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Sample records for activated carbon molecular

  1. Decolorization / deodorization of zein via activated carbons and molecular sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective is to evaluate a series of granular media consisting of activated carbons and molecular sieves in a batch process for the purpose of clarifying and removal of color and odor components from yellow zein dispersed in an aqueous alcohol medium. The major contributors of yellow zein is du...

  2. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  3. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  4. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out. PMID:25804669

  5. Decolorization/Deodorization of Zein via Activated Carbons and Molecular Sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of commercial activated carbons generated from different media and selective microporous zeolites with different pore sizes were used in a batch system to sequester the low molecular weight odor and color contaminants in commercial zein products. Because the adsorbents can also adsorb prot...

  6. A molecular model for adsorption of water on activated carbon: Comparison of simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, C.L.; McGrother, S.C.; Bandosz, T.J.; Mueller, E.A.; Gubbins, K.E.

    1999-01-19

    Experimental and molecular simulation results are presented for the adsorption of water onto activated carbons. The pore size distribution for the carbon studied was determined from nitrogen adsorption data using density functional theory, and the density of acidic and basic surface sites was found using Boehm and potentiometric titration. The total surface site density was 0.675 site/nm{sup 2}. Water adsorption was measured for relative pressures P/P{sub 0} down to 10{sup {minus}3}. A new molecular model for the water/activated carbon system is presented, which the authors term the effective single group model, and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the range of pressures covered in the experiments. A comparison of these simulations with the experiments show generally good agreement, although some discrepancies are attributed to the simplification of using a single surface group species, while those at high pressure are believed to arise from uncertainties in the pore size distribution. The simulation results throw new light on the adsorption mechanism for water at low pressures. The influence of varying both the density of surface sites and the size of the graphite microcrystals is studied using molecular simulation.

  7. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  8. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON THE ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN OHIO RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently published data show that the adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon for phenois increases significantly in the presence of molecular oxygen (Vidic, Suidan,Traegner and Nakhla, 1990). in this study, the effect of molecular oxygen on the adsorptive capacity of a...

  9. N-doped carbon networks: alternative materials tracing new routes for activating molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Remedios; Ferrante, Francesco; Roggan, Stefan; Duca, Dario

    2015-02-23

    The fragmentation of molecular hydrogen on N-doped carbon networks was investigated by using molecular (polyaromatic macrocycles) as well as truncated and periodic (carbon nanotubes) models. The computational study was focused on the ergonicity analysis of the reaction and on the properties of the transition states involved when constellations of three or four pyridinic nitrogen atom defects are present in the carbon network. Calculations show that whenever N-defects are embedded in species characterized by large conjugated π-systems, either in polyaromatic macrocycles or carbon nanotubes, the corresponding H2 bond cleavage is largely exergonic. The fragmentation Gibbs free energy is affected by the final arrangement of the hydrogen atoms on the defect and by the extension of the π-electron cloud, but it is not influenced by the curvature of the system. PMID:25614208

  10. Effects of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.; Pinisetti, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the influence of molecular oxygen and pH on the adsorption of aniline to F-300 Calgon Carbon. Molecular oxygen increased the adsorptive capacity of GAC for anilines by 250--400 % at pH 3, 30--83% at pH 5, 17--42% at pH 9, and B-45% at pH 11 (higher than those obtained in the absence of molecular oxygen). At pH 7, some of the products formed are poorly adsorbed as evidenced by an increase in UV absorbance in the oxic isotherms as compared to the other isotherms. Oxygen uptake measurements revealed significant consumption of molecular oxygen during the adsorption of aniline compounds. It is speculated that the increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions was due to the polymerization of these adsorbates on the carbon surface.

  11. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Carbon-Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites am produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity far use in gas separations. Carbon fiber composites are prepared at ORNL, usually in plate or tubular form, by vacuum molding from water slurries containing phenolic resin and chopped isotropic petroleum pitch fibers. The composites are activated at the CAER in steam or CO{sub 2} using samples of dimensions up to 1.5 x 4 x 12 cm that are cut from the original plates. One of the objectives is to produce uniformly activated composites, which is especially critical when attempting to active large monoliths. It has been found that there are appreciable variations in the density and permeability of the as-formed composites that must relate to the forming technique. These variations are expected to exert some influence on the rate and extent of reaction and surface area development. In attempting to uniformly activate the composites, two reactor configurations have been investigated. In the more successful arrangement, steam ''is introduced at several points along the length of the composite. A reduction in steam partial pressure from 95vol% to 44vol% significantly improved the uniformity of surface area distribution. Activation with CO{sub 2} was still better, which is attributed to the much slower reaction rate than with steam. Measurements of composite dimensions have shown that there is an overall shrinkage during activation. A direct correlation is found between dimensional shrinkage and burnoff, and is similar for a and steam activation. The causes of the shrinkage are not yet clear. At

  12. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  13. Exploring molecular sieve capabilities of activated carbon fibers to reduce the impact of NOM preloading on trichloroethylene adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju Karanfil; Seyed A. Dastgheib; Dina Mauldin

    2006-02-15

    Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) by two activated carbon fibers ACF10 and ACF20H and two granular activated carbons, coal-based F400 and Macro preloaded with hydrophobic and transphilic fractions of natural organic matter (NOM) was examined. ACF10, the most microporous activated carbon used in this study, had over 90% of its pore volume in pores smaller than 10 {angstrom}. It also had the highest volume in pores 5-8 {angstrom}, which is the optimum pore size region for TCE adsorption, among the four activated carbons. Adsorption of NOM fractions by ACF10 was, in general, negligible. Therefore, ACF10, functioning as a molecular sieve during preloading, exhibited the least NOM uptake for each fraction, and subsequently the highest TCE adsorption. The other three sorbents had wider pore size distributions, including high volumes in pores larger than 10 {angstrom}, where NOM molecules can adsorb. As a result, they showed a higher degree of uptake for all NOM fractions, and subsequently lower adsorption capacities for TCE, as compared to ACF10. The results obtained in this study showed that understanding the interplay between the optimum pore size region for the adsorption of target synthetic organic contaminant (SOC) and the pore size region for the adsorption of NOM molecules is important for controlling NOM-SOC competitions. Experiments with different NOM fractions indicated that the degree of NOM loading is important in terms of preloading effects; however the way that the carbon pores are filled and loaded by different NOM fractions can be different and may create an additional negative impact on TCE adsorption. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Diarylsulfonamides and their bioisosteres as dual inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase: Structure activity relationship and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Rashida, Mariya; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Ali, Sharafat; Shaukat, Aisha; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Ahmed, Maqsood; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-05-15

    The effect of bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with sulfonamide linking group, on alkaline phosphatase (AP) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition activity of aromatic benzenesulfonamides was investigated. A series of carboxamide linked aromatic benzenesulfonamides 1a-1c, 2a-2d and their sulfonamide linked bioisosteres 3a-3d, 4a-4d was synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against bovine tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and bCA II. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity was observed upon bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with a sulfonamide group. Some of these compounds were identified as highly potent and selective AP inhibitors. Compounds 1b, 2b, 3d, 4d 5b and 5c were found to be selective bTNAP inhibitors, whereas compounds 1a, 1c, 2a, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3c, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a were found to be selective bIAP inhibitors. For most active AP inhibitor 3b, detailed kinetic studies indicated a competitive mode of inhibition against tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and non-competitive mode of inhibition against intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Molecular docking studies were carried out to rationalize important binding site interactions. PMID:25865133

  15. Characterising low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon compounds in subglacial systems; implications for subglacial metabolic activity and potential downstream export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Emily; Wadham, Jemma; Lis, Grzegorz; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets represent ~10% of the contemporary global surface coverage, yet remain one of the least explored sectors of the Earth's biosphere. The basal regions of these ice masses, known as subglacial environments, are capable of harbouring a diverse range of microorganisms that are often metabolically active despite the lack of sunlight, the cold temperatures and nutrient scarcity. Here, we consider the potential for such environments to be active components of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Subglacial environments have traditionally been excluded from global carbon budgets because they were assumed to be predominantly abiotic. Organic carbon (OC) reservoirs and transformations were also believed to be limited. However, significant stores of bioavailable carbon are thought to be present in glacially-overridden material, providing a potential substrate for in situ microbial metabolism. We examine the molecular characteristics of dissolved OC in basal ice and subglacial runoff from two glacier/ice-sheet systems with contrasting organic carbon substrates; Russell/Leverett Glacier, Greenland ice sheet, and Engabreen, Norway, to determine the range of dissolved low molecular weight OC (LMWOC) compounds and their relative bioavailability. Overridden material beneath the Greenland ice sheet is relatively young and organic-rich, contrasting with the older crystalline bedrock/continental shield that was overridden during glaciation at Engabreen. We first utilise a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and ion chromatography to identify and quantify volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids in basal ice. Volatile fatty acids are key metabolic substrates and their provision is thought to be a primary control on subglacial metabolic activity. We then provide a temporal record of amino acids and carbohydrates in subglacial runoff from Leverett Glacier (June 23rd - August 18th 2009), and compare this with subglacial runoff from Engabreen (2008 melt

  16. Activation and micropore structure determination of carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves. Topical report, 30 March 1994--14 April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, You Qing

    1995-05-19

    Progress in developing novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are activated using steam or CO{sub 2}, in order to produce uniform activation through the material and to control the pore structure and adsorptive properties. There is an overall shrinkage during activation, which is directly correlated with burnoff; burnoff above 40% results in fracture. Burnoffs higher than 10% does not produce any benefit for separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures. Five samples of CFCMS have been prepared for testing as molecular sieves; all have relatively narrow pore size distributions with average pore diameters around 6A.

  17. Clean Donor Oxidation Enhances the H2 Evolution Activity of a Carbon Quantum Dot-Molecular Catalyst Photosystem.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Joliat, Evelyne; Bachmann, Cyril; Alberto, Roger; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are new-generation light absorbers for photocatalytic H2 evolution in aqueous solution, but the performance of CQD-molecular catalyst systems is currently limited by the decomposition of the molecular component. Clean oxidation of the electron donor by donor recycling prevents the formation of destructive radical species and non-innocent oxidation products. This approach allowed a CQD-molecular nickel bis(diphosphine) photocatalyst system to reach a benchmark lifetime of more than 5 days and a record turnover number of 1094±61 molH2  (molNi )(-1) for a defined synthetic molecular nickel catalyst in purely aqueous solution under AM1.5G solar irradiation. PMID:27355200

  18. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  19. Carbon molecular sieves for air separation from Nomex aramid fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, Silvia; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D

    2002-10-15

    Activated carbon fibers prepared from aramid fibers have proved to possess outstanding homogeneity in pore size, most of all when Nomex aramid fiber is used as precursor. Taking advantage of this feature, microporous carbon molecular sieves for air separation have been prepared through carbon vapor deposition of benzene on Nomex-derived carbon fibers activated to two different burnoff degrees. Carbon molecular sieves with good selectivity for this separation and showing acceptable adsorption capacities were obtained from ACFs activated to the two burnoff degrees chosen. PMID:12702417

  20. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  1. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  2. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  3. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  4. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  5. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  6. Optimizing the industrial wastewater pretreatment by activated carbon and coagulation: effects of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and molecular weights of dissolved organics.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Hammad; Ha, Dong-Hwan; Jung, Jinyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses industrial wastewater treatment to remove dissolved organic compounds (DOC) using Fenton and coagulation processes, followed by granular activated carbon (GAC), and powdered activated carbon (PAC) as a pretreatment before reverse osmosis (RO). The effects of the hydrophobic / hydrophilic fractions and the molecular weights (MW) of the organics on DOC removal were tested and used to optimize the combination process. The raw wastewater (RWW) had a dominant hydrophobic fraction, as determined by polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4. High performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) results showed that MW of organics were 256, 172, 258, 146, 392, 321, 182, 373, 276, 365, 409 and 453 in increasing order of hydrophobicity. GAC had higher adsorption capacity and was more selective for hydrophobic DOC removal than PAC. The removal efficiency of DOC by PAC and GAC was decreased after Fenton treatment, which decreased the hydrophobic fraction. Coagulation with ferric chloride efficiently removed the non-ionic hydrophilic and anionic hydrophilic organics. The coagulant doses selected as a pretreatment before GAC were 2.1 and 15.5 mg Fe(III)/mg DOC. The effluent total organic carbon (TOC) trends were correlated with the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions by using a rapid small-scale column test (RSSCT) for GAC breakthrough with a scale down factor of 5. GAC preferentially adsorbed the hydrophobic and the cationic hydrophilic organics. The effluent TOC trend could be divided into four stages: maximum adsorption, hydrophobic stage, exhaustion, and biological. The TOC removal after the exhaustion stage was almost equal to the hydrophilic fraction of TOC. Therefore these results demonstrated that the combination of coagulation and GAC adsorption was a highly efficient process for reducing DOC. PMID:23383639

  7. Molecular transport: Catch the carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Barbara; Intemann, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the minute details of CO2 transport is key to finding new technologies that reduce the hazardous levels of CO2 in our atmosphere. Now, the observation that the transport of CO2 in molten calcium carbonate occurs faster than standard molecular diffusion brings us one step closer.

  8. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  9. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  10. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  11. Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  12. Coal-based carbons with molecular sieve properties

    SciTech Connect

    El-Wakil, A.M.; Youssef, A.M.; Tollan, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves are used extensively in gas chromatography for the separation of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons. Carbon molecular sieves also find commercial application for the manufacture of pure hydrogen from hydrogen-rich gases such as coke-oven gas, and for the separation of air by the pressure-swing adsorption technique. The objective of this investigation was to prepare carbons from Maghara coal, recently available on the commercial market. Coal-based carbons, if they possess molecular sieve properties, are superior to molecular sieve carbons from agricultural by-products because they have more satisfactory mechanical properties.

  13. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  14. Molecular selectivity of brown carbon chromophores.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Roach, Patrick; Eckert, Peter; Gilles, Mary K; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and microspectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene SOA (LSOA) and α-pinene SOA (PSOA). The LSOA compounds readily formed adducts with Na(+) under electrospray ionization conditions, with only a small fraction of compounds detected in the protonated form. In contrast, a significant fraction of PSOA compounds appeared in the protonated form because of their increased molecular rigidity. Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas was detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl-imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the α-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores. PMID:25233355

  15. A Chemoreceptor That Detects Molecular Carbon Dioxide*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan St. John; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis; Ringstad, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Animals from diverse phyla possess neurons that are activated by the product of aerobic respiration, CO2. It has long been thought that such neurons primarily detect the CO2 metabolites protons and bicarbonate. We have determined the chemical tuning of isolated CO2 chemosensory BAG neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that BAG neurons are principally tuned to detect molecular CO2, although they can be activated by acid stimuli. One component of the BAG transduction pathway, the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9, suffices to confer cellular sensitivity to both molecular CO2 and acid, indicating that it is a bifunctional chemoreceptor. We speculate that in other animals, receptors similarly capable of detecting molecular CO2 might mediate effects of CO2 on neural circuits and behavior. PMID:24240097

  16. Microcystin-LR Adsorption by Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Schumann, Russell; Wong, Shiaw Hui

    2001-08-01

    We use a selection of wood-based and coconut-based activated carbons to investigate the factors controlling the removal of the hepatotoxin microcystin-LR (m-LR) from aqueous solutions. The wood carbons contain both micropores and mesopores. The coconut carbons contain micropores only. Confirming previously published observations, we also find that the wood-based carbons adsorb more microcystin than the coconut-based carbons. From a combination of a judicious modification of a wood-based carbon's surface chemistry and of the solution chemistry, we demonstrate that both surface and solution chemistry play minor roles in the adsorption process, with the adsorbent surface chemistry exhibiting less influence than the solution chemistry. Conformational changes at low solution pH probably contribute to the observed increase in adsorption by both classes of adsorbent. At the solution pH of 2.5, the coconut-based carbons exhibit a 400% increased affinity for m-LR compared with 100% increases for the wood-based carbons. In an analysis of the thermodynamics of adsorption, using multiple temperature adsorption chromatography methods, we indicate that m-LR adsorption is an entropy-driven process for each of the carbons, except the most hydrophilic and mesoporous carbon, B1. In this case, exothermic enthalpy contributions to adsorption also exist. From our overall observations, since m-LR contains molecular dimensions in the secondary micropore width range, we demonstrate that it is important to consider both the secondary micropore and the mesopore volumes for the adsorption of m-LR from aqueous solutions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11446779

  17. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Burchell, Timothy D

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues, measurements were

  18. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Hartung, H P

    1996-01-01

    Microglial cells are brain macrophages which serve specific functions in the defense of the central nervous system (CNS) against microorganisms, the removal of tissue debris in neurodegenerative diseases or during normal development, and in autoimmune inflammatory disorders of the brain. In cultured microglial cells, several soluble inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and bacterial products like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were demonstrated to induce a wide range of microglial activities, e.g. increased phagocytosis, chemotaxis, secretion of cytokines, activation of the respiratory burst and induction of nitric oxide synthase. Since heightened microglial activation was shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of experimental inflammatory CNS disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of microglial activation may lead to new treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders, multiple sclerosis and bacterial or viral infections of the nervous system. PMID:8876774

  20. Copper crystallite in carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfurfuryl alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  1. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  2. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  3. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  4. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  5. A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Confinement of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazor, Meagan; Rende, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    The influence of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on global warming is considered as one of the primary environmental issues of the past two decades. The main source of CO2 emission is human activity, such as the use of fossil fuels in transportation and industrial plants. Following the release of Kyoto Protocol in 1997, effective ways of controlling CO2 emissions received much attention. As a result, various materials such as activated carbon, zeolites, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated for their CO2 adsorbing properties. CNTs were reported to have CO2 adsorption capability twice that of activated carbon, hence they received the most attention. In the current study, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were used as one dimensional nanoporous materials and their CO2 adsorption capacity was analyzed with Molecular Dynamics simulations. Results indicated that SWNTs are excellent CO2 adsorbers and their effectiveness increase at low CO2 concentrations. In addition, we showed that by varying temperature, CO2 can be removed from the SWNTs, providing a simple method to reuse SWNTs.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium/sodium carbonate mixture.

    PubMed

    Ottochian, Alistar; Ricca, Chiara; Labat, Frederic; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion and ionic conductivity of Li x Na1-x CO3 salt mixtures were studied by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, using the Janssen and Tissen model (Janssen and Tissen, Mol Simul 5:83-98; 1990). These salts have received particular attention due to their central role in fuel cells technology, and reliable numerical methods that could perform as important interpretative tool of experimental data are thus required but still lacking. The chosen computational model nicely reproduces the main structural behaviour of the pure Li2CO3, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 carbonates, but also of their Li/K and Li/Na mixtures. However, it fails to accurately describe dynamic properties such as activation energies of diffusion and conduction processes, outlining the need to develop more accurate models for the simulation of molten salt carbonates. PMID:26897519

  7. Theoretical study of carbon dioxide activation by metals (Co, Cu, Ni) supported on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Van Khu, Le; Cam, Le Minh

    2015-12-01

    The activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by catalytic systems comprising a transition metal (Co, Cu,Ni) on an activated carbon (AC) support was investigated using a combination of different theoretical calculation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, DFT and DFT-D, molecular dynamics (MD), and a climbing image nudged elastic band (CI-NEB) method. The results obtained indicate that CO2 is easily adsorbed by AC or MAC (M: Cu, Co, Ni). The results also showed that the process of adsorbing CO2 does not involve a transition state, and that NiAC and CoAC are the most effective of the MAC catalysts at adsorbing CO2. Adsorption on NiAC led to the strongest activation of the C-O bond, while adsorption on CuAC led to the weakest activation. Graphical Abstract Models of CO2 activation on: a)- activated carbon; b)- metal supported activated carbon (M-AC), where M: Co, Cu, Ni. PMID:26637187

  8. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  9. Growth, modification and integration of carbon nanotubes into molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatello, Jason P.

    Molecules are the smallest possible elements for electronic devices, with active elements for such devices typically a few Angstroms in footprint area. Owing to the possibility of producing ultra-high density devices, tremendous effort has been invested in producing electronic junctions by using various types of molecules. The major issues for molecular electronics include (1) developing an effective scheme to connect molecules with the present micro- and nano-technology, (2) increasing the lifetime and stabilities of the devices, and (3) increasing their performance in comparison to the state-of-the-art devices. In this work, we attempt to use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the interconnecting nanoelectrodes between molecules and microelectrodes. The ultimate goal is to use two individual CNTs to sandwich molecules in a cross-bar configuration while having these CNTs connected with microelectrodes such that the junction displays the electronic character of the molecule chosen. We have successfully developed an effective scheme to connect molecules with CNTs, which is scalable to arrays of molecular electronic devices. To realize this far reaching goal, the following technical topics have been investigated. (1) Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD) and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques (Chapter 3). We have evaluated the potential use of tubular and bamboo-like MWCNTs grown by T-CVD and PE-CVD in terms of their structural properties. (2) Horizontal dispersion of MWCNTs with and without surfactants, and the integration of MWCNTs to microelectrodes using deposition by dielectrophoresis (DEP) (Chapter 4). We have systematically studied the use of surfactant molecules to disperse and horizontally align MWCNTs on substrates. In addition, DEP is shown to produce impurityfree placement of MWCNTs, forming connections between microelectrodes. We demonstrate the deposition density is tunable by

  10. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  11. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  12. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  13. Design of activated carbon/activated carbon asymmetric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro-Prado, Isabel; Salinas-Torres, David; Ruiz Rosas, Ramiro; Morallon, Emilia; Cazorla-Amoros, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices that offer a high power density and a low energy density in comparison with batteries. Their limited energy density can be overcome by using asymmetric configuration in mass electrodes, where each electrode works within their maximum available potential window, rendering the maximum voltage output of the system. Such asymmetric capacitors must be optimized through careful electrochemical characterization of the electrodes for accurate determination of the capacitance and the potential stability limits. The results of the characterization are then used for optimizing mass ratio of the electrodes from the balance of stored charge. The reliability of the design largely depends on the approach taken for the electrochemical characterization. Therefore, the performance could be lower than expected and even the system could break down, if a well thought out procedure is not followed. In this work, a procedure for the development of asymmetric supercapacitors based on activated carbons is detailed. Three activated carbon materials with different textural properties and surface chemistry have been systematically characterized in neutral aqueous electrolyte. The asymmetric configuration of the masses of both electrodes in the supercapacitor has allowed to cover a higher potential window, resulting in an increase of the energy density of the three devices studied when compared with the symmetric systems, and an improved cycle life.

  14. Mercury binding on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bihter Padak; Michael Brunetti; Amanda Lewis; Jennifer Wilcox

    2006-11-15

    Density functional theory has been employed for the modeling of activated carbon (AC) using a fused-benzene ring cluster approach. Oxygen functional groups have been investigated for their promotion of effective elemental mercury binding on AC surface sites. Lactone and carbonyl functional groups yield the highest mercury binding energies. Further, the addition of halogen atoms has been considered to the modeled surface, and has been found to increase the AC's mercury adsorption capacity. The mercury binding energies increase with the addition of the following halogen atoms, F {gt} Cl {gt} Br {gt} I, with the fluorine addition being the most promising halogen for increasing mercury adsorption.

  15. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  16. Carbon nanodots as molecular scaffolds for development of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Ngu-Schwemlein, Maria; Chin, Suk Fun; Hileman, Ryan; Drozdowski, Chris; Upchurch, Clint; Hargrove, April

    2016-04-01

    We report the potential of carbon nanodots (CNDs) as a molecular scaffold for enhancing the antimicrobial activities of small dendritic poly(amidoamines) (PAMAM). Carbon nanodots prepared from sago starch are readily functionalized with PAMAM by using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Electron microscopy images of these polyaminated CNDs show that they are approximately 30-60nm in diameter. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy analyses of the water-soluble material established the presence of the polyamidoaminated moiety and the intrinsic fluorescence of the nanodots. The polyaminated nanodots (CND-PAM1 and CND-PAM2) exhibit in vitro antimicrobial properties, not only to non-multidrug resistant bacteria but also to the corresponding Gram-negative multidrug bacteria. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges from 8 to 64μg/mL, which is much lower than that of PAMAM G1 or the non-active PAMAM G0 and CNDs. Additionally, they show synergistic effect in combination with tetracycline or colistin. These preliminary results imply that CNDs can serve as a promising scaffold for facilitating the rational design of antimicrobial materials for combating the ever-increasing threat of antibiotic resistance. Moreover, their fluorescence could be pertinent to unraveling their mode of action for imaging or diagnostic applications. PMID:26923697

  17. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  18. Molecularly imprinted cryogels for carbonic anhydrase purification from bovine erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Murat; Karagözler, A Alev; Denizli, Adil

    2014-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogels were synthesized and used for purification of carbonic anhydrase from bovine erythrocyte. Cryogels were prepared with free radical cryopolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloylamido histidine and characterized by swelling degree, macroporosity, FTIR, SEM, surface area and elemental analysis. Maximum carbonic anhydrase adsorption of molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogel was found to be 3.16 mg/g. Selectivity of the molecularly imprinted cryogel was investigated using albumin, hemoglobin, IgG, γ-globulin, and lysozyme as competitor proteins and selectivity ratios were found to be 15.26, 60.05, 21.88, 17.61, and 17.42, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase purity was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and zymogram results. PMID:24528406

  19. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotube based molecular switch tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Michael R; Steuerman, David W; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Vignon, Scott A; Star, Alexander; Celestre, Paul C; Stoddart, J Fraser; Heath, James R

    2003-12-15

    This article describes two-terminal molecular switch tunnel junctions (MSTJs) which incorporate a semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) as the bottom electrode. The nanotube interacts noncovalently with a monolayer of bistable, nondegenerate [2]catenane tetracations, self-organized by their supporting amphiphilic dimyristoylphosphatidyl anions which shield the mechanically switchable tetracations from a two-micrometer wide metallic top electrode. The resulting 0.002 micron 2 area tunnel junction addresses a nanometer wide row of approximately 2000 molecules. Active and remnant current-voltage measurements demonstrated that these devices can be reconfigurably switched and repeatedly cycled between high and low current states under ambient conditions. Control compounds, including a degenerate [2]catenane, were explored in support of the mechanical origin of the switching signature. These SWNT-based MSTJs operate like previously reported silicon-based MSTJs, but differently from similar devices incorporating bottom metal electrodes. The relevance of these results with respect to the choice of electrode materials for molecular electronics devices is discussed. PMID:14714382

  1. The Fate of Molecular Markers in Soils and Their Implications for Soil Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenberg, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    During the past decades molecular markers were discovered to be of diagnostic character for tracing the origin and fate of organic matter in soils. Molecular proxies themselves and their combination with compound-specific isotope analyses became powerful tools to distinguish between various biogenic and anthropogenic sources of organic matter and to trace carbon turnover at a molecular level. In the meantime various field and laboratory experiments provided deeper insight into soil organic matter dynamics at a molecular scale. We learnt from these experiments that carbon turnover at a molecular scale occurs in a similar time frame like for bulk soil organic matter and that selective preservation is not an issue for most coumpounds in active soils, but e.g. in fossil soils. Nevertheless, e.g. plant wax-derived alkanes and root-derived suberin markers point to a slower turnover of specific compounds. Recently, molecular markers enabled deciphering root-derived processes that occur in the rhizosphere of living and dead roots within the soil or even in the deep subsoil (up to several meters below the soil surface). Thus, the proposed carbon sequestration by roots in subsoils is not necessarily relevant in the long-term on a decadal or centennial scale. Although molecular markers were not determined to be valuable tools to sequester carbon in the soil, they strongly help elucidating processes relevant for cycling of bulk organic matter from the soil surface towards the deep subsoil.

  2. Studies and characterisations of various activated carbons used for carbon/carbon supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamby, J.; Taberna, P. L.; Simon, P.; Fauvarque, J. F.; Chesneau, M.

    Various activated carbons from the PICA Company have been tested in supercapacitor cells in order to compare their performances. The differences measured in terms of specific capacitance and cell resistance are presented. Porosity measurements made on activated carbon powders and electrode allowed a better understanding of the electrochemical behaviour of these activated carbons. In this way, the PICACTIF SC carbon was found to be an interesting active material for supercapacitors, with a specific capacitance as high as 125 F/g.

  3. Paramagnetic 1H and 13C NMR studies on cobalt-substituted human carbonic anhydrase I carboxymethylated at active site histidine-200: molecular basis for the changes in catalytic properties induced by the modification.

