a gaseous oxidizing agent preferably consisting of air, oxygen, steam, and/or mixtures thereof is introduced into the catalytic reactor at a high flow rate in a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the reactor. This oxidizes any carbon deposits on the catalysts, which would normally cause catalyst deactivation.

  20. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  1. Prediction of oxidation performance of reinforced carbon-carbon material for Space Shuttle leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method was developed for predicting oxidation performance, in an earth atmospheric entry environment, of reinforced carbon-carbon material, coated for oxidation resistance. A model was developed which describes oxidation control mechanisms, and the equations defining these mechanisms were derived. These relations were used to correlate oxidation test data, and to infer pertinent rate constants. Predictions were made of material oxidation performance in a representative entry environment, and the predictions were compared with ground test data. Results indicate that the method can be successfully used for predicting material oxidation performance.

  2. Investigating effectiveness of activated carbons of natural sources on various supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon can be produced from natural sources, such as pistachio and acorn shells, which can be an inexpensive and sustainable sources of natural wastes for the energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors. The carbonaceous materials used in this study were carbonized at the temperatures of 700°C and 900°C after the stabilization process at 240°C for two hours. These shells showed approximately 60% carbon yield. Carbonized nutshells were chemically activated using1wt% potassium hydroxide (KOH). Activated carbon powders with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) were used to construct carbon electrodes. A 1M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as electrolytes. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the characterization of the supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to inspect the surface texture of the activated carbons. Activated pistachio shells carbonized at 700°C showed more porous surface texture than those carbonized at 900°C. Effects of the carbonization temperatures were studied for their electrochemical characteristics. The shells carbonized at 700°C showed better electrochemical characteristics compared to those carbonized at 900°C. The test results provided about 27,083 μF/g specific capacitance at a scan rate of 10mV/s. This study showed promising results for using these activated carbons produced from the natural wastes for supercapacitor applications.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Spaceframes for Low-Density Aerospace Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-26

    Functionalization Methods Chemically sculpting carbon nanotubes into nano-objects of the type needed for synthesizing CNT spaceframe materials require two...distinct functionalization chemistries that produce distinct functional structures at the ends of the nanotubes and on the sidewalls of the nanotubes ...which are applied to the nanotubes . In this project, oxidative etching techniques were explored for end selective functionalization . Selective

  4. Fabrication and characterization of nanotemplated carbon monolithic material.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyun; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Brabazon, Dermot; Zhou, Lin; Glennon, Jeremy D; Luong, John H T; Paull, Brett

    2013-09-11

    A novel hierarchical nanotemplated carbon monolithic rod (NTCM) was prepared using a novel facile nanotemplating approach. The NTCM was obtained using C60-fullerene modified silica gels as hard templates, which were embedded in a phenolic resin containing a metal catalyst for localized graphitization, followed by bulk carbonization, and template and catalyst removal. TEM, SEM, and BET measurements revealed that NTCM possessed an integrated open hierarchical porous structure, with a trimodal pore distribution. This porous material also possessed a high mesopore volume and narrow mesopore size distribution. During the course of carbonization, the C60 conjugated to aminated silica was partly decomposed, leading to the formation of micropores. The Raman signature of NTCM was very similar to that of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as exemplified by three major peaks as commonly observed for other carbon materials, i.e., the sp3 and sp2 carbon phases coexisted in the sample. Surface area measurements were obtained using both nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms (BET) and with a methylene blue binding assay, with BET results showing the NTCM material possessed an average specific surface area of 435 m2 g(-1), compared to an area of 372 m2 g(-1) obtained using the methylene blue assay. Electrochemical studies using NTCM modified glassy carbon or boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes displayed quasi-reversible oxidation/reduction with ferricyanide. In addition, the BDD electrode modified with NTCM was able to detect hydrogen peroxide with a detection limit of below 300 nM, whereas the pristine BDD electrode was not responsive to this target compound.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube from coconut shells activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melati, A.; Hidayati, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored in almost every single cancer treatment modality, including drug delivery, lymphatic targeted chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and gene therapy. They are considered as one of the most promising nanomaterial with the capability of both detecting the cancerous cells and delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to the cells. CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties such as high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechanical strength, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Coconut Shell was researched as active carbon source on 500 - 600°C. These activated carbon was synthesized becomes carbon nanotube and have been proposed as a promising tool for detecting the expression of indicative biological molecules at early stage of cancer. Clinically, biomarkers cancer can be detected by CNT Biosensor. We are using pyrolysis methods combined with CVD process or Wet Chemical Process on 600°C. Our team has successfully obtained high purity, and aligned MWCNT (Multi Wall Nanotube) bundles on synthesis CNT based on coconut shells raw materials. CNTs can be used to cross the mammalian cell membrane by endocytosis or other mechanisms. SEM characterization of these materials have 179 nm bundles on phase 83° and their materials compound known by using FTIR characterization.

  6. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  7. New Carbonate Standard Reference Materials for Boron Isotope Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Christopher, S. J.; Day, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of boron (δ11B) in marine carbonates is well established as a proxy for past ocean pH. Yet, before palaeoceanographic interpretation can be made, rigorous assessment of analytical uncertainty of δ11B data is required; particularly in light of recent interlaboratory comparison studies that reported significant measurement disagreement between laboratories [1]. Well characterised boron standard reference materials (SRMs) in a carbonate matrix are needed to assess the accuracy and precision of carbonate δ11B measurements throughout the entire procedural chemistry; from sample cleaning, to ionic separation of boron from the carbonate matrix, and final δ11B measurement by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To date only two carbonate reference materials exist that have been value-assigned by the boron isotope measurement community [2]; JCp-1 (porites coral) and JCt-1 (Giant Clam) [3]. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will supplement these existing standards with new solution based inorganic carbonate boron SRMs that replicate typical foraminiferal and coral B/Ca ratios and δ11B values. These new SRMs will not only ensure quality control of full procedural chemistry between laboratories, but have the added benefits of being both in abundant supply and free from any restrictions associated with shipment of biogenic samples derived from protected species. Here we present in-house δ11B measurements of these new boron carbonate SRM solutions. These preliminary data will feed into an interlaboratory comparison study to establish certified values for these new NIST SRMs. 1. Foster, G.L., et al., Chemical Geology, 2013. 358(0): p. 1-14. 2. Gutjahr, M., et al., Boron Isotope Intercomparison Project (BIIP): Development of a new carbonate standard for stable isotopic analyses. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU General Assembly 2014, 2014. 16(EGU2014-5028-1). 3. Inoue, M., et al., Geostandards and

  8. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  9. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  10. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-23

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  11. Carbon Materials Metal/Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Composite and Battery Anode Composed of the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of forming a composite material for use as an anode for a lithium-ion battery is disclosed. The steps include selecting a carbon material as a constituent part of the composite, chemically treating the selected carbon material to receive nanoparticles, incorporating nanoparticles into the chemically treated carbon material and removing surface nanoparticles from an outside surface of the carbon material with incorporated nanoparticles. A material making up the nanoparticles alloys with lithium.

  12. Hierarchical, titania-coated, carbon nanofibrous material derived from a natural cellulosic substance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Gu, Yuanqing; Huang, Jianguo

    2010-07-12

    Hierarchical, titania-coated, nanofibrous, carbon hybrid materials were fabricated by employing natural cellulosic substances (commercial filter paper) as a scaffold and carbon precursor. Ultrathin titania films were firstly deposited by means of a surface sol-gel process to coat each nanofiber in the filter paper, and successive calcination treatment under nitrogen atmosphere yielded the titania-carbon composite possessing the hierarchical morphologies and structures of the initial paper. The ultrathin titania coating hindered the coalescence effect of the carbon species that formed during the carbonization process of cellulose, and the original cellulose nanofibers were converted into porous carbon nanofibers (diameters from tens to hundreds of nanometers, with 3-6 nm pores) that were coated with uniform anatase titania thin films (thickness approximately 12 nm, composed of anatase nanocrystals with sizes of approximately 4.5 nm). This titania-coated, nanofibrous, carbon material possesses a specific surface area of 404 m(2) g(-1), which is two orders of magnitude higher than the titania-cellulose hybrid prepared by atomic layer deposition of titania on the cellulose fibers of filter paper. The photocatalytic activity of the titania-carbon composite was evaluated by the improved photodegradation efficiency of different dyes in aqueous solutions under high-pressure, fluorescent mercury-lamp irradiation, as well as the effective photoreduction performance of silver cations to silver nanoparticles with ultraviolet irradiation.

  13. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  14. Impact of carbon on the surface and activity of silica-carbon supported copper catalysts for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, I.; Stoeva, N.; Nickolov, R.; Atanasova, G.; Khristova, M.

    2016-04-01

    Composite catalysts, prepared by one or more active components supported on a support are of interest because of the possible interaction between the catalytic components and the support materials. The supports of combined hydrophilic-hydrophobic type may influence how these materials maintain an active phase and as a result a possible cooperation between active components and the support material could occur and affects the catalytic behavior. Silica-carbon nanocomposites were prepared by sol-gel, using different in specific surface areas and porous texture carbon materials. Catalysts were obtained after copper deposition on these composites. The nanocomposites and the catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, TG, XRD, TEM- HRTEM, H2-TPR, and XPS. The nature of the carbon predetermines the composite's texture. The IEPs of carbon materials and silica is a force of composites formation and determines the respective distribution of the silica and carbon components on the surface of the composites. Copper deposition over the investigated silica-carbon composites leads to formation of active phases in which copper is in different oxidation states. The reduction of NO with CO proceeds by different paths on different catalysts due to the textural differences of the composites, maintaining different surface composition and oxidation states of copper.

  15. Material Mixing of Tungsten with Carbon and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Lee, H. T.

    2010-05-01

    In ITER, graphite and tungsten are used for divertor materials and are mixed through erosion, transport, and redeposition. Helium, a fusion reactant, is an intrinsic element in fusion plasmas that impinges on the metallic wall materials to form He bubbles. W-C mixed layers and He bubble layers greatly affect tritium retention. In this paper, impacts of W-C material mixing on erosion and hydrogen isotope retention are reviewed. Then, recent results on carbon deposition on tungsten in TEXTOR tokamak and helium effects on blistering and retention are discussed.

  16. Carbon nanotube-based functional materials for optical limiting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Ying; Liu, Ying; Doyle, James; He, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Bai, Jinrui; Blau, Werner J

    2007-01-01

    Optical limiting is an important application of nonlinear optics, useful for the protection of human eyes, optical elements, and optical sensors from intense laser pulses. An optical limiter is such a device that strongly attenuates high intensity light and potentially damaging light such as focused laser beams, whilst allowing for the high transmission of ambient light. Optical limiting properties of carbon nanotube suspensions, solubilized carbon nanotubes, small molecules doped carbon nanotubes and polymer/carbon nanotube composites have been reviewed. The optical limiting responses of carbon nanotube suspensions are shown to be dominated by nonlinear scattering as a result of thermally induced solvent-bubble formation and sublimation of the nanotubes, while the solubilized carbon nanotubes optically limit through nonlinear absorption mechanism and exhibit significant solution-concentration-dependent optical limiting responses. In the former case the optical limiting results are independent of nanotube concentrations at the same linear transmittance as that of the solubilized systems. Many efforts have been invested into the research of polymer/carbon nanotube composites in an attempt to allow for the fabrication of films required for the use of nanotubes in a real optical limiting application. The higher carbon nanotube content samples block the incident light more effectively at higher incident energy densities or intensities. The optical limiting mechanism of these composite materials is quite complicated. Besides nonlinear scattering contribution to the optical limiting, there may also be other contributions e.g., nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction, electronic absorption and others to the optical limiting. Further improvements in the optical limiting efficiency of the composites and in the dispersion and alignment properties of carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix could be realized by variation of both nanostructured guest and polymer host, and by

  17. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials: Multi-Functional Materials for Biomedical Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications. PMID:23560817

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    15 111-7 GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS THERMALLY REACTIVATED CARBON .............. 16 I IV-1 PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM FOR... PROCESSING COST OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL REGENERATION BY SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS ........................... 25 l IV-4 SENSITIVITY OF GAC...regenerate adsorbents such as granular activated carbon loaded with a broad variety of organic adsorbates. This regeneration process uses a supercritical

  19. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  20. Dissolution of carbon from alumina-carbon mixtures into liquid iron: Influence of carbonaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Rita; Sahajwalla, Veena; Rodgers, Brenton; McCarthy, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    Due to their excellent thermal shock and wear resistance at high temperatures, alumina-carbon based refractories are used extensively in the steel industry. A clear understanding of factors affecting the dissolution of carbon from refractories is of crucial importance, as carbon depletion from the refractory can significantly deteriorate refractory performance and metal quality. Atomistic simulations on the alumina-graphite/liquid iron system have shown that nonwetting between alumina and liquid iron is an important factor inhibiting the penetration of liquid metal in the refractory matrix and limiting carbon dissolution. This study investigates the role played by the carbonaceous material in the dissolution of carbon from the refractory composite. Two carbonaceous materials, namely, petroleum coke and natural graphite, respectively, containing 0.35 and 5.26 pct ash, were used in this study. Substrates were prepared from mixtures of alumina and carbon over a wide concentration range. Using a sessile drop arrangement, carbon pickup by liquid iron from alumina-carbon mixtures was measured at 1550 °C and was compared with the carbon pickup from alumina-synthetic graphite mixtures. These studies were supplemented with wettability measurements and microscopic investigations on the interfacial region. For high alumina concentrations (>40 wt pct), carbon dissolution from refractory mixtures was found to be negligible for all carbonaceous materials under investigation. Significant differences however were observed at lower alumina concentrations. Carbon dissolution from alumina-petroleum coke mixtures was much lower than the corresponding dissolution from alumina synthetic graphite-mixtures and was attributed to poor wettability of petroleum coke with liquid iron, its structural disorder, and the presence of sulfur. Very high levels of carbon dissolution, however, were observed from alumina-natural graphite mixtures, with carbon pickup by liquid iron from mixtures with up

  1. Ultrasonic modification of carbon materials for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachiy, Bogdan I.; Nykoliuk, Marian O.; Budzulyak, Ivan M.; Kachmar, Andrii I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is devoted to study the ultrasonic impact on the biomass of natural raw materials, which were used for the creation a nanoporous carbon material (NCM), which was used as electrode material for electrochemical capacitors (EC). The dry shells of apricot seeds were a feedstock, which were modified by the chemical treatment in the phosphoric acid and part of them were impacted by ultrasonic waves for 25 minutes. The NCM, which were obtained by carbonization at 550 °C, were modified by chemical treatment in the nitric acid. Thus, the different of modification NCM was obtained to compare their capacitance characteristics for EC. From experimental data we can do a conclusion, that ultrasonic modification and chemical treatment in nitric acidare improvecapacitance characteristics of NCM for EC.

  2. Ultrasonic modification of carbon materials for electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Rachiy, Bogdan I; Nykoliuk, Marian O; Budzulyak, Ivan M; Kachmar, Andrii I

    2017-12-01

    The paper is devoted to study the ultrasonic impact on the biomass of natural raw materials, which were used for the creation a nanoporous carbon material (NCM), which was used as electrode material for electrochemical capacitors (EC). The dry shells of apricot seeds were a feedstock, which were modified by the chemical treatment in the phosphoric acid and part of them were impacted by ultrasonic waves for 25 minutes. The NCM, which were obtained by carbonization at 550 °C, were modified by chemical treatment in the nitric acid. Thus, the different of modification NCM was obtained to compare their capacitance characteristics for EC. From experimental data we can do a conclusion, that ultrasonic modification and chemical treatment in nitric acidare improvecapacitance characteristics of NCM for EC.

