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Sample records for activated carbon particle

  1. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-06-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and positively charged, mesoporous wood-based carbons, as well as with a microporous coconut carbon. To this end, we glued carbon particles to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope and measured the interaction forces upon approach and retraction of thus made tips. Waterborne Raoultella terrigena and Escherichia coli adhered weakly (1-2 nN) to different activated carbon particles, and the main difference between the activated carbons was the percentage of curves with attractive sites revealed upon traversing of a carbon particle through the bacterial EPS layer. The percentage of curves showing adhesion forces upon retraction varied between 21% and 69%, and was highest for R. terrigena with positively charged carbon (66%) and a coconut carbon (69%). Macroscopic bacterial removal by the mesoporous carbon particles increased with increasing percentages of attractive sites revealed upon traversing a carbon particle through the outer bacterial surface layer. PMID:18405910

  2. Bacteria associated with granular activated carbon particles in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Camper, A K; LeChevallier, M W; Broadaway, S C; McFeters, G A

    1986-01-01

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogenization procedure (developed previously) indicated that 41.4% of the water samples had heterotrophic plate count bacteria attached to carbon particles. With the enumeration procedures described, heterotrophic plate count bacteria were recovered at an average rate of 8.6 times higher than by conventional analyses. Over 17% of the samples contained carbon particles colonized with coliform bacteria as enumerated with modified most-probable-number and membrane filter techniques. In some instances coliform recoveries were 122 to 1,194 times higher than by standard procedures. Nearly 28% of the coliforms attached to these particles in drinking water exhibited the fecal biotype. Scanning electron micrographs of carbon fines from treated drinking water showed microcolonies of bacteria on particle surfaces. These data indicate that bacteria attached to carbon fines may be an important mechanism by which microorganisms penetrate treatment barriers and enter potable water supplies. PMID:3767356

  3. Antibacterial activity of carbon-coated zinc oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Jun; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ozkal, Burak; Nakagawa, Zenbe-E

    2007-03-01

    Particles of ZnO coated with carbon (ZnOCC) were prepared and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. ZnO powder and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (polymerization degree: 2,000-95,000) were mixed at a mass ratio (ZnO/PVA) of 1, and then heated at 500-650 degree C for 3 h under argon gas with a flow rate of 50ml/min. Carbon deposited on the ZnOCC surface was amorphous as revealed by X-ray diffraction studies. The ZnOCC particles maintained their shape in water, even under agitation. The antibacterial activity of ZnOCC powder against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the change in the electrical conductivity of the growth medium caused by bacterial metabolism (conductimetric assay). The conductivity curves obtained were analyzed using the growth inhibition kinetic model proposed by Takahashi for calorimetric evaluation, allowing the estimation of the antibacterial efficacy and kinetic parameters of ZnOCC. In a previous study, when ZnO was immobilized on materials, such as activated carbon, the amount of ZnO immobilized was approximately 10-50%, and the antibacterial activity markedly decreased compared to that of the original ZnO. On the other hand, the ZnOCC particles prepared in this study contained approximately 95% ZnO and possessed antibacterial activity similar to that of pure ZnO. The carbon-coating treatment could maintain the antibacterial efficacy of the ZnO and may be useful in the develop-ment of multifunctional antimicrobial materials. PMID:17408004

  4. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  5. Particle Size Effects on Fenton Regeneration of MTBE-spent Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that may reduce water treatment costs. In this study, the effect of GAC particle size on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was evaluated. The GAC was...

  6. Comparing activated carbon of different particle sizes on enhancing methane generation in upflow anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suyun; He, Chuanqiu; Luo, Liwen; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing; Cui, Lifeng

    2015-11-01

    Two sizes of conductive particles, i.e. 10-20 mesh granulated activated carbon (GAC) and 80-100 mesh powdered activated carbon (PAC) were added into lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors, respectively, to testify their enhancement on the syntrophic metabolism of alcohols and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in 95days operation. When OLR increased to more than 5.8gCOD/L/d, the differences between GAC/PAC supplemented reactors and the control reactor became more significant. The introduction of activated carbon could facilitate the enrichment of methanogens and accelerate the startup of methanogenesis, as indicated by enhanced methane yield and substrate degradation. High-throughput pyrosequencing analysis showed that syntrophic bacteria and Methanosarcina sp. with versatile metabolic capability increased in the tightly absorbed fraction on the PAC surface, leading to the promoted syntrophic associations. Thus PAC prevails over than GAC for methanogenic reactor with heavy load. PMID:26298405

  7. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  8. Removal of two waterborne pathogenic bacterial strains by activated carbon particles prior to and after charge modification.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Engels, Eefje; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2006-11-01