    PubMed

    Khalifah, R G; Rogers, J I; Harmon, P; Morely, P J; Carroll, S B

    1984-07-01

    Using bromo[1-13C]acetate to modify N tau of His-200 of human carbonic anhydrase isozyme I leads to the introduction of a useful 13C NMR probe into the active site. To complement our previous diamagnetic NMR studies with this probe, we have now succeeded in directly observing the paramagnetically perturbed resonance of the carboxylate in the cobalt-substituted modified enzyme above pH 8. In the pH range 8-10, the resonance undergoes a pH-dependent slow-exchange process, with the more alkaline form having a much smaller pseudocontact shift and a narrower line width. Below pH 8, the resonance apparently undergoes a very large paramagnetic downfield shift that was estimated by extrapolation. An ionization of approximate pK of 6 appears to control this process. Paramagnetic spin-relaxation studies on the resonance under conditions where it was directly observed yielded distance measurements between the carboxylate carbon and the active site cobalt ion. In inhibitor complexes, this distance was in the range of 5-7 A. In the absence of inhibitors, the distance was approximately 3.0-3.2 A at pH 7.9, consistent with the coordination of the carboxylate to the metal. However, at pH 10, the distance was increased to 4.8 A. These distance determinations were aided by relaxation measurements of a paramagnetically shifted proton resonance at 60-65 ppm downfield assigned by others to a proton of a ligand histidine of metal and confirmed by us to be 5.2 +/- 0.1 A from the metal. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the observed changes in catalytic properties that accompany the carboxymethylation. PMID:6432037

  4. Electronic and molecular structure of carbon grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Luethi, Hans-Peter

    1990-01-01

    Clusters of carbon atoms have been studied with large-scale ab initio calculations. Planar, single-sheet graphite fragments with 6 to 54 atoms were investigated, as well as the spherical C(sub 60) Buckminsterfullerene molecule. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have also been considered. Thermodynamic differences between diamond- and graphite-like grains have been studied in particular. Saturation of the peripheral bonds with hydrogen is found to provide a smooth and uniform convergence of the properties with increasing cluster size. For the graphite-like clusters the convergence to bulk values is much slower than for the three-dimensional complexes.

  5. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  6. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  7. Carbon Nanomaterials and DNA: from Molecular Recognition to Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-15

    DNA is polymorphic. Increasing evidence has indicated that many biologically important processes are related to DNA's conformational transition and assembly states. In particular, noncanonical DNA structures, such as the right-handed A-form, the left-handed Z-form, the triplex, the G-quadruplex, the i-motif, and so forth, have been specific targets for the diagnosis and therapy of human diseases. Meanwhile, they have been widely used in the construction of smart DNA nanomaterials and nanoarchitectures. As rising stars in materials science, the family of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), including two-dimensional graphene, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and zero-dimensional graphene or carbon quantum dots (GQDs or CQDs), interact with DNA and are able to regulate the conformational transitions of DNA. The interaction of DNA with CNMs not only opens new opportunities for specific molecular recognition, but it also expands the promising applications of CNMs from materials science to biotechnology and biomedicine. In this Account, we focus on our contributions to the field of interactions between CNMs and DNA in which we have explored their promising applications in nanodevices, sensing, materials synthesis, and biomedicine. For one-dimensional CNTs, two-dimensional graphene, and zero-dimensional GQDs and CQDs, the basic principles, binding modes, and applications of the interactions between CNMs and DNA are reviewed. We aim to give prominence to the important status of CNMs in the field of molecular recognition for DNA. First, we summarized our discovery of the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with duplex, triplex, and human telomeric i-motif DNA and their interesting applications. For example, SWNTs are the first chemical agents that can selectively stabilize human telomeric i-motif DNA and induce its formation under physiological conditions. On the basis of this principle, two types of nanodevices were designed. One was used for

  8. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  9. Carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds: Theory and observational constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    For the most part, gas phase models of the chemistry of dense molecular clouds predict the abundances of simple species rather well. However, for larger molecules and even for small systems rich in carbon these models often fail spectacularly. Researchers present a brief review of the basic assumptions and results of large scale modeling of the carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds. Particular attention is to the influence of the gas phase C/O ratio in molecular clouds, and the likely role grains play in maintaining this ratio as clouds evolve from initially diffuse objects to denser cores with associated stellar and planetary formation. Recent spectral line surveys at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths along with selected observations in the submillimeter have now produced an accurate inventory of the gas phase carbon budget in several different types of molecular clouds, though gaps in our knowledge clearly remain. The constraints these observations place on theoretical models of interstellar chemistry can be used to gain insights into why the models fail, and show also which neglected processes must be included in more complete analyses. Looking toward the future, larger molecules are especially difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically in such dense, cold regions, and some new methods are therefore outlined which may ultimately push the detectability of small carbon chains and rings to much heavier species.

  10. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  11. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei; Tangpanitanon, Jirawat; Wen, Bo; Xue, Jianming

    2014-05-28

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

  12. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  13. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  15. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  16. Ultrahigh Surface Area Three-Dimensional Porous Graphitic Carbon from Conjugated Polymeric Molecular Framework

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Porous graphitic carbon is essential for many applications such as energy storage devices, catalysts, and sorbents. However, current graphitic carbons are limited by low conductivity, low surface area, and ineffective pore structure. Here we report a scalable synthesis of porous graphitic carbons using a conjugated polymeric molecular framework as precursor. The multivalent cross-linker and rigid conjugated framework help to maintain micro- and mesoporous structures, while promoting graphitization during carbonization and chemical activation. The above unique design results in a class of highly graphitic carbons at temperature as low as 800 °C with record-high surface area (4073 m2 g–1), large pore volume (2.26 cm–3), and hierarchical pore architecture. Such carbons simultaneously exhibit electrical conductivity >3 times more than activated carbons, very high electrochemical activity at high mass loading, and high stability, as demonstrated by supercapacitors and lithium–sulfur batteries with excellent performance. Moreover, the synthesis can be readily tuned to make a broad range of graphitic carbons with desired structures and compositions for many applications. PMID:27162953

  17. Ultrahigh Surface Area Three-Dimensional Porous Graphitic Carbon from Conjugated Polymeric Molecular Framework.

    PubMed

    To, John W F; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Hongbin; He, Jiajun; Kim, Kwanpyo; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Pan, Lijia; Wilcox, Jennifer; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-05-27

    Porous graphitic carbon is essential for many applications such as energy storage devices, catalysts, and sorbents. However, current graphitic carbons are limited by low conductivity, low surface area, and ineffective pore structure. Here we report a scalable synthesis of porous graphitic carbons using a conjugated polymeric molecular framework as precursor. The multivalent cross-linker and rigid conjugated framework help to maintain micro- and mesoporous structures, while promoting graphitization during carbonization and chemical activation. The above unique design results in a class of highly graphitic carbons at temperature as low as 800 °C with record-high surface area (4073 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volume (2.26 cm(-3)), and hierarchical pore architecture. Such carbons simultaneously exhibit electrical conductivity >3 times more than activated carbons, very high electrochemical activity at high mass loading, and high stability, as demonstrated by supercapacitors and lithium-sulfur batteries with excellent performance. Moreover, the synthesis can be readily tuned to make a broad range of graphitic carbons with desired structures and compositions for many applications. PMID:27162953

  18. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  20. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  1. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  2. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  3. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  4. Dielectric relaxation of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; You, Xinli; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2015-11-24

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are widely used solvents in lithium (Li)-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Ion dissolution and diffusion in those media are correlated with solvent dielectric responses. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the pure solvents to calculate dielectric constants and relaxation times, and molecular mobilities. The computed results are compared with limited available experiments to assist more exhaustive studies of these important characteristics. As a result, the observed agreement is encouraging and provides guidance for further validation of force-field simulation models for EC and PC solvents.

  5. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Kirk A.; Burchell, Timothy D.; Judkins, Roddie R.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply airstream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium.

  6. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieve electrically regenerable air filter media

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, K.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1998-10-27

    An electrically regenerable gas filter system includes a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) filter medium. After a separate medium-efficiency pre-filter removes particulate from the supply air stream, the CFCMS filter sorbs gaseous air pollutants before the air is recirculated to the space. When saturated, the CFCMS media is regenerated utilizing a low-voltage current that is caused to pass through the filter medium. 3 figs.

  7. Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobberley, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

  8. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  9. Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

    2014-02-21

    As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

  10. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Lars R.; Pyrz, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The tensile modulus of individual nanotubes and nanotube-polypropylene composites has been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes showed that their tensile modulus was dependent on the tube structure and the diameter if the diameter was below 1,6 nm. The tensile modulus was determined for an infinite single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in an amorphous polypropylene matrix and for a finite and capped single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a polypropylene matrix. For the infinite nanotube-polypropylene system the modulus was found to correspond to the one given by the Voigt approximation. For the finite nanotube-polypropylene system the reinforcing effect of the nanotube was not very pronounced. A pull out simulation showed that the length of the nanotube in the simulation was much smaller than the critical length and hence no load transfer between the nanotube and the matrix existed.

  12. Lysostaphin: molecular changes that preserve staphylolytic activity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysostaphin is a potent staphylolytic enzyme with known resistance mechanisms. To avoid resistance development, this lab is developing lysostaphin-LysK fusion proteins harboring three synergistic lytic activities in one protein. Some of the molecular changes to lysostaphin and their effects on sta...

  13. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  14. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  15. Molecular dynamics of a water jet from a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Yonebayashi, Toru; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2009-04-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a molecular nozzle. It has a cylindrical shape of atomistic regularity, and the diameter can be even less than 1 nm. We have conducted molecular-dynamics simulations of water jet from a (6,6) CNT that confines water in a form of single-file molecular chain. The results show that the water forms nanoscale clusters at the outlet and they are released intermittently. The jet breakup is dominated by the thermal fluctuations, which leads to the strong dependence on the temperature. The cluster size n decreases and the release frequency f increases at higher temperatures. The f roughly follows the reaction kinetics by the transition state theory. The speed of a cluster is proportional to the 1/sqrt[n] because of the central limit theorem. These properties make great contrast with the macroscopic liquid jets. PMID:19518333

  16. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  17. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  19. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  20. Visible-Light-Activated Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Bléger, David; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    The ability to influence key properties of molecular systems by using light holds much promise for the fields of materials science and life sciences. The cornerstone of such systems is molecules that are able to reversibly photoisomerize between two states, commonly referred to as photoswitches. One serious restriction to the development of functional photodynamic systems is the necessity to trigger switching in at least one direction by UV light, which is often damaging and penetrates only partially through most media. This review provides a summary of the different conceptual strategies for addressing molecular switches in the visible and near-infrared regions of the optical spectrum. Such visible-light-activated molecular switches tremendously extend the scope of photoswitchable systems for future applications and technologies. PMID:26096635

  1. Carbon Isotope and Isotopomer Fractionation in Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, K.; Aikawa, Y.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-05-01

    Observations of 13C species would be useful to investigate chemistry of carbon-bearing species. Recent observations in TMC-1 indicate that the abundances are different among carbon isotopomers of the same species. For instance, Takano et al. (1998) found that HCC13CN is more abundant than HC13CCN and H13CCCN, which indicates the three carbon atoms are not equivalent in HC_3N. Sakai et al. (2007; 2010) reported the abundance ratios of C13CS/13CCS and CCH/13CCH to be 4.2 and 1.6, respectively. Again, two carbon atoms are not equivalent in CCS and CCH. Sakai et al. (2007; 2010) discussed an origin of these anomalies and pointed out two possibilities: (i) fractionation during the formation of the species and (ii) rearrangements of the 13C position after the formation of molecules by isotopomer-exchange reactions. We construct a gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) and isotopomers in order to investigate the evolution of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios (12CX/13CX) and the isotopomer ratios (12C13CX/13C12CX) of CCH and CCS in dense molecular cores. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and on grain surfaces, mostly depend on whether the species is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule; the isotope ratio is larger than the elemental abundance ratio of 12C/13C if the species is formed from the carbon atom, while the ratio is smaller if the species is formed from the CO molecule (cf. Langer et al. 1984). We successfully reproduce the observed C13CH/13CCH ratio in TMC-1 by considering the isotopomer-exchange reaction, 13CCH + H rightleftharpoons C13CH + H + 8.1 K. However, the C13CS/13CCS ratio remains lower than observed in TMC-1. We then assume the isotopomer-exchange reaction catalyzed by the H atom, 13CCS + H rightleftharpoons C13CS + H + 17.4 K. In the model with this reaction, the observed C13CS/13CCS, CCS/C13CS and CCS/13CCS ratios can be reproduced simultaneously.

  2. Molecular Imaging with SERS-Active Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Myklejord, Duane V.; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Lead-in Raman spectroscopy has been explored for various biomedical applications (e.g. cancer diagnosis) because it can provide detailed information on the chemical composition of cells and tissues. For imaging applications, several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed to enhance its sensitivity. To date, a wide variety of molecular targets and biological events have been investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active nanoparticles. The superb multiplexing capability of SERS-based Raman imaging, already successfully demonstrated in live animals, can be extremely powerful in future research where different agents can be attached to different Raman tags to enable the simultaneous interrogation of multiple biological events. Over the last several years, molecular imaging with SERS-active nanoparticles has advanced significantly and many pivotal proof-of-principle experiments have been successfully carried out. It is expected that SERS-based imaging will continue to be a dynamic research field over the next decade. PMID:21932216

  3. Molecular carbon isotopic evidence for the origin of geothermal hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Donchin, J.H.; Nehring, N.L.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Previous interest in light hydrocarbons from geothermal systems has focused principally on the origin of the methane1 and the estimation of subsurface temperatures from the carbon isotopic content of coexisting methane and carbon dioxide1-3. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbons were first reported in gases from Yellowstone National Park4, and have since been found to occur commonly in geothermal emanations in the western United States5. Isotopic measurements of individual geothermal hydrocarbons are now reported which help to explain the origin of these hydrocarbons. The thermal decomposition of sedimentary or groundwater organic matter is a principal source of hydrocarbons in four geothermal areas in western North America. ?? 1981 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Modeling Carbon and Hydrocarbon Molecular Structures in EZTB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that models the electronic and mechanical aspects of hydrocarbon molecules and carbon molecular structures on the basis of first principles has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure, which is summarized briefly in the immediately preceding article. Of particular interest, this module can model carbon crystals and nanotubes characterized by various coordinates and containing defects, without need to adjust parameters of the physical model. The module has been used to study the changes in electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, caused by bending of the nanotubes, for potential utility as the basis of a nonvolatile, electriccharge- free memory devices. For example, in one application of the module, it was found that an initially 50-nmlong carbon, (10,10)-chirality nanotube, which is a metallic conductor when straight, becomes a semiconductor with an energy gap of .3 meV when bent to a lateral displacement of 4 nm at the middle.

  5. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  6. Molecular profiling of permafrost soil organic carbon composition and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Mann, B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial degradation of soil organic matter (SOM) is a key process for terrestrial carbon (C) cycling, though the dynamics of these transformations remain unclear at the molecular level. This study reports the application of ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) to profile molecular components of Arctic SOM collected from the surface water and the mineral horizon of a low-centered polygon soil at Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were subjected to anaerobic warming experiments for a period of 40 days, and the SOM was extracted before and after the incubation to determine the components of organic C that were degraded over the course of the study. A CHO index based on molecular composition data was utilized to codify SOM components according to their observed degradation potential. Carbohydrate- and lignin-like compounds in the water-soluble fraction (WSF) demonstrated a high degradation potential, while structures with similar stoichiometries in the base-soluble fraction (BSF) were not readily degraded. The WSF of SOM also shifted to a wider range of measured molecular masses including an increased prevalence of larger compounds, while the size distribution of compounds in the BSF changed little over the same period. Additionally, the molecular profiling data indicated an apparently ordered incorporation of organic nitrogen in the BSF immobilized as primary and secondary amines, possibly as components of N-heterocycles, which may provide insight into nitrogen immobilization or mobilization processes in SOM. Our study represents an important step forward for studying Arctic SOM with improved understanding of the molecular properties of soil organic C and the ability to represent SOM in climate models that will predict the impact of climate change on soil C and nutrient cycling.

  7. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-01

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  8. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-21

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  9. Molecular Mechanics (MM4) Studies on Unusually Long Carbon-Carbon Bond Distances in Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L; Lii, Jenn-Huei; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-06-14

    The carbon-carbon single bond is of central importance in organic chemistry. When the molecular mechanics MM4 force field was developed beginning in the early 1990s, C-C bond lengths were not known very reliably for many important molecules, and bond lengths greater than 1.6 Å were quite poorly known experimentally. Quantum-mechanically computed values could not yet be obtained with useful accuracy in a general way. This paper examines structures now available from experiment and quantum-mechanical computations and extends the fit of the MM4 methodology to include new bond distances as long as 1.71 Å. PMID:27164310

  10. [Molecular mechanisms of niclosamide antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Moskaleva, E Yu; Perevozchikova, V G; Zhirnik, A S; Severin, S E

    2015-01-01

    In this review the recent data regarding the antitumor activity of niclosamide and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity are presented. Niclosamide has been used in the clinic for the treatment of intestinal parasite infections. In recent years in several screening investigations of various drugs and chemical compounds niclosamide was identified as a potential anticancer agent. Niclosamide not only inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin, mTORC1, STAT3, NF-κB and Notch signaling pathways, but also targets mitochondria in cancer cells to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis. A number of studies have established the anticancer activity of niclosamide in both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplantation models using human tumors and immunodeficient mice. It is important that niclosamide is active not only against tumor cells but also cancer stem cells. Normal cells are resistant to niclosamide. The accumulated experimental data suggest niclosamide is a promising drug for the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26716739

  11. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  12. Molecular switches in carbon-rich organometallic compounds: Theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costuas, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic complexes associated with an appropriate choice of ancillary ligands reveal to have a wide range of physical properties leading to promising applications when incorporated in nano-size devices. The challenge is to design innovative multifunctional compounds based on redox active carbon-rich organometallics associated with spin carriers and/or photochromic units. A multidisciplinary approach in this area has proved to be efficient in a series a systems combining carbon-rich bridging ligands and redox metallic moieties. In this domain, the role of theoretical investigations based on quantum mechanics tools have a crucial role in rationalizing and in helping designing systems possessing target properties.

  13. Molecular switches in carbon-rich organometallic compounds: Theoretical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Costuas, Karine

    2015-01-22

    Organometallic complexes associated with an appropriate choice of ancillary ligands reveal to have a wide range of physical properties leading to promising applications when incorporated in nano-size devices. The challenge is to design innovative multifunctional compounds based on redox active carbon-rich organometallics associated with spin carriers and/or photochromic units. A multidisciplinary approach in this area has proved to be efficient in a series a systems combining carbon-rich bridging ligands and redox metallic moieties. In this domain, the role of theoretical investigations based on quantum mechanics tools have a crucial role in rationalizing and in helping designing systems possessing target properties.

  14. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  15. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  16. Water flow through carbon nanotube junctions as molecular convergent nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Nakatani, Akihiro

    2006-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted for water flow through carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions as molecular nozzles. The fluidized piston model (FPM) is employed to drive the inlet flow at streaming velocities of 25 and 50 m s-1. Water flow through the CNT junctions is found to undergo an increase in streaming velocity, a decrease in pressure, and an increase in temperature. Although the difference of the upstream velocities does not generally lead to an appreciable density difference in the downstream CNT, the higher streaming velocity causes the upstream density to increase. The streaming velocity remains almost constant in the upstream CNT, but increases dramatically in the junction region. The ratio of downstream to upstream streaming velocities increases with the ratio of upstream to downstream cross section. A higher inlet velocity results in larger acceleration, which is generally more noticeable at larger cross-sectional ratios, and less prominent in junctions with smaller cross-sectional ratios. The cross-sectional ratio calculated from the internal radii of the CNTs based on the oxygen atomic density profile of water is closer to the ratio of downstream to upstream streaming velocities than the cross-sectional ratio calculated from the radii given by the carbon atomic centres.

  17. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C60q+ cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique. PMID:19649771

  18. Molecular mechanics methods for individual carbon nanotubes and nanotube assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since many years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered for a wide range of applications due to their outstanding mechanical properties. CNTs are tubular structures, showing a graphene like hexagonal lattice. Our interest in the calculation of the mechanical properties is motivated by several applications which demand the knowledge of the material behavior. One application in which the knowledge of the material behavior is vital is the CNT based fiber. Due to the excellent stiffness and strength of the individual CNTs, these fibers are expected to be a promising successor for state of the art carbon fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers fall back behind the properties of individual CNTs. It is assumed that this gap in the properties is a result of the van-der-Waals interactions of the individual CNTs within the fiber. In order to understand the mechanical behavior of the fibers we apply a molecular mechanics approach. The mechanical properties of the individual CNTs are investigated by using a modified structural molecular mechanics approach. This is done by calculating the properties of a truss-beam element framework representing the CNT with the help of a chemical force field. Furthermore, we also investigate the interactions of CNTs arranged in basic CNT assemblies, mimicking the ones in a simple CNT fiber. We consider the van-der-Waals interactions in the structure and calculate the potential surface of the CNT assemblies.

  19. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  20. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  1. EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research into Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) for use in drinking water treatment has a long history in the Drinking Water Research Division and its predecessor organizations. tudies were conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in the late fifties and early sixties to examine...

  2. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  3. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF KRAFT BLEACHING EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of color and organic contaminants by adsorption on activated carbon from the effluent of a kraft pulp bleaching plant was investigated in a pilot plant. The caustic bleach effluent, which contains 80% of the color from pulp bleaching, was decolorized successfully when...

  4. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  5. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  7. Nitrogen-Containing Carbon Nanotube Synthesized from Polymelem and Activated Carbon Derived from Polymer Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Nan

    Polymelem possesses a polymeric structure of heptazine (C6N 7) rings connected by amine bridges and our study has demonstrated that it is a promising precursor for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon materials. Nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (NCNT) was produced by pyrolyzing polymelem as a dual source of carbon and nitrogen with Raney nickel in a high pressure stainless steel cell. Activated carbon was produced from poly(ether ether ketone)/poly(ether imide) (PEEK/PEI blend) and incorporated with polymelem to enhance the hydrogen adsorption. Polymelem was successfully synthesized by pyrolyzing melamine at 450--650 °C and its structure was elucidated by 13C solid state NMR, FTIR, and XRD. The molecular weight determined by a novel LDI MS equipped with a LIFT mode illuminated that polymelem has both linear and cyclic connectivity with a degree of polymerization of 2--5 depending on the synthesis temperature. The decomposition products of polymelem were determined to be cyanoamide, dicyanoamide, and tricyanoamine. Tricyanoamine is the smallest carbon nitride molecule and has been experimentally confirmed for the first time in this study. When polymelem was decomposed in the presence of Raney nickel, homogenous NCNT with nitrogen content of ˜ 4--19 atom% was produced. A mechanism based on a detail analysis of the TEM images at different growth stages proposed that the NCNT propagated via a tip-growth mechanism originating at the nano-domains within the Raney nickel, and was accompanied with the aggregation of the nickel catalysts. Such NCNT exhibited a cup-stack wall structure paired with a compartmental feature. The nitrogen content, tube diameter and wall thickness greatly depended on synthesis conditions. The activated carbon derived from PEEK/PEI blend demonstrated a surface area up to ˜3000 m2/g, and average pore size of < 20 A. Such activated carbon exhibited a hydrogen storage capacity of up to 6.47 wt% at 40 bar, 77 K. The activated carbon has

  8. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  9. Process for attaching molecular wires and devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed towards processes for covalently attaching molecular wires and molecular electronic devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof. Such processes utilize diazonium chemistry to bring about this marriage of wire-like nanotubes with molecular wires and molecular electronic devices.

  10. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  11. Low molecular carbon compounds present in the rhizosphere control denitrification kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, M.; Morley, N.; Baggs, E.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen and carbon cycles play key roles in plant-microbe interactions in soils. Carbon is supplied by plants to microbes in the form of root exudates which includes both high and low molecular compounds. Nitrogen in turn is taken up by plants and rhizosphere microbes metabolise nitrogen compounds in several biochemical pathways. The conversion of nitrogen compounds to volatile products in the process of denitrification leads to increasing amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas and increasing emissions of N2O through intense agriculture have lead to intensified research to find possible mitigation strategies to reduce N2O production from soil. In our study we show the effect of low molecular carbon compounds, typically found in root exudates, on the dynamics of denitrification as well as the dose response effect of the single compounds. The hypothesis was tested that different compound groups change the kinetics of the different reduction steps in the biochemical pathway of denitrification, which results in lower N2O production. Experiments were performed in soil-microcosms using 15N labelling approaches to monitor denitrification products . Microcosms were maintained as slurries in order to create oxygen limiting conditions, which favours denitrification. Carbon dioxide and N2O were monitored throughout the experiments and on three destructive sampling days NO3, NO2, NO and 15N-N2 were measured. Results showed that the denitrification process was differently affected by amino acids and organic acids with higher denitrification activity observed in the presence of organic acids. The dynamics of the single reduction steps were time dependent which indicates that substrate availability plays an important role in soil microbial activity. We concluded that the activity of denitrifiers are significantly influenced by different carbon compounds, and that further studies on the effects of the composition of root

  12. Reverse osmosis molecular differentiation of organic liquids using carbon molecular sieve membranes.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; McCool, Benjamin A; Deckman, Harry W; Lively, Ryan P

    2016-08-19

    Liquid-phase separations of similarly sized organic molecules using membranes is a major challenge for energy-intensive industrial separation processes. We created free-standing carbon molecular sieve membranes that translate the advantages of reverse osmosis for aqueous separations to the separation of organic liquids. Polymer precursors were cross-linked with a one-pot technique that protected the porous morphology of the membranes from thermally induced structural rearrangement during carbonization. Permeation studies using benzene derivatives whose kinetic diameters differ by less than an angstrom show kinetically selective organic liquid reverse osmosis. Ratios of single-component fluxes for para- and ortho-xylene exceeding 25 were observed and para- and ortho- liquid mixtures were efficiently separated, with an equimolar feed enriched to 81 mole % para-xylene, without phase change and at ambient temperature. PMID:27540170

  13. Stable doping of carbon nanotubes via molecular self assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.; Chen, Y.; Podzorov, V.; Cook, A.; Zakhidov, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report a novel method for stable doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) based on methods of molecular self assembly. A conformal growth of a self-assembled monolayer of fluoroalkyl trichloro-silane (FTS) at CNT surfaces results in a strong increase of the sheet conductivity of CNT electrodes by 60–300%, depending on the CNT chirality and composition. The charge carrier mobility of undoped partially aligned CNT films was independently estimated in a field-effect transistor geometry (~100 cm²V⁻¹s⁻¹). The hole density induced by the FTS monolayer in CNT sheets is estimated to be ~1.8 ×10¹⁴cm⁻². We also show that FTS doping of CNT anodes greatly improves the performance of organic solar cells. This large and stable doping effect, easily achieved in large-area samples, makes this approach very attractive for applications of CNTs in transparent and flexible electronics.

  14. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  15. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  16. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Jain, Jinesh; Russo, Richard E.; McIntyre, Dustin; Mao, Xianglei

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  17. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  18. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  19. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  20. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as masks against carbon and argon irradiation. A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Cristian D.; Moreno-Marín, Juan Carlos; Heredia-Avalos, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    Experiments showed that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be used as masks against irradiation to create metallic nanowires in a substrate. In order to understand the limitations of this application, it is interesting to know the energy and number of carbon atoms emerging from the MWCNT after the irradiation and how the structure of the MWCNT is modified. Using a molecular dynamics code that we have previously developed, we have simulated the continuous irradiation of MWCNT with carbon and argon projectiles. We have obtained that the use of carbon instead of argon to irradiate the MWCNT increases de effectiveness of the MWCNTs as masks, due to the ability of the carbon projectiles to be part of the MWCNT structure and partially mend the damage produced during irradiation. We have analyzed the number, energy, and spatial distribution of the recoils generated during irradiation and the change of the MWCNT structure as a function of the incident energy (100 and 500 eV), fluence (up to 4.5 ·1015ions /cm2), and number of shells (up to 5-shells) of the MWCNT. These results determine the effectiveness of MWCNT as a mask, being useful to understand whether the atoms emerging from the MWCNT produce damage in the substrate or not. We find that for carbon projectiles the efficiency of MWCNT as masks does not depend much on the fluence, but on the number of nanotube shells and projectile incident energy. On the other hand, for a given nanotube and fluence, we observe a threshold incident energy below which the nanotube acts as a perfect mask.

  1. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. PMID:25644627

  2. APPRAISAL OF POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESSES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powdered activated carbon has been the subject of several developmental efforts directed towards producing improved methods for treating municipal wastewaters. Granular activated carbon has proven itself as an effective means of reducing dissolved organic contaminant levels, but ...

  3. Factors affecting the behavior of unburned carbon upon steam activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the factors that could affect the behavior of unburned carbon samples upon steam activation. Through this work, the relationships among the factors that could influence the carbon-steam reaction with the surface area of the produced activated carbon were explored. Statistical analysis was used to relate the chemical and physical properties of the unburned carbon to the surface area of the activated carbon. Six unburned carbons were selected as feedstocks for activated carbon, and marked as UCA through UCF. The unburned carbons were activated using steam at 850°C for 90 minutes, and the surface areas of their activated counterparts were measured using N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The activated carbons produced from different unburned carbon precursors presented different surface areas at similar carbon burn-off levels. Moreover, in different carbon burn-off regions, the sequences for surface area of activated carbons from different unburned carbon samples were different. The factors that may affect the carbon-steam gasification reactions, including the concentration of carbon active sites, the crystallite size of the carbon, the intrinsic porous structure of carbon, and the inorganic impurities, were investigated. All unburned carbons investigated in this study were similar in that they showed the very broad (002) and (10 ) carbon peaks, which are characteristic of highly disordered carbonaceous materials. In this study, the unburned carbon samples contained about 17--48% of inorganic impurities. Compared to coals, the unburned carbon samples contain a larger amount of inorganic impurities as a result of the burn-off, or at lease part, of the carbon during the combustion process. These inorganic particles were divided into two groups in terms of the way they are associated with carbon particles: free single particles, and particles combined with carbon particles. As indicated from the present work, unburned

  4. Molecular simulation of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes and idealized carbon slit pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinyu; Johnson, J. Karl

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen gas into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and idealized carbon slit pores is studied by computer simulation. Hydrogen-hydrogen interactions are modeled with the Silvera-Goldman potential. The Crowell-Brown potential is used to model the hydrogen-carbon interactions. Calculations include adsorption inside the tubes, in the interstitial regions of tube arrays, and on the outside surface of isolated tubes. Quantum effects are included through implementation of the path integral formalism. Comparison with classical simulations gives an indication of the importance of quantum effects for hydrogen adsorption. Quantum effects are important even at 298 K for adsorption in tube interstices. We compare our simulations with experimental data for SWNTs, graphitic nanofibers, and activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms from simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data for activated carbon, but do not confirm the large uptake reported for SWNTs and nanofibers. Although the adsorption potential for hydrogen in SWNTs is enhanced relative to slit pores of the same size, our calculations show that the storage capacity of an array of tubes is less than that for idealized slit pore geometries, except at very low pressures. Ambient temperature isotherms indicate that an array of nanotubes is not a suitable sorbent material for achieving DOE targets for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  5. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  6. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  7. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-02-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g-1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g-1 (95 F cc-1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors.