  3. Adsorption of Hydantoins on Activated Carbon,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    performed for single solute, bisolute, and trisolute solutions as well as an undiluted coal gasification wastewater containing predominantly hydantoin...hydantoin, 5,5-dimethylhydantoin, and 5-ethyl-5-methylhydantoin. Absorption using activated carbon did not appear to be an effective treatment process for the removal of hydantoins from the coal gasification wastewater.

  4. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment is a physicochemical process that removes a wide variety of contaminants by adsorbing them from liquid and gas streams [1, p. 6-3]. This treatment is most commonly used to separate organic contaminants from water or air; however, it can b...

  5. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  6. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  7. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  8. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  9. Neutron scattering studies of disordered carbon anode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanek, P.; Kamitakahara, W. A.; Zhou, P.; Fischer, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon-based anodes show many promising properties in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. So-called `disordered carbons' are characterized by a substantial amount of residual hydrogen, and exhibit large Li uptake capacities. We have employed a variety of neutron scattering techniques, coupled with computer simulations, to study the composition, local atomic structure, and vibrational dynamics of such materials. Radial distribution function analysis of neutron diffraction data, and incoherent inelastic scattering show that the structural motif is a planar graphene fragment, with edge carbons terminated by single hydrogen atoms, and random stacking between fragments. The vibrational spectra of the hydrogen-rich carbons are remarkably similar to the spectra of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon coronene in the medium-frequency region. At low frequencies, only a boson peak is observed, characteristic for glassy and disordered materials, and this feature shifts upon doping. The results are consistent with two proposed mechanisms for Li capacity, one analogous to conventional intercalation but with Li on both sides of graphene fragments, the other involving bonding of Li to H-terminated edge carbons.

  10. Removal of the antibiotic metronidazole by adsorption on various carbon materials from aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Carrales-Alvarado, D H; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Leyva-Ramos, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2014-12-15

    The adsorption of the antibiotic metronidazole (MNZ) on activated carbon (F400), activated carbon cloth (ACF), mesoporous activated carbon (CMK-3), and carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in this work. The effect of the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions as well as the operating conditions (ionic strength, solution pH, temperature, chemical modification of the adsorbents by HNO3 treatment, and water matrix) on the adsorption capacity were analyzed to substantiate the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption capacity markedly varied as function of the carbon material, decreasing in the following order: F400>ACF>F400-HNO3>CMK-3>MWCNT>MWCNT-HNO3, and depended not only on their surface area and pore size distribution, but also on their chemical nature. The adsorption of MNZ was influenced by the solution pH, but was not significantly affected by the ionic strength and temperature. The adsorption of MNZ was enhanced when the MNZ solutions were prepared using wastewater. Therefore, the electrolytes present in the wastewater cooperated rather than competed with the MNZ molecules for the adsorption sites. Desorption equilibrium data of MNZ on all carbon materials demonstrated that the adsorption was reversible corroborating the weakness of the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions.

  11. Ozonation of bezafibrate over ceria and ceria supported on carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Alexandra G; Órfão, José J M; Pereira, Manuel Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Two catalysts containing ceria dispersed on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon were investigated as ozonation catalysts for the mineralization of bezafibrate (BZF). The results were compared with those obtained in the absence of the catalyst and in the presence of the parent carbon materials, as well as in the presence of ceria (CeO2). Carbon materials containing ceria showed an interesting catalytic effect. Both materials enhanced the mineralization of BZF relatively to single ozonation and ozonation catalysed by the corresponding carbon materials. In the catalytic ozonation with these materials, both surface and bulk reactions are supposed to occur. The BZF ozonation catalysed by CeO2 leaded to the highest mineralization degrees, indicating that the reaction mechanism followed in the presence of CeO2 (free radical oxidation in solution) leads to the formation of intermediates more easily degradable, mainly after 120 min of reaction. Some primary products and refractory final oxidation compounds in single and catalytic ozonation of BZF were followed. The original chlorine present on the BZF molecule is completely converted to chloride anion and part of the nitrogen is mainly converted to NO3- along with smaller amounts of NO2- and NH4+. Microtox tests revealed that simultaneous use of ozone and CeO2 originated lower acute toxicity.

  12. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 μg/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  13. Process effects on activated carbon with large specific surface area from corn cob.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Xie, Ke-Chang; Lv, Yong-Kang; Bao, Wei-Ren

    2006-01-01

    The main factors that affect the large specific surface area (SSA) of the activated carbon from agricultural waste corn cobs were studied by chemically activated method with solution of KOH and soap which acted as surfactant. The experiment showed that not only the activation temperature, activation time and the mass ratio of KOH to the carbonized material, but also the activated methods using activator obviously influenced the SSA of activated carbon. The experimental operating conditions were as follows: the carbonized temperature being 450 degrees C and keeping time being 4 h using N2 as protective gas; the activation temperature being 850 degrees C and holding time being 1.2 h; the mass ratio of KOH to carbonized material being 4.0; the time of soaking carbonized material in the solution of KOH and soap being 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the SSA of activated carbon from corn cobs reached 2700 m2/g. And the addition of the soap as surfactant may shorten the soaking time. The structure of the activated carbon prepared had narrow distribution of pore size and the micro-pores accounted for 78%. The advantages of the method described were easy and feasible.

  14. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janićijević, Milovan; Srećković, Milesa; Kaluđerović, Branka; Bojanić, Slobodan; Družijanić, Dragan; Dinulović, Mirko; Kovačević, Aleksander

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser-material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated.

  15. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  16. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Rubel, Glenn O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Ball, Thomas M.

    2011-04-01

    The impregnated active carbon used in air purification systems degrades over time due to exposure to contamination and mechanical effects (packing, settling, flow channeling, etc.). A novel approach is proposed to detect contamination in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). ECIS is currently being used to evaluate active carbon filtration material; however, it cannot differentiate the impedance changes due to chemical contamination from those due to mechanical changes. EMIS can detect impedance changes due to mechanical changes. For the research work presented in this paper, Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) was used for the EMIS method. Some remarkable new phenomena were unveiled in the detection of carbon filter status. 1. PWAS EMIS can detect the presence of contaminants, such as water and kerosene in the carbon bed 2. PWAS EMIS can monitor changes in mechanical pressure that may be associated with carbon bed packing, settling and flow channeling 3. EMIS and ECIS measurements are consistent with each other and complimentary A tentative simplified impedance model was created to simulate the PWAS-carbon bed system under increasing pressure. Similar impedance change pattern was observed when comparing the simulation results with experimental data.

  17. Carbonate as sputter target material for rapid 14C AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longworth, Brett E.; Robinson, Laura F.; Roberts, Mark L.; Beaupre, Steven R.; Burke, Andrea; Jenkins, William J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for measuring the 14C content of carbonate samples by producing C- ions directly in the negative ion sputter source of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) system. This direct analysis of carbonate material eliminates the time and expense of graphite preparation. Powdered carbonate is mixed with titanium powder, loaded into a target cartridge, and compressed. Beam currents for optimally-sized carbonate targets (0.09-0.15 mg C) are typically 10-20% of those produced by optimally-sized graphite targets (0.5-1 mg C). Modern (>0.8 Fm) samples run by this method have standard deviations of 0.009 Fm or less, and near-modern samples run as unknowns agree with values from traditional hydrolysis/graphite to better than 2%. Targets with as little as 0.06 mg carbonate produce useable ion currents and results, albeit with increased error and larger blank. In its current state, direct sputtering is best applied to problems where a large number of analyses with lower precision are required. These applications could include age surveys of deep-sea corals for determination of historic population dynamics, to identify samples that would benefit from high precision analysis, and for growth rate studies of organisms forming carbonate skeletons.

  18. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  19. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy covers various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.

  20. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; ...

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy coversmore » various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.« less

  1. Purity Evaluation of Bulk Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Wang, J.; Liang, J.; Hornbostel, B.; Cech, J.; Roth, S.

    2005-09-01

    We report on our experience using a preliminary protocol for quality control of bulk single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) materials produced by the electric arc-discharge and laser ablation method. The first step in the characterization of the bulk material is mechanical homogenization. Quantitative evaluation of purity has been performed using a previously reported procedure based on solution phase near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results confirm that this method is reliable in determining the nanotube content in the arc-discharge sample containing carbonaceous impurities (amorphous carbon and graphitic particles). However, the application of this method to laser ablation samples gives a relative purity value over 100 %. The possible reason for that might be different extinction coefficient meaning different oscillator strength of the laser ablation tubes. At the present time, a 100 % pure reference sample of laser ablation SWNT is not available, so we chose to adopt the sample showing the highest purity as a new reference sample for a quantitative purity evaluation of laser ablation materials. The graphitic part of the carbonaceous impurities has been estimated using X-ray diffraction of 1:1 mixture of nanotube material and C60 as an internal reference. To evaluate the metallic impurities in the as prepared and homogenized carbon nanotube soot inductive coupled plasma (ICP) has been used.

  2. Lightweight Materials for Automotive Application: An Assessment of Material Production Data for Magnesium and Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M. C.; Sullivan, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The use of lightweight materials in vehicle components, also known as “lightweighting,” can result in automobile weight reduction, which improves vehicle fuel economy and generally its environmental footprint. Materials often used for vehicle lightweighting include aluminum, magnesium, and polymers reinforced with either glass or carbon fiber. However, because alternative materials typically used for vehicle lightweighting require more energy to make on a per part basis than the material being replaced (often steel or iron), the fuel efficiency improvement induced by a weight reduction is partially offset by an increased energy for the vehicle material production. To adequately quantify this tradeoff, reliable and current values for life-cycle production energy are needed for both conventional and alternative materials. Our focus here is on the production of two such alternative materials: magnesium and carbon fibers. Both these materials are low density solids with good structural properties. These properties have enabled their use in applications where weight is an issue, not only for automobiles but also for aerospace applications. This report addresses the predominant production methods for these materials and includes a tabulation of available material and energy input data necessary to make them. The life cycle inventory (LCI) information presented herein represents a process chain analysis (PCA) approach to life cycle assessment (LCA) and is intended for evaluation as updated materials production data for magnesium and carbon fiber for inclusion into the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation model (GREET2_2012). The summary life-cycle metrics used to characterize the cradle-to-gate environmental performance of these materials are the cumulative energy demand (CED) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) per kilogram of material.

  3. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  4. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  5. Remediation of organochlorine pesticides contaminated lake sediment using activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Shan; Gong, Ji-Lai; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yao, Fu-Bing; Guo, Min; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in sediment were a potential damage for humans and ecosystems. The aim of this work was to determine the effectiveness of carbon materials remedy hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) in sediment. Two different carbon materials including activated carbon (AC) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used in the present research. Sediment treated with 2 wt% AC and MWCNTs after 150 d contact showed 97%, and 75% reduction for HCH, and 93% and 59% decrease for DDTs in aqueous equilibrium concentration, respectively. Similarly, the reduction efficiencies of DDT and HCH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) treated with AC (MWCNTs) were 97% (75%) and 92% (63%), respectively under the identical conditions. Furthermore, for 2 wt% AC (MWCNTs) system, a reduction of XAD beads uptake up to 87% (52%) and 73% (67%) was obtained in HCH and DDT flux to overlying water in quiescent system. Adding MWCNTs to contaminated sediment did not significantly decrease aqueous equilibrium concentration and DDTs and HCH availability in SPMDs compared to AC treatment. A series of results indicated that AC had significantly higher remediation efficiency towards HCH and DDTs in sediment than MWCNTs. Additionally, the removal efficiencies of two organic pollutants improved with increasing material doses and contact times. The greater effectiveness of AC was attributed to its greater specific surface area, which was favorable for binding contaminants. These results highlighted the potential for using AC as in-situ sorbent amendments for sediment remediation.

  6. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  7. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  8. Synthesis of carbon materials via the cold compression of aromatic molecules and carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.

    Carbon's ability for catenation makes it a remarkable element and allows for many interesting and surprising properties and structures. Carbon can exist in one of its two thermodynamically stable bulk crystals, graphite or diamond, one of its several nanostructures: fullerene, nanotube, or graphene, or as an amorphous material with a mixed bonding pattern. Carbon also has an ability to bond heteroatoms such as hydrogen which can increase its properties and structures even further. Pressure has been shown to be able to drastically change the bonding in and structure of carbon based materials. In this dissertation I will present how pressure can be used to synthesize new amorphous hydrogenated carbons and how a battery of analytical techniques can be used to elicit the microstructure of the carbon networks. This microstructure can then be related back to the reaction conditions and more importantly the starting small molecule. This work has been expanded to looking for a molecular analogue to the cold compressed graphite system by investigating the high pressure stability and reactivity of 2-D polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This work was followed by discovering the failure of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes at high static pressures. When the tubes fail they transform into nano-graphitic polyhedra. It has been found that metallic tubes preferentially collapse, leaving the semiconducting tubes intact for the most part. Finally, the most influential work performed in my dissertation has been related to the kinetically controlled solid state reaction of molecular benzene to form diamond nanothreads. These nanothreads pack into hexagonal bundles without axial order. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray and neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and first principles calculations were performed to confirm their existence. The three data chapters in this dissertation are enhanced by an introduction to carbon based materials and high pressure chemistry

  9. Evaluation of residual shale oil as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Y.Q.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1995-12-01

    Oil shale is one of the largest fossil fuel resources. One of the disadvantages of oil shale liquids is high nitrogen content, especially in high boiling fractions, which causes difficulties in their upgrading to premium quality products. Our earlier studies showed that nitrogen-rich asphalthene fractions of residual shale oils could be used successfully to produce carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers with novel properties. In this study, the maltene fraction (low concentration of nitrogen), was examined as a potential starting material for the production of valuable carbon materials (e.g. mesophase pitch, needle coke), through studies of carbonization behaviors. At normal pressure, carbonizations of the maltene fraction and the parent residue produced porous carbons with isotropic texture, and yields of 8 and 26 wt%, respectively. Pressurized carbonization (at 700 kPa) was found to allow the development of excellent flow texture from the maltene fraction, at a yield of 34 wt%, indicating that this fraction ({approximately}50 wt% of residual shale oils) can be used for the production of premium cokes.