    Waterborne diseases constitute a threat to public health despite costly treatment measures aimed at removing pathogenic microorganisms from potable water supplies. This paper compared the removal of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by negatively and positively charged types of activated carbon particles. Both strains display bimodal negative zeta-potential distributions in stabilized water. Carbon particles were suspended to an equivalent external geometric surface area of 700 cm2 in 250 mL of a bacterial suspension, with shaking. Samples were taken after different durations for plate counting. Initial removal rates were less elevated for the positively charged carbon particle than expected, yielding the conclusion that bacterial adhesion under shaking is mass-transport limited. After 360 min, however, the log-reduction of the more negatively charged R. terrigena in suspension was largest for the positively charged carbon particles as compared with the negatively charged ones, although conditioning in ultrapure or tap water of positively charged carbon particles for 21 days eliminated the favorable effect of the positive charge due to counterion adsorption from the water. Removal of the less negatively charged E. coli was less affected by aging of the (positively charged) carbon particles, confirming the role of electrostatic interactions in bacterial removal by activated carbon particles. The microporous, negatively charged coconut carbon performed less than the mesoporous, positively charged carbon particle prior to conditioning but did not suffer from loss of effect after conditioning in ultrapure or tap water. PMID:17144313

  9. Hyperbranched Aliphatic Polyester Modified Activated Carbon Particles with Homogenized Surface Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Liuxue

    The hyperbranched aliphatic polyester grafted activated carbon (HAPE-AC), was successfully prepared by the simple "one-pot" method. The surface functional groups of commercial activated carbon particles were homogenized to hydroxyl groups by being oxidized with nitric acid and then reduced with lithium tetrahydroaluminate (LiAlH4) at first. Secondly, the surface hydroxyl groups were used as the active sites for the solution polycondensation of the AB2 monomer, 2, 2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA), with the catalysis of p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA). The homogenization of the surface groups of the activated carbon particles and the graft polymerization of the hyperbranched aliphatic polyester were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The products were also characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The competitive adsorption properties of the products toward the heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) also proved the translations of the surface groups.

  10. Electrochemical characterisation of activated carbon particles used in redox flow battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, G. J. W.; Cox, J.; Wills, R. G. A.; Walsh, F. C.

    The Faradaic and non-Faradaic characteristics of a series of activated carbon particles (used to produce composite carbon-polymer electrodes for redox flow cells) have been determined using aqueous electrolytes (sulfuric acid and sodium polysulfide) at 295 K. The particles were mounted as a circular section (ca. 0.80 cm 2) shallow packed bed of 2.5 mm thickness in the direction of electrolyte flow (mean linear flow velocity ≈ 6 mm s -1). Cyclic voltammetry in deaerated, 1 mol dm -3 H 2SO 4 at 295 K indicated a specific capacitance in the range of 50-140 F g -1. Linear sweep voltammetry and galvanostatic step studies in an alkaline sodium polysulfide electrolyte (1.8 mol dm -3 Na 2S 2.11) have demonstrated marked differences amongst various types of activated carbon. Such differences are highlighted during galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling of half-cell electrodes in the polysulfide electrolyte. The electrochemical characteristics are compared to those based on (N 2 adsorption) gas porosimetry measurements.

  11. Children exposure assessment to ultrafine particles and black carbon: The role of transport and cooking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Stabile, L.; Morawska, L.; Russi, A.

    2013-11-01

    An accurate evaluation of the airborne particle dose-response relationship requires detailed measurements of the actual particle concentration levels that people are exposed to, in every microenvironment in which they reside. The aim of this work was to perform an exposure assessment of children in relation to two different aerosol species: ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC). To this purpose, personal exposure measurements, in terms of UFP and BC concentrations, were performed on 103 children aged 8-11 years (10.1 ± 1.1 years) using hand-held particle counters and aethalometers. Simultaneously, a time-activity diary and a portable GPS were used to determine the children's daily time-activity pattern and estimate their inhaled dose of UFPs and BC. The median concentration to which the study population was exposed was found to be comparable to the high levels typically detected in urban traffic microenvironments, in terms of both particle number (2.2 × 104 part. cm-3) and BC (3.8 μg m-3) concentrations. Daily inhaled doses were also found to be relatively high and were equal to 3.35 × 1011 part. day-1 and 3.92 × 101 μg day-1 for UFPs and BC, respectively. Cooking and using transportation were recognized as the main activities contributing to overall daily exposure, when normalized according to their corresponding time contribution for UFPs and BC, respectively. Therefore, UFPs and BC could represent tracers of children exposure to particulate pollution from indoor cooking activities and transportation microenvironments, respectively.

  12. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Armynah, B. Tahir, D. Jaya, N.

    2014-09-25

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  13. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armynah, B.; Tahir, D.; Jaya, N.