  8. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  9. Laser scattered images observed from carbon plasma stagnation and following molecular formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Shibata, R.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sunahara, A.

    2014-06-16

    Two carbon targets were irradiated to create plasma plumes to collide at right angle with two UV laser pulses each other at 10 J/cm{sup 2}/pulse. The collision results in carbon plasma stagnation. Laser scattered imaging indicates that the carbon large molecular formation takes place much later in time after the laser irradiation and stagnation. Compared with the temporal history of electron density (n{sub e}), ion density (n{sub i}), and plasma self-emission dominated by carbon Swan band, it is estimated that the carbon large molecular formation has been initiated with the ion collision followed by the C{sub 2} formation.

  10. Solar hydrogen production using carbon quantum dots and a molecular nickel catalyst.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Hutton, Georgina A M; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-05-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are established as excellent photosensitizers in combination with a molecular catalyst for solar light driven hydrogen production in aqueous solution. The inexpensive CQDs can be prepared by straightforward thermolysis of citric acid in a simple one-pot, multigram synthesis and are therefore scalable. The CQDs produced reducing equivalents under solar irradiation in a homogeneous photocatalytic system with a Ni-bis(diphosphine) catalyst, giving an activity of 398 μmolH2 (gCQD)(-1) h(-1) and a "per Ni catalyst" turnover frequency of 41 h(-1). The CQDs displayed activity in the visible region beyond λ > 455 nm and maintained their full photocatalytic activity for at least 1 day under full solar spectrum irradiation. A high quantum efficiency of 1.4% was recorded for the noble- and toxic-metal free photocatalytic system. Thus, CQDs are shown to be a highly sustainable light-absorbing material for photocatalytic schemes, which are not limited by cost, toxicity, or lack of scalability. The photocatalytic hybrid system was limited by the lifetime of the molecular catalyst, and intriguingly, no photocatalytic activity was observed using the CQDs and 3d transition metal salts or platinum precursors. This observation highlights the advantage of using a molecular catalyst over commonly used heterogeneous catalysts in this photocatalytic system. PMID:25864839

  11. An Update on Natural Products with Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Karioti, Anastasia; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological processes. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. It is more than 70 years that synthetic compounds, mainly sulfonamides, have been used in clinical practice as diuretics and systemic acting antiglaucoma drugs. Recent studies using natural product libraries and isolated constituents from natural sources (such as fungi and plants) have disclosed novel chemotypes possessing carbonic anhydrase inhibition activities. These natural sources offer new opportunities in the search for new and more effective carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and may serve as new leads for the design and development of future drugs. This review will discuss the most recent advances in the search of naturally occurring products and their synthetic derivatives that inhibit the CAs and their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Plant extracts are not considered in the present review. PMID:26654592

  12. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies on binding of dorzolamide to bovine and human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Bijari, Nooshin; Ghobadi, Sirous; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Khodarahmi, Reza; Ghadami, Seyyed Abolghasem

    2015-09-01

    This report is a comparative evaluation on the interaction of dorzolamide (DZA) with bovine and human carbonic anhydrase II (bCA II and hCA II, respectively) using fluorimetry, UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy as well as molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Fluorescence data obtained at different temperatures indicated that DZA quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of both enzymes through a static mechanism. Thermodynamic analysis of the quenching data revealed that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play important roles in drug binding. Calculations of the protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) index, using 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulfonate, also indicated a decrease in PSH of the hCA II and minor increase in PSH value of the bCA II upon drug binding. The results of far- and near-UV CD experiments showed some alterations in the secondary and tertiary structures of both enzymes upon ligation. The structural changes induced by drug binding caused more reduction in the catalytic activity of hCA II than bCA II. Based on the experimental data and the possible binding mode revealed by molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we concluded that DZA binds stronger to hCA II active site cavity compared to bCA II. PMID:26093313

  13. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  14. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  15. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  16. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  17. Molecular equilibria and condensation sequences in carbon rich gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical equilibria in stellar atmospheres have been investigated by many authors. Lattimer, Schramm, and Grossman presented calculations in both O rich and C rich environments and predicted possible presolar condensates. A recent paper by Cherchneff and Barker considered a C rich composition with PAH's included in the calculations. However, the condensation sequences of C bearing species have not been investigated in detail. In a carbon rich gas surrounding an AGB star, it is often assumed that graphite (or diamond) condenses out before TiC and SiC. However, Lattimer et al. found some conditions under which TiC condenses before graphite. We have performed molecular equilibrium calculations to establish the stability fields of C(s), TiC(s), and SiC(s) and other high temperature phases under conditions of different pressures and C/O. The preserved presolar interstellar dust grains so far discovered in meteorites are graphite, diamond, SiC, TiC, and possibly Al2O3.

  18. Low dimensional molecular dynamics of water inside a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Lin, Yuan; Amberg, Gustav; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a number of researches as the key building blocks for nanotechnology, they have also caught attentions as ideal materials that realize quasi-one-dimensional channel environment, a key system in bioscience. Such materials stimulate studies in fluid dynamics under low dimensional confinement, which is restricted and departs significantly from that in three-dimension. The current study serves to explore such atomic scale dynamics by performing a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on water confined in a CNT with a diameter of the order of 1 nm. The MD simulations have successfully probed the phase transition of a water cluster confined in a CNT to an ice-nanotube with anomalous diameter dependence. It has also been applied to investigate the possibility of transporting water through a CNT by a temperature gradient. In this study, we particularly highlight the dielectric properties of water confined inside a CNT. The confinement gives rise to strongly anisotropic dielectric relaxation, where the relaxation becomes faster and slower in the cross sectional and axial directions, respectively. The diameter dependences of the dielectric properties are discussed in connection with water dynamics and structures in quasi-one-dimension.

  19. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  20. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minghong, Wu; Borong, Bao; Ruimin, Zhou; Jinliang, Zhu; Longxin, Hu

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption

  1. Passive CO{sub 2} removal using a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.

    1995-12-01

    Manufacture and characterization of a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), and its efficacy as a CO{sub 2} gas adsorbent are reported. The CFCMS consists of an isotropic pitch derived carbon fiber and a phenolic resin derived carbon binder. Activation (selective gasification) of the CFCMS creates microporosity in the carbon fibers, yielding high micropore volumes (>0.5 cm{sup 3}/g) and BET surface areas (>1000 m{sup 2}/g). Moreover, the CFCMS material is a rigid, strong, monolith with an open structure that allows the free-flow of fluids through the material. This combination of properties provides an adsorbent material that has several distinct advantages over granular adsorbents in gas separation systems such as pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. The results of our initial evaluations of the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and kinetics of CFCMS are reported. The room temperature CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CFCMS is >120 mg of CO{sub 2} per g of CFCMS. A proposed project is described that targets the development, over a three-year period, of a demonstration separation system based on CFCMS for the removal of CO{sub 2} from a flue gas slip stream at a coal-fired power plant. The proposed program would be conducted jointly with industrial and utility partners.

  2. Preparation of binderless activated carbon monolith from pre-carbonization rubber wood sawdust by controlling of carbonization and activation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Taslim, R.; Iwantono

    2013-09-01

    Binderless activated carbon monolith (ACM) was prepared from pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust (RWSD). The effect of the carbonization temperature (400, 500, 600, 700, 800 dan 900 °C) on porosity characteristic of the ACM have been studied. The optimum carbonization temperature for obtaining ACM with high surface area of 600 °C with CO2 activation at 800 °C for one hour. At this condition, the surface area as high as 733 m2 g-1 could be successfully obtained. By improved the activation temperature at 900 °C for 2.5 h, it was found that the surface area of 860 m2 g-1. For this condition, the ACM exhibit the specific capacitance of 90 F g-1. In addition the termogravimertic (TG)-differential termografimertic (DTG) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) measurement were also performed on the ACMs and the result has been studied. Finally, it was conclude that the high surface area of ACM from RWSD could be produced by proper selections of carbonization and activation condition.

  3. Molecular motor powered nanotransportation guided by carbon nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Ramon-Azcon, J.; Kim, K.; Reaves, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Umetsu, M.; Kumagai, I.; Adschiri, T.; Shiku, H.; Matsue, T.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a decrease in the channel size of nanodevices, pressure-driven transport is increasingly limited by the fluid viscosity. This can be overcome by utilizing the motor protein kinesin that can walk processively along the microtubule filaments for active transport. However, using the kinesin-based transport system requires the ability to control the location and orientation of microtubules. We introduce functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) tracks, aligned by dielectrophoresis, to guide kinesin powered microtubule shuttles. In order to resist shear flow and the force exerted by an electric field, the MWNT are attached to the surface via a biotin/streptavidin link. The configuration of the aligned MWNT is investigated using scanning electron microscopy and the guiding performance of the MWNT tracks is studied using fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon. PMID:25848862

  5. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27560991

  6. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-07-25

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27459262

  7. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Tomazett, Mariana Vieira; Zanoelo, Fabiana Fonseca; Bailão, Elisa Flávia Cardoso; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4). In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1) and CA4 (rCA4), with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class) and rCA4 (α-class) were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration), arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4. PMID:27560991

  8. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: Permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Wickland, K.P.; White, Rickie; Berhe, A.A.; Harden, J.W.; Romanovsky, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial abundances and activities in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils. We examined active layer and permafrost soils near Fairbanks, AK, the Yukon River, and the Arctic Circle. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Gas fluxes at -5 and 5 ??C were measured to calculate temperature response quotients (Q10). The Q10 was lower in permafrost soils (average 2.7) compared with active layer soils (average 7.5). Soil nutrients, leachable dissolved organic C (DOC) quality and quantity, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the soils revealed that the organic matter within permafrost soils is as labile, or even more so, than surface soils. Microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and subgroups: methanogens and Basidiomycetes) and exoenzyme activities involved in decomposition were lower in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, which, together with the chemical data, supports the reduced Q10 values. CH4 fluxes were correlated with methanogen abundance and the highest CH4 production came from active layer soils. These results suggest that permafrost soils have high inherent decomposability, but low microbial abundances and activities reduce the temperature sensitivity of C fluxes. Despite these inherent limitations, however, respiration per unit soil C was higher in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, suggesting that decomposition and heterotrophic respiration may contribute to a positive feedback to warming of this eco region. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the

  9. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrop, Mark P.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; White III, R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.

    2010-09-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial abundances and activities in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils. We examined active layer and permafrost soils near Fairbanks, AK, the Yukon River, and the Arctic Circle. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Gas fluxes at -5 and 5ºC were measured to calculate temperature response quotients (Q₁₀). The Q₁₀ was lower in permafrost soils (average 2.7) compared with active layer soils (average 7.5). Soil nutrients, leachable dissolved organic C (DOC) quality and quantity, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the soils revealed that the organic matter within permafrost soils is as labile, or even more so, than surface soils. Microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and subgroups: methanogens and Basidiomycetes) and exoenzyme activities involved in decomposition were lower in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, which, together with the chemical data, supports the reduced Q₁₀ values. CH₄ fluxes were correlated with methanogen abundance and the highest CH₄ production came from active layer soils. These results suggest that permafrost soils have high inherent decomposability, but low microbial abundances and activities reduce the temperature sensitivity of C fluxes. Despite these inherent limitations, however, respiration per unit soil C was higher in permafrost soils compared with active layer soils, suggesting that decomposition and heterotrophic respiration may contribute to a positive feedback to warming of this eco region.

  10. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  11. DISINFECTION OF BACTERIA ATTACHED TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon (GAC) particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected wit...

  12. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  14. Molecular monolayers for attaching electroactive molecules to vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Elizabeth C.

    Integrating molecular monolayers with nanoscale carbon materials is attractive for a variety of applications including electroanalysis, sensing, and electrocatalysis due to the high stability and high surface area of nanoscale carbon. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers are particularly interesting because their molecular structure indicates that they may have relatively reactive surfaces compared to other types of nanoscale carbon. This work explores the use of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers as a platform for electrocatalysis. We determined the morphology and binding locations of molecular layers on the nanofiber surface, then describe two methods for covalently binding electroactive molecules to the surface. The electron transfer process through the molecular layers was studied with emphasis on understanding the effects of the molecular linkage between the electroactive molecule and the surface and understanding the role of solvent and electrolyte in the electron transfer process. We determined that the electron transfer mechanism through monolayers on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers is controlled by the morphology of the molecular layers on the surface. Several potential catalysts were attached to the surface to evaluate the carbon nanofibers as scaffolds for electrocatalytic reactions.

  15. Molecular properties of protonated homogeneous and mixed carbon oxide and carbon dioxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Jaroslaw J.; Roszak, Szczepan; Gora, Robert W.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2003-10-01

    The molecular structures and characteristics of CO and CO2 protonated homogeneous and mixed complexes were studied by theoretical, ab initio calculations. The thermodynamics, vibrational properties, charge distribution, and interaction energy decomposition components are investigated as a function of the increasing size of clusters. The study reveals the similarities and differences between homogeneous protonated carbon oxide and protonated carbon dioxide clusters. In the first-order approximation the structural differences between (CO)nH+ and (CO2)nH+ clusters are the consequence of the electronic charge distribution in the protonated OCH+ and OCOH+ core fragments. The symmetry of protonated dimers, constituting the cationic core of clusters is the second important factor in determining the overall structure of extended complexes. The OCH+ as well as the OCOH+ fragments are stabilized by cluster formation. The structures and energetics of complexes emerge as a balance between competing electrostatic, exchange, and covalent interactions. The directional covalent forces prevail and enforce the structure of the complexes, however. A universal approach is proposed which allows for the computation of interaction energies for chemical reactions involving significant relaxation of the reactants.

  16. Phenol removal onto novel activated carbons made from lignocellulosic precursors: influence of surface properties.

    PubMed

    Nabais, J M Valente; Gomes, J A; Suhas; Carrott, P J M; Laginhas, C; Roman, S

    2009-08-15

    The adsorption of phenol from dilute aqueous solutions onto new activated carbons (AC) was studied. The novel activated carbon was produced from lignocellulosic (LC) precursors of rapeseed and kenaf. Samples oxidised with nitric acid in liquid phase were also studied. The results have shown the significant potential of rapeseed and kenaf for the activated carbon production. The activated carbons produced by carbon dioxide activation were mainly microporous with BET apparent surface area up to 1350 m(2)g(-1) and pore volume 0.5 cm(3)g(-1). The effects of concentration (0.1-2 mM) and pH (3-13) were studied. The phenol adsorption isotherms at 25 degrees C followed the Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 80 and 50 mg g(-1) for the pristine and oxidised activated carbons, respectively. The influence of pH on the adsorption has two trends for pH below and above 10. It was possible to conclude that when phenol is predominantly in the molecular form the most probable mechanism is based on the pi-pi dispersion interaction between the phenol aromatic ring and the delocalised pi electrons present in the activated carbon aromatic structure. When phenolate is the major component the electrostatic repulsion that occurs at high pH values is the most important aspect of the adsorption mechanism. PMID:19233559

  17. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  18. Paleo-Reconstruction of Carbon Cycling in Large-River Delta-Front Estuaries: Use of Molecular Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The burial of organic carbon (OC) in river deltas and continental margins worldwide account for approximately 90% of the carbon burial in the ocean. In particular, sediments in large-river delta-front estuaries have been shown to be repositories and integrators of land-use change across expansive watersheds that drain the continents to the ocean. Thus, separating natural and human-driven changes in the transport of terrestrial organic carbon (TOC) to ocean is important in understanding the effects of climate change on TOC fluxes. Molecular biomarkers of TOC (e.g., lignin phenols, fatty acids, sterols) in LDE sediments have been used extensively to reconstruct of carbon cycling changes that are reflective of land-use change in the watersheds. However, due to the highly variable hydrologic regimes across continents, continental margins (e.g., active versus passive), and coastal dynamics in LDEs, the fate and transport of these molecular biomarkers varies considerably. Here I will discuss some of the key molecular biomarkers that have been used to date in such historical reconstruction exercises in LDEs (e.g., Mississippi/Atchafalaya, Yangtze, Yellow, Ganges-Brahmaputra, Colville Rivers), and explore how margin-type, residence time of transport, redox, and molecular stability, to name a few, impact the utility of using different biomarkers in paleo-reconstruction studies.

  19. Dielectric constants of binary mixtures of propylene carbonate with dimethyl carbonate and ethylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulation: comparison between non-polarizable and polarizable force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghun; Park, Sung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Using non-polarizable and polarizable molecular dynamics simulations, binary mixtures of propylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate and propylene carbonate + ethylene carbonate with various compositions were investigated. The polarizable model produces more reasonable estimation of dielectric constants than the non-polarizable model; however, combining the electronic continuum model with the non-polarizable MD improves the comparison between the two models. Fair agreement was found between the results from these simulations and available experimental data. In addition, for a better understanding of the mixing behaviour, the excess dielectric constants over the entire composition were calculated. By comparison of the two mixtures in various mole fractions, distinctive mixing behaviours of propylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate (poorly symmetric mixture) and propylene carbonate + ethylene carbonate (highly symmetric mixture) were observed.

  20. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  1. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  2. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  3. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  4. Dynamac molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (Biochar)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration (“biochar”). Here we present a molecular-level assessment o...

  5. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5 s-1 at an overpotential of 100 and 200 mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols.

  6. Molecular metal–Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt–nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt–N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5 s−1 at an overpotential of 100 and 200 mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols. PMID:26250525

  7. Activated carbons from North Dakota lignite and leonardite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Olson, E.S.; Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The EERC is undertaking a research and development program on carbon development, part of which is directed towards investigating the key parameters in the preparation of activated carbons from low-rank coals indigenous to North Dakota. Carbons have been prepared and characterized for potential sorption applications in flue gas and waste liquid streams. Lignite, owing to its wide occurrence and variability in properties, has received significant attention as a precursor of active carbon manufacture. Mineral matter content and its alkaline nature are two highly variable properties that can have important consequences on the production of suitable activated carbons. Other factors affecting the production include carbonizing conditions, the activation agents, activation temperature, and activation time. However, as previously noted, the relationship between the above factors and the sorption activity is particularly complex. Part of the difficulty is that sorption activity encompasses at least three parameters, namely, surface area, pore distribution, and surface acidity/basicity. The presence of mineral matter in the coal can affect not only carbonization but also the activation and subsequent sorption and desorption processes. This paper presents results of an investigation of demineralization, carbonization temperature, activation temperature, and activation time for one lignite and leonardite from North Dakota.

  8. Phenol adsorption by activated carbon produced from spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cínthia S; Abreu, Anelise L; Silva, Carmen L T; Guerreiro, Mário C

    2011-01-01

    The present work highlights the preparation of activated carbons (ACs) using spent coffee grounds, an agricultural residue, as carbon precursor and two different activating agents: water vapor (ACW) and K(2)CO(3) (ACK). These ACs presented the microporous nature and high surface area (620-950 m(2) g(-1)). The carbons, as well as a commercial activated carbon (CAC) used as reference, were evaluated as phenol adsorbent showing high adsorption capacity (≈150 mg g(-1)). The investigation of the pH solution in the phenol adsorption was also performed. The different activating agents led to AC with distinct morphological properties, surface area and chemical composition, although similar phenol adsorption capacity was verified for both prepared carbons. The production of activated carbons from spent coffee grounds resulted in promising adsorbents for phenol removal while giving a noble destination to the residue. PMID:22105129

  9. Powerful Molecular Outflows in Nearby Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Meléndez, Marcio

    2014-07-01

    We report the results from a systematic search for molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows with Herschel-PACS† in a sample of 43 nearby (z < 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. We find that the character of the OH feature (strength of the absorption relative to the emission) correlates with that of the 9.7-μm silicate feature, a measure of obscuration in ULIRGs. Unambiguous evidence for molecular outflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than -50 km s-1, is seen in 26 (70%) of the 37 OH-detected targets, suggesting a wide-angle (~ 145°) outflow geometry. Conversely, unambiguous evidence for molecular inflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than +50 km s-1, is seen in only 4 objects, suggesting a planar or filamentary geometry for the inflowing gas. Terminal outflow velocities of ~ -1000 km s-1 are measured in several objects, but median outflow velocities are typically ~ -200 km s-1. While the outflow velocities show no statistically significant dependence on the star formation rate, they are distinctly more blueshifted among systems with large AGN fractions and luminosities [log (L AGN/L ⊙) >= 11.8 +/- 0.3]. The quasars in these systems play a dominant role in driving the molecular outflows. In contrast, the most AGN dominated systems, where OH is seen purely in emission, show relatively modest OH line widths, despite their large AGN luminosities, perhaps indicating that molecular outflows subside once the quasar has cleared a path through the obscuring material.

  10. Computational Nanotechnology of Molecular Materials, Electronics, and Actuators with Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Menon, Madhu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The role of computational nanotechnology in developing next generation of multifunctional materials, molecular scale electronic and computing devices, sensors, actuators, and machines is described through a brief review of enabling computational techniques and few recent examples derived from computer simulations of carbon nanotube based molecular nanotechnology.

  11. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  12. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Dagle, Robert; Tustin, Gerald C; Zoeller, Joseph R; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    We report that when Ir and La halides are deposited on carbon, exposure to CO spontaneously generates a discrete molecular heterobimetallic structure, containing an Ir-La covalent bond that acts as a highly active, selective, and stable heterogeneous catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to produce acetic acid. This catalyst exhibits a very high productivity of ∼1.5 mol acetyl/mol Ir·s with >99% selectivity to acetyl (acetic acid and methyl acetate) without detectable loss in activity or selectivity for more than 1 month of continuous operation. The enhanced activity can be mechanistically rationalized by the presence of La within the ligand sphere of the discrete molecular Ir-La heterobimetallic structure, which acts as a Lewis acid to accelerate the normally rate-limiting CO insertion in Ir-catalyzed carbonylation. Similar approaches may provide opportunities for attaining molecular (single site) behavior similar to homogeneous catalysis on heterogeneous surfaces for other industrial applications. PMID:26276610

  13. Synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles directly from active carbon via a one-step ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao; He, Xiaodie; Liu, Yang; Yu, Hang; Kang, Zhenhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-15

    Water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles were synthesized directly from active carbon by a one-step hydrogen peroxide-assisted ultrasonic treatment. The carbon nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, optical fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that the surface of carbon nanoparticles was rich of hydroxyl groups resulting in high hydrophilicity. The carbon nanoparticles could emit bright and colorful photoluminescence covering the entire visible-to-near infrared spectral range. Furthermore, these carbon nanoparticles also had excellent up-conversion fluorescent properties.

  14. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  15. Novel molecular sources for dispersing boron in carbon-carbon composites. Final report, 1 Jun-30 Nov 91

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1991-12-31

    Improving the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites is key to expanding the use of this material system into higher temperature applications. While boron particles have been added to these materials to seal cracks in protective coatings, oxidation of the carbon matrix neighboring the boron particles seriously affects composite strength. This problem is exacerbate by a natural segregation of the boron particles to fiber rich areas of the composites. Carborane, a robust molecular source of boron, was used as the precursor for atomically dispersed boron in a phenolic derived carbon matrix. Modifications of the chemical structure of carborane were used to improve the solubility in phenolic. Additions of carboranes into the phenolic resins dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of the carbonized char. The char yield of the phenolic resin was also increased significantly.

  16. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAmolecular size of pollutants; ii) chemical structure of pollutants, and iii) chemical properties of adsorbents. In most cases, the adsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pH<5) due to the establishment of attractive electrostatic interactions. In dynamic regime, the amount of pollutant adsorbed was much higher for PA, followed by DPA, and was approximately similar for BPA, 2,4-D, and MCPA. Finally, the amount of BPA and DPA adsorbed on activated carbon decreased by around 50% and 70% in the presence of DPA and BPA, respectively, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on the same adsorption sites of the activated carbon. PMID:26282767

  17. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-06-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and positively charged, mesoporous wood-based carbons, as well as with a microporous coconut carbon. To this end, we glued carbon particles to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope and measured the interaction forces upon approach and retraction of thus made tips. Waterborne Raoultella terrigena and Escherichia coli adhered weakly (1-2 nN) to different activated carbon particles, and the main difference between the activated carbons was the percentage of curves with attractive sites revealed upon traversing of a carbon particle through the bacterial EPS layer. The percentage of curves showing adhesion forces upon retraction varied between 21% and 69%, and was highest for R. terrigena with positively charged carbon (66%) and a coconut carbon (69%). Macroscopic bacterial removal by the mesoporous carbon particles increased with increasing percentages of attractive sites revealed upon traversing a carbon particle through the outer bacterial surface layer. PMID:18405910

  18. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  19. Carbon activation process for increased surface accessibility in electrochemical capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Eisenmann, Erhard T.

    2001-01-01

    A process for making carbon film or powder suitable for double capacitor electrodes having a capacitance of up to about 300 F/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. This is accomplished by treating in aqueous nitric acid for a period of about 5 to 15 minutes thin carbon films obtained by carbonizing carbon-containing polymeric material having a high degree of molecular directionality, such as polyimide film, then heating the treated carbon film in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a non-graphitizing temperature of at least 350.degree. C. for about 20 minutes, and repeating alternately the nitric acid step and the heating step from 7 to 10 times. Capacitors made with this carbon may find uses ranging from electronic devices to electric vehicle applications.

  20. Chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the carbon nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamina, E. N.; Lebedev, N. G.

    2015-05-01

    The electronic-energy characteristics of the adsorption of the oxygen molecule in the ground triplet and excited singlet states on the surface of chiral and achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied by semiempirical MNDO and PM3 quantum-chemical methods using the molecular cluster model with boundary pseudoatoms. The energies of dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the surface of nanotubes were calculated. The chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of the O2 molecule was predicted and studied. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes that adsorb molecular oxygen most effectively were predicted. A physical rationale of the obtained dependences was presented.

  1. Catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide by external power activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.; Prince, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    The catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide and air in a planar stagnation-point flow over a platinum foil with external power is studied in this paper. The reduced heterogeneous kinetics are modelled with the dissociative adsorption of the molecular oxygen and the non-dissociative adsorption of CO, together with a surface reaction of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type and the desorption reaction of the adsorbed product, CO 2(s). The resulting governing equations have been numerically integrated and the whole S-shaped response curve has been obtained as a function of the mixture initial concentration. The critical conditions for the catalytic ignition and extinction are deduced using high activation energy asymptotics of the desorption kinetics of the most efficient adsorbed reactant, CO(s). We obtained a very good agreement between the numerical and asymptotic results for the ignition and extinction conditions. In general, the ignition process can be well modelled without reactant consumption, while extinction occurs in the partial diffusion-controlled regime, with a finite non-zero concentration of carbon monoxide close to the plate.

  2. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  3. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays and Their Application in Single Molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yuyao

    Molecular electronics utilize molecular as building blocks to fabricate electronic components. Due to the advantage of its size, molecular electronics has been an attractive candidate for future electronics for a long time. However, there are major challenges to be solved before single molecular electronic device could be used widely. One of these challenges is the lack of high yield, low cost fabrication technique. Carbon nanotubes are new materials with great electronic conductivity and small diameter, etc. They are great candidate for the electrode of single molecular electronic devices. A great effort of this thesis has been devoted into the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of carbon nanotube, especially the surface aligned carbon nanotube array on miscut quartz surface. A state of art recipe to synthesize carbon nanotube array on quartz with promising cleanliness, density, alignment and nanotube length has been developed. Two novel fabrication processes were proposed and tested to fabricate electrode for single molecule electronic devices with carbon nanotube array. In addition, a fabrication process to create large amount of identical length of carbon nanotubes was introduced and studied.