  10. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Wei Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  11. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  12. Soil Inorganic Carbon Formation: Can Parent Material Overcome Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, C.; Will, R. M.; Seyfried, M. S.; Benner, S. G.; Flores, A. N.; Guilinger, J.; Lohse, K. A.; Good, A.; Black, C.; Pierce, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon is the third largest carbon reservoir and is composed of both organic and inorganic constituents. However, the storage and flux of soil carbon within the global carbon cycle are not fully understood. While organic carbon is often the focus of research, the factors controlling the formation and dissolution of soil inorganic carbon (SIC) are complex. Climate is largely accepted as the primary control on SIC, but the effects of soil parent material are less clear. We hypothesize that effects of parent material are significant and that SIC accumulation will be greater in soils formed from basalts than granites due to the finer textured soils and more abundant calcium and magnesium cations. This research is being conducted in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwestern Idaho. The watershed is an ideal location because it has a range of gradients in precipitation (250 mm to 1200 mm), ecology (sagebrush steppe to juniper), and parent materials (a wide array of igneous and sedimentary rock types) over a relatively small area. Approximately 20 soil profiles will be excavated throughout the watershed and will capture the effects of differing precipitation amounts and parent material on soil characteristics. Several samples at each site will be collected for analysis of SIC content and grain size distribution using a pressure calcimeter and hydrometers, respectively. Initial field data suggests that soils formed over basalts have a higher concentration of SIC than those on granitic material. If precipitation is the only control on SIC, we would expect to see comparable amounts in soils formed on both rock types within the same precipitation zone. However, field observations suggest that for all but the driest sites, soils formed over granite had no SIC detected while basalt soils with comparable precipitation had measurable amounts of SIC. Grain size distribution appears to be a large control on SIC as the sandier, granitic soils promote

  13. A shear localization mechanism for lubricity of amorphous carbon materials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Wang, Lin-Feng; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Li, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is one of the most lubricious materials known, but the mechanism is not well understood. It is counterintuitive that such a strong covalent solid could exhibit exceptional lubricity. A prevailing view is that lubricity of amorphous carbon results from chemical passivation of dangling bonds on surfaces. Here we show instead that lubricity arises from shear induced strain localization, which, instead of homogeneous deformation, dominates the shearing process. Shear localization is characterized by covalent bond reorientation, phase transformation and structural ordering preferentially in a localized region, namely tribolayer, resulting in shear weakening. We further demonstrate an anomalous pressure induced transition from stick-slip friction to continuous sliding with ultralow friction, due to gradual clustering and layering of graphitic sheets in the tribolayer. The proposed shear localization mechanism sheds light on the mechanism of superlubricity, and would enrich our understanding of lubrication mechanism of a wide variety of amorphous materials. PMID:24412998

  14. A shear localization mechanism for lubricity of amorphous carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Wang, Lin-Feng; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Li, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is one of the most lubricious materials known, but the mechanism is not well understood. It is counterintuitive that such a strong covalent solid could exhibit exceptional lubricity. A prevailing view is that lubricity of amorphous carbon results from chemical passivation of dangling bonds on surfaces. Here we show instead that lubricity arises from shear induced strain localization, which, instead of homogeneous deformation, dominates the shearing process. Shear localization is characterized by covalent bond reorientation, phase transformation and structural ordering preferentially in a localized region, namely tribolayer, resulting in shear weakening. We further demonstrate an anomalous pressure induced transition from stick-slip friction to continuous sliding with ultralow friction, due to gradual clustering and layering of graphitic sheets in the tribolayer. The proposed shear localization mechanism sheds light on the mechanism of superlubricity, and would enrich our understanding of lubrication mechanism of a wide variety of amorphous materials.

  15. A shear localization mechanism for lubricity of amorphous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian-Bao; Wang, Lin-Feng; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Li, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-13

    Amorphous carbon is one of the most lubricious materials known, but the mechanism is not well understood. It is counterintuitive that such a strong covalent solid could exhibit exceptional lubricity. A prevailing view is that lubricity of amorphous carbon results from chemical passivation of dangling bonds on surfaces. Here we show instead that lubricity arises from shear induced strain localization, which, instead of homogeneous deformation, dominates the shearing process. Shear localization is characterized by covalent bond reorientation, phase transformation and structural ordering preferentially in a localized region, namely tribolayer, resulting in shear weakening. We further demonstrate an anomalous pressure induced transition from stick-slip friction to continuous sliding with ultralow friction, due to gradual clustering and layering of graphitic sheets in the tribolayer. The proposed shear localization mechanism sheds light on the mechanism of superlubricity, and would enrich our understanding of lubrication mechanism of a wide variety of amorphous materials.

  16. Bimodal activated carbons derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels prepared at different dilution ratios have been activated with phosphoric acid at 450 °C and compared with their carbonaceous counterparts obtained by pyrolysis at 900 °C. Whereas the latter were, as expected, highly mesoporous carbons, the former cryogels had very different pore textures. Highly diluted cryogels allowed preparation of microporous materials with high surface areas, but activation of initially dense cryogels led to almost non-porous carbons, with much lower surface areas than those obtained by pyrolysis. The optimal acid concentration for activation, corresponding to stoichiometry between molecules of acid and hydroxyl groups, was 2 M l−1, and the acid–cryogel contact time also had an optimal value. Such optimization allowed us to achieve surface areas and micropore volumes among the highest ever obtained by activation with H3PO4, close to 2200 m2 g−1 and 0.7 cm3 g−1, respectively. Activation of diluted cryogels with a lower acid concentration of 1.2 M l−1 led to authentic bimodal activated carbons, having a surface area as high as 1780 m2 g−1 and 0.6 cm3 g−1 of microporous volume easily accessible through a widely developed macroporosity. PMID:27877405

  17. Raman spectroscopic studies of carbon in extra-terrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macklin, John; Brownlee, Donald; Chang, Sherwood; Bunch, Ted

    1990-01-01

    The measurements obtained here indicate ways in which micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to elucidate structural characteristics and distribution of carbon in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Existing information about structurally significant aspects of Raman measurements of graphite is combined with structurally relevant findings from the present micro-Raman studies of carbons prepared by carbonization of polyvinylidine chloride (PVDC) at various temperatures and natural material, as well as several acid residues from the Allende and Murchison meteorites in order to establish new spectra-structure relationships. Structural features of many of the materials in this study have been measured by x ray analysis and electron microscopy: thus, their structural differences can be directly correlated with differences in the Raman spectra. The spectral parameters consequently affirmed as indicators of structure are used as a measure of structure in materials that have unknown carbon structure, especially IDPs. The unique applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy is realized not only in the ability to conveniently measure spectra of micron-size IDPs, but also micro-sized parts of an inhomogeneous material. Microcrystalline graphite is known to give Raman spectra that differ dependent on crystallite size (see e.g., Lespade, et. al., 1984, or Nemanich and Solin, 1979). The spectral changes that accompany decreasing particle size include increase in the ratio (R) of the intensity of the band near 1350 cm(-1) (D band) to that of the band near 1600 cm(-1) (G band) increase in the half width of the D band (wD) increase in the frequency maximum of the G band and increase in the half-width (wG) of the 2nd order band near 2700 cm(-1) (G) band.

  18. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-01-30

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  19. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  20. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  1. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  2. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for ``real world'' application.

  3. Carbon recycling in materially closed ecological life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenhuber, D. C.; Folsome, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Results of studies are presented of materially closed energetically open microbial ecosystems or 'closed ecosystems'. These are natural marine ecosystems that have been sealed in glass containers to prevent material exchange with the environment but allow energy to pass freely through them. They represent model life support systems for the future human habitation of space. The results are discussed analytically and indicate that these ecosystems, when subjected to a constant energy flux, seem to be reliable and self-sufficient systems for recycling of biologically produced carbon compounds.

  4. Blended polymer materials extractable with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mei

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is drawing more and more attention because of its unique solvent properties along with being environmentally friendly. Historically most of the commercial interests of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction are in the food industry, pharmaceutical industry, environmental preservation and polymer processing. Recently attention has shifted from the extraction of relatively simple molecules to more complex systems with a much broader range of physical and chemical transformations. However the available data show that a lot of commercially valuable substances are not soluble in supercritical carbon dioxide due to their polar structures. This fact really limits the application of SCF extraction technology to much broader industrial applications. Therefore, the study of a polymer's solubility in a given supercritical fluid and its thermodynamic behavior becomes one of the most important research topics. The major objective of this dissertation is to develop a convenient and economic way to enhance the polymer's solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide. Further objective is to innovate a new process of making metal casting parts with blended polymer materials developed in this study. The key technique developed in this study to change a polymer's solubility in SCF CO2 is to thermally blend a commercially available and CO2 non-soluble polymer material with a low molecular weight CO2 soluble organic chemical that acts as a co-solute. The mixture yields a plastic material that can be completely solubilized in SCF CO2 over a range of temperatures and pressures. It also exhibits a variety of physical properties (strength, hardness, viscosity, etc.) depending on variations in the mixture ratio. The three organic chemicals investigated as CO2 soluble materials are diphenyl carbonate, naphthalene, and benzophenone. Two commercial polymers, polyethylene glycol and polystyrene, have been investigated as CO2 non-soluble materials. The chemical

  5. Nitrogen-Containing Carbon Nanotube Synthesized from Polymelem and Activated Carbon Derived from Polymer Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Nan

    Polymelem possesses a polymeric structure of heptazine (C6N 7) rings connected by amine bridges and our study has demonstrated that it is a promising precursor for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon materials. Nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (NCNT) was produced by pyrolyzing polymelem as a dual source of carbon and nitrogen with Raney nickel in a high pressure stainless steel cell. Activated carbon was produced from poly(ether ether ketone)/poly(ether imide) (PEEK/PEI blend) and incorporated with polymelem to enhance the hydrogen adsorption. Polymelem was successfully synthesized by pyrolyzing melamine at 450--650 °C and its structure was elucidated by 13C solid state NMR, FTIR, and XRD. The molecular weight determined by a novel LDI MS equipped with a LIFT mode illuminated that polymelem has both linear and cyclic connectivity with a degree of polymerization of 2--5 depending on the synthesis temperature. The decomposition products of polymelem were determined to be cyanoamide, dicyanoamide, and tricyanoamine. Tricyanoamine is the smallest carbon nitride molecule and has been experimentally confirmed for the first time in this study. When polymelem was decomposed in the presence of Raney nickel, homogenous NCNT with nitrogen content of ˜ 4--19 atom% was produced. A mechanism based on a detail analysis of the TEM images at different growth stages proposed that the NCNT propagated via a tip-growth mechanism originating at the nano-domains within the Raney nickel, and was accompanied with the aggregation of the nickel catalysts. Such NCNT exhibited a cup-stack wall structure paired with a compartmental feature. The nitrogen content, tube diameter and wall thickness greatly depended on synthesis conditions. The activated carbon derived from PEEK/PEI blend demonstrated a surface area up to ˜3000 m2/g, and average pore size of < 20 A. Such activated carbon exhibited a hydrogen storage capacity of up to 6.47 wt% at 40 bar, 77 K. The activated carbon has

  6. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER.

  7. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials.

    PubMed

    Blowers, Paul; Caborn, Jane; Dell, Tony; Gingell, Terry; Harms, Arvic; Long, Stephanie; Sleep, Darren; Stewart, Charlie; Walker, Jill; Warwick, Phil E

    2011-10-01

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the (14)C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing (14)C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  9. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  10. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  11. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage.

    PubMed

    Kemp, K Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-09-25

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm(3) g(-1) and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ∼4.2 mmol g(-1) at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  12. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kejing; Wang, Menglei; Wu, Junqing; Qian, Kun; Sun, Jie; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-05-12

    The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF) composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  13. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kejing; Wang, Menglei; Wu, Junqing; Qian, Kun; Sun, Jie; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF) composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials. PMID:28335217

  14. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ∼650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption.

  15. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies.

  16. Granular activated carbons from broiler manure: physical, chemical and adsorptive properties.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabel M; Marshall, Wayne E

    2005-04-01

    Broiler manure produced at large concentrated facilities poses risks to the quality of water and public health. This study utilizes broiler litter and cake as source materials for granular activated carbon production and optimizes conditions for their production. Pelletized manure samples were pyrolyzed at 700 degrees C for 1 h followed by activation in an inert atmosphere under steam at different water flow rates, for a period ranging from 15 to 75 min. Carbon physical and adsorptive properties were dependent on activation time and quantity of steam used as activant, yields varied from 18% to 28%, surface area varied from 253 to 548 m2/g and copper ion adsorption varied from 0.13 to 1.92 mmol Cu2+/g carbon. Best overall performing carbons were steam activated for 45 min at 3 ml/min. Comparative studies with commercial carbons revealed the broiler cake-based carbon as having the highest copper ion efficiency.

  17. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    PubMed Central

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. −4.4 eV and ca. −5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  18. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules.

  19. Water purification by sulfide-containing activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Oeste, F D; Haas, R; Kaminski, L

    2000-03-01

    We investigated a new kind of activated carbon named gaiasafe-Formstoff as an agent for powerful heavy metal reduction. This activated carbon contains highly dispersed sulfide compounds. Our investigations with lead containing wastewaters showed an outstanding metal sulfide precipitation power of the new agent. The lead reduction rates are independent of wastewater parameters like lead concentration and complexing agent concentration. Contacted as powder or as a fixed bed with wastewater gaiasafe-Formstoff showed the best cleaning capacity in comparison to all other agents tested. Investigations with gaiasafe-Formstoff about its ability to reduce the contents of further heavy metals in wastewater are under way. The gaiasafe-Formstoff reaction products with wastewater represent an energy-rich and raw material-rich resource when fed to metallurgical processes.

  20. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out.

  1. Carbonized material adsorbents for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Charcoal in itself is porous making it an excellent material for activated charcoal manufacture. However, few studies have been conducted in harnessing its potential for adsorption purposes, especially in water treatment. This paper describes the possibility of utilizing charcoal materials from Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) for adsorbing heavy metals like mercury from aqueous solutions of different concentrations. The effect of soaking time, pore analyses and chemical properties on the adsorption capabilities of the carbonized materials were discussed. The pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitored during the soaking period were also described.

  2. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  3. 78 FR 13894 - Certain Activated Carbon From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Activated Carbon From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4381 (February 2013), entitled Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation...

  4. Characterization and modeling of compliant active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, S. P.; Ramesh, K. T.; Douglas, A. S.

    2003-09-01

    Active materials respond mechanically to changes in environmental conditions. One example of a compliant active material is a polymer gel. Active polymer gels expand and contract in response to certain environmental stimuli, such as the application of an electric field or a change in the pH level of the surroundings. This ability to achieve large, reversible deformations with no external mechanical loading has generated much interest in the use of these gels as actuators and "artificial muscles". While much work has been done to study the behavior and properties of these gels, little information is available regarding the full constitutive description of the mechanical and actuation properties. This work focuses on developing a means of characterizing the mechanical properties of compliant active materials. A thermodynamically consistent finite-elastic constitutive model was developed to describe the mechanical and actuation behaviors of these kinds of materials. The mechanical properties of compliant active materials are characterized by a free-energy function, and the model utilizes an evolving internal variable to describe the actuation state. A biaxial testing system has been developed which can measure stresses and deformations of polymer gel films in a variety of liquid environments. This testing system is used to determine the form and parameters of the free-energy function for a specific active polymer gel, poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylic acid) gel.

  5. Activated carbons from potato peels: The role of activation agent and carbonization temperature of biomass on their use as sorbents for bisphenol A uptake from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzidou, An; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbons prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product, and activated with different activating chemicals, have been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor (Bisphenol-A) from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with phosphoric acid, KOH and ZnCl2. The different activating chemicals were tested in order the better activation agent to be found. The carbons were carbonized by pyrolysis, in one step procedure, at three different temperatures in order the role of the temperature of carbonization to be pointed out. The porous texture and the surface chemistry of the prepared activated carbons were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption (BET), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), thermal analysis (DTA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH, the adsorbent dose, the initial bisphenol A concentration and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as the change of enthalpy (ΔH0), entropy (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0) of adsorption systems were also evaluated. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found to be 450 mg g-1 at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon, that make the activated carbon a promising adsorbent material.

  6. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  7. Novel sintered ceramic materials incorporated with EAF carbon steel slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayannis, V.; Ntampegliotis, K.; Lamprakopoulos, S.; Papapolymerou, G.; Spiliotis, X.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research, novel sintered clay-based ceramic materials containing electric arc furnace carbon steel slag (EAFC) as a useful admixture were developed and characterized. The environmentally safe management of steel industry waste by-products and their valorization as secondary resources into value-added materials towards circular economy have attracted much attention in the last years. EAF Carbon steel slag in particular, is generated during the manufacture of carbon steel. It is a solid residue mainly composed of rich-in- Fe, Ca and Si compounds. The experimental results show that the beneficial incorporation of lower percentages of EAFC up to 6%wt. into ceramics sintered at 950 °C is attained without significant variations in sintering behavior and physico-mechanical properties. Further heating up to 1100 °C strongly enhances the densification of the ceramic microstructures, thus reducing the porosity and strengthening their mechanical performance. On the other side, in terms of thermal insulation behavior as well as energy consumption savings and production cost alleviation, the optimum sintering temperature appears to be 950 °C.