    2014-09-01

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  14. Carbon-particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  15. Fenton-driven regeneration of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon - Effects of particle size and Iron Amendment Procedures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of spent granular activated carbon (GAC) is a technology being developed to regenerate organic contaminant-spent GAC. Here, the effect of GAC particle size (>2 mm to <0.35 mm) on Fenton-driven oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent GAC was ev...

  16. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  17. Effects of Nanosized Lithium Carbonate Particles on the Functional Activity of Macrophages During Development of Hepatocarcinoma 29.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, V I; Borodin, Yu I; Makarova, O P; Bgatova, N P; Rachkovskaya, L N

    2015-08-01

    The functional activity of macrophages in response to injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after initiation of hepatocarcinoma 29 in male CBA mice was evaluated by the production of NO, arginase activity, and absorption of zymosan granules. In intact animals, NO production by peritoneal macrophages increased by 4 times and arginase activity 3.1 times in response to a single injection of nanosized particles into the hip muscle. The level of NO production by macrophages remained high after 4 and 5 injections, while arginase activity returned to normal. The level of phagocytic peritoneal macrophages increased by 1.4 times after 5 injections of the particles. The level of NO production by macrophages gradually increased in animals with hepatocarcinoma developing in the hip muscle: by 1.6 times on day 3, 3.2 times on day 7, and by 2.6 times on day 13 in comparison with the corresponding parameters in intact animals. The increase of NO production by peritoneal macrophages after tumor process initiation was not paralleled by changes in arginase activity and absorption of zymosan granules. The results indicated that injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after inoculation of hepatocarcinoma 29 cells in the right hip muscle tissue was inessential for the function of peritoneal macrophages by the studied parameters. PMID:26388569

  18. In situ measurement of cloud condensation nuclei activation of black carbon particles in dependence of their mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Bukowiecki, N.; Juranyi, Z.; Hammer, E.; Zieger, P.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) emitted from combustion sources is the major absorbing component of atmospheric aerosols. The Earth's climate can be influenced by BC particles in several ways, e.g. through absorption of solar radiation or through decreasing the surface albedo of glaciers due to deposited BC particles. Cloud droplets only form on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The CCN activation behaviour of BC particles is important for their atmospheric life cycle as wet removal is an important sink. Several laboratory and field studies have shown that BC is less hygroscopic and less CCN active than inorganic or water-soluble organic aerosol components. The goal of this study was to investigate the CCN activation behaviour of BC-containing particles in dependence of their mixing state and compared to non-BC containing particles. In situ measurements of the cloud droplet activation behaviour of aerosol particles were done in winter 2010 at the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl), Switzerland. Two different inlets were employed during cloud episodes to selectively collect the interstitial aerosol (all particles that did not form cloud droplets) as well as the total aerosol (interstitial aerosol plus cloud droplet residuals). Both types of aerosol samples were characterized using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), providing quantitative measurement of BC mass in individual particles as well as information on the mixing state of BC, and further aerosol measurement techniques. Outdoor measurements of microphysical cloud properties were also available. Comparison of the aerosol samples from the interstitial and total inlets makes it possible to determine the properties of the CCN active aerosol as opposed to the interstitial aerosol. The analysis of several cloud events revealed that coated BC particles are more readily activated to CCN compared to uncoated BC particles with equal BC mass. This can actually be expected even for non-hygroscopic coatings due

  19. Enhanced methanol oxidation activity and stability of Pt particles anchored on carbon-doped TiO2 nanocoating support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Li, Yunfeng; Lv, Ren-Liang; Wang, Tie-Lin; Wang, Wei-Guo; Wang, Cun-Wen

    2015-03-01

    In this work, carbon-doped TiO2 nanocoating (TiO2-C) was prepared by a sol-gel process and employed as the support of Pt nanoparticles for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The obtained Pt/TiO2-C catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. XRD characterization shows that the average crystallite sizes of Pt particles and TiO2-C support are 2.7 and 6.5 nm, respectively. TEM characterizations show that Pt particles are highly dispersed on TiO2 nanocoating, which preserves its nanoscale structure without no apparent sintering after carbon doping. XPS characterization shows that the Pt particles anchored on TiO2-C exhibit positively shifted binding energies of Pt 4f. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) characterizations show that TiO2-C has a greatly enhanced electrical conductivity and Pt/TiO2-C catalyst has better electrocatalytic activity and stability than Pt/C catalyst for MOR, which could be attributed to the high dispersion of Pt particles on TiO2-C support, the strong metal-support interactions between Pt particles and TiO2-C support, and the rich active -OH species on TiO2-C support.