  4. Activated Carbon Modified with Copper for Adsorption of Propanethiol

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Tirano, Joaquín; Salamanca, Brisa; Giraldo, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbons were characterized texturally and chemically before and after treatment, using surface area determination in the BET model, Boehm titration, TPR, DRX and immersion calorimetry. The adsorption capacity and the kinetics of sulphur compound removal were determined by gas chromatography. It was established that the propanethiol retention capacity is dependent on the number of oxygenated groups generated on the activated carbon surface and that activated carbon modified with CuO at 0.25 M shows the highest retention of propanethiol. Additionally is proposed a mechanism of decomposition of propenothiol with carbon-copper system. PMID:20479992

  5. High performance carbon fibers from very high molecular weight polyacrylonitrile precursors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morris, E. Ashley; Weisenberger, Matthew C.; Abdallah, Mohamed G.; Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Eberle, Cliff; Jackson, David C.; Mecham, Sue J.; et al

    2016-02-02

    In this study, carbon fibers are unique reinforcing agents for lightweight composite materials due to their outstanding mechanical properties and low density. Current technologies are capable of producing carbon fibers with 90-95% of the modulus of perfect graphite (~1025 GPa). However, these same carbon fibers possess less than 10% of the theoretical carbon fiber strength, estimated to be about 100 GPa.[1] Indeed, attempts to increase carbon fiber rigidity results in lower breaking strength. To develop advanced carbon fibers with both very high strength and modulus demands a new manufacturing methodology. Here, we report a method of manufacturing high strength, verymore » high modulus carbon fibers from a very high molecular weight (VHMW) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor without the use of nanomaterial additives such as nucleating or structure-templating agents, as have been used by others.[2,3]« less

  6. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of manufacturing a carbonized and activated nonwoven made by cotton fiber was investigated in this paper. The study was focused on the acoustic application and nonwoven composites with cotton nonwoven as a base layer and glass fiber nonwoven, cotton nonwoven, and carbonized and activated...

  7. Preparation of nitrogen-enriched activated carbons from brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Pietrzak; Helena Wachowska; Piotr Nowicki

    2006-05-15

    Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons were prepared from a Polish brown coal. Nitrogen was introduced from urea at 350{sup o}C in an oxidizing atmosphere both to carbonizates obtained at 500-700{sup o}C and to activated carbons prepared from them. The activation was performed at 800{sup o}C with KOH in argon. It has been observed that the carbonization temperature determines the amount of nitrogen that is incorporated (DC5U, 8.4 wt % N{sup daf}; DC6U, 6.3 wt % N{sup daf}; and DC7U, 5.4 wt % N{sup daf}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have shown that nitrogen introduced both at the stage of carbonizates and at the stage of activated carbons occurs mainly as -6, -5, and imine, amine and amide groups. On the other hand, the activation of carbons enriched with nitrogen results in the formation of pyridonic nitrogen and N-Q. The introduction of nitrogen at the activated carbon stage leads to a slight decrease in surface area. It has been proven that the most effective way of preparing microporous activated carbons enriched with nitrogen to a considerable extent and having high surface area ({approximately} 3000 m{sup 2}/g) is the following: carbonization - activation - reaction with urea. 40 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  8. Molecular aspects of vitamin D anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Picotto, Gabriela; Liaudat, Ana C; Bohl, Luciana; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2012-10-01

    Environment may influence the development and prevention of cancer. Calcitriol has been associated with calcium homeostasis regulation. Many epidemiological, biochemical, and genetic studies have shown non-classic effects of vitamin D, such as its involvement in the progression of different cancers. Although vitamin D induces cellular arrest, triggers apoptotic pathways, inhibits angiogenesis, and alters cellular adhesion, the precise mechanisms of its action are still not completely established. This article will present a revision about the molecular aspects proposed to be involved in the anticancer action of calcitriol. Adequate levels of vitamin D to prevent cancer development will also be discussed. PMID:22963190

  9. On the relative roles of carbonate and molecular CO2 in subduction zones: implications for Earth's deep carbon cycle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Kavner, A.; Chopelas, A.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction-zone volcanism returns oxidized carbon (chiefly CO2) to Earth’s surface reservoirs. However, the mechanism by which this carbon is transferred from the slab to the arc-magma source region is uncertain. Phase equilibrium studies of subduction zones indicate that in the absence of fluids carbonate minerals are quite stable along slab P-T paths, so their simple breakdown cannot be a significant mechanism for CO2 loss, at least to subarc depths. Alternatively, CO2 can be generated from slab carbonates by infiltration of an H2O-rich fluid, driving reactions that can be modeled by aragonite + quartz = wollastonite + CO2. However, the high P and low T of subduction zones causes maximum CO2 concentrations to remain low at depths <100 km. But such calculations assume that dissolved carbon is present as molecular CO2, whereas carbon liberated by dissolution of CaCO3 in H2O at slab P and T is predominantly carbonate, dominantly H2CO3. Using the equation of Caciagli and Manning (2003, CMP, 146, 275) for the solubility of CaCO3 in H2O, we computed dissolved carbonate content in fluids at the P and T of the Cascadia slab mantle interface. In H2O equilibrated with CaCO3 at depths shallower than ~80 km, more carbon is present as carbonic acid than as molecular CO2. Molecular CO2 is 10x lower than carbonic acid over most of the depth interval. It rises rapidly at 70-80 km, where the two species are present in subequal concentrations (~2000 ppm). At greater depths, carbon in the fluid is predicted to be dominantly molecular CO2. Where carbonate species predominate in slab fluids, the capacity for carbon transport will depend strongly on pH. For example, at 1.8 GPa, the Cascadia slab-mantle interface is predicted to be 500°C. At this P and T, the pH of pure H2O equilibrated with CaCO3 is 6.7 (neutral pH is 3.8). However, the pH buffered by model mineral assemblages of the slab (e.g., jadeite-paragonite-quartz) or mantle wedge (talc-olivine) is 4-6. Because CaCO3

  10. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  12. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  13. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  14. Conductance switching in single light-sensitive molecular device with carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Cai-Juan; Gao, Kun; Zhang, De-Hua; Yang, Mao; Feng, Fei-Long

    2014-08-01

    By applying nonequilibrium Green's function formalism combined first-principles density functional theory, a new mechanism for optical switch of single molecular device with carbon nanotube electrodes is proposed. The molecule comprises the switch can convert between enol and keto isomers upon photoinduced excited state hydrogen transfer in the molecular bridge. Theoretical results show that these two isomers exhibit very different current-voltage characteristics both in armchair and zigzag junction, which can realize the on and off states of the molecular switch. Meantime, the chirality of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) electrodes strongly affects the switching characteristics of the molecular junctions. The maximum value of on-off ratio can reach 72 at 1.6 V for the switch with zigzag SWCNT electrodes, suggesting potential applications of this junction in future design of light-driven molecular switches.

  15. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  16. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  17. Effect of molecular weight on the electrophoretic deposition of carbon black nanoparticles in moderately viscous systems.

    PubMed

    Modi, Satyam; Panwar, Artee; Mead, Joey L; Barry, Carol M F

    2013-08-01

    Electrophoretic deposition from viscous media has the potential to produce in-mold assembly of nanoparticles onto three-dimensional parts in high-rate, polymer melt-based processes like injection molding. The effects of the media's molecular weight on deposition behavior were investigated using a model system of carbon black and polystyrene in tetrahydrofuran. Increases in molecular weight reduced the electrophoretic deposition of the carbon black particles due to increases in suspension viscosity and preferential adsorption of the longer polystyrene chains on the carbon black particles. At low deposition times (≤5 s), only carbon black deposited onto the electrodes, but the deposition decreased with increasing molecular weight and the resultant increases in suspension viscosity. For longer deposition times, polystyrene codeposited with the carbon black, with the amount of polystyrene increasing with molecular weight and decreasing with greater charge on the polystyrene molecules. This deposition behavior suggests that use of lower molecular polymers and control of electrical properties will permit electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles from polymer melts for high-rate, one-step fabrication of nano-optical devices, biochemical sensors, and nanoelectronics. PMID:23848316

  18. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  19. Activation and splitting of carbon dioxide on the surface of an inorganic electride material

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshitake; Hirayama, Hiroyuki; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Torrisi, Antonio; Sushko, Peter V.; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Activation of carbon dioxide is the most important step in its conversion into valuable chemicals. Surfaces of stable oxide with a low work function may be promising for this purpose. Here we report that the surfaces of the inorganic electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 activate and split carbon dioxide at room temperature. This behaviour is attributed to a high concentration of localized electrons in the near-surface region and a corrugation of the surface that can trap oxygen atoms and strained carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide molecules. The [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface exposed to carbon dioxide is studied using temperature-programmed desorption, and spectroscopic methods. The results of these measurements, corroborated with ab initio simulations, show that both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide adsorb on the [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e−)4 surface at RT and above and adopt unusual configurations that result in desorption of molecular carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen upon heating. PMID:23986101

  20. Coumarin or benzoxazinone based novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant studies.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Mert Olgun; Uslu, Harun; Sarı, Suat; Alagöz, Mehmet Abdullah; Karakurt, Arzu; Alıcı, Bülent; Bilen, Cigdem; Yavuz, Emre; Gencer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2016-10-01

    Among many others, coumarin derivatives are known to show human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitory activity. Since hCA inhibition is one of the underlying mechanisms that account for the activities of some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), hCA inhibitors are expected to have anti-seizure properties. There are also several studies reporting compounds with an imidazole and/or benzimidazole moiety which exert these pharmacological properties. In this study, we prepared fifteen novel coumarin-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride, nine novel benzoxazinone-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride derivatives and evaluated their hCA inhibitory activities and along with fourteen previously synthesized derivatives we scanned their anticonvulsant effects. As all compounds inhibited purified hCA isoforms I and II, some of them also proved protective against Maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and ScMet induced seizures in mice. Molecular docking studies with selected coumarin derivatives have revealed that these compounds bind to the active pocket of the enzyme in a similar fashion to that previously described for coumarin derivatives. PMID:26207513

  1. Impact of Sulfur Oxides on Mercury Capture by Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACI, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric RAF dimer activation.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Bohuszewicz, Olga; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kolch, Walter; Rosta, Edina

    2014-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in cell regulatory mechanisms. Dimerization plays also a crucial role in the kinase activity of many kinases, including RAF, CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), with heterodimers often being the most active forms. However, the structural and mechanistic details of how phosphorylation affects the activity of homo- and hetero-dimers are largely unknown. Experimentally, synthesizing protein samples with fully specified and homogeneous phosphorylation states remains a challenge for structural biology and biochemical studies. Typically, multiple changes in phosphorylation lead to activation of the same protein, which makes structural determination methods particularly difficult. It is also not well understood how the occurrence of phosphorylation and dimerization processes synergize to affect kinase activities. In the present article, we review available structural data and discuss how MD simulations can be used to model conformational transitions of RAF kinase dimers, in both their phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. PMID:25109958

  3. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  4. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  5. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction. PMID:24020801

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  7. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  8. Novel molecular sources for dispersing boron in carbon-carbon composites. Final report, 8 September 1992-7 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1993-11-07

    Improving the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites is key to extending the applications of this material system into higher temperature regimes. While molecularly dispersed boron, through addition of carborane, helps to provide oxidation protection to phenolic derived carbon, the moisture affinity of the boria seriously affects composite performance. Substitution of furfuryl and pitch as the resin precursors significantly improved the moisture resistance of the carbon matrix material by stabilizing the boron at low temperatures and minimizing premature boria formation. Carborane addition to a commercial furfuryl/pitch blend (Kaiser Code88A) yielded a carbon char with reduced moisture affinity and improved oxidation resistance. Mechanical properties of the Code88A matrix composites were not significantly affected by the addition of carborane. Although sample size limitations in testing detracted from the demonstration of success, data suggests that the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbons can be significantly enhanced via this approach without detriment to the physical attributes and moisture resistance of the composite.

  9. Reprocessing of used tires into activated carbon and other products

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.; Serio, M.A.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    Landfilling used tires which are generated each year in the US is increasingly becoming an unacceptable solution. A better approach, from an environmental and economic standpoint, is to thermally reprocess the tires into valuable products such as activated carbon, other solid carbon forms (carbon black, graphite, and carbon fibers), and liquid fuels. In this study, high surface area activated carbons (> 800 m{sup 2}/g solid product) were produced in relatively high yields by pyrolysis of tires at up to 900 C, followed by activation in CO{sub 2} at the same temperature. The surface areas of these materials are comparable with those of commercial activated carbons. The efficiency of the activation process (gain in specific surface area/loss in mass) was greatest (up to 138 m{sup 2}/g original tire) when large pieces of tire material were used ({approximately} 170 mg). Oxygen pretreatment of tires was found to enhance both the yield and the surface area of the carbon product. High-pressure treatment of tires at low temperatures (< 400 C) is an alternative approach if the recovery of carbon black or fuel oils is the primary objective.

  10. A systematic investigation of the preparation and properties of composite carbon molecular sieves containing inorganic oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Henry C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to define the methodology for the preparation and characterization of new carbon-based molecular sieves with composite structures. Carbon molecular sieves have found increasing application in the field of separation and purification of gases. These materials are relatively easy to prepare and their surfaces can be modified to some extent. It is expected that by combining inorganic oxides with the carbonaceous structure one can begin to design composite materials with a wider range of possible chemical and physical properties. In this way, the IOM-CMS materials may confer distinct advantages over pure carbon molecular sieves, not just for separation, but also for catalysis. The most recent results in the design and characterization of these IOM-CMS materials are reviewed and summarized. Directions for further research are also presented.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  12. Ameliorative effects of pomegranate on carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity in rats: A molecular and histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Nassan, Mohamed Abdo; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the hepatoprotective effects of pomegranate (POM) against oxidative stress in a rat model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage. Injection of rats with CCl4 resulted in hepatic inflammation and lipid accumulation via the upregulation of interleukin (IL)‑6 and sterol regulatory element‑binding protein 1c (SREBP‑1c) mRNA expression. CCl4 induced downregulation of the anti‑inflammatory factors alpha 2‑macroglobulin (α‑2M) and IL‑10 in comparison with the POM treated group. In addition, CCl4 induced downregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S‑transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) expression. Conversely, prior administration of POM counteracted the deleterious alterations induced by CCl4. POM downregulated CCl4-induced IL‑6 upregulation, normalized the increase in SREBP‑1c expression, and prevented CCl4‑induced α‑2M downregulation. POM counteracted CCL4‑induced alterations via immunosuppressive, anti‑inflammatory and regenerative effects by upregulating transforming growth factor‑β1, HSP70 and IL-10 mRNA expression. In addition, POM increased reactive oxygen species scavenging activity by augmenting the antioxidant defense mechanism against CCl4 hepatotoxicity, as demonstrated by detecting SOD, CAT and GST expression. These results confirm that, at the molecular level, POM exerts hepatoprotective effects against CCl4‑induced oxidative stress and liver tissue damage. PMID:26936425

  13. Molecular carbon isotopic evidence for the origin of geothermal hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Donchin, J. H.; Nehring, N. L.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Isotopic measurements of individual geothermal hydrocarbons that are, as a group, of higher molecular weight than methane are reported. It is believed in light of this data that the principal source of hydrocarbons in four geothermal areas in western North America is the thermal decomposition of sedimentary or groundwater organic matter.

  14. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED ELECTROPOLYMERIZED CARBON ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) selective for fluorescein, rhodamine or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were electropolymerized onto graphite electrodes using an aqueous solution equimolar in resorsinol/ortho-phenylenediamine and in the presence of the template mole...

  15. Carbon nanostructures as catalytic support for chemiluminescence of sulfur compounds in a molecular emission cavity analysis system.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norouz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi; Koleini, Mohammad Mehdi

    2009-06-30

    The effect of different substrates including stainless steel, activated carbon, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), fullerenes (C60, C70, etc.) and SWCNTs doped with iron and palladium nanoparticles were compared for catalytic chemiluminescence reaction of sulfur compounds in a flame-containing cavity of molecular emission cavity analysis (MECA) system. Different forms of CNT substrates were fabricated using electric arc-discharge method. The blue emission of excited S2 was monitored using a CCD camera. The results demonstrate that, due to the high surface area, plenty of basal planes, high thermal conductivity, and high flexibility of the carbon nanostructure as appropriate support, carbon nanostructures play an important role in catalytic chemiluminescence emission of sulfur compounds in MECA. Moreover, the presence of metallic nanoparticles doped on carbon nanostructures enhances their catalytic effect. The results revealed that under similar conditions, SWCNTs/Pd doped nanoparticles, SWCNTs/Fe doped nanoparticles, SWCNTs, MWCNTs and fullerenes have the most catalytic effects on chemiluminescence of sulfur compounds, respectively. PMID:19463563

  16. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  17. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μm

  18. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  19. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  20. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  1. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption. PMID:19576692

  2. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  3. Tight-binding model for amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions formed with carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Hyeon; Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-05-01

    We measured the conductance of a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junction formed with carbon electrodes by using a scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. The tight-binding model that includes the molecular backbone states accurately captured the experimentally measured the molecular conductance and the exponential decay trend of the conductance with the molecular backbone length. Furthermore, we found that this model tracked successfully the shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital toward the Fermi energy as increasing the molecular length. Finally, we found that the tight-binding model explaining more week coupling strength with the graphite electrode than that with the Au electrode is in quantitative agreement with the density functional theory calculations.

  4. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes.

    PubMed

    Schoell, M; Schouten, S; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Summons, R E

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ((13)C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in (18)O (delta(18)O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (delta(13)C = 25.4 +/- 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C(35) hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing (13)C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples (delta(13)C = -29.5 to -31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone. PMID:17831625

  5. From oligomers to molecular giants of soybean oil in supercritical carbon dioxide medium: 1. Preparation of polymers with lower molecular weight from soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengshe; Sharma, Brajendra K; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2007-01-01

    Polymers with a low molecular weight derived from soybean oil have been prepared in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium by cationic polymerization. Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate was used as an initiator. Influences of polymerization temperature, amount of initiator, and carbon dioxide pressure on the molecular weight were investigated. It is shown that the higher polymerization temperature favors polymers with relatively higher molecular weights. Larger amounts of initiator also provide polymers with higher molecular weights. Higher pressure favors polymers with relatively higher molecular weights. The applications of these soy-based materials will be in the lubrication and hydraulic fluid areas. PMID:17206812

  6. Molecular fossils of prokaryotes in ancient authigenic minerals: archives of microbial activity in reefs and mounds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, Katrin; Birgel, Daniel; Richoz, Sylvain; Westphal, Hildegard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    Molecular fossils (lipid biomarkers) are commonly used as proxies in organic-rich sediments of various sources, including eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Usually, molecular fossils of organisms transferred from the water column to the sediment are studied to monitor environmental changes (e.g., temperature, pH). Apart from these 'allochthonous' molecular fossils, prokaryotes are active in sediments and mats on the seafloor and leave behind 'autochthonous' molecular fossils in situ. In contrast to many phototrophic organisms, most benthic sedimentary prokaryotes are obtaining their energy from oxidation or reduction of organic or inorganic substrates. A peculiarity of some of the sediment-thriving prokaryotes is their ability to trigger in situ mineral precipitation, often but not only due to metabolic activity, resulting in authigenic rocks (microbialites). During that process, prokaryotes are rapidly entombed in the mineral matrix, where the molecular fossils are protected from early (bio)degradation. In contrast to other organic compounds (DNA, proteins etc.), molecular fossils can be preserved over very long time periods (millions of years). Thus, molecular fossils in authigenic mineral phases are perfectly suitable to trace microbial activity back in time. Among the best examples of molecular fossils, which are preserved in authigenic rocks are various microbialites, forming e.g. in phototrophic microbial mats and at cold seeps. Microbialite formation is reported throughout earth history. We here will focus on reefal microbialites form the Early Triassic and the Holocene. After the End-Permian mass extinction, microbialites covered wide areas on the ocean margins. In microbialites from the Griesbachian in Iran and Turkey (both Neotethys), molecular fossils of cyanobacteria, archaea, anoxygenic phototrophs, and sulphate-reducing bacteria indicate the presence of layered microbial mats on the seafloor, in which carbonate precipitation was induced. In association with

  7. Dust around AFGL 2688, molecular shielding, and the production of carbon chain molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kroto, H.

    1990-01-01

    The molecular, IR, and optical maps of the evolved carbon star AFGL 2688 (the 'Egg' Nebula) are all consistent with a model of a bipolar outflow of approximately 0.0001 solar masses/yr that stopped as this object evolved beyond the asymptotic giant branch about 200 years ago. In order to explain the extended HC7N emission around this star, it is proposed that carbon grains are collisionally fragmented as they supersonically steam through the circumstellar envelope.

  8. A 1-D Model of the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Developments to improve system efficiency and reliability for water and carbon dioxide separation systems on crewed vehicles combine sub-scale systems testing and multi-physics simulations. This paper describes the development of COMSOL simulations in support of the Life Support Systems (LSS) project within NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. Specifically, we model the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) operating on the International Space Station (ISS).

  9. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  10. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  11. Role of Surfactant Molecular Structure on Self Assembly: Aqueous SDBS on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttipong, Manaswee; Thompson, John R.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Stabilizing aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes mono-dispersed in diameter and chirality remains elusive. Surfactants have proven useful in deploying ultra-centrifugation techniques, but the molecular mechanism responsible for their effectiveness remains not fully understood. Based on a number of recent molecular simulation results, including those from our group, it appears that the morphology of the self-assembled surfactant aggregates on the carbon nanotubes strongly affects the effective potential of mean force between pairs of interacting carbon nanotubes. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant molecular structure on the properties of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates. We employ equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We consider the surfactant SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) with benzene ring located on the fifth or on the twelfth carbon atom in the tail, and the surfactant AOT [sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate]. The simulations are conducted at room conditions for different surface coverages on (6,6), (12,12), and (20,20) single walled carbon nanotubes. These new results will help us identify the surfactant properties that allow us to manipulate nanotube-nanotube effective interactions. Research supported by the Department of Energy via CANTEC.

  12. Activated carbons from North Dakota lignite and leonardite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Olson, E.S.; Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-01

    In a research and development program on carbon development, the EERC investigated key factors in the preparation of activated carbons from low-rank coals indigenous to North Dakota. The carbons were prepared for potential sorption applications with flue gas and waste liquid streams. Testing involved as-received, physically cleaned, and demineralized samples of a lignite and a leonardite. The following variables were examined: mineral matter content (7-19 wt%), carbonization temperature (350{degrees}-550{degrees}C), activation temperature (700{degrees}-1000{degrees}C), and activation time (10-60 minutes). Activated carbon samples were characterized by sorption of gaseous sulfur dioxide and liquid iodine. For both lignite and leonardite, sorption activity increased with lower mineral content and correlated with medium carbonization temperature and relatively high activation temperature but relatively short activation time. Steam activation did not significantly enhance the char`s sorptive capacity. Physically cleaned leonardite char had SO{sub 2} sorptive capacities as high as 10.9% of the sample weight at ambient temperatures.

  13. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A MOBILE ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption has become a standard procedure for the cleanup of contaminated water streams. To facilitate such cleanup at hazardous waste and spill sites, mobile carbon adsorption units have been constructed and are now in use. Their primary drawback is the logisti...

  14. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  15. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  16. Carbon dioxide sorption in a nanoporous octahedral molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Izaak; Nelson, Eric B.; Li, Lan

    2015-08-01

    We have performed first-principles density functional theory calculations, incorporated with van der Waals interactions, to study CO2 adsorption and diffusion in nanoporous solid—OMS-2 (Octahedral Molecular Sieve). We found the charge, type, and mobility of a cation, accommodated in a porous OMS-2 material for structural stability, can affect not only the OMS-2 structural features but also CO2 sorption performance. This paper targets K+, Na+, and Ba2+ cations. First-principles energetics and electronic structure calculations indicate that Ba2+ has the strongest interaction with the OMS-2 porous surface due to valence electrons donation to the OMS-2 and molecular orbital hybridization. However, the Ba-doped OMS-2 has the worst CO2 uptake capacity. We also found evidence of sorption hysteresis in the K- and Na-doped OMS-2 materials.

  17. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR CARBON AS A TRACER OF TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Burgh, Eric B.; France, Kevin; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    Using archival, high-resolution far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra of 34 Galactic O and B stars, we measure C I column densities and compare them with measurements from the literature of CO and H{sub 2} with regard to understanding the presence of translucent clouds along the line of sight. We find that the CO/H{sub 2} and CO/C I ratios provide good discriminators for the presence of translucent material, and both increase as a function of molecular fraction, f{sup N} = 2N(H{sub 2})/N(H). We suggest that sightlines with values below CO/H{sub 2} approx10{sup -6} and CO/C I approx1 contain mostly diffuse molecular clouds, while those with values above sample clouds in the transition region between diffuse and dark. These discriminating values are also consistent with the change in slope of the CO versus H{sub 2} correlation near the column density at which CO shielding becomes important, as evidenced by the change in photochemistry regime studied by Sheffer et al. Based on the lack of correlation of the presence of translucent material with traditional measures of extinction, we recommend defining 'translucent clouds' based on the molecular content rather than line-of-sight extinction properties.

  18. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  19. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  20. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  1. STEM Imaging of Single Pd Atoms in Activated Carbon Fibers Considered for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Klaus; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Contescu, Cristian I; Pennycook, Stephen J; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging individual Pd atoms that are highly dispersed throughout the volume of activated carbon fibers. Simultaneous acquisition of high-angle annular dark-field and bright-field images allows correlation of the location of single Pd atoms with microstructural features of the carbon host material. Sub-Angstrom imaging conditions revealed that 18 wt% of the total Pd content is dispersed as single Pd atoms in three re-occurring local structural arrangements. The identified structural configurations may represent effective storage sites for molecular hydrogen through Kubas complex formation as discussed in detail in the preceding article.

  2. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the morphology transformations in unzipped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Yingnan; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Xin; Li, Wen; Dong, Zihan; Wang, Wensen

    2016-08-01

    Tuning the assembly of carbon nanomaterials to obtain a kaleidoscope of carbon nanostructures is very important and challenging for the development of nanotechnology. Using molecular dynamics simulations method, we studied the morphology transformations of unzipped CNTs with different unzipping patterns. By modulating the unzipping patterns, the CNTs could self-assemble forming graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanoscrolls. From the energy analyzation, we find that the van der Waals interactions are responsible for the assembly of the unzipped CNTs. This unusual self-assembling method for CNTs could provide clues for further studies on the design of novel nanostructures.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Kimoto, Yoshihisa; Tada, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hideki; Akita, Seiji; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2007-05-15

    Molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes. We have proposed a simulation model which includes the interaction between a high-energy incident electron and a carbon atom, based on Monte Carlo method using the elastic-scattering cross section. The atomic level behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube under electron irradiation is demonstrated in nanosecond time scale. The incident electron energy, tube diameter, and tube temperature dependences of electron-irradiation effects are studied with the simulation.

  5. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  6. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  7. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  8. Parametric Study of ReaxFF Simulation Parameters for Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Reactive Carbon Gases.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Bandyopadhyay, Ananyo; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2012-09-11

    The development of innovative carbon-based materials can be greatly facilitated by molecular modeling techniques. Although the Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) can be used to simulate the chemical behavior of carbon-based systems, the simulation settings required for accurate predictions have not been fully explored. Using the ReaxFF, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to simulate the chemical behavior of pure carbon and hydrocarbon reactive gases that are involved in the formation of carbon structures such as graphite, buckyballs, amorphous carbon, and carbon nanotubes. It is determined that the maximum simulation time step that can be used in MD simulations with the ReaxFF is dependent on the simulated temperature and selected parameter set, as are the predicted reaction rates. It is also determined that different carbon-based reactive gases react at different rates, and that the predicted equilibrium structures are generally the same for the different ReaxFF parameter sets, except in the case of the predicted formation of large graphitic structures with the Chenoweth parameter set under specific conditions. PMID:26605713

  9. Analysis of carbon in SrTiO{sub 3} grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Bharat; Cagnon, Joeel; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-11-15

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to investigate carbon impurity concentrations in stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3} films grown by a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach that uses an effusion cell to supply strontium, a rf plasma source for oxygen and a metal organic titanium source (titanium tetra isopropoxide). The carbon concentration in the films was measured as a function of growth parameters. At sufficiently high growth temperatures (>800 degree sign C), the films contain a few ppm of carbon. The challenges in accurately quantifying low carbon concentrations are discussed. A carbon-containing contamination layer is detected on the surfaces of SrTiO{sub 3} substrates and air-exposed films by SIMS and in scanning transmission electron microscopy. The contamination layer could be removed by high-temperature predeposition oxygen plasma cleaning.

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  12. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoell, M. ); Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste', J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de ); Summons, R.E. )

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ([sup 13]C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in [sup 18]O ([delta][sup 18]O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes ([delta][sup 13]C = 25.4 [+-] 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C[sub 35] hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing [sup 13]C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples ([delta][sup 13]C = 29.5 to [minus]31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  13. Ectomycorrhizal fungi increase soil carbon storage: molecular signatures of mycorrhizal competition driving soil C storage at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Barry, B. K.; Hawkes, C.