  8. Carbon stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, Michael; Hawkins, I.

    1991-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to search for companions to two carbon-rich stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes, EU And and V778 Cyg. Depending upon the amount of interstellar extinction and distances (probably between 1 and 2 kpc from the Sun) to these two stars, upper limits were placed between approx. 1.5 and 6 solar mass to the mass of any main sequence companions. For the 'near' distance of 1 kpc, it seems unlikely that there are white dwarf companions because the detection would be expected of ultraviolet emission from accretion of red giant wind material onto the white dwarf. A new model is proposed to explain the oxygen-rich envelopes. If these stars have a high nitrogen abundance, the carbon that is in excess of the oxygen may be carried in the circumstellar envelopes in HCN rather than C2H2 which is a likely key seed molecule for the formation of carbon grains. Consequently, carbon particles may not form; instead, oxygen-rich silicate dust may nucleate from the SiO present in the outflow.

  9. Coaxial fiber supercapacitor using all-carbon material electrodes.

    PubMed

    Le, Viet Thong; Kim, Heetae; Ghosh, Arunabha; Kim, Jaesu; Chang, Jian; Vu, Quoc An; Pham, Duy Tho; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-07-23

    We report a coaxial fiber supercapacitor, which consists of carbon microfiber bundles coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a core electrode and carbon nanofiber paper as an outer electrode. The ratio of electrode volumes was determined by a half-cell test of each electrode. The capacitance reached 6.3 mF cm(-1) (86.8 mF cm(-2)) at a core electrode diameter of 230 μm and the measured energy density was 0.7 μWh cm(-1) (9.8 μWh cm(-2)) at a power density of 13.7 μW cm(-1) (189.4 μW cm(-2)), which were much higher than the previous reports. The change in the cyclic voltammetry characteristics was negligible at 180° bending, with excellent cycling performance. The high capacitance, high energy density, and power density of the coaxial fiber supercapacitor are attributed to not only high effective surface area due to its coaxial structure and bundle of the core electrode, but also all-carbon materials electrodes which have high conductivity. Our coaxial fiber supercapacitor can promote the development of textile electronics in near future.

  10. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco José; Rosas, Juana; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-05-01

    A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2). In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt). Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  12. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  13. Determination of Activated Carbon Residual Life using a Microwave Cavity Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, A.; Wylie, S.; Shaw, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Thomas, A.; Keele, H.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the continuation of work conducted jointly between Dstl and LJMU. This unique body of work has been, largely, concerned with detecting the residual life of high performance filter materials using electromagnetic (EM) waves within a resonant cavity. Past work has considered both HEPA [1] and ASZM-TEDA[2] activated carbon filter materials. This paper continues the later work, considering the response of ASZM-TEDA activated carbon through the co-ageing of two distinct batches of the material. The paper briefly introduces activated carbon, discusses theory relevant to the work and the methodology used for investigation. A comprehensive set of results is included which seek to validate this technique for determining the residual lifespan of activated carbon.

  14. Integrated ultrasonic and petrographical characterization of carbonate building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligas, Paola; Fais, Silvana; Cuccuru, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the application of non-destructive ultrasonic techniques in evaluating the conservation state and quality of monumental carbonate building materials. Ultrasonic methods are very effective in detecting the elastic characteristics of the materials and thus their mechanical behaviour. They are non-destructive and effective both for site and laboratory tests, though it should be pointed out that ultrasonic data interpretation is extremely complex, since elastic wave velocity heavily depends on moisture, heterogeneity, porosity and other physical properties of the materials. In our study, considering both the nature of the building materials and the constructive types of the investigated monuments, the ultrasonic investigation was carried out in low frequency ultrasonic range (24 kHz - 54 kHz) with the aim of detecting damages and degradation zones and assessing the alterability of the investigated stones by studying the propagation of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulses. In fact alterations in the materials generally cause a decrease in longitudinal pulse velocity values. Therefore starting from longitudinal velocity values the elasto-mechanical behaviour of the stone materials can be deduced. To this aim empirical and effective relations between longitudinal velocity and mechanical properties of the rocks can be used, by transferring the fundamental concepts of the studies of reservoir rocks in the framework of hydrocarbon research to the diagnostic process on stone materials. The ultrasonic measurements were performed both in laboratory and in situ using the Portable Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT) by C.N.S. Electronics LTD. A number of experimental sessions were carried out choosing different modalities of data acquisition. On the basis of the results of the laboratory measurements, an in situ ultrasonic survey on significant monuments, have been carried out. The ultrasonic measurements were integrated by a

  15. Assessment of Fracture Toughness of a Discretely-Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepashkin, A. A.; Ozherelkov, D. Yu.; Sazonov, Yu. B.; Komissarov, A. A.; Mozolev, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The stress-strain state at the tip of a crack in a discretely reinforced quasi-isotropic carbon-carbon composite material (CCCM) is studied. The stress intensity factor J 1 c and the J-integral are evaluated in accordance with domestic methods and international standards. The distribution of the fields of displacements and strains on the surface of the specimens is determined by the method of numerical correlation of digital images using a VIC-D system. The applicability of different criteria to evaluation of the fracture toughness of CCCM of type TERMAR is determined.

  16. CO2 Sequestraion by Mineral Carbonation of Cement Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H.; Jang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation with cement materials was investigated in this study. Ca extraction and CO2 injection tests were conducted on three different materials (lime, Portland cement, waste concrete) using different extract reagents (NH4Cl, CH3COOH, HCl, and Deionized water) under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. CO2 gas (99.9%) was injected to either supernatant without solids or suspension with solids obtained from extraction tests at 4 ml/min of flow rate. Ca concentrations were measured from filtered solutions before and after CO2 injection. The chemical and mineralogical composition of raw materials and precipitates were determined using X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The morphology and chemical composition of precipitates were analyzed with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy equipped with the Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. For the extraction tests, Ca concentrations of the extracts were related with the CaO content and type of CaO bearing minerals of the materials, regardless of the extraction solutions. Lime had a higher Ca concentration ranging between 942.7 and 39945.0 mg/L in the extracts than waste concrete (188.4 ~ 2978.1 mg/L) in the extracts due to its higher content of CaO (CaO : 24.5% and waste concrete : 20.3%). In contrast, the Portland cement (6346.0 and 28903.5 mg/L) had lower Ca concentrations than lime (94.27 ~ 39945.0 mg/L), even though the Portland cement (56.3%) had a higher CaO content than lime (24.5%). For a given extraction solution, lime had the highest CO2 carbonation efficiency. In addition, for a given material, the CO2 carbonation efficiency was the highest when NH4Cl solution was used as an extraction solution. Results of material analyses indicate that precipitates from the CO2 injection tests consisted of mostly CaCO3, regardless of types of materials and extraction solutions.

  17. Carbon-Based Microbial-Fuel-Cell Electrodes: From Conductive Supports to Active Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Cheng, Chong; Thomas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted considerable interest due to their potential in renewable electrical power generation using the broad diversity of biomass and organic substrates. However, the difficulties in achieving high power densities and commercially affordable electrode materials have limited their industrial applications to date. Carbon materials, which can exhibit a wide range of different morphologies and structures, usually possess physiological activity to interact with microorganisms and are therefore fast-emerging electrode materials. As the anode, carbon materials can significantly promote interfacial microbial colonization and accelerate the formation of extracellular biofilms, which eventually promotes the electrical power density by providing a conductive microenvironment for extracellular electron transfer. As the cathode, carbon-based materials can function as catalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction, showing satisfying activities and efficiencies nowadays even reaching the performance of Pt catalysts. Here, first, recent advancements on the design of carbon materials for anodes in MFCs are summarized, and the influence of structure and surface functionalization of different types of carbon materials on microorganism immobilization and electrochemical performance is elucidated. Then, synthetic strategies and structures of typical carbon-based cathodes in MFCs are briefly presented. Furthermore, future applications of carbon-electrode-based MFC devices in the energy, environmental, and biological fields are discussed, and the emerging challenges in transferring them from laboratory to industrial scale are described.

  18. Nanostructured carbon materials decorated with organophosphorus moieties: synthesis and application

    PubMed Central

    Biagiotti, Giacomo; Langè, Vittoria; Ligi, Cristina; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Flis, Anna; Pietrusiewicz, K Michał; Ghini, Giacomo; Brandi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for the production of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) decorated with organophosphorus moieties is presented. Three different triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) derivatives were used to decorate oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs) and graphene platelets (GPs). The TPPOs chosen bear functional groups able to react with the CNMs by Tour reaction (an amino group), nitrene cycloaddition (an azido group) or CuAAC reaction (one terminal C–C triple bond). All the adducts were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, elemental analysis and ICP-AES. The cycloaddition of nitrene provided the higher loading on ox-MWCNTs and GPs as well, while the Tour approach gave best results with nanotubes (CNTs). Finally, we investigated the possibility to reduce the TPPO functionalized CNMs to the corresponding phosphine derivatives and applied one of the materials produced as heterogeneous organocatalyst in a Staudinger ligation reaction. PMID:28326239

  19. Carbon nanotubes based functional materials for MSL and biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nanyan

    In this thesis, several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) based functional materials have been successfully synthesized and systematically characterized. Their applications for MicroStereoLithography (MSL) and biosensor were further explored. A new mild oxidization method for oxidizing multi-walled CNTs was developed using potassium permanganate as the oxidant and assisted with phase transfer catalyst. The novel oxidization procedure gives significantly higher yield and high functional group density. Facilitated with the above functional groups, a variety of homogeneous polymer/CNTs nanocomposites were prepared through either chemical or physical interactions and they were systematically characterized. UV curable oligomers have been attached to the wall of the oxidized carbon nanotubes, and they were cured by MicroStereoLithography (MSL) UV light laser with both free radical and cationic polymerization mechanisms. Furthermore, graphite and several CNTs-based glucose thick film biosensors are fabricated and evaluated.

  20. Dinuclear transition metal complexes in carbon nanostructured materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, J. I.; Hernández, E.; Delgado, E.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) were prepared with two similar techniques using organometallic complexes as catalysts precursors. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and pyrolysis with chlorine gas approaches were employed in order to explore the effect of dinuclear transition metal compounds [Fe2(CO)6(μ-S2C6H2X2), (X=OH, Cl)] in synthesis of CNMs. Our to-date results have shown these complexes generate different carbonaceous materials when they are used in bulk, it was also observed that their performances in synthesis differ even though these compounds are analogous. With X=OH complex used in CVD process, metal nanoparticles of ca. 20-50 nm in size and embedded in carbon matrix were obtained. X=C1 complex has been used in pyrolysis experiments and showed an entire volatilisation or no reaction, depending on selected temperature. Furthermore, obtaining of a new tetranuclear iron cluster is presented in this work.

  1. Advanced materials based on carbon nanotube arrays, yarns and papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Phlip David

    Carbon nanotubes have hundreds of potential applications but require innovative processing techniques to manipulate the microscopic carbon dust into useful devices and products. This thesis describes efforts to process carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using novel methods with the goals of: (1) improving the properties of energy absorbing and composite carbon nanotube materials and (2) increasing understanding of fundamental structure-property relationships within these materials. Millimeter long CNTs, in the form of arrays, yarns and papers, were used to produce energy absorbing foams and high volume fraction CNT composites. Vertically aligned CNT arrays were grown on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ethylene gas over iron nano-particles. The low density, millimeter thick arrays were tested under compression as energy absorbing foams. With additional CVD processing steps, it was possible to tune the compressive properties of the arrays. After the longest treatment, the compressive strength of the arrays was increased by a factor of 35 with a density increase of only six fold, while also imparting recovery from compression to the array. Microscopy revealed that the post-synthesis CVD treatment increased the number of CNT walls through an epitaxial type radial growth on the surface of the as-grown tubes. The increase in tube radius and mutual support between nanotubes explained the increases in compressive strength while an increase in nanotube roughness was proposed as the morphological change responsible for recovery in the array. Carbon nanotube yarns were used as the raw material for macroscopic textile preforms with a multi-level hierarchical carbon nanotube (CNT) structure: nanotubes, bundles, spun single yarns, plied yarns and 3-D braids. In prior tensile tests, composites produced from the 3-D braids exhibited unusual mechanical behavior effects. The proposed physical hypotheses explained those effects by molecular level interactions and

  2. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor molasses by activation with sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Legrouri, K; Khouya, E; Ezzine, M; Hannache, H; Denoyel, R; Pallier, R; Naslain, R

    2005-02-14

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulphuric acid, followed by carbonisation at varying conditions (temperature and gas coverage) in order to optimize preparation parameters. The influence of activation conditions was investigated by determination of adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined while the micropore volume was determined by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and reveal the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activated carbons properties in this study were found for activation of the mixture (molasses/sulphuric acid) in steam at 750 degrees C. The samples obtained in this condition were highly microporous, with high surface area (> or =1200 m2/g) and the maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine were 435 and 1430 mg/g, respectively.

  3. Activated carbon and tungsten oxide supported on activated carbon catalysts for toluene catalytic combustion.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Merino, M A; Ribeiro, M F; Silva, J M; Carrasco-Marín, F; Maldonado-Hódar, F J

    2004-09-01

    We have used activated carbon (AC) prepared from almond shells as a support for tungsten oxide to develop a series of WOx/AC catalysts for the catalytic combustion of toluene. We conducted the reaction between 300 and 350 degrees C, using a flow of 500 ppm of toluene in air and space velocity (GHSV) in the range 4000-7000 h(-1). Results show that AC used as a support is an appropriate material for removing toluene from dilute streams. By decreasing the GHSV and increasing the reaction temperature AC becomes a specific catalyst for the total toluene oxidation (SCO2 = 100%), but in less favorable conditions CO appears as reaction product and toluene-derivative compounds are retained inside the pores. WOx/AC catalysts are more selective to CO2 than AC due to the strong acidity of this oxide; this behavior improves with increased metal loading and reaction temperature and contact time. The catalytic performance depends on the nonstoichiometric tungsten oxide obtained during the pretreatment. In comparison with other supports the WOx/AC catalysts present, at low reaction temperatures, higher activity and selectivity than WO, supported on SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, or Y zeolite. This is due to the hydrophobic character of the AC surface which prevents the adsorption of water produced from toluene combustion thus avoiding the deactivation of the active centers. However, the use of WOx/AC system is always restricted by its gasification temperature (around 400 degrees C), which limits the ability to increase the conversion values by increasing reaction temperatures.

  4. Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions using iron-oxide-coated modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lin, Y C; Xu, Bin; Le, Lin-sheng

    2007-08-01

    Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions was evaluated with the following three different sorption materials: coal-based activated carbon 12 x 40 (activated carbon), iron(II) oxide (FeO)/activated carbon-H, and iron oxide. The apparent characteristics and physical chemistry performances of these adsorbents were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electronic microscope. Also, batch experiments for arsenic removal were performed, and the effects of pH value on arsenic(V) removal were studied. The results suggest that the main phases of the iron oxide surface are magnetite, maghemite, hematite, and goethite; fine and uniform iron oxide particles can cover activated carbon surfaces and affect the surface area or pore structures of activated carbon; adsorption kinetics obey a pseudo-first-order rate equation; and adsorption capacities of adsorbents are affected by the values of pH. The optimum value of pH for iron oxide lies in a narrow range between 4.0 and 5.5, and arsenic(V) removal by FeO/activated carbon-H is ideal and stable in the pH range 3 to 7, while activated carbon has the lowest adsorption capacity in the entire pH range. Also, the adsorption characteristics of FeO/activated carbon-H composites and virgin activated carbon match well the Langmuir adsorption model, while those of iron oxide fit well the Freundlich adsorption model.