  20. [Intraoperative chemotherapy with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, A; Takahashi, T; Sasabe, T; Itoh, M; Kondoh, S; Seiki, K; Yoneyama, C; Shimotsuma, M; Hagiwara, A; Yamaguchi, T

    1989-08-01

    A new form of dosage (MMC-CH) was composed of activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C. Intraperitoneal administration of MMC-CH was tested clinically for prophylactic and therapeutic effects on peritoneal carcinomatosis of gastric cancer. The criteria of MMC-CH's administration were equal or less than 70 years old, more than 40 kg in body weight, no disfunction of liver and kidney, no particular findings in electrocardiography, S2 or S3 in the grade of serosal invasion, P0, P1, P2 or P3 in the grade of peritoneal dissemination, according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study in Surgery and Pathology by the Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer. MMC-CH was given to 44 patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer in our department from 1985 to 1988. The 44 patients were composed of 12 patients with P0 findings (P0 patients), 8 patients with P1 findings (P1 patients), 12 patients with P2 findings (P2 patients), and 12 patients with P3 findings (P3 patients). MMC-CH at 50 mg/person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the operation wound was closed. Fifty-seven patients in our department from 1983 to 1987 for whom the same criteria were applicable and did not receive MMC-CH therapy, served as the control group. The 57 patients were composed of 23 P0 patients, 21 P1 patients, 10 P2 patients, and 3 P3 patients. There was statistically with chi 2 test no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases between the MMC-CH group and the control group. Survival rate was calculated with Kaplan-Meier's method in the overall patients in each of the MMC-CH group or the control group. The overall survival rate in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly (p less than 0.01-0.05) higher from day 460 to day 552 and from day 736 to day 800 than that in the control group. Next, the patients were classified into two subgroups

  1. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  2. Ceria–Zirconia Particles Wrapped in a 2D Carbon Envelope: Improved Low-Temperature Oxygen Transfer and Oxidation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aneggi, Eleonora; Rico-Perez, Veronica; de Leitenburg, Carla; Maschio, Stefano; Soler, Lluís; Llorca, Jordi; Trovarelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Engineering the interface between different components of heterogeneous catalysts at nanometer level can radically alter their performances. This is particularly true for ceria-based catalysts where the interactions are critical for obtaining materials with enhanced properties. Here we show that mechanical contact achieved by high-energy milling of CeO2–ZrO2 powders and carbon soot results in the formation of a core of oxide particles wrapped in a thin carbon envelope. This 2D nanoscale carbon arrangement greatly increases the number and quality of contact points between the oxide and carbon. Consequently, the temperatures of activation and transfer of the oxygen in ceria are shifted to exceptionally low temperatures and the soot combustion rate is boosted. The study confirms the importance of the redox behavior of ceria-zirconia particles in the mechanism of soot oxidation and shows that the organization of contact points at the nanoscale can significantly modify the reactivity resulting in unexpected properties and functionalities. PMID:26448053

  3. Intra-particle migration of mercury in granular polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Masue-Slowey, Yoko; Fendorf, Scott; Luthy, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The depth profile of mercuric ion after the reaction with polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC) was investigated using micro-x-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging techniques and mathematical modeling. The μ-XRF results revealed that mercury was concentrated at 0~100 μm from the exterior of the particle after three months of treatment with PSR-AC in 10 ppm HgCl2 aqueous solution. The μ-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (μ-XANES) analyses indicated HgS as a major mercury species, and suggested that the intra-particle mercury transport involved a chemical reaction with PSR polymer. An intra-particle mass transfer model was developed based on either a Langmuir sorption isotherm with liquid phase diffusion (Langmuir model) or a kinetic sorption with surface diffusion (kinetic sorption model). The Langmuir model predicted the general trend of mercury diffusion, although at a slower rate than observed from the μ-XRF map. A kinetic sorption model suggested faster mercury transport, which overestimated the movement of mercuric ions through an exchange reaction between the fast and slow reaction sites. Both μ-XRF and mathematical modeling results suggest mercury removal occurs not only at the outer surface of the PSR-AC particle but also at some interior regions due to a large PSR surface area within an AC particle. PMID:22133913

  4. [Intraoperative chemotherapy against peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer with intraperitoneal activated carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, A; Takahashi, T; Sawai, K; Yamaguchi, T; Iwamoto, A; Yoneyama, C