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon storage and decay is regulated by the activity of free-living decomposer microbes, which can be limited by nitrogen availability. Many plants associate with symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi on their roots, which produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes and may be able to compete with free-living decomposers for soil organic nitrogen. By doing so, ectomycorrhizal fungi may able to induce nitrogen limitation and reduce activity of free-living microbial decomposition by mining soil organic nitrogen. The implication is that ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems should have increased soil carbon storage relative to non-ectomycorrhizal systems, which has been confirmed at a global scale. To investigate these effects, we analyzed 364 globally distributed observations of soil fungal communities using 454 sequencing of the ITS region, along with soil C and N concentrations, climate and chemical data. We assigned operational taxonomic units using the QIIME pipeline and UNITE fungal database and assigned fungal reads as ectomycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal based on current taxonomic knowledge. We tested for associations between ectomycorrhizal abundance, climate, and soil carbon and nitrogen. Sites with greater soil carbon had quantitatively more ectomycorrhizal fungi within the soil microbial community based on fungal sequence abundance, after accounting for soil nitrogen availability. This is consistent with our hypothesis that ectomycorrhizal fungi induce nitrogen-limitation of free-living decomposers and thereby increase soil carbon storage. The strength of the mycorrhizal effect increased non-linearly with ectomycorrhizal abundance: the greater the abundance, the greater the effect size. Mean annual temperature, potential evapotranspiration, soil moisture and soil pH were also significant predictors in the final AIC selected model. This analysis suggests that molecular data on soil microbial communities can be used to make quantitative biogeochemical predictions. The

  14. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L; Roy, Ajit K

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested. PMID:27108606

  15. Effects of CO 2 activation on porous structures of coconut shell-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shenghui; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Kunbin; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shimin; Xia, Hongying

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, textural characterization of an activated carbon derived from carbonized coconut shell char obtained at carbonization temperature of 600 °C for 2 h by CO 2 activation was investigated. The effects of activation temperature, activation time and flow rate of CO 2 on the BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield of activated carbons prepared were evaluated systematically. The results showed that: (i) enhancing activation temperature was favorable to the formation of pores, widening of pores and an increase in mesopores; (ii) increasing activation time was favorable to the formation of micropores and mesopores, and longer activation time would result in collapsing of pores; (iii) increasing flow rate of CO 2 was favorable to the reactions of all active sites and formation of pores, further increasing flow rate of CO 2 would lead carbon to burn out and was unfavorable to the formation of pores. The degree of surface roughness of activated carbon prepared was measured by the fractal dimension which was calculated by FHH (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill) theory. The fractal dimensions of activated carbons prepared were greater than 2.6, indicating the activated carbon samples prepared had very irregular structures, and agreed well with those of average micropore size.

  16. Pitch-based activated carbon fibers: The effect of precursor composition on pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekinalp, Halil Levent

    Although researchers have previously investigated the effect of precursor differences on the final properties of activated carbon fibers (ACFs), those precursors were not well-characterized. In particular, detailed information about their molecular composition and anisotropy was not available. In this study, seven oligomeric fractions, each of well-defined composition and molecular weight (mol wt) distribution, were isolated from a commercially produced isotropic petroleum pitch (i.e., Marathon M-50) and used for the production of ACFs. Four of these precursors of varying oligomeric composition were fully isotropic and three contained different levels of mesophase, so that the effects of molecular composition and molecular order were successfully isolated from each other. After the precursors were melt-spun into fibers and stabilized, they were processed by so-called "direct activation", whereby carbonization and activation occurred simultaneously. Separate carbonization tests were also carried out in order to separate out the effects of carbonization vs. activation. Carbonization weight loss was found to be higher for fibers prepared from lower average mol wt (480--550 Da) precursors. The presence of mesophase per se did not affect weight loss during carbonization. On the other hand, activation weight loss (˜28 percent) was found to be essentially independent of precursor mol wt for all isotropic fibers. (Activation weight loss for mesophase-containing fibers was much lower.) The micropore volume of the ACFs was found to increase with decreasing precursor mol wt. However, the ratio of pores smaller than 7 A (i.e., the desired pore size for hydrogen storage) to the total pore volume (3.9--30 A) was found to be essentially constant for all isotropic precursors, suggesting that a similar activation mechanism occurred for all of these materials, with both new pore formation and pore widening proceeding at similar rates. For mesophase-containing precursors, on the

  17. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrase from Populus tremula x tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Larsson, S; Björkbacka, H; Forsman, C; Samuelsson, G; Olsson, O

    1997-07-01

    A leaf cDNA library from hybrid aspen, Populus tremula x tremuloides, was constructed. From this two different cDNA clones, denoted CA1a and CA1b, encoding a chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) were isolated and DNA sequenced. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the isolated CAs belong to the beta-CA family, and have identities around 70% to other dicotyledonous plant CAs. The two hybrid aspen cDNA clones display a high nucleotide sequence identity, only 12 nucleotides differ. Since only one gene copy of this soluble chloroplastic CA is present in the nuclear genome, we postulate that the two isolated cDNA clones are alleles. Northern blot hybridization revealed a CA transcript of ca. 1300 bases, 140 bases shorter than in pea. Western and northern blot hybridizations on crude protein extracts and on total RNA, respectively, isolated from stem and leaves, showed that hybrid aspen CA is expressed specifically in the leaf under the growth conditions used. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the mature hybrid aspen CA enzyme subunit has a molecular mass of 24.8 kDa. The enzyme was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified by affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization showed that the protein structure and the CO2-hydration activity are similar to the pea enzyme. Molecular characterization of a CA from a perennial plant has not previously been performed, and it demonstrates that both the structure and activity of hybrid aspen CA resembles CAs from annual plants. PMID:9247540

  18. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  19. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  20. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  1. Molecular Determinants of GS-9620-Dependent TLR7 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rebbapragada, Indrani; Birkus, Gabriel; Perry, Jason; Xing, Weimei; Kwon, HyockJoo; Pflanz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    GS-9620 is an orally administered agonist of Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 currently being evaluated in clinical studies for the treatment of chronic HBV and HIV patients. GS-9620 has shown antiviral efficacy in preclinical models of chronic hepadnavirus infection in woodchuck as well as chimpanzee. However, the molecular determinants of GS-9620-dependent activation of TLR7 are not well defined. The studies presented here elucidate GS-9620 subcellular distribution and characterize its molecular interactions with human TLR7 using structure-guided mutational analysis. Based on our results we present a molecular model of TLR7 bound to GS-9620. We also determine that several coding SNPs had no effect on GS-9620-dependent TLR7 activation. In addition, our studies provide evidence that TLR7 exists in a ligand-independent oligomeric state and that, TLR7 activation by GS-9620 is likely associated with compound-induced conformational changes. Finally, we demonstrate that activation of NF-κB and Akt pathways in primary plasmacytoid dendritic cells occur as immediate downstream cellular responses to GS-9620 stimulation. The data presented here further our understanding of the molecular parameters governing TLR7 activation by GS-9620, and more generally by nucleos/tide-related ligands. PMID:26784926

  2. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  3. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  4. Modeling of the Electro-Mechanical Response of Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Dynamics and Transport Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Maiti, Amitesh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the modeling of the electromechanical response of carbon nanotubes, utilizing molecular dynamics and transport calculations. The topics include: 1) Simulations of the experiment; 2) Effect of diameter, length and temperature; and 3) Study of sp3 coordination-"The Table experiment".

  5. Genotypic Variation in Soybean Molecular Responses to Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A critical step in maximizing crop yield in a future of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) is identifying genotypic variability in response to elevated [CO2] and understanding the molecular basis for the variation. We compared photosynthesis, leaf metabolites and global gene e...

  6. Molecular Dynamics Study of Carbon Nanotubes/Polyamide Reverse Osmosis Membranes: Polymerization, Structure, and Hydration.

    PubMed

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Inukai, Shigeki; Noguchi, Toru; Tanioka, Akihiko; Kawaguchi, Takeyuki; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-11-11

    Carbon nanotubes/polyamide (PA) nanocomposite thin films have become very attractive as reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this work, we used molecular dynamics to simulate the influence of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the polyamide molecular structure as a model case of a carbon nanotubes/polyamide nanocomposite RO membrane. It was found that the addition of SWCNTs decreases the pore size of the composite membrane and increases the Na and Cl ion rejection. Analysis of the radial distribution function of water confined in the pores of the membranes shows that SWCNT+PA nanocomposite membranes also exhibit smaller clusters of water molecules within the membrane, thus suggesting a dense membrane structure (SWCNT+PA composite membranes were 3.9% denser than bare PA). The results provide new insights into the fabrication of novel membranes reinforced with tubular structures for enhanced desalination performance. PMID:26505521

  7. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  8. High-pressure chemistry of molecular solids: evidences for novel extended phases of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C S

    1999-07-22

    At high pressures and temperatures, many molecular solids become unstable and transform into denser extended phases. Recently, we have discovered evidences for two novel extended phases of carbon dioxide at high pressures and temperatures: (1) an ionic form of dimeric CO,, C02+C03*- at 8-13 GPa and above 2000 K [I] and (2) a polymeric phase CO,-V above 35 GPa and 1800 K [2,3]. These extended phases can be quenched at room temperature at low pressures, from which their molecular and crystal structures have been determined. These transitions occur to soften highly repulsive intermolecular potentials via delocalization of electrons at high pressures and temperatures. Based on these and other previous results, we conjecture that three fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure chemistry are ionization, polymerization, and metallization, occurring in high-density molecular solids and fluids. [carbon dioxide, polymeric COZ, ionic CO, dimer, high-pressure chemistry, electron delocalization

  9. Detecting Extracellular Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Using Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Delacruz, Joannalyn; Mikulski, Rose; Tu, Chingkuang; Li, Ying; Wang, Hai; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Frost, Susan C.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Silverman, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Current research into the function of carbonic anhydrases in cell physiology emphasizes the role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases, such as carbonic anhydrase IX that has been identified in malignant tumors and is associated with extracellular acidification as a response to hypoxia. We present here a mass spectrometric method to determine the extent to which total carbonic anhydrase activity is due to extracellular carbonic anhydrase in whole cell preparations. The method is based on the biphasic rate of depletion of 18O from CO2 measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The slopes of the biphasic depletion are a sensitive measure of the presence of carbonic anhydrase outside and inside of the cells. This property is demonstrated here using suspensions of human red cells in which external carbonic anhydrase was added to the suspending solution. It is also applied to breast and prostate cancer cells which both express exofacial carbonic anhydrase IX. Inhibition of external carbonic anhydrase is achieved by use of a membrane impermeant inhibitor that was synthesized for this purpose, p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide attached to a polyethyleneglycol polymer. PMID:20417171

  10. Transport properties of carbon dioxide and ammonia in water - ethylene glycol mixtures from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2015-03-01

    The endothermic decomposition of ammonium carbamate has been proposed as a novel heat sink mechanism for aircraft thermal management (Johnson et al. SAE Technical Paper 2012-01-2190, 2012, doi:10.4271/2012-01-2190]). The products of this decomposition are carbon dioxide and ammonia which need to be efficiently removed in order to better control the decomposition reaction. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the transport properties of carbon dioxide and ammonia in the carrier fluid. In this work, an extensive set of molecular dynamics simulations was performed to better quantify the concentration dependence of solubility and diffusivity of carbon dioxide and ammonia in water, ethylene glycol, and their mixtures at standard temperature and pressure and at elevated temperature. The simulation results confirm the experimental observations that ammonia is more soluble than carbon dioxide in either water or ethylene glycol and that both carbon dioxide and ammonia are more soluble in ethylene glycol than in water. The simulations of water - ethylene glycol mixtures show that increasing the molar fraction of ethylene glycol leads to increased solubility of carbon dioxide and ammonia in the mixture. The authors gratefully acknowledge the DoD High Performance Computing Centers for computational resources.

  11. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    PubMed

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to < 3 nm. The effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on this oxidized carbon phosphide layer was subsequently probed in situ using XPS. Initially AO exposure resulted in a loss of carbon atoms from the surface, but increased the surface concentration of phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers. PMID:16853637

  12. Preparation of activated carbons from bituminous coals with zinc chloride activation

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.; Yeh, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by chemical activation from two Australian bituminous coals in this study. The preparation process consisted of zinc chloride impregnation followed by carbonization in nitrogen. The carbonization temperature ranges from 400 to 700 C. Experimental results reveal that an acid-washing process following the carbonization with ZnCl{sub 2} is necessary for preparing high-porosity carbons. Surface area, pore volume, and average pore diameter of the resulting carbons increase with the carbonization temperature to a maximum at 500 C and then begin to decrease. The maximum values of surface area and pore volume are larger for the carbon prepared from the coal with a lower O/C atomic ratio, while earlier findings from physical activation with CO{sub 2} have shown an opposite trend. An increase in particle size of the coal precursor leads to a reduction in porosity of the resulting carbons. The duration of the carbonization period affects the porosity of the resulting carbons, and the influence varies with the activation temperature.

  13. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  14. Extracellular Enzymatic Hydrolysis of High Molecular Weight Organic Carbon in Eastern Mediterranean Sapropelic and Non-Sapropelic Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, A.; Couper, L.; Arnosti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Organic carbon availability is an important constraint on microbial activity in the subsurface. Since most sedimentary organic matter is likely high molecular weight and complex, bioavailability of organic carbon is closely tied to activities of extracellular enzymes that hydrolyze organic macromolecules into transportable sizes. In part due to methodological difficulties, few measurements of extracellular enzymatic activities have been made in marine sediments below ca. 20cm depth. We measured extracellular hydrolysis of specific polysaccharides in deep sediments from sapropel and non-sapropel sections of a single core from the Eastern Mediterranean. In order to counteract adsorption of the substrate onto sediment particles, we developed an extraction protocol utilizing competitive desorption and mild heating. This treatment improved substrate recovery from incubation subsamples 5- to 10-fold, and enabled us to detect enzymatic activity in deep subsurface sediments. The wide variation in TOC between proximal sediment layers in this core provided an excellent opportunity to investigate (i) the rate at which subsurface microbial communities can hydrolyze a diversity of organic substrates, and (ii) rates and ranges of enzymatic capabilities as a function of sediment depth, organic carbon load and microbial community composition. Our experiments were carried out in long-term incubations (3-6 weeks), in which substrates were readily hydrolyzed, but hydrolysis rates differed among substrates and among sediment sections. Activity was not correlated with depth, but was highest in sections with highest organic carbon content. Isolation of strains able to grow directly on the substrates of interest are underway, and provide a promising path forward to illuminate mechanisms driving potential hydrolytic activity in the subsurface.

  15. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  16. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  17. Survival of selected bacterial species in sterilized activated carbon filters and biological activated carbon filters.

    PubMed Central

    Rollinger, Y; Dott, W

    1987-01-01

    The survival of selected hygienically relevant bacterial species in activated carbon (AC) filters on a bench scale was investigated. The results revealed that after inoculation of the test strains the previously sterilized AC absorbed all bacteria (10(6) to 10(7)). After a period of 6 to 13 days without countable bacteria in the effluent, the numbers of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas putida increased up to 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml of effluent and 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g of AC. When Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis were used, no growth in filters could be observed. The numbers of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida, however, decreased immediately and showed no regrowth in nonsterile AC from a filter which had been continuously connected to running tap water for 2 months. Under these conditions an autochthonous microflora developed on the carbon surface which could be demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and culturing methods (heterotrophic plate count). These bacteria reduced E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida densities in the effluent by a factor of more than 10(5) within 1 to 5 days. The hypothesis that antagonistic substances of the autochthonous microflora were responsible for the elimination of the artificial contamination could not be confirmed because less than 1% of the isolates of the autochthonous microflora were able to produce such substances as indicated by in vitro tests. Competition for limiting nutrients was thought to be the reason for the observed effects. PMID:3579281

  18. Ethanol decomposition on transition metal nanoparticles during carbon nanotube growth: ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Shimamura, Kohei; Oguri, Tomoya; Arifin, Rizal; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Yamaguchi, Shu

    2015-03-01

    The growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been widely discussed both from experimental and computational studies. Regarding the computational studies, most of the studies focuses on the aggregation of isolate carbon atoms on the catalytic metal nanoparticle, whereas the initial dissociation of carbon source molecules should affect the yield and quality of the products. On the other hand, we have studied the dissociation process of carbon source molecules on the metal surface by the ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. In the study, we investigate the ethanol dissociation on Pt and Ni clusters by ab initio MD simulations to discuss the initial stage of CNT growth by alcohol CVD technique. Part of this research is supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (a) (No. 24686026) from MEXT, Japan.

  19. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon aerogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Fengshou

    2014-03-01

    Activated carbon aerogel spheres (A-CAS) were successfully prepared by imposing KOH activation on aerogel spheres. It was found that the activation treatment did not destroy the order of the surface of the carbon aerogel spheres (CAS), but it improved the pore structure and adsorption performance of the products. With increasing burn-off, the amount of mesopores first decreased and then increased, with the amount of micropores continuously increasing. The highest measured BET surface area and micropore surface area reached 1198 and 786 m2/g, respectively. The adsorption capacity of benzene organic vapour on the A-CAS is more than eight times as large as that on CAS.

  20. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment. PMID:16290775

  1. Thermochemically activated carbon as an electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Ostafiychuk, Bogdan K; Budzulyak, Ivan M; Rachiy, Bogdan I; Vashchynsky, Vitalii M; Mandzyuk, Volodymyr I; Lisovsky, Roman P; Shyyko, Lyudmyla O

    2015-01-01

    The results of electrochemical studies of nanoporous carbon as electrode material for electrochemical capacitors (EC) are presented in this work. Nanoporous carbon material (NCM) was obtained from the raw materials of plant origin by carbonization and subsequent activation in potassium hydroxide. It is established that there is an optimal ratio of 1:1 between content of KOH and carbon material at chemical activation, while the maximum specific capacity of NCM is 180 F/g. An equivalent electrical circuit, which allows modeling of the impedance spectra in the frequency range of 10(-2) to 10(5) Hz, is proposed, and a physical interpretation of each element of the electrical circuit is presented. PMID:25852362

  2. Measured Enthalpies of Adsorption of Boron-Doped Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Dohnke, E.; Singh, A.; Schaeperkoetter, J.; Stalla, D.; Burress, J.; Jalisatgi, S.; Suppes, G.; Hawthorne, M. F.; Yu, P.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2012-02-01

    There is significant interest in the properties of boron-doped activated carbons for their potential to improve hydrogen storage.ootnotetextMultiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage, P. Pfeifer et al. DOE Hydrogen Program 2011 Annual Progress Report, IV.C.3, 444-449 (2011). Boron-doped activated carbons have been produced using a process involving the pyrolysis of decaborane (B10H14) and subsequent high-temperature annealing. In this talk, we will present a systematic study of the effect of different boron doping processes on the samples' structure, hydrogen sorption, and surface chemistry. Initial room temperature experiments show a 20% increase in the hydrogen excess adsorption per surface area compared to the undoped material. Experimental enthalpies of adsorption will be presented for comparison to theoretical predictions for boron-doped carbon materials. Additionally, results from a modified version of the doping process will be presented.

  3. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  4. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  5. Selection of desorbing solvents for organic compounds from active carbon tubes.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Y

    1996-01-01

    To ensure the effective performance of active carbon tubes for working environment measurements, suitable desorbing solvents were selected for 46 kinds of organic compounds by the phase equilibrium method. The criteria for suitable desorbing solvents in this study was desorption of the objective compounds from active carbon at efficiencies greater than 90% and to give good separation between its own peak and that of the objective compound on a gas chromatogram. For most non-polar or hydrophobic compounds, carbon disulfide was a versatile and effective solvent. But for polar and hydrophilic compounds like alcohol, N,N-dimethylformamide and dimethylsulfoxide were good desorbing solvents if their peaks did not overlap with those of the objective compounds. Mixtures of lower molecular weight alcohols with carbon disulfide or dichloromethane could be alternative solvents for hydrophilic compounds as well. A thermodynamic parameter of the solute-solvent system, i.e., the mixing energy derived from the solubility parameter, gave a rough indication of the effectiveness of solvents but it could not be used as a critical indicator for the efficient desorbing solvents for organic vapors collected on active carbon. PMID:8768662

  6. Bacteria associated with granular activated carbon particles in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Camper, A K; LeChevallier, M W; Broadaway, S C; McFeters, G A

    1986-01-01

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogenization procedure (developed previously) indicated that 41.4% of the water samples had heterotrophic plate count bacteria attached to carbon particles. With the enumeration procedures described, heterotrophic plate count bacteria were recovered at an average rate of 8.6 times higher than by conventional analyses. Over 17% of the samples contained carbon particles colonized with coliform bacteria as enumerated with modified most-probable-number and membrane filter techniques. In some instances coliform recoveries were 122 to 1,194 times higher than by standard procedures. Nearly 28% of the coliforms attached to these particles in drinking water exhibited the fecal biotype. Scanning electron micrographs of carbon fines from treated drinking water showed microcolonies of bacteria on particle surfaces. These data indicate that bacteria attached to carbon fines may be an important mechanism by which microorganisms penetrate treatment barriers and enter potable water supplies. PMID:3767356

  7. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  8. Carbon dioxide-activated carbons from almond tree pruning: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán, J.; González, J. F.; González-García, C. M.; Ramiro, A.; Sabio, E.; Román, S.

    2006-06-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from almond tree pruning by non-catalytic and catalytic gasification with carbon dioxide and their surface characteristics were investigated. In both series a two-stage activation procedure (pyrolysis at 800 °C in nitrogen atmosphere, followed by carbon dioxide activation) was used for the production of activated samples. In non-catalytic gasification, the effect of the temperature (650-800 °C for 1 h) and the reaction time (1-12 h at 650 °C) on the surface characteristics of the prepared samples was investigated. Carbons were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The textural parameters of the carbons present a linear relation with the conversion degree until a value of approximately 40%, when they come independent from both parameters studied. The highest surface area obtained for this series was 840 m 2 g -1. In the catalytic gasification the effect of the addition of one catalyst (K and Co) and the gasification time (2-4 h) on the surface and porosity development of the carbons was also studied. At the same conditions, Co leads to higher conversion values than K but this last gives a better porosity development.

  9. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  10. Insights into carbon nanotube and graphene formation mechanisms from molecular simulations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, A. J.; Ding, F.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene over the last two decades has heralded a new era in physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. During this time, intense efforts have been made towards understanding the atomic-scale mechanisms by which these remarkable nanostructures grow. Molecular simulations have made significant contributions in this regard; indeed, they are responsible for many of the key discoveries and advancements towards this goal. Here we review molecular simulations of CNT and graphene growth, and in doing so we highlight the many invaluable insights gained from molecular simulations into these complex nanoscale self-assembly processes. This review highlights an often-overlooked aspect of CNT and graphene formation—that the two processes, although seldom discussed in the same terms, are in fact remarkably similar. Both can be viewed as a 0D → 1D → 2D transformation, which converts carbon atoms (0D) to polyyne chains (1D) to a complete sp2-carbon network (2D). The difference in the final structure (CNT or graphene) is determined only by the curvature of the catalyst and the strength of the carbon-metal interaction. We conclude our review by summarizing the present shortcomings of CNT/graphene growth simulations, and future challenges to this important area.

  11. Insights into carbon nanotube and graphene formation mechanisms from molecular simulations: a review.

    PubMed

    Page, A J; Ding, F; Irle, S; Morokuma, K

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene over the last two decades has heralded a new era in physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. During this time, intense efforts have been made towards understanding the atomic-scale mechanisms by which these remarkable nanostructures grow. Molecular simulations have made significant contributions in this regard; indeed, they are responsible for many of the key discoveries and advancements towards this goal. Here we review molecular simulations of CNT and graphene growth, and in doing so we highlight the many invaluable insights gained from molecular simulations into these complex nanoscale self-assembly processes. This review highlights an often-overlooked aspect of CNT and graphene formation-that the two processes, although seldom discussed in the same terms, are in fact remarkably similar. Both can be viewed as a 0D → 1D → 2D transformation, which converts carbon atoms (0D) to polyyne chains (1D) to a complete sp(2)-carbon network (2D). The difference in the final structure (CNT or graphene) is determined only by the curvature of the catalyst and the strength of the carbon-metal interaction. We conclude our review by summarizing the present shortcomings of CNT/graphene growth simulations, and future challenges to this important area. PMID:25746411

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Active Zone Organization at Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Organization of presynaptic active zones is essential for development, plasticity, and pathology of the nervous system. Recent studies indicate a trans-synaptic molecular mechanism that organizes the active zones by connecting the pre- and the postsynaptic specialization. The presynaptic component of this trans-synaptic mechanism is comprised of cytosolic active zone proteins bound to the cytosolic domains of voltage-dependent calcium channels (P/Q-, N-, and L-type) on the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic component of this mechanism is the synapse organizer (laminin β2) that is expressed by the postsynaptic cell and accumulates specifically on top of the postsynaptic specialization. The pre- and the postsynaptic components interact directly between the extracellular domains of calcium channels and laminin β2 to anchor the presynaptic protein complex in front of the postsynaptic specialization. Hence, the presynaptic calcium channel functions as a scaffolding protein for active zone organization and as an ion-conducting channel for synaptic transmission. In contrast to the requirement of calcium influx for synaptic transmission, the formation of the active zone does not require the calcium influx through the calcium channels. Importantly, the active zones of adult synapses are not stable structures and require maintenance for their integrity. Furthermore, aging or diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system impair the active zones. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that organize the presynaptic active zones and summarize recent findings at the neuromuscular junctions and other synapses. PMID:22135013

  13. Magnetically Active Carbon Nanotubes at Work.

    PubMed

    Stopin, Antoine; Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-06-22

    Endohedral and exohedral assembly of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) recently gave birth to a large body of new hybrid nanomaterials (MNPs-CNTs) featuring properties that are otherwise not in reach with only the graphitic or metallic cores themselves. These materials feature enhanced magnetically guided motions (rotation and translation), magnetic saturation and coercivity, large surface area, and thermal stability. By guiding the reader through the most significant examples in this Concept paper, we describe how researchers in the field engineered and exploited the synergistic combination of these two types of nanoparticles in a large variety of current and potential applications, such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia therapeutics and in magnetic resonance imaging to name a few. PMID:26017389

  14. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Montmorillonite Using an Accurate and Flexible Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V N; Cygan, R T; Myshakin, E M

    2012-06-21

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, CO2. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating CO2 in the interlayer of layered clays, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation. An accurate and fully flexible set of interatomic potentials for CO2 is developed and combined with Clayff potentials to help evaluate the intercalation mechanism and examine the effect of molecular flexibility onthe diffusion rate of CO2 in water.

  15. Heterometal nanoparticles from Ru-based molecular clusters covalently anchored onto functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Vidick, Deborah; Ke, Xiaoxing; Devillers, Michel; Poleunis, Claude; Delcorte, Arnaud; Moggi, Pietro; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterometal clusters containing Ru and Au, Co and/or Pt are anchored onto carbon nanotubes and nanofibers functionalized with chelating phosphine groups. The cluster anchoring yield is related to the amount of phosphine groups available on the nanocarbon surface. The ligands of the anchored molecular species are then removed by gentle thermal treatment in order to form nanoparticles. In the case of Au-containing clusters, removal of gold atoms from the clusters and agglomeration leads to a bimodal distribution of nanoparticles at the nanocarbon surface. In the case of Ru–Pt species, anchoring occurs without reorganization through a ligand exchange mechanism. After thermal treatment, ultrasmall (1–3 nm) bimetal Ru–Pt nanoparticles are formed on the surface of the nanocarbons. Characterization by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) confirms their bimetal nature on the nanoscale. The obtained bimetal nanoparticles supported on nanocarbon were tested as catalysts in ammonia synthesis and are shown to be active at low temperature and atmospheric pressure with very low Ru loading. PMID:26199832

  16. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of novel benzylsulfamides using molecular modeling and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Göksu, Süleyman; Naderi, Ali; Akbaba, Yusuf; Kalın, Pınar; Akıncıoğlu, Akın; Gülçin, İlhami; Durdagi, Serdar; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a series of sulfamoyl carbamates and sulfamide derivatives were synthesized. Six commercially available benzyl amines and BnOH were reacted with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) to give sulfamoyl carbamates. Pd-C catalyzed hydrogenolysis reactions of carbamates afforded sulfamides. The inhibition effects of novel benzylsulfamides on the carbonic anhydrase I, and II isoenzymes (CA I, and CA II) purified from fresh human blood red cells were determined by Sepharose-4B-L-Tyrosine-sulfanilamide affinity chromatography. In vitro studies were shown that all of novel synthesized benzylsulfamide analogs inhibited, concentration dependently, both hCA isoenzyme activities. The novel benzylsulfamide compounds investigated here exhibited nanomolar inhibition constants against the two isoenzymes. Ki values were in the range of 28.48±0.01-837.09±0.19nM and 112.01±0.01-268.01±0.22nM for hCAI and hCA II isoenzymes, respectively. Molecular modeling approaches were also applied for studied compounds. PMID:25159522

  17. Molecular DYNAmics of Soil Organic carbon (DYNAMOS ): a project focusing on soils and carbon through data and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes

    2010-05-01

    Here we present the first results of the DynaMOS project whose main issue is the build-up of a new generation of soil carbon model. The modeling will describe together soil organic geochemistry and soil carbon dynamics in a generalized, quantitative representation. The carbon dynamics time scale envisaged here will cover the 1 to 1000 yr range and describe molecule behaviours (i.e.)carbohydrate, peptide, amino acid, lignin, lipids, their products of biodegradation and uncharacterized carbonaceous species of biological origin. Three main characteristics define DYNAMOS model originalities: it will consider organic matter at the molecular scale, integrate back to global scale and account for component vertical movements. In a first step, specific data acquisition will concern the production, fate and age of carbon of individual organic compounds. Dynamic parameters will be acquired by compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of both 13C and 14C, by GC/C/IR-MS and AMS. Sites for data acquisition, model calibration and model validation will be chosen on the base of their isotopic history and environmental constraints: 13C natural labeling (with and without C3/C4 vegetation changes), 13C/15N-labelled litter application in both forest and cropland. They include some long-term experiments owned by the partners themselves plus a worldwide panel of sites. In a second step the depth distribution of organic species, isotopes and ages in soils (1D representation) will be modeled by coupling carbon dynamics and vertical movement. Besides the main objective of providing a robust soil carbon dynamics model, DYNAMOS will assess and model the alteration of the isotopic signature of molecules throughout decay and create a shared database of both already published and new data of compound specific information. Issues of the project will concern different scientific fields: global geochemical cycles by refining the description of the terrestrial carbon cycle and entering the chemical

  18. Molecular DYNAmics of Soil Organic carbon (DYNAMOS *): a project focusing on soils and carbon through data and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatté, C.; Balesdent, J.; Derenne, S.; Derrien, D.; Dignac, M.; Egasse, C.; Ezat, U.; Gauthier, C.; Mendez-Millan, M.; Nguyen Tu, T.; Rumpel, C.; Sicre, M.; Zeller, B.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present the first results of the DynaMOS project whose main issue is the build-up of a new generation of soil carbon model. The modeling will describe together soil organic geochemistry and soil carbon dynamics in a generalized, quantitative representation. The carbon dynamics time scale envisaged here will cover the 1 to 1000 yr range and described molecules will be carbohydrate, peptide, amino acid, lignin, lipids, their products of biodegradation and uncharacterized carbonaceous species of biological origin. Three main characteristics define DYNAMOS model originalities: it will consider organic matter at the molecular scale, integrate back to global scale and account for component vertical movements. In a first step, specific data acquisition will concern the production, fate and age of carbon of individual organic compounds. Dynamic parameters will be acquired by compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of both 13C and 14C, by GC/C/IR-MS and AMS. Sites for data acquisition, model calibration and model validation will be chosen on the base of their isotopic history and environmental constraints: 13C natural labeling (with and without C3/C4 vegetation changes), 13C/15N-labelled litter application in both forest and cropland. They include some long-term experiments owned by the partners themselves plus a worldwide panel of sites. In a second step the depth distribution of organic species, isotopes and ages in soils (1D representation) will be modeled by coupling carbon dynamics and vertical movement. Besides the main objective of providing a robust soil carbon dynamics model, DYNAMOS will assess and model the alteration of the isotopic signature of molecules throughout decay and create a shared database of both already published and new data of compound specific information. Issues of the project will concern different scientific fields: global geochemical cycles by refining the description of the terrestrial carbon cycle and entering the chemical

  19. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  20. Black Carbon in Estuarine (Coastal) High-molecular-weight Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean constitutes one of the largest pools of organic carbon in the biosphere, yet much of its composition is uncharacterized. Observations of black carbon (BC) particles (by-products of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning) in the atmosphere, ice, rivers, soils and marine sediments suggest that this material is ubiquitous, yet the contribution of BC to the ocean s DOM pool remains unknown. Analysis of high-molecular-weight DOM isolated from surface waters of two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean finds that BC is a significant component of DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of BC to the ocean through DOM. We show that BC comprises 4-7% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at coastal ocean sites, which supports the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition. Flux calculations suggest that BC could be as important as vascular plant-derived lignin in terms of carbon inputs to the ocean. Production of BC sequesters fossil fuel- and biomass-derived carbon into a refractory carbon pool. Hence, BC may represent a significant sink for carbon to the ocean.