  5. Highly porous activated carbons from resource-recovered Leucaena leucocephala wood as capacitive deionization electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Hung; Liu, Nei-Ling; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Highly porous activated carbons were resource-recovered from Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. wood through combined chemical and physical activation (i.e., KOH etching followed by CO2 activation). This invasive species, which has severely damaged the ecological economics of Taiwan, was used as the precursor for producing high-quality carbonaceous electrodes for capacitive deionization (CDI). Carbonization and activation conditions strongly influenced the structure of chars and activated carbons. The total surface area and pore volume of activated carbons increased with increasing KOH/char ratio and activation time. Overgasification induced a substantial amount of mesopores in the activated carbons. In addition, the electrochemical properties and CDI electrosorptive performance of the activated carbons were evaluated; cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements revealed a typical capacitive behavior and electrical double layer formation, confirming ion electrosorption in the porous structure. The activated-carbon electrode, which possessed high surface area and both mesopores and micropores, exhibited improved capacitor characteristics and high electrosorptive performance. Highly porous activated carbons derived from waste L. leucocephala were demonstrated to be suitable CDI electrode materials.

  6. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity.

  7. Study of the Electrocatalytic Activity of Cerium Oxide and Gold-Studded Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Sonogel-Carbon Material as Supporting Electrode: Electroanalytical Study in Apple Juice for Babies

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahim, M. Yahia M.; Benjamin, Stephen R.; Cubillana-Aguilera, Laura Ma; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Ignacio; Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, Josè L.; Delgado, Juan Josè; Palacios-Santander, Josè Ma

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports a study of the electrocatalytic activity of CeO2 nanoparticles and gold sononanoparticles (AuSNPs)/CeO2 nanocomposite, deposited on the surface of a Sonogel-Carbon (SNGC) matrix used as supporting electrode and the application of the sensing devices built with them to the determination of ascorbic acid (AA) used as a benchmark analyte. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to investigate the electrocatalytic behavior of CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes, utilizing different concentrations of CeO2 nanoparticles and different AuSNPs:CeO2 w/w ratios. The best detection and quantification limits, obtained for CeO2 (10.0 mg·mL−1)- and AuSNPs/CeO2 (3.25% w/w)-modified SNGC electrodes, were 1.59 × 10−6 and 5.32 × 10−6 M, and 2.93 × 10−6 and 9.77 × 10−6 M, respectively, with reproducibility values of 5.78% and 6.24%, respectively, for a linear concentration range from 1.5 μM to 4.0 mM of AA. The electrochemical devices were tested for the determination of AA in commercial apple juice for babies. The results were compared with those obtained by applying high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a reference method. Recovery errors below 5% were obtained in most cases, with standard deviations lower than 3% for all the modified SNGC electrodes. Bare, CeO2- and AuSNPs/CeO2-modified SNGC electrodes were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). AuSNPs and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and information about their size distribution and shape was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM;. The advantages of employing CeO2 nanoparticles and AuSNPs/CeO2 nanocomposite in SNGC supporting material are also described. This research suggests that the modified electrode can be a very promising voltammetric sensor for the determination of

  8. Multilayer Electroactive Polymer Composite Material Comprising Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive material comprises multiple layers of electroactive composite with each layer having unique dielectric, electrical and mechanical properties that define an electromechanical operation thereof when affected by an external stimulus. For example, each layer can be (i) a 2-phase composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation, or (ii) a 3-phase composite having the elements of the 2-phase composite and further including a third component of micro-sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic incorporated in the polymer matrix.

  9. Computational Nanotechnology of Materials, Electronics and Machines: Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the goals and research of the Integrated Product Team (IPT) on Devices and Nanotechnology. NASA's needs for this technology are discussed and then related to the research focus of the team. The two areas of focus for technique development are: 1) large scale classical molecular dynamics on a shared memory architecture machine; and 2) quantum molecular dynamics methodology. The areas of focus for research are: 1) nanomechanics/materials; 2) carbon based electronics; 3) BxCyNz composite nanotubes and junctions; 4) nano mechano-electronics; and 5) nano mechano-chemistry.

  10. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  11. Carbon-Rich Compounds: From Molecules to Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik

    2006-01-01

    This is the only up-to-date book on the market to focus on the synthesis of these compounds in this particularly suitable way. A team of excellent international authors guarantees high-quality content, covering such topics as monodisperse carbon-rich oligomers, molecular electronic wires, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, nonconjugated small molecules, nanotubes, fullerenes, polyynes, macrocycles, dendrimers, phenylenes and diamondoid structures. The result is a must-have for everyone working in this expanding and interdisciplinary field, including organic and polymer chemists, materials scientists, and chemists working in industry.

  12. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  13. Effect of oxidation of carbon material on suspension electrodes for flow electrode capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Kelsey B; Hatzell, Marta C; Cook, Kevin M; Boota, Muhammad; Housel, Gabrielle M; McBride, Alexander; Kumbur, E Caglan; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-03-03

    Flow electrode deionization (FCDI) is an emerging area for continuous and scalable deionization, but the electrochemical and flow properties of the flow electrode need to be improved to minimize energy consumption. Chemical oxidation of granular activated carbon (AC) was examined here to study the role of surface heteroatoms on rheology and electrochemical performance of a flow electrode (carbon slurry) for deionization processes. Moreover, it was demonstrated that higher mass densities could be used without increasing energy for pumping when using oxidized active material. High mass-loaded flow electrodes (28% carbon content) based on oxidized AC displayed similar viscosities (∼21 Pa s) to lower mass-loaded flow electrodes (20% carbon content) based on nonoxidized AC. The 40% increased mass loading (from 20% to 28%) resulted in a 25% increase in flow electrode gravimetric capacitance (from 65 to 83 F g(-1)) without sacrificing flowability (viscosity). The electrical energy required to remove ∼18% of the ions (desalt) from of the feed solution was observed to be significantly dependent on the mass loading and decreased (∼60%) from 92 ± 7 to 28 ± 2.7 J with increased mass densities from 5 to 23 wt %. It is shown that the surface chemistry of the active material in a flow electrode effects the electrical and pumping energy requirements of a FCDI system.

  14. Effect of oxidation of carbon material on suspension electrodes for flow electrode capacitive deionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Kelsey B.; Hatzell, Marta C.; Cook, Kevin M.; Boota, Muhammad; Housel, Gabrielle M.; Mcbride, Alexander; Kumbur, E. Caglan; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-29

    Flow electrode deionization (FCDI) is an emerging area for continuous and scalable deionization, but the electrochemical and flow properties of the flow electrode need to be improved to minimize energy consumption. We examine chemical oxidation of granular activated carbon (AC) here to study the role of surface heteroatoms on rheology and electrochemical performance of a flow electrode (carbon slurry) for deionization processes. Moreover, it was demonstrated that higher mass densities could be used without increasing energy for pumping when using oxidized active material. High mass-loaded flow electrodes (28% carbon content) based on oxidized AC displayed similar viscosities (~21 Pa s) to lower mass-loaded flow electrodes (20% carbon content) based on nonoxidized AC. The 40% increased mass loading (from 20% to 28%) resulted in a 25% increase in flow electrode gravimetric capacitance (from 65 to 83 F g–1) without sacrificing flowability (viscosity). The electrical energy required to remove ~18% of the ions (desalt) from of the feed solution was observed to be significantly dependent on the mass loading and decreased (~60%) from 92 ± 7 to 28 ± 2.7 J with increased mass densities from 5 to 23 wt %. Finally, it is shown that the surface chemistry of the active material in a flow electrode effects the electrical and pumping energy requirements of a FCDI system.

  15. Effect of oxidation of carbon material on suspension electrodes for flow electrode capacitive deionization

    DOE PAGES

    Hatzell, Kelsey B.; Hatzell, Marta C.; Cook, Kevin M.; ...

    2015-01-29

    Flow electrode deionization (FCDI) is an emerging area for continuous and scalable deionization, but the electrochemical and flow properties of the flow electrode need to be improved to minimize energy consumption. We examine chemical oxidation of granular activated carbon (AC) here to study the role of surface heteroatoms on rheology and electrochemical performance of a flow electrode (carbon slurry) for deionization processes. Moreover, it was demonstrated that higher mass densities could be used without increasing energy for pumping when using oxidized active material. High mass-loaded flow electrodes (28% carbon content) based on oxidized AC displayed similar viscosities (~21 Pa s)more » to lower mass-loaded flow electrodes (20% carbon content) based on nonoxidized AC. The 40% increased mass loading (from 20% to 28%) resulted in a 25% increase in flow electrode gravimetric capacitance (from 65 to 83 F g–1) without sacrificing flowability (viscosity). The electrical energy required to remove ~18% of the ions (desalt) from of the feed solution was observed to be significantly dependent on the mass loading and decreased (~60%) from 92 ± 7 to 28 ± 2.7 J with increased mass densities from 5 to 23 wt %. Finally, it is shown that the surface chemistry of the active material in a flow electrode effects the electrical and pumping energy requirements of a FCDI system.« less

  16. Carbon and related materials for thermal and electrical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Yasuhiro

    High thermal stability has been attained in polyol ester by using a sterically half-hindered phenolic primary antioxidant and a thiopropionate secondary antioxidant. Carbon black and boron nitride (BN) serve as antioxidants in the presence of either primary antioxidant or secondary antioxidant at 200°C. BN paste shows an estimated 100°C lifetime of 19 years, compared to 1.3 years for the carbon black paste and 0.10 year for commercial silver paste. Phase-change materials (PCMs) with high thermal stability and high heat of fusion have been attained by using antioxidants (mainly hydrocarbons with linear segments). Their heat of fusion is much higher than those of commercial PCMs. The use of 98.0 wt.% thiopropionate antioxidant with 2.0 wt.% half-hindered phenolic antioxidant as the matrix and 16 vol.% BN particles gives 100°C lifetime indicator 5.3 years, in contrast to 0.95 year or less for the commercial PCMs. Carbon-based films with thickness 1-13 mum, electrical resistivity 6 x 10-4 - 3 O.cm, and strong bonding to alumina, have been attained through the use of EPON SU 2.5 epoxy and an amine curing agent as the carbon precursor, and a carbonization temperature of 650°C. Nickel nanoparticles (filamentary) are more effective for enhancing the conductivity than silver nanoparticles (not filamentary) at the same volume fraction. Even the combined use of carbon nanotube and silver is less effective than nickel. A three-dimensional microstructure in the form of a microscale bridge on alumina has been attained by using a novel low-cost process that involves thermoplastic spacer (wax) evaporation during pyrolysis of an epoxy-based film that coats the spacer and a part of the substrate. Multiwalled carbon nanotube as a filler is effective for reducing cracking during pyrolysis. A bridge with a girder of length 90-300 microm, separated from the substrate by a height of 5-15 mum, has been attained.

  17. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing ‘waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si–Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2. PMID:27981967

  18. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of high surface area biomass-based activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Sang, Da-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High surface area activated carbons were prepared with Spartina alterniflora and cotton stalk as raw materials and KOH as activating agent. Effects of materials type, impregnation ratio, activation temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The properties and pore structure of the carbons were characterized with nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main pore characteristics of activated carbons were analyzed by BET equation, Horvath-Kawazoe BET method and DFT method. The considerable preparation conditions are obtained as follows: impregnation ratio of 3: 1, an activation temperature of 800 degrees C and an activation time of 1.5 h. The BET surface area of activated carbon prepared from Spartina alterniflora reached 2 825 m2 x g(-1) when its total pore volume, yield, iodine number and methylene blue adsorption were 1.374 cm3 x g(-1), 16.36%, 1797 mg x g(-1) and 495 mg x g(-1) respectively under above conditions. The activated carbon from cotton stalk was prepared with BET surface area of 2 135 m2 x g(-1), total pore volume of 1.038 cm3 x g(-1), yield of 11.22%, methylene blue adsorption of 1 251 mg x g(-1), and iodine number of 478 mg x g(-1), respectively. The methylene blue adsorption and iodine number are much higher than the national first level for activated carbon. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of 2,4-dinitrophenol on the two carbons were 932 mg x g(-1) and 747 mg x g(-1), respectively, which are superior to ordinary activated carbon and activated carbon fiber.

  19. Chemical immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd by phosphate materials and calcium carbonate in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyong; Su, Xiaojuan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Zhu, Yifei; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination with toxic metals has increasingly become a global concern over the past few decades. Phosphate and carbonate compounds are good passivation materials for Pb immobilization, while the effect of phosphate and carbonate on the immobilization of multiple heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Cd) in contaminated soils was seldom investigated. In this study, bone meal (BM), phosphate rock (PR), oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock (APR), super phosphate (SP), and calcium carbonate (CC) were added to the contaminated soils to evaluate the effect of phosphate materials and calcium carbonate on the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd. The results showed that the pH of the treated soils increased 1.3-2.7, except SP which decreased 0.5 at most. Compared to the control treatment, all phosphates and calcium carbonate added to the polluted soils increased the fraction of residual metals, and the application of APR, PR, BM, and CC significantly reduced exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction metals. PR and APR were the most effective for the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd in the soils among these materials. Moreover, the concentrations of all metals in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate decreased with increasing amounts of amendments, and the concentrations of Pb in the TCLP leachate for soils treated with PR and APR were below the nonhazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) (US Environmental Protection Agency). Based on our results, phosphate rock and oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock are effective in the immobilization of multiple metals by reducing their mobility in the co-contaminated soils.

  20. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  1. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  2. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  3. Tailoring micro-mesoporosity in activated carbon fibers to enhance SO₂ catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Diez, Noel; Alvarez, Patricia; Granda, Marcos; Blanco, Clara; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Wróbel-Iwaniec, Iwona; Sliwak, Agata; Machnikowski, Jacek; Menendez, Rosa

    2014-08-15

    Enhanced SO2 adsorption of activated carbon fibers is obtained by tailoring a specific micro-mesoporous structure in the fibers. This architecture is obtained via metal catalytic activation of the fibers with a novel precursor, cobalt naphthenate, which contrary to other precursors, also enhances spinnability and carbon fiber yield. In the SO2 oxidation, it is demonstrated that the combination of micropores and large mesopores is the main factor for an enhanced catalytic activity which is superior to that observed in other similar microporous activated carbon fibers. This provides an alternative way for the development of a new generation of catalytic material.

  4. Production of activated carbon from coconut shell char in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, P.M.S.; Ahmed, J.; Krishnaiah, K.

    1997-09-01

    Activated carbon is produced from coconut shell char using steam or carbon dioxide as the reacting gas in a 100 mm diameter fluidized bed reactor. The effect of process parameters such as reaction time, fluidizing velocity, particle size, static bed height, temperature of activation, fluidizing medium, and solid raw material on activation is studied. The product is characterized by determination of iodine number and BET surface area. The product obtained in the fluidized bed reactor is much superior in quality to the activated carbons produced by conventional processes. Based on the experimental observations, the optimum values of process parameters are identified.

  5. Water treatment using activated carbon supporting silver and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Valušová, Eva; Vandžurová, Anna; Pristaš, Peter; Antalík, Marián; Javorský, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts in water purification have led to the development of novel materials whose unique properties can offer effective biocidal capabilities with greater ease of use and at lower cost. In this study, we introduce a novel procedure for the preparation of activated carbon (charcoal) composite in which magnetite and silver are incorporated (MCAG); we also describe the use of this material for the disinfection of surface water. The formation process of magnetic MCAG composite was studied using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The results demonstrated the high sorption efficiency of AgNO₃ to magnetic activated carbon. The antimicrobial capabilities of the prepared MCAG were examined and the results clearly demonstrate their inhibitory effect on total river water bacteria and on Pseudomonas koreensis and Bacillus mycoides cultures isolated from river water. The bacterial counts in river water samples were reduced by five orders of magnitude following 30 min of treatment using 1 g l⁻¹ of MCAG at room temperature. The removal of all bacteria from the surface water samples implies that the MCAG material would be a suitable disinfectant for such waters. In combination with its magnetic character, MCAG would be an excellent candidate for the simple ambulatory disinfection of surface water.