    1989-02-01

    For prevention and therapy of peritoneal dissemination, a new dosage from (MMC-CH) comprising carbon particles adsorbing mitomycin C was given to 44 patients (the MMC-CH group) undergoing gastrectomy for gastric cancer, of which advancing stage was classified into the category of H0, and S2 or S3, and P0, P1, P2 or P3 according to the General Rules for the Gastric Cancer Study. MMC-CH, principally at 50 mg person in terms of mitomycin C was administered intraperitoneally before the surgical wound was closed. Historical control group was composed of 53 patients not given MMC-CH, who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the same advancing stage as those of the 44 patients. There was statistically no significant difference of age, sex, depth of infiltration, macroscopically and microscopically defined progression of lymph-nodal metastases, between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. The survival rate of the overall patients, and each group of the patients with the lesion defined as P0, P1, P2, or P3 was compared with Kaplan-Meier's method between the MMC-CH group and the historical control group. In the MMC-CH group, the survival rates of the overall patients and the patients with P0, P1, or P2 lesion were statistically significantly higher than those in the historical control group. However, the rate of the P3 patients in the MMC-CH group was statistically significantly lower than in the historical control group. PMID:2493221

  5. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was. PMID:23528781

  6. Dose-dependent regulation of microbial activity on sinking particles by polyunsaturated aldehydes: Implications for the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bethanie R; Bidle, Kay D; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2015-05-12

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, fixing CO2 into organic carbon, which may then be exported to depth via sinking particles. The molecular diversity of this organic carbon is vast and many highly bioactive molecules have been identified. Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are bioactive on various levels of the marine food web, and yet the potential for these molecules to affect the fate of organic carbon produced by diatoms remains an open question. In this study, the effects of PUAs on the natural microbial assemblages associated with sinking particles were investigated. Sinking particles were collected from 150 m in the water column and exposed to varying concentrations of PUAs in dark incubations over 24 h. PUA doses ranging from 1 to 10 µM stimulated respiration, organic matter hydrolysis, and cell growth by bacteria associated with sinking particles. PUA dosages near 100 µM appeared to be toxic, resulting in decreased bacterial cell abundance and metabolism, as well as pronounced shifts in bacterial community composition. Sinking particles were hot spots for PUA production that contained concentrations within the stimulatory micromolar range in contrast to previously reported picomolar concentrations of these compounds in bulk seawater. This suggests PUAs produced in situ stimulate the remineralization of phytoplankton-derived sinking organic matter, decreasing carbon export efficiency, and shoaling the average depths of nutrient regeneration. Our results are consistent with a "bioactivity hypothesis" for explaining variations in carbon export efficiency in the oceans. PMID:25918397

  7. Dose-dependent regulation of microbial activity on sinking particles by polyunsaturated aldehydes: Implications for the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Bethanie R.; Bidle, Kay D.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.

    2015-05-01

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, fixing CO2 into organic carbon, which may then be exported to depth via sinking particles. The molecular diversity of this organic carbon is vast and many highly bioactive molecules have been identified. Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are bioactive on various levels of the marine food web, and yet the potential for these molecules to affect the fate of organic carbon produced by diatoms remains an open question. In this study, the effects of PUAs on the natural microbial assemblages associated with sinking particles were investigated. Sinking particles were collected from 150 m in the water column and exposed to varying concentrations of PUAs in dark incubations over 24 h. PUA doses ranging from 1 to 10 µM stimulated respiration, organic matter hydrolysis, and cell growth by bacteria associated with sinking particles. PUA dosages near 100 µM appeared to be toxic, resulting in decreased bacterial cell abundance and metabolism, as well as pronounced shifts in bacterial community composition. Sinking particles were hot spots for PUA production that contained concentrations within the stimulatory micromolar range in contrast to previously reported picomolar concentrations of these compounds in bulk seawater. This suggests PUAs produced in situ stimulate the remineralization of phytoplankton-derived sinking organic matter, decreasing carbon export efficiency, and shoaling the average depths of nutrient regeneration. Our results are consistent with a "bioactivity hypothesis" for explaining variations in carbon export efficiency in the oceans.

  8. Dose-dependent regulation of microbial activity on sinking particles by polyunsaturated aldehydes: Implications for the carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bethanie R.; Bidle, Kay D.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle, fixing CO2 into organic carbon, which may then be exported to depth via sinking particles. The molecular diversity of this organic carbon is vast and many highly bioactive molecules have been identified. Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are bioactive on various levels of the marine food web, and yet the potential for these molecules to affect the fate of organic carbon produced by diatoms remains an open question. In this study, the effects of PUAs on the natural microbial assemblages associated with sinking particles were investigated. Sinking particles were collected from 150 m in the water column and exposed to varying concentrations of PUAs in dark incubations over 24 h. PUA doses ranging from 1 to 10 µM stimulated respiration, organic matter hydrolysis, and cell growth by bacteria associated with sinking particles. PUA dosages near 100 µM appeared to be toxic, resulting in decreased bacterial cell abundance and metabolism, as well as pronounced shifts in bacterial community composition. Sinking particles were hot spots for PUA production that contained concentrations within the stimulatory micromolar range in contrast to previously reported picomolar concentrations of these compounds in bulk seawater. This suggests PUAs produced in situ stimulate the remineralization of phytoplankton-derived sinking organic matter, decreasing carbon export efficiency, and shoaling the average depths of nutrient regeneration. Our results are consistent with a “bioactivity hypothesis” for explaining variations in carbon export efficiency in the oceans. PMID:25918397