  1. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  2. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration. PMID:26257348

  3. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  4. Diffusion of methane and carbon dioxide in carbon molecular sieve membranes by multinuclear pulsed field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Robert; Kanungo, Rohit; Kiyono-Shimobe, Mayumi; Koros, William J; Vasenkov, Sergey

    2012-07-10

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are promising materials for energy efficient separations of light gases. In this work, we report a detailed microscopic study of carbon dioxide and methane self-diffusion in three CMS membrane derived from 6FDA/BPDA(1:1)-DAM and Matrimid polymers. In addition to diffusion of one-component sorbates, diffusion of a carbon dioxide/methane mixture was investigated. Self-diffusion studies were performed by the multinuclear (i.e., (1)H and (13)C) pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR technique which combines the advantages of high field (17.6 T) NMR and high magnetic field gradients (up to 30 T/m). Diffusion measurements were carried out at different temperatures and for a broad range of the root-mean-square displacements of gas molecules inside the membranes. The diffusion data obtained from PFG NMR are compared with the corresponding results of membrane permeation measurements reported previously for the same membrane types. The observed differences between the transport diffusivities and self-diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide and methane are discussed. PMID:22694169

  5. A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-23

    A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

  6. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of turbostratic dry and hydrated montmorillonite with intercalated carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M; Makaremi, Meysam; Romanov, Vyacheslav N; Jordan, Kenneth D; Guthrie, George D

    2014-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations using classical force fields were carried out to study energetic and structural properties of rotationally disordered clay mineral-water-CO2 systems at pressure and temperature relevant to geological carbon storage. The simulations show that turbostratic stacking of hydrated Na- and Ca-montmorillonite and hydrated montmorillonite with intercalated carbon dioxide is an energetically demanding process accompanied by an increase in the interlayer spacing. On the other hand, rotational disordering of dry or nearly dry smectite systems can be energetically favorable. The distributions of interlayer species are calculated as a function of the rotational angle between adjacent clay layers. PMID:24745358

  8. Fabrication of carbon nanotube nanogap electrodes by helium ion sputtering for molecular contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, Cornelius; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank; Muñoz Torres, David; Eaton, Thomas R.; Mayor, Marcel; Kappes, Manfred M.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; and others

    2014-03-10

    Carbon nanotube nanogaps have been used to contact individual organic molecules. However, the reliable fabrication of a truly nanometer-sized gap remains a challenge. We use helium ion beam lithography to sputter nanogaps of only (2.8 ± 0.6) nm size into single metallic carbon nanotubes embedded in a device geometry. The high reproducibility of the gap size formation provides a reliable nanogap electrode testbed for contacting small organic molecules. To demonstrate the functionality of these nanogap electrodes, we integrate oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecular rods, and measure resistance before and after gap formation and with and without contacted molecules.

  9. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study of successive hydrogenation reactions of carbon monoxide producing methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thi Nu; Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    Doing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate a possibility of hydrogenation of carbon monoxide producing methanol step by step. At first, the hydrogen atom reacts with the carbon monoxide molecule at the excited state forming the formyl radical. Formaldehyde was formed after adding one more hydrogen atom to the system. Finally, absorption of two hydrogen atoms to formaldehyde produces methanol molecule. This study is performed by using the all-electron mixed basis approach based on the time dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation for an electronic ground-state configuration and the one-shot GW approximation for an electronic excited state configuration.

  10. How does an amorphous surface influence molecular binding?--ovocleidin-17 and amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Colin L; Harding, John H; Quigley, David; Rodger, P Mark

    2015-07-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate interacting with the protein ovocleidin-17 are presented. These simulations demonstrate that the amorphisation of the calcium carbonate surface removes water structure from the surface. This reduction of structure allows the protein to bind with many residues, unlike on crystalline surfaces where binding is strongest when only a few residues are attached to the surface. Basic residues are observed to dominate the binding interactions. The implications for protein control over crystallisation are discussed. PMID:26009013

  11. Chars pyrolyzed from oil palm wastes for activated carbon preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Lua, A.C.; Guo, J.

    1999-01-01

    Chars pyrolyzed from extracted oil palm fibers for the preparation of activated carbons were studied. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and hold time on density, porosity, yield, BET and micropore surface areas, total pore volume, and pore size distributions of chars were investigated. The optimum conditions for pyrolysis were found to be at a pyrolysis temperature of 850 C for a hold time of 3.5 h. Scanning electron micrographs of the char surfaces verified the presence of porosities. The experimental results showed that it was feasible to produce chars with high BET and micropore surface areas from extracted oil palm fibers. The resulting chars will be subjected to steam or carbon dioxide activation to prepare activated carbons for use as gas adsorbents for air pollution control.

  12. Modified Activated Carbon to be Used in Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S.; de Silva, W. R. M.; de Silva, K. M. N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study a novel nano composite of hydroxyapatite nano particles impregnated activated carbon (C-HAp), which was synthesized in our own method, was used in iron adsorption studies. The study was conducted in order to investigate the potential of using C-HAp nanocomposite to be used in clinical detoxifications such as acute iron toxicity where the use of Activated carbon (GAC) is not very effective. Adsorption studies were conducted for synthetic solutions of Fe2+, Fe3+ and iron syrup using GAC, C-HAp and neat HAp as adsorbents. According to the results C-HAp nano composite showed improved properties than GAC in adsorbing Fe2+, Fe3+ and also Fe ions in iron syrup solutions. Thus the results of the in-vitro studies of iron adsorption studies indicated the potential of using C-HAp as an alternative to activated carbon in such clinical applications.

  13. Impact of sulfur oxides on mercury capture by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Presto, Albert A; Granite, Evan J

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACl, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface. PMID:17948811

  14. Impact of sulfur oxides on mercury capture by activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Albert A. Presto; Evan J. Granite

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACI, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO{sub 2} concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO{sub 3} inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation for flow characteristics in nanochannels and single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, H.; Imae, T.; Kaneda, M.; Suga, K.

    2014-08-01

    Flows in graphite-, diamond- and silicon-walled nanochannels are discussed by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Flows in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene- walled nanochannels are also investigated. It is found that the flow rate in the graphite-walled channel tends to be the largest because of its slippery wall structure by the short bond length and the high molecular density of the CNTs. The flow rate in the single walled CNT at a very narrow diameter tends to increase although such a tendency is not seen in the graphene-walled channel.

  16. Effects of molecular adsorption on electron transport properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Moonsub

    2005-03-01

    Highly sensitive response of semiconducting single-walled carbon naotubes (SWNTs) to molecular adsorption provides a simple yet efficient direction in exploiting their unique electrical properties. For example, simultaneous doping and nearly ideal gate efficiencies are achieved with polymer electrolytes. However, highly sensitive responses can also lead to difficulties in interpretation of many observations such as the controversy surrounding whether oxygen adsorption causes doping or changes in the nature of SWNT-metal contacts. Effects of molecular adsorption from oxygen in the ambient surrounding to polymers with varying chemical groups on the electrical properties of SWNTs will be discussed.

  17. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  18. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  19. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  20. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  1. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients in supercritical carbon dioxide using a coated capillary column

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.C.; Tan, C.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of ethyl acetate, toluene, phenol, and caffeine in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by a chromatographic peak broadening technique in a coated capillary column at temperatures of 308, 318, and 328 K and pressures up to 145 bar. A linear adsorption in the polymer layer coated on the inner wall of the capillary column was observed. The experimentally determined diffusion coefficients showed substantial agreement with those reported in the literature. The diffusion coefficients were in the order of 10[sup [minus]4] cm[sup 2]/s and decreased with increasing carbon dioxide density. Based on the molecular diffusion coefficient data reported here and those published elsewhere, an empirically modified Wilke-Chang equation was proposed which was found to be more quantitative than some existing equations such as the Stokes-Einstein and Wilke-Chang equations.

  2. Growth and activity of reservoir microorganisms under carbon capture and storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage is a technology to decelerate global warming by reducing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. To ensure safe long-term storage of CO2 in the underground a number of factors need to be considered. One of them is microbial activity in storage reservoirs, which can lead to the formation of acidic metabolites, H2S or carbonates which then might affect injectivity, permeability, pressure build-up and long-term operability. Our research focused on the effect of high CO2 concentrations on growth and activity of selected thermophilic fermenting and sulphate-reducing bacteria isolated from deep reservoirs. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a certain sterilizing effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures with 100 bar of hydrostatic pressure. However, when provided with a surface for attachment, CO2-inhibited cells restarted growth after CO2 release. The same was observed for organisms able to form spores. Further experiments will examine physiological and molecular properties of the model organism allowing for prediction of its sensitivity and/or adaptability to carbon dioxide in potential future storage sites.

  3. Carbon-Based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Su, D.; Murali, S.; Stoller, M.D.; Ganesh, K.J.; Cai, W.; Ferreira, P.J.; Pirkle, A.; Wallace, R.M.; Cychosz, K.A., Thommes, M.; Stach, E.A.; Ruoff, R.S.

    2011-06-24

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  4. Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  5. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The activation strain model is a powerful tool for understanding reactivity, or inertness, of molecular species. This is done by relating the relative energy of a molecular complex along the reaction energy profile to the structural rigidity of the reactants and the strength of their mutual interactions: ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). We provide a detailed discussion of the model, and elaborate on its strong connection with molecular orbital theory. Using these approaches, a causal relationship is revealed between the properties of the reactants and their reactivity, e.g., reaction barriers and plausible reaction mechanisms. This methodology may reveal intriguing parallels between completely different types of chemical transformations. Thus, the activation strain model constitutes a unifying framework that furthers the development of cross-disciplinary concepts throughout various fields of chemistry. We illustrate the activation strain model in action with selected examples from literature. These examples demonstrate how the methodology is applied to different research questions, how results are interpreted, and how insights into one chemical phenomenon can lead to an improved understanding of another, seemingly completely different chemical process. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:324–343. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1221 PMID:26753009

  6. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  7. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  8. Immobilization of a molecular catalyst on carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electro-catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Fusheng; Li, Lin; Tong, Lianpeng; Daniel, Quentin; Göthelid, Mats; Sun, Licheng

    2014-11-21

    Electrochemically driven water oxidation has been performed using a molecular water oxidation catalyst immobilized on hybrid carbon nanotubes and nano-material electrodes. A high turnover frequency (TOF) of 7.6 s(-1) together with a high catalytic current density of 2.2 mA cm(-2) was successfully obtained at an overpotential of 480 mV after 1 h of bulk electrolysis. PMID:25265253

  9. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  10. Carbon atom, dimer and trimer chemistry on diamond surfaces from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies of various atmospheres appearing in diamond film synthesis suggest evidence for carbon atoms, dimers, or trimers. Molecular dynamics simulations with the Brenner hydrocarbon potential are being used to investigate the elementary reactions of these species on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) surface. In principle these types of simulations can be extended to simulations of growth morphologies, in the 1-2 monolayer regime presently.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the ordering of carbon in highly supersaturated α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. W.; Perez, M.; Veiga, R. G. A.; Weck, A.

    2010-06-01

    A recently developed Fe-C interatomic potential has been used to investigate carbon in highly supersaturated α iron with an emphasis on the possible ways in which carbon can arrange itself on the octahedral sites of the tetragonally distorted α -iron lattice. Focusing particularly on the composition Fe16C2 , the embedded atom method potential used gives the same ground-state structure of Fe16C2 as density-functional-theory calculations. Moreover, when computing C-C interactions between two carbon atoms at 0 K with energy minimization, the preferred separation distance corresponds exactly to the octahedral site positions expected in Fe16C2 . It has been shown with molecular dynamics that the carbon atoms in Fe16C2 change how they order on octahedral sites during heating and during cooling. Finally, when investigating the interaction energy of Fe1-xCx for different carbon compositions, it is found that there is a clear minimum at x=0.11 for the fully ordered structure, corresponding to Fe16C2 composition. The results of these calculations are discussed with particular reference to carbon ordering in ferrous martensite.

  12. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  13. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  14. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  15. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  16. Reuse of spent granular activated carbon for organic micro-pollutant removal from treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingyi; Shang, Ran; Heijman, Bas; Rietveld, Luuk

    2015-09-01

    Spent granular activated carbons (sGACs) for drinking water treatments were reused via pulverizing as low-cost adsorbents for micro-pollutant adsorption from a secondary treated wastewater effluent. The changes of physicochemical characteristics of the spent carbons in relation to the fresh carbons were determined and were correlated to the molecular properties of the respective GAC influents (i.e. a surface water and a groundwater). Pore size distribution analysis showed that the carbon pore volume decreased over a wider size range due to preloading by surface water, which contains a broader molecular weight distribution of organic matter in contrast to the groundwater. However, there was still considerable capacity available on the pulverized sGACs for atrazine adsorption in demineralized water and secondary effluent, and this was particularly the case for the groundwater spent GAC. However, as compared to the fresh counterparts, the decreased surface area and the induced surface acidic groups on the pulverized sGACs contributed both to the lower uptake and the more impeded adsorption kinetic of atrazine in the demineralized water. Nonetheless, the pulverized sGACs, especially the one preloaded by surface water, was less susceptible to adsorption competition in the secondary effluent, due to its negatively charged surface which can repulse the accessibility of the co-present organic matter. This suggests the reusability of the drinking water spent GACs for micro-pollutant adsorption in the treated wastewater. PMID:26093103

  17. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon. PMID:25881437

  18. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors for Space Molecule Detection and Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie

    2001-01-01

    Both space molecule detection and clinical molecule diagnostics need to develop ultra sensitive biosensors for detection of less than attomole molecules such as amino acids for DNA. However all the electrode sensor systems including those fabricated from the existing carbon nanotubes, have a background level of nA (nanoAmp). This has limited DNA or other molecule detection to nA level or molecules whose concentration is, much higher than attomole level. A program has been created by NASA and NCI (National Cancer Institute) to exploit the possibility of carbon nanotube based biosensors to solve this problem for both's interest. In this talk, I will present our effort on the evaluation and novel design of carbon nanotubes as electrode biosensors with strategies to minimize background currents while maximizing signal intensity.The fabrication of nanotube electrode arrays, immobilization of molecular probes on nanotube electrodes and in vitro biosensor testing will also be discussed.

  19. Is atomic carbon a good tracer of molecular gas in metal-poor galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of molecular hydrogen (H2) in metal-rich galaxies, but is known to become ineffective in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. Atomic carbon has been suggested as a superior tracer of H2 in these metal-poor systems, but its suitability remains unproven. To help us to assess how well atomic carbon traces H2 at low metallicity, we have performed a series of numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds that cover a wide range of different metallicities. Our simulations demonstrate that in star-forming clouds, the conversion factor between [C I] emission and H2 mass, XCI, scales approximately as XCI ∝ Z-1. We recover a similar scaling for the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, but find that at this point in the evolution of the clouds, XCO is consistently smaller than XCI, by a factor of a few or more. We have also examined how XCI and XCO evolve with time. We find that XCI does not vary strongly with time, demonstrating that atomic carbon remains a good tracer of H2 in metal-poor systems even at times significantly before the onset of star formation. On the other hand, XCO varies very strongly with time in metal-poor clouds, showing that CO does not trace H2 well in starless clouds at low metallicity.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of activated carbon from asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandah, Munther Issa; Shawabkeh, Reyad; Al-Zboon, Mahmoud Ar'ef

    2006-11-01

    Asphalt (cheap and available in huge amount in Jordan) was converted into activated carbon powder by chemical treatment with sulphuric and nitric acids at 450 °C. The final product was characterized and found effective as adsorbent material. Its cation exchange capacity reaches 191.2 meq/100-g carbons when treated with 30 wt% acid/asphalt ratio without airflow rate injection and 208 meq/100-g carbons when 6.5 ml air/min was injected into the surface of the asphalt during activation at the same acid/asphalt weight ratio of 30 and temperature 450 °C. The zero point of charge for this product was found to be stable at pH value around 3 in the range of initial pH between 3 and 10.

  1. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  2. Molecular docking, TG/DTA, molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, natural bond orbital and TD-DFT analysis of diphenyl carbonate by DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, S.; Periandy, S.; Carthigayan, K.; Sebastian, S.

    2016-12-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis of Diphenyl Carbonate (DPC) is carried out by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques. It is found that all vibrational modes are in the expected region. Gaussian computational calculations were performed using B3LYP method with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The computed geometric parameters are in good agreement with XRD data. The observation shows that the structure of the carbonate group is unsymmetrical by ∼5° due to the attachment of the two phenyl rings. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interaction and charge delocalization are analyzed by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study and the results show the lone pair transition has higher stabilization energy compared to all other. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are calculated using the Gauge-Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) method. The chemical shifts computed theoretically go very closer to the experimental results. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) exhibit the high reactivity nature of the molecule. The non-linear optical property of the DPC molecule predicted theoretically found to be good candidate for NLO material. TG/DTA analysis was made and decomposition of the molecule with respect to the temperature was studied. DPC having the anthelmintic activity is docked in the Hemoglobin of Fasciola hepatica protein. The DPC has been screened to antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antibacterial effects.

  3. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  4. Molecular profiling of activated neurons by phosphorylated ribosome capture.

    PubMed

    Knight, Zachary A; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L; Wysocki, Robert W; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-21

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  5. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    PubMed

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. PMID:27107611

  6. Wheat digalactosyldiacylglycerol molecular species profiling using porous graphitic carbon stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Frantz S; Gaudin, Karen; Baillet, Arlette; Chaminade, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    The potential of porous graphitic carbon stationary phase (PGC) was assessed for the separation of molecular species of digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). Detection was by an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). A conventional optimization strategy allowed definition of a quaternary non-aqueous mobile phase and separation of 9 wheat DGDG molecular species with isocratic elution: methanol/toluene/tetrahydrofuran/chloroform 64.3/21.5/13.7/0.5 v/v with 0.1% of triethylamine and a stoichiometric amount of formic acid. The molecular species were identified by LC/MS. The chromatographic behavior of DGDG on PGC was then compared to previous studies. The addition of a carbon double bond on the alkyl chain decreased the retention. This contribution was less important when the number of unsaturations increased in the alkyl chain. The consequence of this retention behavior with PGC was an elution order of molecular species which did not agree with the partition number as observed with C18 grafted stationary phases. PMID:15587281

  7. Dye adsorption onto activated carbons from tyre rubber waste using surface coverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Mui, Edward L K; Cheung, W H; Valix, Marjorie; McKay, Gordon

    2010-07-15

    Two types of activated carbons from tyre char (with or without sulphuric acid treatment) were produced via carbon dioxide activation with BET surface areas in the range 59-1118 m(2)/g. Other characterisation tests include micropore and mesopore surface areas and volumes, pH, and elemental compositions, particularly heteroatoms such as nitrogen and sulphur. They were correlated to the adsorption capacity which were in the range of 0.45-0.71 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.62-0.84 mmol/g (acid-treated) for Acid Blue 25. In the case of larger-sized molecules like Acid Yellow 117, capacities were in the range of 0.23-0.42 mmol/g (untreated) and 0.29-0.40 mmol/g (acid-treated). Some tyre carbons exhibit a more superior performance than a microporous, commercial activated carbon (Calgon F400). By modelling the dye adsorption equilibrium data, the Redlich-Peterson isotherm is adopted as it has the lowest SSE. Based on the surface coverage analysis, a novel molecular orientation modelling of adsorbed dyes has been proposed and correlated with surface area and surface charge. For the acid dyes used in this study, molecules were likely to be adsorbed by the mesopore areas. PMID:20416883

  8. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  9. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The close solid-state structure–property relationships of organic π−aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π−aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here—form and probe molecular dimers—is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions. PMID:26173983

  10. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    The close solid-state structure-property relationships of organic π-aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π-aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here--form and probe molecular dimers--is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions.

  11. Carbon nanotube–liposome supramolecular nanotrains for intelligent molecular-transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Miyako, Eijiro; Kono, Kenji; Yuba, Eiji; Hosokawa, Chie; Nagai, Hidenori; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Biological network systems, such as inter- and intra-cellular signalling systems, are handled in a sophisticated manner by the transport of molecular information. Over the past few decades, there has been a growing interest in the development of synthetic molecular-transport systems. However, several key technologies have not been sufficiently realized to achieve optimum performance of transportation methods. Here we show that a new type of supramolecular system comprising of carbon nanotubes and liposomes enables the directional transport and controlled release of carrier molecules, and allows an enzymatic reaction at a desired area. The study highlights important progress that has been made towards the development of biomimetic molecular-transport systems and various lab-on-a-chip applications, such as medical diagnosis, sensors, bionic computers and artificial biological networks. PMID:23187626

  12. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  13. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  14. CONSIDERATIONS IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF COMBINED INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to examine the use of activated carbon in reducing the content of biologically resistant organic compounds in a combined industrial wastewater treatment system. The invvestigation was conducted in two stages: (1) characterize organic priority pol...

  15. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS: SELECTED TECHNICAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the tremendous interest in the organic constituent removal by activated carbon, the two industrial categories displaying the most interest are the petroleum refining and petrochemical industries. EPA's Office of Research and Development has co-sponsored two technical s...

  16. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from cotton nonowoven fabric. For the ACF acoustical application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glass fiber ...

  17. Overview of EPA activities and research related to black carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this international presentation is to give an overview of EPA activities related to black carbon (BC). This overview includes some summary information on how EPA defines BC, current knowledge on United States emissions and forecasted emission reductions, and ongoin...

  18. MICROBIOLOGICAL ALTERATIONS IN DISTRIBUTED WATER TREATED WITH GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to examine the effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment on the microbiological characteristics of potable water in distribution systems. Data was collected from both field and pilot plant studies. Field monitoring studies from two water tre...

  19. Activated carbon injection - a mercury control success story

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Almost 100 full-scale activated carbon injection (ACI) systems have been ordered by US electric utilities. These systems have the potential to remove over 90% of the mercury in flue, at a cost below $10,000 per pound of mercury removal. Field trials of ACI systems arm outlined. 1 fig.

  20. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  1. Morphosynthesis of cubic silver cages on monolithic activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Hong; Lai, Yijian; Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Binyuan; Ning, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2013-11-14

    Cubic silver cages were prepared on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) pre-absorbed with Cl(-), SO4(2-), or PO4(3-) anions. Silver insoluble salts served as templates for the morphosynthesis of silver cages. The silver ions were reduced by reductive functional groups on MAC micropores through a galvanic cell reaction mechanism. PMID:24080952

  2. Carbon Electrode-Molecule Junctions: A Reliable Platform for Molecular Electronics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Xin, Na; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-15

    The development of reliable approaches to integrate individual or a small collection of molecules into electrical nanocircuits, often termed "molecular electronics", is currently a research focus because it can not only overcome the increasing difficulties and fundamental limitations of miniaturization of current silicon-based electronic devices, but can also enable us to probe and understand the intrinsic properties of materials at the atomic- and/or molecular-length scale. This development might also lead to direct observation of novel effects and fundamental discovery of physical phenomena that are not accessible by traditional materials or approaches. Therefore, researchers from a variety of backgrounds have been devoting great effort to this objective, which has started to move beyond simple descriptions of charge transport and branch out in different directions, reflecting the interdisciplinarity. This Account exemplifies our ongoing interest and great effort in developing efficient lithographic methodologies capable of creating molecular electronic devices through the combination of top-down micro/nanofabrication with bottom-up molecular assembly. These devices use nanogapped carbon nanomaterials (such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene), with a particular focus on graphene, as point contacts formed by electron beam lithography and precise oxygen plasma etching. Through robust amide linkages, functional molecular bridges terminated with diamine moieties are covalently wired into the carboxylic acid-functionalized nanogaps to form stable carbon electrode-molecule junctions with desired functionalities. At the macroscopic level, to improve the contact interface between electrodes and organic semiconductors and lower Schottky barriers, we used SWCNTs and graphene as efficient electrodes to explore the intrinsic properties of organic thin films, and then build functional high-performance organic nanotransistors with ultrahigh responsivities

  3. Ammonia-Activated Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Lee, Jeseung; Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Porous carbon membranes, which generally show improved chemical and thermal stability compared to polymer membranes, have been used in gas separations for many years. In this work, we show that the post-synthesis ammonia treatment of porous carbon at elevated temperature can improve the permeance and selectivity of these membranes for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons from permanent gases. Hierarchically structured porous carbon membranes were exposed to ammonia gas at temperatures ranging from 850 C to 950 C for up to 10 min and the N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeances were measured for these different membranes. Higher treatment temperatures and longer exposure times resulted in higher gas permeance values. In addition, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} selectivities increased by a factor of 2 as the treatment temperature and time increased up to a temperature and time of 900 C, 10 min. Higher temperatures showed increased permeance but decreased selectivity indicating excess pore activation. Nitrogen adsorption measurements show that the ammonia treatment increased the porosity of the membrane while elemental analysis revealed the presence of nitrogen-containing surface functionalities in the treated carbon membranes. Thus, ammonia treatment at high temperature provides a controlled method to introduce both added microporosity and surface functionality to enhance gas separations performance of porous carbon membranes.

  4. Chemistry in the Molecular Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are the centers of galaxies with supermassive blackholes whose accretion of mass causes very high luminosities of L˜1044-46erg s-1. An accretion disk has a molecular component that extends to hundreds of pc from the central AGN core. The question of how much central illumination affects the disk and how much star formation is present near the core have been astrophysical interests. Rotational lines from these disks at a sub-kpc scale have been observed for molecules such as CO, HCO+, HCN, and HNC. When ALMA becomes fully operational, it will be able to resolve these disks at much higher resolution than currently. Molecular observations at higher resolution may give some hints on the physics in the molecular disk. We modeled the chemical composition of a molecular disk in an AGN on a scale of tens of pc. To do this, we extended our standard gas-phase OSU network to include important processes at much higher temperatures, approaching 1000 K. We used the density model of Thompson et al., and determined the temperature by the blackbody approximation from the luminosity of the AGN core. The ionization by X-rays from the AGN core, by cosmic-rays from the AGN core, supernovae and stellar winds, and by UV-photons from OB stars are considered. We will briefly mention the effects from other factors that may change the molecular abundances such as shock waves and inhomogeneity of the density of the disk. T. Thompson, E. Quataert, and N. Murray, Astrophysical J. 630, 167 (2005)

  5. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  6. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  7. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  8. Theoretical studies of zirconium and carbon clusters with molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.