  6. Hydrogen storage studies on palladium-doped carbon materials (AC, CB, CNMs) @ metal-organic framework-5.

    PubMed

    Viditha, V; Srilatha, K; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a rapidly growing class of porous materials and are considered as best adsorbents for their high surface area and extraordinary porosity. The MOFs are synthesized by using various chemicals like triethylamine, terepthalic acid, zinc acetate dihydrate, chloroform, and dimethylformamide (DMF). Synthesized MOFs are intercalated with palladium/activated carbon, carbon black, and carbon nanomaterials by chemical reduction method for the purpose of enhancing the hydrogen adsorption capacities. We have observed that the palladium doped activated carbon on MOF-5 showed high hydrogen storage capacity. This may be due to the affinity of the palladium toward hydrogen molecule. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. We have observed a clear decrease in the BET surface area and pore volume. The obtained results show a better performance for the synthesized sample. To our best knowledge, no one has reported the work on palladium-doped carbon materials (activated carbon, carbon black, carbon nanomaterials) impregnated to the metal-organic framework-5. We have attempted to synthesize carbon nanomaterials using indigenously fabricated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) unit as a support. We have observed an increase in the hydrogen storage capacities.

  7. A method for determining structural properties of RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, R. M.; Fowler, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A method was developed for evaluation and prediction of effects of oxidation of the graphitic substrate on structural properties of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) thermal protection material. Test specimens of RCC material were exposed to successive periods of convective heating in a plasma-jet facility to simulate the chemical reactions of Shuttle atmospheric entry. After each period of testing, the test specimen mass loss and performance in a nondestructive flexure test were determined. A computational model of the RCC specimen was developed for the NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) program and validated by comparison of calculated and experimental results of flexure tests. The elastic moduli and ultimate loads in tension and compression were then computed for various levels of substrate oxidation.

  8. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  9. Biological and biochemical properties of the carbon composite and polyethylene implant materials.

    PubMed

    Pesáková, V; Smetana, K; Balík, K; Hruska, J; Petrtýl, M; Hulejová, H; Adam, M

    2003-06-01

    We studied the biocompatibility of the carbon composites and polyethylene materials with and without collagen or collagen and proteoglycan cover. We used the in vitro technology to study the adhesion of model cells evalution, their metabolic activity and the production of TNF-alpha as a cytokine model. Under in vivo condition, the biocompatibility of tested polymers were studied in the implantation experiment, subcutaneously in the interscapular region in the laboratory rat. We have found in the in vitro assay favorable proliferation and the smallest production of pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha cytokine in cells adherent to the hydrophobic polyethylene material coated with biological macromolecules. Using in vivo tests performed by the implantation of materials to the rat we demonstrated that the materials are not cytotoxic. The tissue capsule surrounding the implants was not significantly influenced by the type of the implant and the pre-treatment by the biological molecules. However, the foreign-body giant multinucleated cells were observed only in the vicinity of the collagen - covered hydrophobic polyethylene implant. Interestingly, while the collagen coating improved the biocompatibility of tested polymers in vitro, the inflammatory reaction against this covered materials was higher under in vivo conditions. The pre-treatment of carbon composites by both types of biological macromolecules reduced the occurrence of carbon debris in the implantation site. The tested carbon composites and polyethylene materials are not toxic. The pre-treatment of the materials by extracellular matrix components increased their biological tolerance in vitro and reduced implant wears in animal experiment, which can be important for the medical application.

  10. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  11. Electric Pulse Discharge Activated Carbon Supercapacitors for Transportation Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi; Agrawal, Jyoti

    2012-03-01

    ScienceTomorrow is developing a high-speed, low-cost process for synthesizing high-porosity electrodes for electrochemical double-layer capacitors. Four types of coal (lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite) were used as precursor materials for spark discharge activation with multiscale porous structure. The final porosity and pore distribution depended, among other factors, on precursor type. The high gas content in low-grade carbon resulted in mechanical disintegration, whereas high capacitance was attained in higher-grade coal. The properties, including capacitance, mechanical robustness, and internal conductivity, were excellent when the cost is taken into consideration.

  12. Conducting polymer transistors making use of activated carbon gate electrodes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Kumar, Prajwal; Zhang, Shiming; Yi, Zhihui; Crescenzo, Gregory De; Santato, Clara; Soavi, Francesca; Cicoira, Fabio

    2015-01-14

    The characteristics of the gate electrode have significant effects on the behavior of organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), which are intensively investigated for applications in the booming field of organic bioelectronics. In this work, high specific surface area activated carbon (AC) was used as gate electrode material in OECTs based on the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). We found that the high specific capacitance of the AC gate electrodes leads to high drain-source current modulation in OECTs, while their intrinsic quasi-reference characteristics make unnecessary the presence of an additional reference electrode to monitor the OECT channel potential.

  13. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  14. Preparation of binderless activated carbon monolith from pre-carbonization rubber wood sawdust by controlling of carbonization and activation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Taslim, R.; Iwantono

    2013-09-01

    Binderless activated carbon monolith (ACM) was prepared from pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust (RWSD). The effect of the carbonization temperature (400, 500, 600, 700, 800 dan 900 °C) on porosity characteristic of the ACM have been studied. The optimum carbonization temperature for obtaining ACM with high surface area of 600 °C with CO2 activation at 800 °C for one hour. At this condition, the surface area as high as 733 m2 g-1 could be successfully obtained. By improved the activation temperature at 900 °C for 2.5 h, it was found that the surface area of 860 m2 g-1. For this condition, the ACM exhibit the specific capacitance of 90 F g-1. In addition the termogravimertic (TG)-differential termografimertic (DTG) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) measurement were also performed on the ACMs and the result has been studied. Finally, it was conclude that the high surface area of ACM from RWSD could be produced by proper selections of carbonization and activation condition.

  15. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-07

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon.

  16. Carbon supports from natural organic materials and carbon-supported palladium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, B.N.

    2007-07-15

    Experimental data are presented concerning the influence of preparation conditions on the pore structure of carbon supports obtained from different types of plant biomass, thermally expanded graphites, and chemically modified anthracites, on the distribution and particle size of supported palladium, and on the activity of the supported catalyst in the liquid-phase hydrogenation of hex-1-ene and cyclohexene.

  17. Characterization of oxidized carbon materials with photoinduced absorption response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uklein, A. V.; Diyuk, V. E.; Grishchenko, L. M.; Kozhanov, V. O.; Boldyrieva, O. Yu.; Lisnyak, V. V.; Multian, V. V.; Gayvoronsky, V. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    An efficient application of fast remote diagnostics for carbon material (CM) bulk particles was demonstrated. Porous layers of CM particles with different oxidation levels were characterized by self-action of picosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. Nitrogen adsorption, Boehm titration, and thermal analysis of the oxidized CMs revealed diverse specific surface area S_{BET}, reasonable surface acidity, and high concentration of surface oxygen-containing groups. Dense CM porous layers showed a monotonous reduction of the absorptive nonlinear optical (NLO) response efficiency versus the oxidation level with characteristic magnitude Im(χ _C^{(3)})˜ 10^{-10} esu for the carbon particles fraction. The obtained Im(χ _C^{(3)})/S_{BET} ratio remains approximately constant, which indicates the certain proportion between the absorptive NLO response efficiency and the specific surface area. We suggest to use Im(χ _C^{(3)}) as a figure of merit for carbons subjected to the oxidation—the route to enhance the CM surface reactivity.

  18. Microwave absorption in nanocomposite material of magnetically functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labunov, V. A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Prudnikava, A. L.; Komissarov, I.; Shulitski, B. G.; Speisser, C.; Antoni, F.; Le Normand, F.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation in X and Ka bands with magnetic nanocomposite of disordered carbon nanotubes arrays has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Samples were synthesized on the quartz reactor walls by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene which provided random intercalation of iron phase nanoparticles in carbon nanotube array. The exhaustive characterization of the samples by means of the scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was performed. It was found that the absorption of the electromagnetic wave monotonically increases with the frequency. To describe these experimental data, we extended the Bruggeman effective medium theory to a more complex case of a magnetic nanocomposite with randomly distributed spherical ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a conducting medium. The essential feature of the developed model is the consideration of the complex nature of the studied material. In particular, such important parameters as magnetic and dielectric properties of both the carbon nanotube medium and the nanoparticles, the volume concentration and the dimensions of the nanoparticles, the wave impedance of the resistive-capacitive shells of the conductive nanoparticles are explicitly taken into account in our model. Moreover, analysing the experimental results, we were able to obtain the frequency dependencies of permittivity and permeability of the studied nanocomposite.

  19. Molecular dynamics study on core-shell structure stability of aluminum encapsulated by nano-carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qingwen; Xu, Jingcheng; Liu, Yi; Zhai, Dong; Zhou, Kai; Pan, Deng

    2017-02-01

    A ReaxFF reactive forcefield for aluminum-carbon composite system has been developed to investigate structural stability and thermal decomposition mechanism of nano-carbon materials coating aluminum particles. Research results indicated the Al@C particles were structurally stable in a broad temperature range from room temperature up to 2735 K. In particular, the broken carbon cage self-healed to reconstruct a more stable Al@C core-shell structure after Al atoms sequentially departing from carbon cage during thermal decomposition, proffering an effective protection for aluminum surface-activeness.

  20. Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    market . Overall Program Summary The overall objective of the Active Materials for Photonic Systems (AMPS) program was to develop and demonstrate...mode fiber, with alignment tolerances of several microns functions well for data communications , single mode fiber is required for several significant...in the laser/optics community . Boeing and MCNC have signed a memorandum of agreement for commercialization and are actively seeking partners for

  1. Preparation of activated carbons from bituminous coal pitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañan, J.; González-García, C. M.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Macías-García, A.; Díaz-Díez, M. A.

    2004-11-01

    High-porosity carbons were prepared from bituminous coal pitches by combining chemical and physical activation. The chemical activation process consisted of potassium hydroxide impregnation followed by carbonization in nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of the KOH impregnation ratio on the surface area and pore volumes evolution of the carbons derived from mesophase pitch was studied. The optimum KOH:pitch ratio was fixed to realize a physical activation process in order to increase the textural parameters of the KOH-activated carbons. Physical activation was performed by carbonizing the KOH-activated carbons followed by gasifying with air. The influence of the carbonization temperature and the residence time of the gasification with air were explored to optimize those preparation parameters.

  2. Preparation of activated carbon from waste plastics polyethylene terephthalate as adsorbent in natural gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Ramadhan, I. T.

    2017-02-01

    The main problem is the process of natural gas storage and distribution, because in normal conditions of natural gas in the gas phase causes the storage capacity be small and efficient to use. The technology is commonly used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). The weakness of this technology safety level is low because the requirement for high-pressure CNG (250 bar) and LNG requires a low temperature (-161°C). It takes innovation in the storage of natural gas using the technology ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) with activated carbon as an adsorbent, causing natural gas can be stored in a low pressure of about 34.5. In this research, preparation of activated carbon using waste plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET). PET plastic waste is a good raw material for making activated carbon because of its availability and the price is a lot cheaper. Besides plastic PET has the appropriate characteristics as activated carbon raw material required for the storage of natural gas because the material is hard and has a high carbon content of about 62.5% wt. The process of making activated carbon done is carbonized at a temperature of 400 ° C and physical activation using CO2 gas at a temperature of 975 ° C. The parameters varied in the activation process is the flow rate of carbon dioxide and activation time. The results obtained in the carbonization process yield of 21.47%, while the yield on the activation process by 62%. At the optimum process conditions, the CO2 flow rate of 200 ml/min and the activation time of 240 minutes, the value % burn off amounted to 86.69% and a surface area of 1591.72 m2/g.

  3. Structural studies on carbon materials for advanced space technology. Part 1: Structure and oxidation behavior of some carbon/carbon composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, D. B.; Uptegrove, D. R.; Srinivasagopalan, S.

    1974-01-01

    The microstructure and some microstructural effects of oxidation have been investigated for laminar carbon fiber cloth/cloth binder matrix composite materials. It was found that cloth wave is important in determining the macrostructure of the composites X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the composites were more graphitic than the constituent fiber phases, indicating a graphitic binder matrix phase. Various tests which were conducted to investigate specific properties of the material are described. It was learned that under the moderate temperature and oxidant flow conditions studied, C-700, 730 materials exhibit superior oxidation resistance primarily because of the inhibiting influence of the graphitized binder matrix.

  4. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  5. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    PubMed

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (<1 mm) and were characterized using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. In the present work we have investigated the fluorescence characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  6. Soft Materials Approaches to Carbon Nanotubes: from Gels to Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes combine low density with exceptional mechanical, electrical and optical properties. Unfortunately, these nanoscale properties have not been retained in bulk structures. I will describe surface modification assisted self-assembly of single wall carbon nanotube into macroscopic nanotube networks - hydrogels and aerogels. The nanotube networks are ultra-lightweight, electrically conducting and thermally insulating. The shapes and sizes of these nanotube networks are readily tunable and is a tremendous strength of our fabrication method. The interesting properties and structure of these nanotube networks make them suitable for diverse applications. For example, we have used these networks as scaffolds to enhance elastic modulus of polymers by 36,000%. The porous nanotube networks also show high capacitance, and can be impregnated with catalysts nanoparticles at high loading, which can then be simultaneously used as electrodes and catalysts supports in electrochemical cells. A weakness of the nanotube networks is their fragility - but we have recently developed a method to transform these inelastic networks into superelastic materials by coating them with between one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. This work has been supported by the NSF (DMR-0645596, DMR-0619424 and CBET-0933510), Sloan Foundation, ACS-PRF, the Korea Institute of Energy Research, DARPA, and Bayer Materials.

  7. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  8. Surface modification of activated carbons for CO 2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevida, C.; Plaza, M. G.; Arias, B.; Fermoso, J.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J. J.

    2008-09-01

    The reduction of anthropogenic CO 2 emissions to address the consequences of climate change is a matter of concern for all developed countries. In the short term, one of the most viable options for reducing carbon emissions is to capture and store CO 2 at large stationary sources. Adsorption with solid sorbents is one of the most promising options. In this work, two series of materials were prepared from two commercial activated carbons, C and R, by heat treatment with gaseous ammonia at temperatures in the 200-800 °C range. The aim was to improve the selectivity and capacity of the sorbents to capture CO 2, by introducing basic nitrogen-functionalities into the carbons. The sorbents were characterised in terms of texture and chemical composition. Their surface chemistry was studied through temperature-programmed desorption tests and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The capture performance of the carbons was evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analyser to record mass uptakes by the samples when exposed to a CO 2 atmosphere.

  9. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  10. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  11. Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Samuel; Fàbregas, Esteve; Pumera, Martin

    2009-01-07

    Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polysulfone composite electrodes for enhanced heterogeneous electron transfer is studied. The physicochemical insight into the electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites was provided by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Dopamine, ascorbic acid, NADH, and ferricyanide are used as a model redox system for evaluating the performance of activated carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes. We demonstrate that polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes is subject to defects and to partial removal during activation. Such tunable activation of electrodes would enable on-demand activation of electrodes for satisfying the needs of sensing or energy storage devices.

  12. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  13. Characterization of activated carbon prepared from chlorella-based algal residue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Tien; Li, Ming-Hsuan

    2015-05-01

    The chlorella-based microalgal residue (AR) was tested as a novel precursor for preparing activated carbons. A combined carbonization-activation process with flowing N2 and CO2 gases was used to prepare the carbon materials at the activation temperatures of 800-1000 °C and the residence times of 0-30 min in this work. The elemental contents, pore properties and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of the resulting activated carbons have been performed. The results showed that activation temperature may be the most important parameter for determining their pore properties. The maximal Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and total pore volume of the resulting activated carbon, which was produced at the activation temperature of 950 °C with the residence time of 30 min, were 840 m(2)/g and 0.46 cm(3)/g, respectively. More interestingly, the resulting activated carbons have significant nitrogen contents of 3.6-9.6 wt%, which make them lower carbon contents (i.e., 54.6-68.4 wt%) than those of commercial activated carbons.