  9. Carbon-rich particles in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of particles detected in the coma of Comet Halley contain carbon atoms; many of these grains appear to consist preponderately or only of light elements. These light-element particles may be composed of organic compounds. Of the possible combinations of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, numerous examples are found of particles containing the combinations (H,C,O,N), (H,C,N), (H,C,O), and (H,C). These results may bear on the recent detection of polyoxymethylene fragments, the observation of cyanojets (CN patterns consistent with release from solid particles), the possible presence of cyanopolyacetylenes or HCN polymer and the make-up of the CHON particles. If cometary matter could reach the surface of the earth without complete disruption, these diverse organic and mixed particles could create unique microenvironments, possibly with significant or even pivotal prebiotic chemical activity. Here a speculative insight into possible relationships between carbon in comets and carbon in life is given, as well as a brief overview of on-going analysis of data from the highly successful Particle Impact Analyzer (PIA) experiment flown on the Giotto spacecraft for the flyby of Comet Halley (development and implementation of PIA was under the direction of J. Kissel of the Max Planck Institute for Kernphysik, Heidelberg). PIA is a time-of-flight analyzer which obtains mass spectra of ions from individual particles impacting on a Pt-Ag foil target within the instrument.

  10. Particle size distribution and morphological changes in activated carbon-metal oxide hybrid catalysts prepared under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2016-03-01

    In catalysis processes, activated carbon (AC) and metal oxides (MOs) are widely used either as catalysts or as catalyst supports because of their unique properties. A combination of AC and a MO in a single hybrid material entails changes not only in the composition, microstructure and texture but also in the morphology, which may largely influence the catalytic behaviour of the resulting product. This work is aimed at investigating the modifications in the morphology and particle size distribution (PSD) for AC-MO hybrid catalysts as a result of their preparation under markedly different heating conditions. From a commercial AC and six MO (Al2 O3 , Fe2 O3 , ZnO, SnO2 , TiO2 and WO3 ) precursors, two series of such catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120ºC, and subsequent heat treatment at 200ºC or 850ºC in inert atmosphere. The resulting samples are characterized in terms of their morphology and PSD by scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ processing program. Obtained results indicate that the morphology, PSD and degree of dispersion of the supported catalysts are strongly dependent both on the MO precursor and the heat treatment temperature. With the temperature rise, trends are towards the improvement of crystallinity, the broadening of the PSD and the increase in the average particle size, thus suggesting the involvement of sintering mechanisms. Such effects are more pronounced for the Fe, Sn and W catalysts due to the reduction of the corresponding MOs by AC during the heat treatment at 850ºC. PMID:26457467

  11. Purification of transcriptionally active multimeric plasmid DNA using zwitterionic detergent and carbonate apatite nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Lau Khye; Ling, Chong Siew; Chua, Ming Jang; Abdullah, Syahril; Rosli, Rozita; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2011-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is one of the indispensable components in molecular biology research and a potential biomaterial for gene therapy and DNA vaccination. Both quality and quantity of extracted plasmid DNA are of the great interests in cloning and subsequent expression of genes in vitro and in vivo for basic research and therapeutic interventions. Bacteria with extremely short generation times are the valuable source of plasmid DNA that can be isolated through a number of existing techniques. However, the current methods have some limitations in isolating high quality plasmid DNA since the multimeric plasmid which is believed to be more efficiently transcribed by RNA polymerase than the monomeric form, is almost lost during the extraction process. Recently, we developed a rapid isolation technique for multimeric plasmid based on generation of a 'protein aggregate' using a zwitterionic detergent and alkali. Here we have investigated the roles of different parameters in the whole extraction process to optimise the production of high quality multimeric plasmid DNA. Moreover, we have showed the advantageous effects of nanoparticles to effectively sediment the 'protein aggregate' for smooth elution of multimeric plasmid DNA from it. Finally, quality assessment study has revealed that the isolated multimeric DNA is at least 10 times more transcriptionally active than the monomeric form isolated by the commercially available Qiaget kit. PMID:21419794

  12. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  13. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-01-24

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  14. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  15. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2011-08-16

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratios following thermodenuder treatment of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T