    1993-08-01

    In this dissertation, we will present a systematic study of structures of fullerenes ranging from C{sub 20} to C{sub 100} by introducing a novel scheme. Using our new scheme, we not only reproduce all known fullerene structures but also successfully predicted several other fullerene structures which were confirmed by experiments. By utilizing the tight-binding molecular-dynamic (TBMD) simulation, we also studied the dynamical behavior of fullerenes: Vibrations, thermal disintegration of individual clusters as well as collisions between fullerenes. If the beauty of carbon fullerene is not enough, people found that carbon can also form tubules and even speculated that they can form three-dimensional graphite-like networks. By extending our fullerene structure searching scheme, we performed a search for the ground-state structure of three dimensional carbon network. We found the most stable structure people ever proposed for simple cubic based networks. From the difference of this new form of carbon and graphite in the electronic and vibrational properties, we propose an experimental probe to identify these novel three-dimensional carbon networks.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation for arrangement of nickel atoms filled in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Liu Zhenyu, Zhao; Lirui, Liu

    2014-08-28

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) filled with metals can be used in capacitors, sensors, rechargeable batteries, and so on. Atomic arrangement of the metals has an important role in the function of the composites. The tips of CNTs were opened, and then nickel was filled by means of hydrothermal oxidation/ultrasonic vibration method. The tests of TEM, HREM, and EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis showed that Ni was filled in CNTs successfully. The atomic arrangement of nickel filled into single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and bond orientation order were established to analyze the atomic arrangement of nickel filled in carbon nanotubes during the cooling process. The results show that nickel atoms became in order gradually and preferably crystallized on the inner wall of carbon nanotubes when the temperature decreased from 1600 K. After it cooled to 100 K, the arrangement of nickel atoms in outermost circle was regular and dense, but there were many defects far from the wall of CNTs. According to the calculation of bond orientation order parameters Q{sub 6} and its visualization, the structure of nickel is Face-centered cube (f.c.c). (1,1,1){sub Ni} was close on the inner surface of carbon nanotubes. Radial direction of CNTs was [1,1,1] crystal orientation. Axial direction of CNTs, namely, filling direction, was [1{sup ¯}, 1{sup ¯},2] crystal orientation.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation for arrangement of nickel atoms filled in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Liu; Lirui, Liu; Zhenyu, Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) filled with metals can be used in capacitors, sensors, rechargeable batteries, and so on. Atomic arrangement of the metals has an important role in the function of the composites. The tips of CNTs were opened, and then nickel was filled by means of hydrothermal oxidation/ultrasonic vibration method. The tests of TEM, HREM, and EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis showed that Ni was filled in CNTs successfully. The atomic arrangement of nickel filled into single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and bond orientation order were established to analyze the atomic arrangement of nickel filled in carbon nanotubes during the cooling process. The results show that nickel atoms became in order gradually and preferably crystallized on the inner wall of carbon nanotubes when the temperature decreased from 1600 K. After it cooled to 100 K, the arrangement of nickel atoms in outermost circle was regular and dense, but there were many defects far from the wall of CNTs. According to the calculation of bond orientation order parameters Q6 and its visualization, the structure of nickel is Face-centered cube (f.c.c). (1,1,1)Ni was close on the inner surface of carbon nanotubes. Radial direction of CNTs was [1,1,1] crystal orientation. Axial direction of CNTs, namely, filling direction, was [1¯, 1¯,2] crystal orientation.

  12. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in this report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjuntion with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. xcessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed l...

  13. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  14. Linking neural activity and molecular oscillations in the SCN

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) function as part of a central timing circuit that drives daily changes in our behaviour and underlying physiology. A hallmark feature of SCN neuronal populations is that they are mostly electrically silent during the night, start to fire action potentials near dawn and then continue to generate action potentials with a slow and steady pace all day long. Sets of currents are responsible for this daily rhythm, with the strongest evidence for persistent Na+ currents, L-type Ca2+ currents, hyperpolarization-activated currents (IH), large-conductance Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) currents and fast delayed rectifier (FDR) K+ currents. These rhythms in electrical activity are crucial for the function of the circadian timing system, including the expression of clock genes, and decline with ageing and disease. This article reviews our current understanding of the ionic and molecular mechanisms that drive the rhythmic firing patterns in the SCN. PMID:21886186

  15. Translational diffusion of water inside hydrophobic carbon micropores studied by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diallo, S. O.; Vlcek, L.; Mamontov, E.; Keum, J. K.; Chen, Jihua; Hayes, J. S.; Chialvo, A. A.

    2015-02-17

    When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer-size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures (~150 K), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. Here we have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol ACF-10 (average pore size ~11.6 Å, with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature T = 280 K in its stable liquid state down to T = 230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be, respectively, higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time (more » $${{\\tau}}$$) when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the width of the slit pores-not their curvature-that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 Å. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 Å gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer Q (Q ≤ 0.9 Å-1). At high Q, however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. Consequently, the simulations are compared to the experiments at low Q, where the two can be best reconciled. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter D associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bimodal exponential model, is used to parametrize the self-correlation function I (Q,t).« less

  16. Translational diffusion of water inside hydrophobic carbon micropores studied by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Vlcek, L.; Mamontov, E.; Keum, J. K.; Chen, Jihua; Hayes, J. S.; Chialvo, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer-size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures (˜150 K ), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. We have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol ACF-10 (average pore size ˜11.6 Å , with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature T =280 K in its stable liquid state down to T =230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be, respectively, higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time <τ > when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the width of the slit pores—not their curvature—that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 Å. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 Å gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer Q (Q ≤0.9 Å -1) . At high Q , however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. Consequently, the simulations are compared to the experiments at low Q , where the two can be best reconciled. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter D associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bimodal exponential model, is used to parametrize the self-correlation function I (Q ,t ) .

  17. Translational diffusion of water inside hydrophobic carbon micropores studied by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Diallo, S O; Vlcek, L; Mamontov, E; Keum, J K; Chen, Jihua; Hayes, J S; Chialvo, A A

    2015-02-01

    When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer-size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures (∼150K), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. We have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol ACF-10 (average pore size ∼11.6Å, with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature T=280 K in its stable liquid state down to T=230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be, respectively, higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time 〈τ〉 when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the width of the slit pores-not their curvature-that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 Å. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 Å gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer Q(Q≤0.9Å(-1)). At high Q, however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. Consequently, the simulations are compared to the experiments at low Q, where the two can be best reconciled. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter D associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bimodal exponential model, is used to parametrize the self-correlation function I(Q,t). PMID:25768475

  18. Translational diffusion of water inside hydrophobic carbon micropores studied by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S. O.; Vlcek, L.; Mamontov, E.; Keum, J. K.; Chen, Jihua; Hayes, J. S.; Chialvo, A. A.

    2015-02-17

    When water molecules are confined to nanoscale spacings, such as in the nanometer-size pores of activated carbon fiber (ACF), their freezing point gets suppressed down to very low temperatures (~150 K), leading to a metastable liquid state with remarkable physical properties. Here we have investigated the ambient pressure diffusive dynamics of water in microporous Kynol ACF-10 (average pore size ~11.6 Å, with primarily slit-like pores) from temperature T = 280 K in its stable liquid state down to T = 230 K into the metastable supercooled phase. The observed characteristic relaxation times and diffusion coefficients are found to be, respectively, higher and lower than those in bulk water, indicating a slowing down of the water mobility with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature-dependent average relaxation time (${{\\tau}}$) when compared to previous findings indicate that it is the width of the slit pores-not their curvature-that primarily affects the dynamics of water for pore sizes larger than 10 Å. The experimental observations are compared to complementary molecular dynamics simulations of a model system, in which we studied the diffusion of water within the 11.6 Å gap of two parallel graphene sheets. We find generally a reasonable agreement between the observed and calculated relaxation times at the low momentum transfer Q (Q ≤ 0.9 Å-1). At high Q, however, where localized dynamics becomes relevant, this ideal system does not satisfactorily reproduce the measurements. Consequently, the simulations are compared to the experiments at low Q, where the two can be best reconciled. The best agreement is obtained for the diffusion parameter D associated with the hydrogen-site when a representative stretched exponential function, rather than the standard bimodal exponential model, is used to parametrize the self-correlation function I (Q,t).

  19. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs. PMID:17157493

  20. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.˚ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  1. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  2. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  3. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  4. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  5. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  6. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen. PMID:25902034

  7. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  8. Systematic conversion of single walled carbon nanotubes into n-type thermoelectric materials by molecular dopants.

    PubMed

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  9. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  11. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2011-01-15

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  12. Preparation of activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell by air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, M.S.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, three-step process for the production of high-quality activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell charcoals is described. In this process the charcoal is (1) heated to a high temperature (carbonized), (2) oxidized in air following a stepwise heating program from low (ca. 450 K) to high (ca. 660 K) temperatures (oxygenated), and (3) heated again in an inert environment to a high temperature (activated). By use of this procedure, activated carbons with surface areas greater than 1,000 m{sub 2}/g are manufactured with an overall yield of 15% (based on the dry shell feed). Removal of carbon mass by the development of mesopores and macropores is largely responsible for increases in the surface area of the carbons above 600 m{sub 2}/g. Thus, the surface area per gram of activated carbon can be represented by an inverse function of the yield for burnoffs between 15 and 60%. These findings are supported by mass-transfer calculations and pore-size distribution measurements. A kinetic model for gasification of carbon by oxygen, which provides for an Eley-Rideal type reaction of a surface oxide with oxygen in air, fits the measured gasification rates reasonably well over the temperature range of 550--660 K.

  13. Dynamic molecular structure of plant biomass-derived black carbon (biochar)

    SciTech Connect

    Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P.S.; Johnson, M.G.; Kleber, M.

    2009-11-15

    Char black carbon (BC), the solid residue of incomplete combustion, is continuously being added to soils and sediments due to natural vegetation fires, anthropogenic pollution, and new strategies for carbon sequestration ('biochar'). Here we present a molecular-level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. BET-N{sub 2} surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy are used to show how two plant materials (wood and grass) undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring temperature increases from 100 to 700 C. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct categories of char consisting of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by disordered graphitic crystallites. The molecular variations among the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to persist in the environment and function as environmental sorbents.

  14. Organic Geochemistry of the Hamersley Province: Relationships Among Organic Carbon Isotopes, Molecular Fossils, and Lithology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular fossils are particularly valuable ancient biosignatures that can provide key insight about microbial sources and ecology in early Earth studies. In particular, hopanes carrying 2-methyl or 3-methyl substituents are proposed to be derived from cyanobacteria and oxygen-respiring methanotrophs, respectively, based on both their modem occurrences and their Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sedimentary distributions. Steranes are likely from ancestral eukaryotes. The distribution of methylhopanes, steranes, and other biomarkers in 2.72-2.56 billion-year-old rocks from the Hamersley Province, Western Australia show relationships to lithology, facies, and isotopes of macromolecular carbon, and other biomarkers. These observations support biomarker syngenicity and thermal maturity. Moreover, ecological signatures are revealed, including a surprising relationship between isotopic values for bulk macromolecular carbon and the biomarker for methanotrophs. The record suggests that cyanobacteria were likely key organisms of shallow-water microbial ecosystems providing molecular oxygen, fixed carbon, and possibly fixed nitrogen, and methanotrophs were not alone in recycling methane and other C-13-depleted substrates.

  15. Molecular Simulation of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species were carried out with two different potential models to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species and evaluate the ability of the two models to reproduce published ab initio and experimental data. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of uranyl carbonate species that often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The first potential model was based on a series of shell models developed by Parker and co-workers (including (DE LEEUW and PARKER, 1998; KERISIT and PARKER, 2004; PAVESE et al., 1996). The second potential model was a rigid-ion model based on the flexible SPC water model (TELEMAN et al., 1987), the uranyl model of Guilbaud and Wipff (GUILBAUD and WIPFF, 1996), and the parameters for the carbonate ion given by Greathouse and co-workers (GREATHOUSE and CYGAN, 2005; GREATHOUSE et al., 2002). Analysis of structural (mean interatomic distances and coordination numbers) and dynamical (water residence times in hydration shell and self-diffusion coefficients) properties showed that, overall, the first potential model performed best when compared to published data, although the only major discrepancy with the second model was a misrepresentation of the configuration adopted by the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate ions. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the alkaline-earth cations and the uranyl ion were compared with three variants of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and it was found that none of the three SE models were able to reproduce both the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations. However, as would be expected based on the SE equation, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed a general linear dependence with the two models yielding almost identical gradients

  16. Molecular Imprint of Enzyme Active Site by Camel Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang-Wei; Xia, Lijie; Su, Youhong; Liu, Hongchun; Xia, Xueqing; Lu, Qinxia; Yang, Chunjin; Reheman, Kalbinur

    2012-01-01

    Screening of inhibitory Ab1 antibodies is a critical step for producing catalytic antibodies in the anti-idiotypic approach. However, the incompatible surface of the active site of the enzyme and the antigen-binding site of heterotetrameric conventional antibodies become the limiting step. Because camelid-derived nanobodies possess the potential to preferentially bind to the active site of enzymes due to their small size and long CDR3, we have developed a novel approach to produce antibodies with alliinase activities by exploiting the molecular mimicry of camel nanobodies. By screening the camelid-derived variable region of the heavy chain cDNA phage display library with alliinase, we obtained an inhibitory nanobody VHHA4 that recognizes the active site. Further screening with VHHA4 from the same variable domain of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody library led to a higher incidence of anti-idiotypic Ab2 abzymes with alliinase activities. One of the abzymes, VHHC10, showed the highest activity that can be inhibited by Ab1 VHHA4 and alliinase competitive inhibitor penicillamine and significantly suppressed the B16 tumor cell growth in the presence of alliin in vitro. The results highlight the feasibility of producing abzymes via anti-idiotypic nanobody approach. PMID:22374998

  17. Multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shilun

    This thesis is concerned with the development of high performance ultrahigh molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers reinforced using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A novel process has been developed, whereby, MWCNT/UHMWPE nanocomposite fibers with Young's modulus up to 137 GPa and tensile strength of ˜4.2 GPa has been produced. This fiber possesses the best specific mechanical properties amongst all current commercial high performance fibers. Systematic investigations were carried out to elucidate the mechanisms of reinforcement. Firstly, systematical experimental studies were carried out to investigate the CNT reinforcing effect on nanocomposite fibers prepared with different PE molecular orientations. The overall effect can be classified into three regions. At low molecular orientation levels, the CNTs act to toughen and strengthen the nanocomposites. At the intermediate molecular orientations, the CNTs have negligible effects on the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. At very high molecular orientations, the CNTs act to mainly stiffen and strengthen the nanocomposite. Secondly, systematic investigations were carried out to investigate the structure evolution as well as the load transfer between the embedded CNTs and that of the matrix PE. Thermal and morphological studies demonstrate that CNTs act as effective nucleation sites for PE crystal growth. The load transfer mechanisms in both the low and high molecular orientation fibers are similar. Major differences were related to CNT alignment effects. The highly oriented fibers show CNT alignment effect in the initial elastic regime, whereas the CNTs in the fibers of low molecular orientations show no appreciable alignment in the elastic regime. Finally, based on the experimental observations, a mechanistic model has been proposed to elucidate the reinforcement mechanisms. This model proposes that there exists an absorption layer surrounding CNTs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  18. First Molecular Dynamics simulation insight into the mechanism of organics adsorption from aqueous solutions on microporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Zieliński, Wojciech; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Wesołowski, Radosław P.; Klimek, Kamil K.

    2011-10-01

    The results of 84 MD simulations showing the influence of porosity and carbon surface oxidation on adsorption of three organic compounds from aqueous solutions on carbons are reported. Based on a model of 'soft' activated carbon, three carbon structures with gradually changed microporosity were created. Next, different number of surface oxygen groups was introduced. We observe quantitative agreement between simulation and experiment i.e. the decrease in adsorption from benzene down to paracetamol. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that the balance between porosity and carbon surface chemical composition in organics adsorption on carbons, and the pore blocking determine adsorption properties of carbons.

  19. Nontrivial magnetoresistive behavior of a single-wall carbon nanotube with an attached molecular magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płomińska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-11-01

    The spin-resolved transport properties of a single-wall carbon nanotube quantum dot, with an attached single molecular magnet, are studied theoretically. With the aid of the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation expansion with respect to the tunnel coupling, the current, differential conductance, and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) are determined in both the linear and nonlinear response regimes. It is shown that transport properties depend greatly on both the shell filling sequence of the carbon nanotube and the type of exchange interaction between the molecular magnet and nanotube. This results in highly nontrivial behavior of the TMR, which is especially visible in the low bias voltage regime. Depending on the gate voltage and parameters of the system, we find transport regimes where either a greatly enhanced or negative TMR develops. The mechanism leading to such behavior is associated with nonequilibrium spin accumulation, which builds up in the antiparallel magnetic configuration of the device. We show that it is crucial whether the spin accumulation occurs in the highest-weight spin states or in states with lower spin values. While in the former case it leads to enhanced TMR, in the latter case it may result in negative tunnel magnetoresistance. In addition, we analyze how the above effects depend on the magnitude of the molecular magnet's spin, and show that this dependence is generally nonmonotonic.

  20. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c–axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and “low k di-electric” systems. PMID:27145699

  1. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c-axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and "low k di-electric" systems. PMID:27145699

  2. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c–axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and “low k di-electric” systems.

  3. Selective visualization of point defects in carbon nanotubes at the atomic scale by an electron-donating molecular tip.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomoaki; Kanata, Satoshi; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2011-07-14

    Electron-donating molecular tips were used for the observation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Defects in SWNTs were selectively visualized at the atomic scale on the basis of charge-transfer interaction with the molecular tip. PMID:21629907

  4. Characterization and metal sorptive properties of oxidized active carbon.

    PubMed

    Strelko, Vladimir; Malik, Danish J

    2002-06-01

    A commercial activated carbon Chemviron F 400 has been oxidized using nitric acid in order to introduce a variety of acidic surface functional groups. Both unoxidized and oxidized carbon samples were characterized using nitrogen porosimetry, elemental analysis, pH titration, Boehm's titration, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Results show that oxidation treatment reduced surface area and pore volume. However, the carbon surface acquires an acidic character with carboxylic groups being the dominant surface functional groups. The modified sample displays cation-exchange properties over a wide range of pH values and exhibits polyfunctional nature. Both carbon samples were challenged for the removal of transition metals such as copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), and manganese(II). The affinity series Mn2+Zn2+ has been found to coincide with the general stability sequence of metal complexes (the Irving-Williams series). The higher preference displayed by carbons toward copper(II) is a consequence of the fact that copper(II) often forms distorted and more stable octahedral complexes. PMID:16290653

  5. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  6. Enhancing capacitive deionization performance of electrospun activated carbon nanofibers by coupling with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiang; Wang, Gang; Wu, Tingting; Peng, Senpei; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-05-15

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an alternative, effective and environmentally friendly technology for desalination of brackish water. The performance of the CDI device is highly determined by the electrode materials. In this paper, a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in activated carbon nanofiber (ACF) was prepared by a direct co-electrospinning way and subsequent CO2 activation. The introduction of CNTs can greatly improve the conductivity while the CO2-mediated activation can render the final product with high porosity. As such, the hybrid structure can provide an excellent storage space and pathways for ion adsorption and conduction. When evaluated as electrode materials for CDI, the as-prepared CNT/ACF composites with higher electrical conductivity and mesopore ratios exhibited higher electrosorption capacity and good regeneration performance in comparison with the pure ACF. PMID:25595622

  7. Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers as electrode materials in carbon based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, K.; Lerf, A.; Winter, M.; Besenhard, J. O.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Suárez-García, F.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    Electrochemical characterization has been carried out for electrodes prepared of several activated carbon fiber samples derived from poly (m-phenylene isophthalamide) (Nomex) in an aqueous solution. Depending on the burn-off due to activation the BET surface area of the carbons was in the order of 1300-2800 m 2 g -1, providing an extensive network of micropores. Their capability as active material for supercapacitors was evaluated by using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Values for the capacitance of 175 F g -1 in sulfuric acid were obtained. Further on, it was observed that the specific capacitance and the performance of the electrode increase significantly with increasing burn-off degree. We believe that this fact can be attributed to the increase of surface area and porosity with increasing burn-off.

  8. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  9. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, S.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    The kernels of grain such as corn and hard red winter wheat were subjected to a two-stage pyrolytic process to generate relatively high yields of charcoals. The process involved carbonization of the kernels at low temperatures (250-325{degrees}C) followed by complete devolatilization of the resultant charcoals at around 750{degrees}C. The charcoals were subsequently activated physically with CO{sub 2} at 800{degrees}C to yield activated carbons. The total pore volumes and surface areas of the activated carbons were determined at various degree of activation by physisorption methods. The surface areas from the nitrogen BET method ranged from 500 to 1750 m{sup 2}/g, while the total pore volumes obtained from the volumes at saturation were in the interval from 0.3 to 0.7 cm{sup 3}/g. The fractal nature of the pore interfaces as well as the existence of different types of pores were investigated through small-angle x-ray scattering.

  10. Antibacterial activity of carbon-coated zinc oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Jun; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ozkal, Burak; Nakagawa, Zenbe-E

    2007-03-01

    Particles of ZnO coated with carbon (ZnOCC) were prepared and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. ZnO powder and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (polymerization degree: 2,000-95,000) were mixed at a mass ratio (ZnO/PVA) of 1, and then heated at 500-650 degree C for 3 h under argon gas with a flow rate of 50ml/min. Carbon deposited on the ZnOCC surface was amorphous as revealed by X-ray diffraction studies. The ZnOCC particles maintained their shape in water, even under agitation. The antibacterial activity of ZnOCC powder against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the change in the electrical conductivity of the growth medium caused by bacterial metabolism (conductimetric assay). The conductivity curves obtained were analyzed using the growth inhibition kinetic model proposed by Takahashi for calorimetric evaluation, allowing the estimation of the antibacterial efficacy and kinetic parameters of ZnOCC. In a previous study, when ZnO was immobilized on materials, such as activated carbon, the amount of ZnO immobilized was approximately 10-50%, and the antibacterial activity markedly decreased compared to that of the original ZnO. On the other hand, the ZnOCC particles prepared in this study contained approximately 95% ZnO and possessed antibacterial activity similar to that of pure ZnO. The carbon-coating treatment could maintain the antibacterial efficacy of the ZnO and may be useful in the develop-ment of multifunctional antimicrobial materials. PMID:17408004

  11. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed. PMID:20842929

  12. Production of charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    With its wide range of properties, charcoal finds many commercial applications for domestic cooking, refining of metals (steel, copper, bronze, nickel, aluminum and electro-manganese), production of chemicals (carbon disulfide, calcium carbide, silicon carbide, sodium cyanide, carbon black, fireworks, gaseous chemicals, absorbents, soil conditioners and pharmaceuticals), as well as production of activated carbon and synthesis gas. In 1991, the world production of charcoal was 22.8 million cubic meters (3.8 million metric tons) as shown in Table 1. Brazil is the world`s largest charcoal producer --- 5.9 million cubic meters or one million metric tons was produced in 1991, most of which is used in steel and iron industry. African countries produced 45% of the world total amount of charcoal, where 86% of the wood-based energy is for domestic use, most of which is inefficiently used. Charcoal is produced commercially in kilns with a 25% to 30% yield by mass on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Until recently, the highest yield of good quality charcoal reported in the literature was 38%. In this paper, and ASME code rated experimental system is presented for producing charcoal and activated carbon from biomass.

  13. Synthesis and Antioxidant Activity of Hydroxytyrosol Alkyl-Carbonate Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Pastor, Ignacio; Fernandez-Hernandez, Antonia; Rivas, Francisco; Martinez, Antonio; Garcia-Granados, Andres; Parra, Andres

    2016-07-22

    Three procedures have been investigated for the isolation of tyrosol (1) and hydroxytyrosol (2) from a phenolic extract obtained from the solid residue of olive milling. These three methods, which facilitated the recovery of these phenols, were chemical or enzymatic acetylation, benzylation, and carbomethoxylation, and subsequent carbonylation or acetonation reactions. Several new lipophilic alkyl-carbonate derivatives of hydroxytyrosol have been synthesized, coupling the primary hydroxy group of this phenol, through a carbonate linker, using alcohols with different chain lengths. The antioxidant properties of these lipophilic derivatives have been evaluated by different methods and compared with free hydroxytyrosol (2) and also with the well-known antioxidants BHT and α-tocopherol. Three methods were used for the determination of this antioxidant activity: FRAP and ABTS assays, to test the antioxidant power in hydrophilic media, and the Rancimat test, to evaluate the antioxidant capacity in a lipophilic matrix. These new alkyl-carbonate derivatives of hydroxytyrosol enhanced the antioxidant activity of this natural phenol, with their antioxidant properties also being higher than those of the commercial antioxidants BHT and α-tocopherol. There was no clear influence of the side-chain length on the antioxidant properties of the alkyl-carbonate derivatives of 2, although the best results were achieved mainly by the compounds with a longer chain on the primary hydroxy group of this natural phenolic substance. PMID:27337069

  14. PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  15. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  19. Proton play in the formation of low molecular weight chitosan (LWCS) by hydrolyzing chitosan with a carbon based solid acid.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R Akhil; Deshmukh, Pranjal; Agarwal, Siddharth; Purohit, Poorvi; Dhoble, Deepa; Waske, Prashant; Khandekar, Dileep; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2016-10-20

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LWCS) constitute a special class of value added chemicals that are primarily obtained from crustacean shells, which are the main water pollutants from crabs and shrimp processing centers. Unlike chitin and chitosan, LWCS possess improved solubility in water and aqueous solutions, making them widely applicable in numerous fields ranging from drug delivery to waste water treatment. Among the methods employed for their production, chemical breakdown by strong liquid acids has yielded good success. However, this method is met with severe concerns arising from the harsh nature of liquid acids, which may corrode the reactors for commercial synthesis, and their limited reusability. The physical methods like ultrasound and microwave are energy intensive in nature, while the enzymatic methods are expensive and offers limited scope for reuse. We have attempted to overcome these problems by employing carbon based solid acid (CSA) for hydrolyzing chitosan to LWCS. CSA can be easily produced using activated carbon, a cost-effective and easily available raw material. Reactions were carried out between chitosan and CSA in a hydrothermal glass reactor and the products, separated by cold centrifugation, were purified and dried. The dried products were characterized for their molecular weight and solubility. Results indicated more than ten-fold decrease in the molecular weight of chitosan and the product exhibited water solubility. The CSA could be used upto four times, without regeneration, to give a consistent quality product. The aqueous solution of resulting LWCS exhibited a pH of 6.03±0.11, as against the acidic pH range of solutions of commercially available LWCS, indicating its suitability for biomedical applications. Our investigation facilitates a 'green approach' that may be employed for commercial production of value added chemicals from waste products of marine industry. PMID:27474584

  20. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  1. Density functional theory study of C₂F₅I synthesis over activated carbon catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingjie; Xue, Mengwei; Yang, Guangchen; Pan, Renming

    2015-09-01

    Quantum chemistry calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) are carried out to investigate the reaction mechanism of C2F5I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon. The possible adsorption configurations of fluorocarbon intermediates are analyzed carefully. Also, the related transition states and reaction pathway are analyzed. According to calculation, firstly, the dehydrofluorination of C2HF5, as the rate-determining step, is catalyzed by the carboxyl acid groups. Secondly, the tetrafluoroethylidene radicals disproportionate on graphite (001) surface instead of rearrangement or dimerization. Next, the fluorine abstractions between fluorocarbon intermediates over graphite (001) surfaces proceed successfully. Finally, the desorbed pentafluoroethyl abstracts iodine atom from molecular iodine spontaneously to afford C2F5I. In adition, our calculations reveal that the carbon deposit in experiment is caused by the fluorine abstraction from fluoroethinyl. The suggested mechanism corresponds with our calculations and available experiments. PMID:26276012

  2. Activated carbon from leather shaving wastes and its application in removal of toxic materials.

    PubMed

    Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2010-07-15

    In this study, utilization of a solid waste as raw material for activated carbon production was investigated. For this purpose, activated carbons were produced from chromium and vegetable tanned leather shaving wastes by physical and chemical activation methods. A detailed analysis of the surface properties of the activated carbons including acidity, total surface area, extent of microporosity and mesoporosity was presented. The activated carbon produced from vegetable tanned leather shaving waste produced has a higher surface area and micropore volume than the activated carbon produced from chromium tanned leather shaving waste. The potential application of activated carbons obtained from vegetable tanned shavings as adsorbent for removal of water pollutants have been checked for phenol, methylene blue, and Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of activated carbons were found to be comparable to that of activated carbons derived from biomass. PMID:20382474

  3. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy coversmore » various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.« less

  4. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  5. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy covers various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.

  6. In Situ Molecular Spectroscopic Evidence for CO2 Intercalation into Montmorillonite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, John S.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Thompson, Christopher J.; Miller, Quin RS; Martin, Paul F.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-04-25

    The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO2 (scCO2) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e. close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 °C and 90 bar). The CO2 molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO2 conditions is due to CO2 migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO2 molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO2 does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state.