  14. Comparative Investigation of the Efficiency of Absorption of Solar Energy by Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhod‧ko, N. G.; Smagulova, G. T.; Rakhymzhan, N. B.; Kim, S.; Lesbaev, B. T.; Nazhipkyzy, M.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the efficiency of absorption of solar energy by various carbon materials (soot, carbonized apricot pits and rice husks, and carbon nanotubes in the form of a ″forest″), as well as by composites based on them with inclusions of metal oxide nanoparticles. An analysis of the efficiency of absorption of solar energy by various carbon materials has demonstrated the advantage of the carbon material from carbonized apricot pits. The results of the comparative investigation of the absorptivity of apricot pits with that of the coating of a production prototype of solar collector are presented.

  15. Characterization of the micropore structure of activated carbons by adsorptions of nitrogen and some hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Guezel, F.

    1999-02-01

    In the present study the effects of the duration of carbonization and physical activation properties of activated carbon from vegetable materials were investigated. Peanut shells were used to obtain active carbon. These shells were activated chemically with ZnCl{sub 2} and/or CO{sub 2} for different times, and the micropore structures of these active carbons were studied by measuring the adsorption isotherms for nitrogen and some hydrocarbons such as benzene, n-butane, isobutane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and isooctane. As the physical activation time was increased, the primary micropores, which were measured at 0.01 relative pressure, were reduced, and they were replaced by larger secondary and tertiary micropores which were measured at 0.15--0.01 and 0.30--0.15 relative pressures. The ratios of the mesopore volume to the micropore volume also increased as the duration of physical activation increased.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  17. Thermal Characteristics of Pitch Based Carbon Foam and Phase Change Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    communications systems. Carbon foam derived from a blown mesophase pitch precursor can be considered to be an interconnected network of graphitic...THERMAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PITCH BASED CARBON FOAM AND PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS THESIS Kevin...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. THERMAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PITCH BASED CARBON FOAM AND PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS

  18. Carbon fiber production using high pressure treatment of a precursor material

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, I.C.; Moore, A.W.

    1983-09-06

    A process for producing a carbon fiber includes the steps of heat treating a selected precursor material under high pressure, thereafter solvent extracting the treated precursor material to obtain mesophase pitch, spinning the mesophase pitch into at least one pitch fiber, thermosetting the pitch fiber, and carbonizing the pitch fiber to obtain the carbon fiber.

  19. Methods of detection and identificationoc carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Karev, Alexander Ivanovich; Raevsky, Valery Georgievich; Dzhalivyan, Leonid Zavenovich; Brothers, Louis Joseph; Wilhide, Larry K

    2013-11-12

    Methods for detecting and identifying carbon- and/or nitrogen-containing materials are disclosed. The methods may comprise detection of photo-nuclear reaction products of nitrogen and carbon to detect and identify the carbon- and/or nitrogen-containing materials.

  20. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  1. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  2. Statistical characterization of carbon phenolic prepreg materials, volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beckley, D.A.; Stites, J. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The objective was to characterize several lots of materials used for carbon/carbon and carbon/phenol product manufacture. Volume one is organized into testing categories based on raw material of product form. Each category contains a discussion of the sampling plan, comments and observations on each test method utilized, and a summary of the results obtained each category.

  3. 21 CFR 878.3500 - Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers... Prosthetic Devices § 878.3500 Polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material. (a) Identification. A polytetrafluoroethylene with carbon fibers composite implant material is a porous...

  4. Latent Heat Characteristics of Biobased Oleochemical Carbonates as Novel Phase Change Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleochemical carbonates are biobased materials that were readily prepared through a carbonate interchange reaction between renewable C10-C18 fatty alcohols and dimethyl or diethyl carbonate in the presence of a catalyst. These carbonates have various commercial uses in cosmetic, fuel additive and l...

  5. Exploration of the Role of Heat Activation in Enhancing Serpentine Carbon Sequestration Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    McKelvy, M.J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Diefenbacher, J.; Bearat, H.; Wolf, G.

    2005-03-29

    As compared with other candidate carbon sequestration technologies, mineral carbonation offers the unique advantage of permanent disposal via geologically stable and environmentally benign carbonates. The primary challenge is the development of an economically viable process. Enhancing feedstock carbonation reactivity is key. Heat activation dramatically enhances aqueous serpentine carbonation reactivity. Although the present process is too expensive to implement, the materials characteristics and mechanisms that enhance carbonation are of keen interest for further reducing cost. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) of the serpentine mineral lizardite was used to isolate a series of heat-activated materials as a function of residual hydroxide content at progressively higher temperatures. Their structure and composition are evaluated via TGA/DTA, X-ray powder diffraction (including phase analysis), and infrared analysis. The meta-serpentine materials that were observed to form ranged from those with longer range ordering, consistent with diffuse stage-2 like interlamellar order, to an amorphous component that preferentially forms at higher temperatures. The aqueous carbonation reaction process was investigated for representative materials via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Magnesite was observed to form directly at 15 MPa CO{sub 2} and at temperatures ranging from 100 to 125 C. Carbonation reactivity is generally correlated with the extent of meta-serpentine formation and structural disorder.

  6. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  7. Superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges for separation and absorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Liang, Weidong; Zhao, Xinhong; La, Peiqing; Deng, Weiqiao

    2013-06-01

    Highly porous activated carbon with a large surface area and pore volume was synthesized by KOH activation using commercially available activated carbon as a precursor. By modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), highly porous activated carbon showed superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 163.6°. The changes in wettability of PDMS- treated highly porous activated carbon were attributed to the deposition of a low-surface-energy silicon coating onto activated carbon (confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), which had microporous characteristics (confirmed by XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses). Using an easy dip-coating method, superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges were also fabricated; those exhibited excellent absorption selectivity for the removal of a wide range of organics and oils from water, and also recyclability, thus showing great potential as efficient absorbents for the large-scale removal of organic contaminants or oil spills from water.

  8. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods.

  9. Carbon Nitride Supramolecular Hybrid Material Enabled High-Efficiency Photocatalytic Water Treatments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghai; Xie, Shuyuan; Geng, Zhibin; Huang, Keke; Fan, Long; Zhou, Weilei; Qiu, Lixin; Gao, Denglei; Ji, Lei; Duan, Limei; Lu, Luhua; Li, Wanfei; Bai, Suozhu; Liu, Zongrui; Chen, Wei; Feng, Shouhua; Zhang, Yuegang

    2016-10-12

    Surface defects in relation to surface compositions, morphology, and active sites play crucial roles in photocatalytic activity of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) material for highly reactive oxygen radicals production. Here, we report a high-efficiency carbon nitride supramolecular hybrid material prepared by patching the surface defects with inorganic clusters. Fe (III) {PO4[WO(O2)2]4} clusters have been noncovalently integrated on surface of g-C3N4, where the surface defects provide accommodation sites for these clusters and driving forces for self-assembly. During photocatalytic process, the activity of supramolecular hybrid is 1.53 times than pure g-C3N4 for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and 2.26 times for Methyl Orange (MO) under the simulated solar light. Under the mediation of H2O2 (50 mmol L(-1)), the activity increases to 6.52 times for RhB and 28.3 times for MO. The solid cluster active sites with high specific surface area (SSA) defect surface promoting the kinetics of hydroxide radicals production give rise to the extremely high photocatalytic activity. It exhibits recyclable capability and works in large-scale demonstration under the natural sunlight as well and interestingly the environmental temperature has little effects on the photocatalytic activity.

  10. Magnetite impregnation effects on the sorbent properties of activated carbons and biochars.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhantao; Sani, Badruddeen; Mrozik, Wojciech; Obst, Martin; Beckingham, Barbara; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Werner, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the sorbent properties of magnetic activated carbons and biochars produced by wet impregnation with iron oxides. The sorbents had magnetic susceptibilities consistent with theoretical predictions for carbon-magnetite composites. The high BET surface areas of the activated carbons were preserved in the synthesis, and enhanced for one low surface area biochar by dissolving carbonates. Magnetization decreased the point of zero charge. Organic compound sorption correlated strongly with BET surface areas for the pristine and magnetized materials, while metal cation sorption did not show such a correlation. Strong sorption of the hydrophobic organic contaminant phenanthrene to the activated carbon or biochar surfaces was maintained following magnetite impregnation, while phenol sorption was diminished, probably due to enhanced carbon oxidation. Copper, zinc and lead sorption to the activated carbons and biochars was unchanged or slightly enhanced by the magnetization, and iron oxides also contributed to the composite metal sorption capacity. While a magnetic biochar with 219 ± 3.7 m(2)/g surface area nearly reached the very strong organic pollutant binding capacity of the two magnetic activated carbons, a magnetic biochar with 68 ± 2.8 m(2)/g surface area was the best metal sorbent. Magnetic biochars thus hold promise as more sustainable alternatives to coal-derived magnetic activated carbons.

  11. Imidazolium-Functionalized Carbon Nanohorns for the Conversion of Carbon Dioxide: Unprecedented Increase of Catalytic Activity after Recycling.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Carla; Liotta, Leonarda F; Carbonell, Esther; Giacalone, Francesco; Gruttadauria, Michelangelo; Aprile, Carmela

    2016-11-29

    Six new hybrid materials composed of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) and highly cross-linked imidazolium salts were easily synthesized using a one-step procedure based on the radical oligomerization of bis-vinylimidazolium salts (bVImiX) in the presence of pristine CNHs. The hybrid materials were characterized and employed as the sole catalysts for the conversion of carbon dioxide into cyclic carbonate by reaction with epoxides. The solids displayed excellent turnover number and productivity. Moreover, four catalysts were investigated in recycling experiments. Two catalysts containing an octyl linker between the imidazolium units and a bromide or an iodide anion showed no loss in activity after three cycles. The other two catalysts containing a p-xylyl linker and a bromide anion and different CNHs/bVImiX ratios showed an unprecedented increase of activity after recycling.

  12. Preparation of sodium dodecyl sulphate-functionalized activated carbon from Gnetum gnemon shell for dye adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is; Yahya, Amri; Sasti, Rilis Akista Tria

    2017-03-01

    Preparation of functionalized activated carbon from Gnetum gnemon shell was investigated. This work aimed to prepare highly active adsorbent for dye adsorption process by carbonization of Gnetum gnemon shell followed by functionalization using sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to form SDS-modified activated carbon (SDS-AC). The study of physicochemical character change was performed by SEM and FTIR analysis while the adsorptivity of the materials was tested in methylene blue adsorption. According to the results, it is found that SDS-AC exhibits the greater adsorptivity compared to AC.

  13. Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Alexey N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2012-07-01

    Computational study of thermal conductivity of interconnected networks of bundles in carbon nanotube (CNT) films reveals a strong effect of the finite thermal conductivity kT of individual nanotubes on the conductivity k of the CNT materials. The physical origin of this effect is explained in a theoretical analysis of systems composed of straight randomly dispersed CNTs. An analytical equation for quantitative description of the effect of finite kT on the value of k is obtained and adopted for continuous networks of bundles characteristic of CNT films and buckypaper. Contrary to the common assumption of the dominant effect of the contact conductance, the contribution of the finite kT is found to control the value of k at material densities and CNT lengths typical for real materials.

  14. The Reaction of Oxygen-Nitrogen Mixtures with Granular Activated Carbons Below the Spontaneous Ignition Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-14

    number) Activated carbon Oxidation of charcoals with 02 Spontaneous ignition temperature Anonialous desorption of CO and CO2 20. VTRACT (Conlnue on...that desorbed as CO or CO2. An example of the temperature control is shown (Figure 7) for the coconut shell charcoal (G-210) in 100% oxygen in which...and Flammability 2, 141-156 (1971). (5) "Standard Test for Ignition Temperature of Granular Activated Carbon ’’, American Society of Testing Materials

  15. Thermal Energy in Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffres, Scott N.

    Low-dimensional materials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, possess extraordinary properties---higher thermal conductivity than any bulk material, mechanical strength 10-100 times greater than steel on a mass basis, and electrical current capacity 1000 times greater than copper. While composites incorporating these low-dimensional materials promise solutions to global sustainability challenges, significant transport barriers exist at the matrix interface that influence the composite properties. My PhD research sought to address this knowledge gap. I've experimentally explored how CNTs and graphene impact thermal conductivity when added in small volume fractions to gases, liquids and solids through the study of CNT aerogels (ultra lightweight, 8 kg/m3, 99.6% void space), and phase change nanocomposites (hexadecane-graphene). I measured the thermal conductivity of the CNT aerogel with various filling gases versus pressure using a novel technique that targeted ultralow thermal conductivity materials, called metal-coated 3o. I observed amplified energy transport length scales resulting from low gas accommodation, which is a general feature of carbon based nanoporous materials. Our evidence also shows that despite the high thermal conductivity of CNTs, thermal conduction through the CNT network is limited by the high thermal boundary resistance at van der Waals bonded CNT junctions. In the second system, I studied thermal and electrical conductivity of hexadecane- multi-layered-graphene (MLG) phase change nanocomposites to understand how morphology of the MLG network impacts transport. By adjusting the freezing rate, the electrical conductivity in the solid phase can be tuned between 1 and 5 orders-of-magnitude and the solid-liquid thermal conductivity ratio can be varied between 2.6 to 3.0. This research has yielded interesting insights into the tunability of nanocomposites and the physics underlying it, including evidence to indicate that the presence of

  16. Carbon material based microelectromechanical system (MEMS): Fabrication and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenjun

    This PhD dissertation presents the exploration and development of two carbon materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon fiber (CF), as either key functional components or unconventional substrates for a variety of MEMS applications. Their performance in three different types of MEMS devices, namely, strain/stress sensors, vibration-powered generators and fiber solar cells, were evaluated and the working mechanisms of these two non-traditional materials in these systems were discussed. The work may potentially enable the development of new types of carbon-MEMS devices. Carbon nanotubes were selected from the carbon family due to several advantageous characteristics that this nanomaterial offers. They carry extremely high mechanical strength (Ey=1TPa), superior electrical properties (current density of 4x109 A/cm2), exceptional piezoresistivity (G=2900), and unique spatial format (high aspect ratio hollow nanocylinder), among other properties. If properly utilized, all these merits can give rise to a variety of new types of carbon nanotube based micro- and nanoelectronics that can greatly fulfill the need for the next generation of faster, smaller and better devices. However, before these functions can be fully realized, one substantial issue to cope with is how to implement CNTs into these systems in an effective and controllable fashion. Challenges associated with CNTs integration include very poor dispersibility in solvents, lack of melting/sublimation point, and unfavorable rheology with regard to mixing and processing highly viscous, CNT-loaded polymer solutions. These issues hinder the practical progress of CNTs both in a lab scale and in the industrial level. To this end, a MEMS-assisted electrophoretic deposition technique was developed, aiming to achieve controlled integration of CNT into both conventional and flexible microsystems at room temperature with a relatively high throughput. MEMS technology has demonstrated strong capability in developing

  17. Recent Data Analysis of Carbon ACtivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui Ming; Smith, Elizabeth; Padalino, Stephen; Baumgart, Leigh; Suny Geneseooltz, Katie; Colburn, Robyn; Fuschino, Julia

    2002-10-01

    A method for measuring tertiary neutrons produced in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactions has been developed using carbon activation. Ultra pure samples of carbon, free from positron-emitting contaminants must be used in the detection. Our primary goal has been to reduce the contamination level by refining purification and packaging procedures. This process involves baking the disks in a vacuum oven to 1000¢XC @ 200 microns for a prescribed bake time without exposing the disks to nitrogen in the air which is a major contaminant. Recent experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bake time for purification. Disks were baked for varying times, from one hour to five hours, and then exposed to high-neutron-yield ( 5 x 1013) shots on OMEGA. Data collected was normalized to the same time interval and the same primary neutron yield, and no significant difference in the number of background counts was seen. Experimental results also indicated that disks that were exposed to air for short time intervals showed a significant increase in the number of contamination counts. This further supports our findings that the gaseous diffusion through graphite disks is very high. Experimental results of these findings will be presented. Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy.