    2011-08-28

    The effects of thermodenuder treatment on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and elemental composition of organic particles grown by α-pinene ozonolysis were investigated. The secondary organic material (SOM) was produced in a continuous-flow chamber, with steady-state organic particle mass concentrations M(org) ranging from 1.4 to 37 μg m(-3). Particles exiting in the outflow were heated to temperatures T of up to 100 °C in a thermodenuder. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) and hydrogen-to-carbon (H:C) ratios were measured by on-line mass spectrometry. The observed elemental ratios were fit by a linear function, given by (H:C) = -0.8 (O:C) +1.8 for 0.38 < O:C < 0.50. This fit included the dependence on both M(org) and T, meaning that the single variable of post-thermodenuder M(org) was sufficient as an accurate predictor for O:C(M(org)(T)) and H:C(M(org)(T)). This result suggests that equilibrium partitioning theory largely governed the initial volatilization in the thermodenuder. By comparison, the CCN activity had a different dependence on thermodenuder treatment. At 25 °C, the CCN activity was independent of M(org), having an effective hygroscopicity parameter κ(org) of 0.103 ± 0.002. At 100 °C, however, κ(org) varied from 0.105 for M(org) = 1.4 μg m(-3) to 0.079 for M(org) = 37 μg m(-3), indicating that for high mass concentration the CCN activity decreased with heat treatment. The interpretation is that the oligomer fraction of the SOM increased at elevated T, both because of particle-phase reactions that produced oligomers under those conditions and because of the relative enrichment of lower-volatility oligomers in the SOM accompanying the evaporation of higher-volatility monomers from the SOM. Oligomers have high effective molecular weights and thereby significantly influence CCN activity. The production rates of different types of oligomers depend on the types and concentrations of functional groups present in the SOM, which in turn are

  18. DISINFECTION OF BACTERIA ATTACHED TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon (GAC) particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected wit...

  19. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  20. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE INTERLEUKIN-8 GENE TRANSCRIPTION AND P38 MAPK ACTIVATION IN NORMAL BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to particulate matter-induced adverse health effects. Interleukin (IL)-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung that is induced in respiratory cells exposed to a variety of environmental insul...

  1. Improve the catalytic activity of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in decomposition of ammonium perchlorate by coating amorphous carbon on their surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yifu; Liu Xinghai; Nie Jiaorong; Yu Lei; Zhong Yalan; Huang Chi

    2011-02-15

    Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value of the designed synthetic system, respectively. The sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with diameter about 25 nm on average were encapsulated into carbon shells to fabricate a novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C) through the coating experiments. The catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which show that {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell composites have higher catalytic activity than that of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. -- Graphical abstract: The catalytic performance of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value. {yields} A novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell structured composite) has been successfully synthesized using sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the cores and glucose as the source of carbon. {yields} The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which shows that these materials have high catalytic activity.

  2. Particle resuspension via human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing

    This dissertation consists of three correlated parts that are related to particle resuspension from floorings in indoor environment. The term resuspension in this dissertation refers the re-entrainment of deposited particles into atmosphere via mechanic disturbances by human activity indoors, except where it is specified. The first part reviews the literature related to particle resuspension. Fundamental concepts and kinetics of resuspension of particles were extracted from previous studies. Suggestions for future research on indoor particle resuspension have been given based on the literature reviews and the findings of part 2 and part 3. The second part involved 54 resuspension experiments conducted in a room-scale environmental chamber. Three floorings types and two ventilation configurations were tested. Air exchange rate were fixed during the experiments, and the temperature/RH were monitored. The airborne particle concentration was measured by an array of optical particle counters (OPCs) in the chamber. Resuspension rates were estimated in size ranges of 0.8--1, 1.0--2.0, 2.0--5.0, and 5.0--10 mum ranging from 10-5--10 -2 hr-1, with higher resuspension rates associated with larger particles. Resuspension via walking activity varied from experiment to experiment. A "heavy and fast" walking style was associated with a higher resuspension rate than a less active style. Given the same floor loading of the test particles, resuspension rates for the carpeted floor were on the same order of magnitude but significantly higher than those for the hard floor. In the third part, an image analysis method (IAM) was adapted to characterize the particle distribution on fabric floorings. The IAM results showed the variability of particles loading on various carpets. The dust particles on fibers from ten carpets vary in sizes. The normal dust loading varies from house to house from 3.6x106 particles/cm2 to 8.2x106 particles/cm2. The dust particle number distribution for size

  3. Protection of porous carbon fuel particles from boudouard corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.

    2015-05-26

    A system for producing energy that includes infusing porous carbon particles produced by pyrolysis of carbon-containing materials with an off-eutectic salt composition thus producing pore-free carbon particles, and reacting the carbon particles with oxygen in a fuel cell according to the reaction C+O.sub.2=CO.sub.2 to produce electrical energy.