  7. Carbon-based molecular devices: Fano effects controlled by the molecule length and the gate voltage.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Kuang, Y W; Liu, Y S; Zhang, D B; Shao, Z G; Yu, H L; Hong, X K; Feng, J F; Chen, X S; Wang, X F

    2016-08-25

    Fano effect is an important quantum phenomenon in mesoscopic systems, which arises from an interference between the localized state and the extended state. Here we observe an obvious Fano effect near the Fermi level in an all-carbon molecular device consisting of an acene molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes. By increasing the length of the molecule, an extended state gradually evolves into a localized state. With the aid of the nearby extended state, a Fano effect is achieved. Using a gate voltage, we can easily tune the Fano effect induced by the single-transmission channel. When the spin degree of freedom is involved, the all-carbon device can show a half-metallic property with positive or negative 100% spin polarization at the Fermi level under the gate voltage; meanwhile the spin thermoelectric effect can also be enhanced. PMID:27528438

  8. In situ molecular spectroscopic evidence for CO2 intercalation into montmorillonite in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Loring, John S; Schaef, Herbert T; Turcu, Romulus V F; Thompson, Christopher J; Miller, Quin R S; Martin, Paul F; Hu, Jianzhi; Hoyt, David W; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S; Felmy, Andrew R; Rosso, Kevin M

    2012-05-01

    The interaction of anhydrous supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) with both kaolinite and ~1W (i.e., close to but less than one layer of hydration) calcium-saturated montmorillonite was investigated under conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (50 °C and 90 bar). The CO(2) molecular environment was probed in situ using a combination of three novel high-pressure techniques: X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. We report the first direct evidence that the expansion of montmorillonite under scCO(2) conditions is due to CO(2) migration into the interlayer. Intercalated CO(2) molecules are rotationally constrained and do not appear to react with waters to form bicarbonate or carbonic acid. In contrast, CO(2) does not intercalate into kaolinite. The findings show that predicting the seal integrity of caprock will have complex dependence on clay mineralogy and hydration state. PMID:22533894

  9. The role of molecular diffusion processes in tertiary carbon dioxide flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, A.T.; Pinczewski, W.V.

    1984-04-01

    The role of molecular diffusion in the mobilization of waterflood residual oil is examined. A simple numerical model which simulates the swelling of residual oil blobs by carbon dioxide diffusion through a blocking water phase is developed. The diffusion times calculated using the model are compared with the corresponding times in laboratory micromodel and core flood experiments. The comparison shows that diffusion plays a major role in the mobilization and recovery of waterflood residual oil and that high unit or local displacement efficiencies are achieved when there is sufficient time for diffusion to significantly swell the oil. For the length scales normally associated with laboratory core floods diffusion is shown to be sufficiently rapid to effectively reduce the adverse effects of bypassing on overall recovery efficiency. This is not so for field floods where bypassing of oil by injected carbon dioxide may be expected to occur on a much larger scale.

  10. MOLECULAR LINE OBSERVATIONS OF THE CARBON-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPE CIT 6 AT 7 mm WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Wayne; Zhang Yong; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Deguchi, Shuji

    2012-11-20

    We present a {lambda}7 mm spectral line survey of the carbon-rich circumstellar envelope (CSE) CIT 6 using the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. A total of 25 spectral features belonging to five molecular species (HC{sub 3}N, HC{sub 5}N, HC{sub 7}N, SiO, and CS) are detected, enabling us to investigate the chemistry of cyanopolyyne chains. The line strengths are compared with those of the proto-typical carbon-rich CSE IRC+10216. The results show that the cyanopolyyne molecules are enhanced in CIT 6, suggesting that it is more evolved than IRC+10216. In order to investigate the structure of CIT 6, we have constructed a three-dimensional spatiokinematic model. By comparing the observed line profiles with the models, we conclude that this envelope is asymmetric and is composed of several incomplete shells.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of the stability of a carbon nanotube atop a catalytic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a single-walled carbon nanotube placed on top of a catalytic nickel nanoparticle is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. As a case study, we consider the (12,0) nanotube consisting of 720 carbon atoms and the icosahedral Ni309 cluster. An explicit set of constant-temperature simulations is performed in order to cover a broad temperature range from 400 to 1200 K, at which a successful growth of carbon nanotubes has been achieved experimentally by means of chemical vapor deposition. The stability of the system depending on parameters of the involved interatomic interactions is analyzed. It is demonstrated that different scenarios of the nanotube dynamics atop the nanoparticle are possible depending on the parameters of the Ni-C potential. When the interaction is weak the nanotube is stable and resembles its highly symmetric structure, while an increase of the interaction energy leads to the abrupt collapse of the nanotube in the initial stage of simulation. In order to validate the parameters of the Ni-C interaction utilized in the simulations, DFT calculations of the potential energy surface for carbon-nickel compounds are performed. The calculated dissociation energy of the Ni-C bond is in good agreement with the values, which correspond to the case of a stable and not deformed nanotube simulated within the MD approach.

  12. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  13. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width. PMID:17092643

  14. Cost and performance of activated carbon injection for mercury control

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-15

    Activated carbon injection (ACI) is one technology being developed to absorb mercury from mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants. In 2003/04, the USDOE and NETL selected 14 projects to test and evaluate mercury control technologies. While field testing is still ongoing, DOE/NETL recently completed an economic analysis of mercury control for six test sites spanning three ACI variations - conventional powdered activated carbon (PAC), brominated PAC and conventional PAC combined with a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) applied to the coal. To evaluate the progress of the field testing program and discern the performance of ACI, a data adjustment methodology was developed to account for baseline methane capture. This data were used to perform economic analyses to achieve low, mid and high levels of mercury control. The costs are given in the article. Full details are available on the DOE/NETL website, www.netl.doe.gov. 2 figs., 1 photo.

  15. Activated carbon from biochar: influence of its physicochemical properties on the sorption characteristics of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Park, Junyeong; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Rojas, Orlando J; Lim, Kwang Hun; Park, Sunkyu

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between physicochemical properties of biochar-based activated carbons and its adsorption was investigated using an aromatic model compound, phenanthrene. Solid-state (13)C NMR analysis indicated more condensed aromatic structures when pyrolysis temperature increased or after activation process induced. The increasing aromaticity and non-protonated carbon fraction of the activated biochar treated at 300°C amounted to 14.7% and 24.0%, respectively, compared to 7.4% and 4.4% for biochar treated at 700°C. The surface area and pore volume were reduced with the increase in pyrolysis temperature, but increased after activation. Surface characteristics correlated with the initial sorption rate and equilibrium concentration of phenanthrene, but not with the aromaticity. Solid-state (2)H NMR for phenanthrene-d10 saturated activated biochars, however, showed substantial difference in molecular mobility, which might be due to the high aromaticity of the activated biochars. Overall, these results provide an opportunity to manipulate the characteristics of biomass-based adsorbents based on the application needs. PMID:24128401

  16. Porous Organic Molecular Frameworks with Extrinsic Porosity: A Platform for Carbon Storage and Separation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jian; Cao, Rong

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of porous organic molecular frameworks (POMFs), which typically evidence common feasibility and compatibility, purification, and regeneration at practical conditions, remains a strategic challenge in modern materials science and is crucial for their favorable applications in biological, medical, and environmental realms. However, instructive knowledge of well-organized POMF assembly by supramolecular interactions is, in general, ambiguous to date. Nevertheless, a significant advance in controlled POMF assembly has been recently achieved. This Minireview highlights these approaches, with a particular focus on the design of molecular constituents and assembly strategies. We also look beyond the field of solid-state POMF materials into the assembly and recognition in solution, thus covering recent advances in POMFs based on material design and applications in carbon storage and separation. PMID:27410190

  17. Removal of trihalomethanes from aqueous solution through armchair carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Azamat, Jafar; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo; Yin, Binfeng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) including CH3Cl, CH2Cl2 and CHCl3 from aqueous solutions by armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under induced pressure. The studied system involved the armchair CNTs embedded between two graphene sheets with an aqueous solution of THMs in the simulation box. An external pressure was applied to the system along the z-axis of the simulation box. Six types of armchair CNTs with different diameter were used in this work, included (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), (7,7), (8,8) and (9,9) CNTs. The results of molecular dynamics simulation display that the armchair CNTs behave differently relative to THMs and water molecules. The permeation of THMs and water molecules through the armchair CNTs was dependent on the diameter of CNTs and the applied pressure. PMID:25682360

  18. Symmetry-adapted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of chiral carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Amin; Dayal, Kaushik

    2011-06-01

    We report on non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations of chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes using the framework of Objective Structures. This enables us to adapt molecular dynamics to the symmetry of chiral nanotubes and efficiently simulate these systems with small unit cells. We outline the method and the adaptation of a conventional thermostat and barostat to this setting. We then apply the method in order to examine the behavior of nanotubes with various chiralities subject to a constant extensional strain rate. We examine the effects of temperature, strain rate, and pre-compression/pre-tension. We find a range of failure mechanisms, including the formation of Stone-Wales defects, the opening of voids, and the motion of atoms out of the cross-section.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube from coconut shells activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melati, A.; Hidayati, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored in almost every single cancer treatment modality, including drug delivery, lymphatic targeted chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and gene therapy. They are considered as one of the most promising nanomaterial with the capability of both detecting the cancerous cells and delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to the cells. CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties such as high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechanical strength, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Coconut Shell was researched as active carbon source on 500 - 600°C. These activated carbon was synthesized becomes carbon nanotube and have been proposed as a promising tool for detecting the expression of indicative biological molecules at early stage of cancer. Clinically, biomarkers cancer can be detected by CNT Biosensor. We are using pyrolysis methods combined with CVD process or Wet Chemical Process on 600°C. Our team has successfully obtained high purity, and aligned MWCNT (Multi Wall Nanotube) bundles on synthesis CNT based on coconut shells raw materials. CNTs can be used to cross the mammalian cell membrane by endocytosis or other mechanisms. SEM characterization of these materials have 179 nm bundles on phase 83° and their materials compound known by using FTIR characterization.

  20. Detection of the J = 6 - 5 transition of carbon monoxide. [in Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.; Erickson, N. R.; Fetterman, H. R.; Clifton, B. J.; Peck, D. D.; Tannenwald, P. E.; Koepf, G. A.; Buhl, D.; Mcavoy, N.

    1981-01-01

    The J = 6 - 5 rotational transition of carbon monoxide has been detected in emission from the KL 'plateau source' in the Orion molecular cloud. The corrected peak antenna temperature is 100 K, and the FWHM line width is 26 km/sec. These observations were carried out using the 3 m telescope of the NASA IRTF (Infrared Telescope Facility) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and constitute the first astronomical data obtained at submillimeter wavelengths with a heterodyne system using a laser local oscillator. The data support the idea that the high-velocity dispersion CO in Orion is optically thin and set a lower limit to its temperature of approximately 180 K.

  1. A molecular and carbon isotopic study towards the origin and diagenetic fate of diaromatic carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Hartgers, W A; Sinninghe Damsté, J S; Requejo, A G; Allan, J; Hayes, J M; Ling, Y; Xie, T M; Primack, J; De Leeuw, J W

    1994-12-01

    Pyrolysates of high-molecular-weight sedimentary fractions of the Duvernay Formation (Western Canada Basin) are dominated by 1,2,3,4- and 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzene, which, generated via beta-cleavage, indicate the presence of diaromatic carotenoids in the macromolecular aggregates. This was substantiated by desulphurization of sulphur-rich aggregates of the polar fraction, which released (partly) hydrogenated carotenoids. Furthermore, these components were important constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fractions and related oils. Apart from renieratane and isorenieratane, 1H NMR analysis established the aromatic substitution pattern of the most abundant component present, which was identified as a diaromatic compound with an unprecedented 2,3,6-/3,4,5-trimethyl aromatic substitution pattern. Molecular and isotopic analyses of both soluble and insoluble fractions of organic matter revealed relationships between diagenetically-derived carotenoids found in bitumen and related oils and their precursors incorporated into high-molecular-weight fractions. Aryl isoprenoids, important components in extracts and oils, were apparently derived from thermal cracking of bound diaromatic carotenoids rather than cleavage of free carotenoids as previously suggested. Furthermore, products derived from diaromatic carotenoids were substantially enriched in 13C relative to n-alkanes of algal origin. Together with the characteristic carotenoids, this isotopic enrichment provides evidence of significant contributions from photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae), which fix carbon via the reversed tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In spite of the prominence of these molecular signals, the overall isotopic composition of the organic matter indicated that only a very small portion of the preserved organic carbon was derived from the biomass of photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria. PMID:11539138

  2. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  3. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  4. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  5. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  6. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  7. Activated carbon adsorbents from waste tires for air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, C.M.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Hsi, H.C.

    1999-07-01

    This study evaluates methodologies for utilizing waste tire rubber to produce carbonaceous adsorbents for use in air quality control operations. Such an approach provides a two-fold environmental and economic benefit. A recycling path is developed for waste tire rubber and new adsorbents are produced from a low cost feedstock for use in environmentally-related operations. Bench-scale and pilot-scale quantities of tire-derived activated carbon (TDAC) were produced from waste tire rubber. Raw tire rubber samples and devolatilized tire char were obtained from several US vendors. The raw samples were analyzed using proximate, ultimate, and elemental analyses. Batches of activated carbon samples were prepared using a bench-scale fixed-tubular reactor to prepare {approximately}10 g samples and a fluidized-bed reactor to prepare {approximately}100 g quantities. About 25 kg of activated carbon was also produced at a pilot-scale commercial facility. The resulting TDACs were then characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K. The sample surface areas were determined by the BET method, and the pore size distribution (PSD) was evaluated using the BJH model, and a 3-D PSD model. Performance of the TDACs was evaluated in their ability to remove gaseous mercury species from simulated power-plant flue-gas streams, and for the removal of organic compounds (e.g., acetone and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) from flowing gas streams.

  8. The effect of poly(trimethylene carbonate) molecular weight on macrophage behavior and enzyme adsorption and conformation.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Li, Anne; Amsden, Brian G

    2014-11-01

    Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with molecular weights greater than 100 kg/mol is known to degrade readily in vivo while PTMC of less than 70 kg/mol is resistant to degradation. The reason for the molecular weight dependent degradation rate of PTMC is unclear, and may be due to differences in macrophage behavior or enzyme adsorption or activity. Macrophage number and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and esterase were measured when cultured on 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC. Cholesterol esterase and lipase were adsorbed to 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC and mass and viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed enzyme layers were measured. No significant differences were observed in macrophage number or production of degradative species. Significant differences were measured in mass, shear modulus and viscosity of the adsorbed cholesterol esterase layer, suggesting that the cholesterol esterase is adsorbing in a different conformation on the 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC. Despite similar bulk moduli, the surface modulus of 60 kg/mol PTMC was significantly lower than 100 kg/mol. It is proposed that the difference in surface stiffness and polymer chain flexibility affect the arrangement of water bound to and freed from the polymer chains during adsorption, thus affecting enzymatic adsorption, conformation, and activity. PMID:25109440

  9. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    PubMed

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  10. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Chan, H C Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir; Stevens, Raymond C; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-08-22

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 R) is activated by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1 R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 μs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1 R activation. PMID:27460867

  11. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  12. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Janus Kinase (JAK) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2, was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organisation of the component FERM-SH2, pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain containing proteins, SOCS (Suppressors of Cytokine Signalling) proteins and Lnk. These recent advances highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilised by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  13. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  14. Molecular Characterization of the Cytotoxic Mechanism of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Nano-Onions on Human Skin Fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lianghao; Stilwell, Jackie; Zhang, Tingting; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Jiang, Huijian; Selegue, John P.; Cooke, Patrick A.; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Although both fullerene and carbon nanotubes have been demonstrated to accumulate to cytotoxic levels within organs of various animal models and cell types and carbon nanomaterials have been exploited for cancer therapies, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for cytotoxicity of this class of nanomaterial are not yet fully apparent. To address this question, we have performed whole genome expression array analysis and high content image analysis based phenotypic measurements on human skin fibroblast cell populations exposed to multiwall carbon nano-onions (MWCNOs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Here we demonstrate that exposing cells to MWCNOs and MWCNTs at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis. Expression array analysis indicates that multiple cellular pathways are perturbed after exposure to these nanomaterials at these doses, with material-specific toxigenomic profiles observed. Moreover, there are also distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles, with each material at different dosage levels (6 and 0.6 μg/mL for MWCNO and 0.6 and 0.06 μg/mL for MWCNT). MWCNO and MWCNT exposure activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. MWCNTs induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts, while MWCNO changes are concentrated in genes induced in response to external stimuli. Promoter analysis of the microarray results demonstrate that interferon and p38/ERK-MAPK cascades are critical pathway components in the induced signal transduction contributing to the more adverse effects observed upon exposure to MWCNTs as compared to MWCNOs. PMID:16351195

  15. The effects of activation temperature on physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbons derived from biomass wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Bachrun; Hidayat, Arif

    2015-12-01

    This research focused on investigating in the effect of activation temperature on the physico-chemical properties of palm empty fruit bunch (PEFB) based activated carbon prepared by physical activation with carbon dioxide. The activation temperature was studied in the range of 400-800°C by keeping the activation temperature at 800°C for 120 min. It was found that the porous properties of activated carbon decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature. The activated carbons prepared at the highest activation temperature at 800°C and activation time of 120 min gave the activated carbon with the highest of BET surface area and pore volume of 938 m2/g and 0.4502 cm3/g, respectively

  16. Identification and analysis of low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon in subglacial basal ice ecosystems by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, E. C.; Wadham, J. L.; Lis, G. P.; Tranter, M.; Pickard, A. E.; Stibal, M.; Dewsbury, P.; Fitzsimons, S.

    2015-08-01

    Glacial runoff is an important source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for downstream heterotrophic activity, despite the low overall DOC concentrations. This is because of the abundance of bioavailable, low molecular weight (LMW) DOC species. However, the provenance and character of LMW-DOC is not fully understood. We investigated the abundance and composition of DOC in subglacial environments via a molecular level DOC analysis of basal ice, which forms by water/sediment freeze-on to the glacier sole. Spectrofluorometry and a novel ion chromatographic method, which has been little utilised in glacial science for LMW-DOC determinations, were employed to identify and quantify the major LMW fractions (free amino acids, carbohydrates and carboxylic acids) in basal ice from four glaciers, each with a different basal debris type. Basal ice from Joyce Glacier (Antarctica) was unique in that 98 % of the LMW-DOC was derived from the extremely diverse FAA pool, comprising 14 FAAs. LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice were dependent on the bioavailability of the overridden organic carbon (OC), which in turn, was influenced by the type of overridden material. Mean LMW-DOC concentrations in basal ice from Russell Glacier (Greenland), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard) and Engabreen (Norway) were low (0-417 nM C), attributed to the relatively refractory nature of the OC in the overridden paleosols and bedrock. In contrast, mean LMW-DOC concentrations were an order of magnitude higher (4430 nM C) in basal ice from Joyce Glacier, a reflection of the high bioavailability of the overridden lacustrine material (>17 % of the sediment OC comprised extractable carbohydrates, a proxy for bioavailable OC). We find that the overridden material may act as a direct (via abiotic leaching) and indirect (via microbial cycling) source of DOC to the subglacial environment and provides a range of LMW-DOC compounds that may stimulate microbial activity in wet sediments in current subglacial

  17. Molecular properties and intermolecular forces--factors balancing the effect of carbon surface chemistry in adsorption of organics from dilute aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P

    2004-07-01

    Presented paper recapitulates the results of 6 years' study concerning the effect of carbon surface chemical composition on adsorption of paracetamol, phenol, acetanilide, and aniline from dilute aqueous solutions on carbons. Adsorption-desorption isotherms, enthalpy, and kinetics of adsorption data are shown for the measurements performed at three temperatures (300, 310, and 320 K) at two pH levels (1.5 and 7) on commercial activated carbons. The data were obtained for four carbons: the initial carbon D43/1 and forms modified by applying concentrated HNO3, fuming H2SO4, and gaseous NH3. The modification procedures do not change the porosity in a drastic way, but lead to drastic changes of the composition of carbon surface layer. By applying MOPAC (a general-purpose semiempirical molecular orbital package), the physicochemical constants characterizing the molecules of adsorbates are calculated, including the distribution of the Mulliken charges, the dipole moments and ionization potentials, and the energies of interaction with the unique positive and negative charges. They are correlated with the parameters characterizing the adsorption (and kinetics) process of studied molecules on the mentioned above carbons. The mechanisms proposed in the literature for the description of adsorption from dilute aqueous solutions are verified, and a general mechanism of adsorption is proposed. PMID:15158374

  18. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin, bisphenol and 2-chlorophenol on electrospun carbon nanofibers: in comparison with powder activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaona; Chen, Shuo; Fan, Xinfei; Quan, Xie; Tan, Feng; Zhang, Yaobin; Gao, Jinsuo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer solutions followed by thermal treatment. For the first time, the influence of stabilization procedure on the structure properties of CNFs was explored to improve the adsorption capacity of CNFs towards the environmental pollutants from aqueous solution. The adsorption of three organic chemicals including ciprofloxacin (CIP), bisphenol (BPA) and 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) on electrospun CNFs with high surface area of 2326m(2)/g and micro/mesoporous structure characteristics were investigated. The adsorption affinities were compared with that of the commercial powder activated carbon (PAC). The adsorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the maximum adsorption capacities (qm) of CNFs towards the three pollutants are sequenced in the order of CIP>BPA>2-CP, which are 2.6-fold (CIP), 1.6-fold (BPA) and 1.1-fold (2-CP) increase respectively in comparison with that of PAC adsorption. It was assumed that the micro/mesoporous structure of CNFs, molecular size of the pollutants and the π electron interaction play important roles on the high adsorption capacity exhibited by CNFs. In addition, electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interaction also contribute to the adsorption of CNFs. This study demonstrates that the electrospun CNFs are promising adsorbents for the removal of pollutants from aqueous solutions. PMID:25702869

  19. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide by nut shell carbon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoliang; Wang, Sheng; Dong, Xuebin; Zhang, Qiaoxin

    2009-08-15

    Nut shell carbon (NSC)-nanotitanium dioxide (TiO(2)) composites were prepared by sol-gel method. Photocatalytic activity on degradation of dye Rhodamine B was studied. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, pore size distribution, ultraviolet-vis light absorption spectrum, and photoluminescence spectrum were carried out to characterize the composite catalyst. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activity of NSC-nano-TiO(2) composites was much higher than P25 (Degussa). NSC could greatly absorb the organic substance and oxygen of solution because of its large surface area. PMID:19200653

  20. THE EFFECT OF POWERED ACTIVATED CARBON IN A PETROLEUM REFINERY ACTIVATED SLUDGE TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research program was to determine the effect of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to refinery activated sludge systems. Bench-scale and full-scale tests were performed. A wide range of PAC concentrations and sludge ages were evaluated. Bench-scal...

  1. EVALUATION OF FULL SCALE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS UTILIZING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON ADDITION WITH WET AIR REGENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to activated sludge systems is a proven method of wastewater treatment. Of eleven POTWs in the U.S. that were designed for PAC use, ten included wet air regeneration (WAR) for the destruction of secondary sludge solids and recovery ...

  2. Liquid-Phase Adsorption of Phenol onto Activated Carbons Prepared with Different Activation Levels.

    PubMed

    Hsieh; Teng

    2000-10-01

    The influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions was explored. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons, determined according to the Dubinin-Stoeckli equation, were found to vary with the burn-off level. By incorporating the distribution with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation using an inverse proportionality between the micropore size and the adsorption energy, the isotherms for the adsorption of phenol onto these carbons can be well predicted. The present study has demonstrated that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998301

  3. Converting poultry litter to activated carbon: optimal carbonization conditions and product sorption for benzene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Song, Weiping

    2011-12-01

    To promote utilization of poultry litter as a source material for manufacturing low-cost activated carbon (AC) that can be used in wastewater treatment, this study investigated optimal production conditions and water-borne organic sorption potential of poultry litter-based AC. Pelletized broiler litter was carbonized at different temperatures for varied time periods and activated with steam at a range of flow rate and time. The AC products were examined for quality characteristics using standard methods and for organic sorption potentials using batch benzene sorption techniques. The study shows that the yield and quality of litter AC varied with production conditions. The optimal production conditions for poultry litter-based AC were carbonization at 700 degrees C for 45 min followed by activation with 2.5 ml min(-1) steam for another 45 min. The resulting AC possessed an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1) and a specific surface area of 403 m2 g(-1). It sorbed benzene in water following sigmoidal kinetic and isothermal patterns. The sorption capacity for benzene was 23.70 mg g(-1), lower than that of top-class commercial AC. The results, together with other reported research findings, suggest that poultry litter is a reasonable feedstock for low-cost AC applicable to pre-treat wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants and heavy metals. PMID:22439566

  4. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  5. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  6. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasachar, Srivats; Benson, Steven; Crocker, Charlene; Mackenzie, Jill

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  7. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  17. Multivariate Analysis of Water-Soluble Organic Carbon Molecular Formulas in Daily Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Samburova, V.; Hallar, A. G.; Zielinska, B.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Kohl, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in aerosols is a highly complex mixture with thousands of compounds that can be identified using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry. In this study, molecular formula characterization of aerosol WSOC was done on individual daily aerosol samples (N = 34) collected consecutively from June 25 to July 28 in 2010 at the Storm Peak Laboratory near Steamboat Spring, Colorado (3220m a.s.l.). The aerosol samples were analyzed using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry after a reverse phase solid phase extraction procedure. 2000-5000 monoisotopic molecular formulas were identified in each of the daily samples with a majority of the molecular formulas present in multiple samples. Relative abundance weighted oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O/Cw) and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios (H/Cw) were calculated for each of the daily aerosol samples based on the identified molecular formulas. The overall O/Cw values for each of the daily samples are very similar ranging between 0.47 and 0.55. Similarly, the overall H/Cw values were mostly around 1.55. Relative abundance double bond equivalents (DBEw) were also calculated for each of the samples. DBEw values were approximately 5 for most of the samples with a few exceptions of DBEw > 5.4. Daily aerosol WSOC samples were examined using hierarchical cluster analysis. The hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted on the identified monoisotopic molecular formulas and their relative abundance for all of the aerosol samples. Eight of the samples were analyzed twice and all of the eight replicates were closely paired in the cluster analysis dendrogram which partially validates the results. The cluster analysis indicates that the aerosols have similar composition when the air masses have similar origins. For example, aerosol samples collected from July 14th to July 18th are located in the same branch of the dendrogram and their back trajectory analysis indicates the air

  18. Molecular imprinted polymer functionalized carbon nanotube sensors for detection of saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhulika, Sushmee; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and fabrication of an enzyme-free sugar sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) on the surface of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Electropolymerization of 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-APBA) in the presence of 10 M d-fructose and fluoride at neutral pH conditions resulted in the formation of a self-doped, molecularly imprinted conducting polymer (MICP) via the formation of a stable anionic boronic ester complex between poly(aniline boronic acid) and d-fructose. Template removal generated binding sites on the polymer matrix that were complementary to d-fructose both in structure, i.e., shape, size, and positioning of functional groups, thus enabling sensing of d-fructose with enhanced affinity and specificity over non-MIP based sensors. Using carbon nanotubes along with MICPs helped to develop an efficient electrochemical sensor by enhancing analyte recognition and signal generation. These sensors could be regenerated and used multiple times unlike conventional affinity based biosensors which suffer from physical and chemical stability.

  19. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes using mixed surfactants: experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, B; Poorgholami-Bejarpasi, N; Nayeri, N

    2014-03-20

    The ability of cationic-rich and anionic-rich mixtures of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) for dispersing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous media has been studied through both the experimental and molecular dynamics simulation methods. Compared to the pure CTAB and SDS, these mixtures are more effective with the lower concentrations and more individual CNTs, reflecting a synergistic effect in these mixtures. The synergistic effects observed in mixed surfactant systems are mainly due to the electrostatic attractions between surfactant heads. In addition, the surface charge related to the colloidal stability of mixed surfactant-covered nanotubes has been characterized by means of ζ-potential measurements. The results indicate that the hydrophobic interactions between surfactant tails also give rise to the higher adsorption of surfactant molecules. Furthermore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to provide insight about the structure of surfactant aggregates onto nanotubes and to attempt an explanation of the experimental results. The MD simulation results indicate that the random and disordered adsorption of mixed surfactants onto carbon nanotubes may be preferred for a low surfactant concentration. Our research may provide experimental and theoretical bases for using mixed surfactants to disperse CNTs, which can open an avenue for new applications of mixed surfactants. PMID:24555914

  20. Electronic structure of carbon dioxide under pressure and insights into the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Sean R; Jarrige, Ignace; Wu, Min; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tse, John S; Mi, Zhongying; Kaci, Linada; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Cai, Yong Q

    2013-11-12

    Knowledge of the high-pressure behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2), an important planetary material found in Venus, Earth, and Mars, is vital to the study of the evolution and dynamics of the planetary interiors as well as to the fundamental understanding of the C-O bonding and interaction between the molecules. Recent studies have revealed a number of crystalline polymorphs (CO2-I to -VII) and an amorphous phase under high pressure-temperature conditions. Nevertheless, the reported phase stability field and transition pressures at room temperature are poorly defined, especially for the amorphous phase. Here we shed light on the successive pressure-induced local structural changes and the molecular-to-nonmolecular transition of CO2 at room temperature by performing an in situ study of the local electronic structure using X-ray Raman scattering, aided by first-principle exciton calculations. We show that the transition from CO2-I to CO2-III was initiated at around 7.4 GPa, and completed at about 17 GPa. The present study also shows that at ~37 GPa, molecular CO2 starts to polymerize to an extended structure with fourfold coordinated carbon and minor CO3 and CO-like species. The observed pressure is more than 10 GPa below previously reported. The disappearance of the minority species at 63(± 3) GPa suggests that a previously unknown phase transition within the nonmolecular phase of CO2 has occurred. PMID:24167283