  18. Thermal/Pyrolysis Gas Flow Analysis of Carbon Phenolic Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    Provided in this study are predicted in-depth temperature and pyrolysis gas pressure distributions for carbon phenolic materials that are externally heated with a laser source. Governing equations, numerical techniques and comparisons to measured temperature data are also presented. Surface thermochemical conditions were determined using the Aerotherm Chemical Equilibrium (ACE) program. Surface heating simulation used facility calibrated radiative and convective flux levels. Temperatures and pyrolysis gas pressures are predicted using an upgraded form of the SINDA/CMA program that was developed by NASA during the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP). Multispecie mass balance, tracking of condensable vapors, high heat rate kinetics, real gas compressibility and reduced mixture viscosity's have been added to the algorithm. In general, surface and in-depth temperature comparisons are very good. Specie partial pressures calculations show that a saturated water-vapor mixture is the main contributor to peak in-depth total pressure. Further, for most of the cases studied, the water-vapor mixture is driven near the critical point and is believed to significantly increase the local heat capacity of the composite material. This phenomenon if not accounted for in analysis models may lead to an over prediction in temperature response in charring regions of the material.

  19. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  20. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  1. Evaluation of the sediment remediation potential of magnetite impregnated activated carbons and biochars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Han, Zhantao; Karapanagioti, Hrissi

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the sediment remediation potential of magnetic composite materials synthesized by precipitating magnetite minerals onto activated carbons and biochars. Magnetite impregnation did not reduce the phenanthrene sorption capacity of the activated carbon or biochar component of the composite materials. The phenanthrene sorption capacity of the composite materials correlated with the surface areas of the pristine carbonaceous sorbents. XRD data and mass magnetic susceptibility data indicate that the mineral component of the composites is indeed nearly 100% magnetite. Addition of magnetic activated carbon to River Tyne sediment slurries reduced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon availability by more than 90%. After 3 months of mixing, 77% of the added magnetic activated carbon could be recovered with a magnetic rod. Continued monitoring showed that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon availability remained low following the magnetic recovery of most of the added sorbent mass. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of magnetite in the recovered sorbent material, with some other mineral phases such as calcite and quartz also being identifiable. Magnetic activated carbon has potential as a recoverable sorbent amendment for the treatment of sediment polluted with hydrophobic organic compounds. Further work will include an evaluation of the long-term magnetic sorbent effectiveness and stability in unmixed sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and regeneration and re-use options for the recovered sorbent materials.

  2. Enhanced adsorption of humic acids on ordered mesoporous carbon compared with microporous activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengling; Xu, Zhaoyi; Wan, Haiqin; Wan, Yuqiu; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-04-01

    Humic acids are ubiquitous in surface and underground waters and may pose potential risk to human health when present in drinking water sources. In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon was synthesized by means of a hard template method and further characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transition electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate adsorption of two humic acids from coal and soil, respectively, on the synthesized carbon. For comparison, a commercial microporous activated carbon and nonporous graphite were included as additional adsorbents; moreover, phenol was adopted as a small probe adsorbate. Pore size distribution characterization showed that the synthesized carbon had ordered mesoporous structure, whereas the activated carbon was composed mainly of micropores with a much broader pore size distribution. Accordingly, adsorption of the two humic acids was substantially lower on the activated carbon than on the synthesized carbon, because of the size-exclusion effect. In contrast, the synthesized carbon and activated carbon showed comparable adsorption for phenol when the size-exclusion effect was not in operation. Additionally, we verified by size-exclusion chromatography studies that the synthesized carbon exhibited greater adsorption for the large humic acid fraction than the activated carbon. The pH dependence of adsorption on the three carbonaceous adsorbents was also compared between the two test humic acids. The findings highlight the potential of using ordered mesoporous carbon as a superior adsorbent for the removal of humic acids.

  3. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  4. Manufacture of a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Santen, S.; Johansson, B.

    1984-08-21

    In a process for manufacturing a gas substantially containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon, the starting material is injected in powder or liquid form together with an oxidizing agent and slag former in a combustion zone while heat energy is simultaneously supplied. The combustion zone is formed in the lower portion of a shaft filled with particulate, solid, carbonaceous material and sulphur-binding slag former.

  5. Thermostructural Analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic Material Tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Ehle, Curt; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RSRM nozzle liner components have been analyzed and tested to explore the occurrence of anomalous material performance known as pocketing erosion. Primary physical factors that contribute to pocketing seem to include the geometric permeability, which governs pore pressure magnitudes and hence load, and carbon fiber high temperature tensile strength, which defines a material limiting capability. The study reports on the results of a coupled thermostructural finite element analysis of Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) material tested at the Laser Hardened Material Evaluation Laboratory (the LHMEL facility). Modeled test configurations will be limited to the special case of where temperature gradients are oriented perpendicular to the composite material ply angle. Analyses were conducted using a transient, one-dimensional flow/thermal finite element code that models pore pressure and temperature distributions and in an explicitly coupled formulation, passes this information to a 2-dimensional finite element structural model for determination of the stress/deformation behavior of the orthotropic fiber/matrix CCP. Pore pressures are generated by thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin which evolve as a multi-component gas phase which is partially trapped in the porous microstructure of the composite. The nature of resultant pressures are described by using the Darcy relationships which have been modified to permit a multi-specie mass and momentum balance including water vapor condensation. Solution to the conjugate flow/thermal equations were performed using the SINDA code. Of particular importance to this problem was the implementation of a char and deformation state dependent (geometric) permeability as describing a first order interaction between the flow/thermal and structural models. Material property models are used to characterize the solid phase mechanical stiffness and failure. Structural calculations were performed using the ABAQUS code. Iterations were made

  6. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg-1), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg-1, respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (~0.4 MPa).Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid

  7. Novel Carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Composite Fibers As Multifunctional Materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Haisong; Schulz, Björn; Vad, Thomas; Liu, Jianwen; Mäder, Edith; Seide, Gunnar; Gries, Thomas

    2015-10-14

    Electroconductive fibers composed of cellulose and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were spun using aqueous alkaline/urea solution. The microstructure and physical properties of the resulting fibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, tensile tests, and electrical resistance measurements. We found that these flexible composite fibers have sufficient mechanical properties and good electrical conductivity, with volume resistivities in the range of about 230-1 Ohm cm for 2-8 wt % CNT loading. The multifunctional sensing behavior of these fibers to tensile strain, temperature, environmental humidity, and liquid water was investigated comprehensively. The results show that these novel CNT/cellulose composite fibers have impressive multifunctional sensing abilities and are promising to be used as wearable electronics and for the design of various smart materials.

  8. Carbon nanotube fibers spun from a sizing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fancheng; Lu, Weibang; Li, Qingwen; Claes, Michaël; Kchit, Nadir; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers with large pores of hundreds of nanometers in diameter are synthesized from a commercially available sizing material. The pore size can be well controlled by varying the processing conditions including fiber drying temperature and shrinkage ratio. With the use of small amount H2SO4 (1 wt. %), low-concentration (1 wt. %) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) bath coagulated porous fibers are flexible, with both high mechanical strength and electrical conductivity. Ethylene glycol/methanol mixture bath is also used to fabricate PVA-free porous CNT fibers. The porous fiber demonstrates good performance in foreign components accessing and accommodating, which may facilitate more CNT fiber practical applications, such as absorbents and supercapacitors.

  9. Characterization of radar cross section of carbon fiber composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon fiber composite (CFC) materials have been used for many structural applications for decades. Their electromagnetic properties are also of great interest and are being quantified by recent research. This research explores shielding effectiveness, antenna design, conductivity, reflection, and absorption properties. The work in this paper specifically characterizes the radar cross section (RCS) of CFC structures. Various CFC planar samples were created using a wet layup method and vacuum bagging techniques. These samples were then placed in an anechoic chamber and their RCS values were measured at normal incidence. These measured values were compared to those of aluminum samples made into the same shape as the CFC samples. All of the measurements were made over 7 - 12 GHz frequency range. The RCS of the CFC samples show some interesting results. The fiber direction in the CFC samples had great influence on the RCS. Theories and reasoning for the results are presented and discussed.

  10. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  11. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Dangelo, Carlos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  12. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  13. Advanced materials from natural materials: synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes on wollastonites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Nie, Jing-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2010-04-26

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on natural materials is a low-cost, environmentally benign, and materials-saving method for the large-scale production of CNTs. Directly building 3D CNT architectures on natural materials is a key issue for obtaining advanced materials with high added value. We report the fabrication of aligned CNT arrays on fibrous natural wollastonite. Strongly dispersed iron particles with small sizes were produced on a planar surface of soaked fibrous wollastonite by a reduction process. These particles then catalyzed the decomposition of ethylene, leading to the synchronous growth of CNTs to form leaf- and brush-like wollastonite/CNT hybrids. The as-obtained hybrids could be further transformed into porous SiO(2)/CNT hybrids by reaction with hydrochloric acid. Further treatment with hydrofluoric acid resulted in aligned CNT arrays, with purities as high as 98.7 %. The presented work is very promising for the fabrication of advanced materials with unique structures and properties that can be used as fillers, catalyst supports, or energy-absorbing materials.

  14. Nanostructured carbon materials based electrothermal air pump actuators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Liu, Luqi; Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhong

    2014-06-21

    Actuator materials can directly convert different types of energy into mechanical energy. In this work, we designed and fabricated electrothermal air pump-type actuators by utilization of various nanostructured carbon materials, including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), and graphene oxide (GO)/SWCNT hybrid films as heating elements to transfer electrical stimulus into thermal energy, and finally convert it into mechanical energy. Both the actuation displacement and working temperature of the actuator films show the monotonically increasing trend with increasing driving voltage within the actuation process. Compared with common polymer nanocomposites based electrothermal actuators, our actuators exhibited better actuation performances with a low driving voltage (<10 V), large generated stress (tens of MPa), high gravimetric density (tens of J kg(-1)), and short response time (few hundreds of milliseconds). Besides that, the pump actuators exhibited excellent stability under cyclic actuation tests. Among these actuators, a relatively larger actuation strain was obtained for the r-GO film actuator due to the intrinsic gas-impermeability nature of graphene platelets. In addition, the high modulus of the r-GO and GO/SWCNT films also guaranteed the large generated stress and high work density. Specifically, the generated stress and gravimetric work density of the GO/SWCNT hybrid film actuator could reach up to more than 50 MPa and 30 J kg(-1), respectively, under a driving voltage of 10 V. The resulting stress value is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that of natural muscles (∼ 0.4 MPa).

  15. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Azam, M.A.; Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A.; Kudin, T.I.T.; Yahya, M.Z.A.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  16. Active materials for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Funk, David S.; Veasey, David L.; Peters, Philip M.; Sanford, Norman A.

    1999-11-01

    The ability to engineer glass properties through the selection and adjustment of chemical composition continues to make glass a leading material in both active and passive applications. The development of optimal glass compositions for integrated optical applications requires a number of considerations that are often at variance with one another. Of critical importance is that the glass offers compatibility with standard ion exchange technologies, allowing fabrication of guided wave structures. In addition, for application as an active material, the resultant structures must be characterized by absence of inclusions and low absorption at the lasing wavelength, putting demands on both the selection and identity of the raw materials used to prepare the glass. We report on the development of an optimized glass composition for integrated optic applications that combines good laser properties with good chemical durability allowing for a wide range of chemical processing steps to be employed without substrate deterioration. In addition, care was taken during the development of this glass to insure that the selected composition was consistent with manufacturing technology for producing high optical quality glass. We present the properties of the resultant glasses, including results of detailed chemical and laser properties, for use in the design and modeling of active waveguides prepared with these glasses.

  17. Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials obtained from natural biopolymer as host matrixes for lithium-sulfur battery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Xiao, Min; Wang, Shuanjin; Han, Dongmei; Song, Shuqin; Chen, Guohua; Meng, Yuezhong

    2014-08-13

    Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials with very high surface areas, large pore volumes and high electron conductivities were prepared from silk cocoon by carbonization with KOH activation. The prepared novel porous carbon-encapsulated sulfur composites were fabricated by a simple melting process and used as cathodes for lithium sulfur batteries. Because of the large surface area and hierarchically porous structure of the carbon material, soluble polysulfide intermediates can be trapped within the cathode and the volume expansion can be alleviated effectively. Moreover, the electron transport properties of the carbon materials can provide an electron conductive network and promote the utilization rate of sulfur in cathode. The prepared carbon-sulfur composite exhibited a high specific capacity and excellent cycle stability. The results show a high initial discharge capacity of 1443 mAh g(-1) and retain 804 mAh g(-1) after 80 discharge/charge cycles at a rate of 0.5 C. A Coulombic efficiency retained up to 92% after 80 cycles. The prepared hierarchically porous carbon materials were proven to be an effective host matrix for sulfur encapsulation to improve the sulfur utilization rate and restrain the dissolution of polysulfides into lithium-sulfur battery electrolytes.

  18. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-10-27

    A method of separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water, includes: (a) mixing magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture; (b) applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material; and (c) removing the body of water from the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material while maintaining the applied magnetic force. The magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material, for a period of time effective to allow the carbon-metal nanocomposites to be formed.

  19. Carbon-Based Functional Materials Derived from Waste for Water Remediation and Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qinglang; Yu, Yifu; Sindoro, Melinda; Fane, Anthony G; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Carbon-based functional materials hold the key for solving global challenges in the areas of water scarcity and the energy crisis. Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have shown promising results in various fields of application, their high preparation cost and low production yield still dramatically hinder their wide practical applications. Therefore, there is an urgent call for preparing carbon-based functional materials from low-cost, abundant, and sustainable sources. Recent innovative strategies have been developed to convert various waste materials into valuable carbon-based functional materials. These waste-derived carbon-based functional materials have shown great potential in many applications, especially as sorbents for water remediation and electrodes for energy storage. Here, the research progress in the preparation of waste-derived carbon-based functional materials is summarized, along with their applications in water remediation and energy storage; challenges and future research directions in this emerging research field are also discussed.

  20. Processing and applications of carbon based nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Aiping

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, including single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs, multi-layer graphene), possess exceptional electrical, thermal and mechanical properties coupled with high aspect ratio and high temperature stability. These unique properties have attracted increased attention during the past decade. These materials form the basis of the work presented here, which includes research targeting fabrication, processing and applications in new composites and devices. As-prepared SWNTs are typically contaminated with amorphous carbon as well as metal catalyst and graphitic nanoparticles. We have demonstrated an efficient approach for removing most of these impurities by the combination of nitric acid treatment and both low speed (2000 g) and high speed centrifugation (20,000 g). This approach gives rise to the highest-purified arc-discharge SWNTs which are almost free from impurities, and in addition are left in a low state of aggregation. The new purification process offers a convenient way to obtain different grade of SWNTs and allows the study of the effect purity on the thermal conductivity of SWNT epoxy composite. Purified functionalized SWNTs provide a significantly greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity, whereas AP-SWNTs allow the best electrical properties because of their ability to form efficient percolating network. We found that purified SWNTs provide ˜5 times greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity than the impure SWNT fraction demonstrating the significance of SWNTs quality for thermal management. The introduced GNPs have directed the thermal management project to a new avenue due to the significant improvement of the thermal conductivity of the composites in comparison with that of SWNTs. A novel process was demonstrated to achieve a 4-graphene layer structure referred to GNPs with a thickness of ˜2 nm. This material was embedded in an epoxy resin matrix and the measured thermal conductivity of