  4. Black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gengchen; Bai, Jianhui; Kong, Qinxin; Emilenko, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    A study of the concentration of black carbon particles and its variation in the urban atmosphere has been carried out since 1996 in the Beijing area. The measurements were done in the late autumn and early winter each year, the period before and after domestic heating activities begin. The results show the presence of black carbon particles at the high level that vary over a large range in the urban atmosphere in Beijing. The mean value of daily average concentration for the whole observation period of 1996 2004 is 20.0 μg m-3. An evident decrease of black carbon particle concentration in the Beijing area is observed after 2000, and the daily average concentration of black carbon particles is estimated to be 16.0 μg m-3 with a variation range of 2.10 50.50 μg m-3 for the period of 2000 2004. The observation method and main variation behavior characteristics of black carbon particles in the urban atmosphere in the Beijing area are given and discussed.

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on copper particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol'tsova, T. S.; Larionova, T. V.; Shusharina, N. N.; Tolochko, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the synthesis of carbon nanostructures from the gas phase (mixture of acetylene or ethylene with hydrogen) on the surface of copper particles without using other catalysts. The synthesized structures (multilayer graphene and carbon nanofibers) are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. It is shown that the fiber structure is determined by the C: H ratio in the gas phase. The kinetics of synthesis is analyzed in terms of the formal kinetics of conversion in accordance with the Johnson—Mehl—Avrami equation.

  6. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Particles for Ocean Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Aaron C.; Adams, E. Eric; Israelsson, P. H.; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents strategies for producing negatively buoyant CO{sub 2} hydrate composite particles for ocean carbon sequestration. Our study is based on recent field observations showing that a continuous-jet hydrate reactor located at an ocean depth of 1500 m produced curved negatively buoyant cylindrical particles with diameters {approx} 2.5 cm and lengths up to {approx} 1 m. Accordingly we performed new laboratory experiments to determine the drag coefficient of such particles and, based on the measured drag coefficient and the initial settling velocity observed in the field, have concluded that the reactor efficiency (percentage of liquid CO{sub 2} converted to hydrate) in the field was {approx} 16%. Using the dissolution rates observed in the field, we conclude that such particles would ultimately sink to depth below discharge of {approx} 115 m. We have also predicted the sinking depth of particles potentially produced from various scaled-up reactors and have shown that, for example, a 10 cm diameter particle produced with a hydrate conversion of 50% could reach the ocean bottom before completely dissolving. In a real sequestration scenario, we are interested in following large groups of hydrate particles released continuously. We have previously shown that increasing particle size and hydrate conversion efficiency enhances the sinking of hydrate particle plumes produced by the continuous release of CO{sub 2} in a quiescent ambient, but that a sufficiently strong current will cause the entrained particles to separate from the plume and settle discretely. In the latter case, particles of different sizes and hydrate conversions (hence different settling velocities) will follow different settling trajectories as they dissolve. This particle fractionation, if employed deliberately, spreads the discharged CO{sub 2} in the down current and vertical directions, enhancing mixing, while turbulent diffusion helps spread the CO{sub 2} in the third direction. A

  8. Factors affecting the behavior of unburned carbon upon steam activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the factors that could affect the behavior of unburned carbon samples upon steam activation. Through this work, the relationships among the factors that could influence the carbon-steam reaction with the surface area of the produced activated carbon were explored. Statistical analysis was used to relate the chemical and physical properties of the unburned carbon to the surface area of the activated carbon. Six unburned carbons were selected as feedstocks for activated carbon, and marked as UCA through UCF. The unburned carbons were activated using steam at 850°C for 90 minutes, and the surface areas of their activated counterparts were measured using N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The activated carbons produced from different unburned carbon precursors presented different surface areas at similar carbon burn-off levels. Moreover, in different carbon burn-off regions, the sequences for surface area of activated carbons from different unburned carbon samples were different. The factors that may affect the carbon-steam gasification reactions, including the concentration of carbon active sites, the crystallite size of the carbon, the intrinsic porous structure of carbon, and the inorganic impurities, were investigated. All unburned carbons investigated in this study were similar in that they showed the very broad (002) and (10 ) carbon peaks, which are characteristic of highly disordered carbonaceous materials. In this study, the unburned carbon samples contained about 17--48% of inorganic impurities. Compared to coals, the unburned carbon samples contain a larger amount of inorganic impurities as a result of the burn-off, or at lease part, of the carbon during the combustion process. These inorganic particles were divided into two groups in terms of the way they are associated with carbon particles: free single particles, and particles combined with carbon particles. As indicated from the present work, unburned

  9. Method for applying pyrolytic carbon coatings to small particles

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.; Kiplinger, Dale V.; Chilcoat, Bill R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for coating small diameter, low density particles with pyrolytic carbon is provided by fluidizing a bed of particles wherein at least 50 per cent of the particles have a density and diameter of at least two times the remainder of the particles and thereafter recovering the small diameter and coated particles.

  10. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  11. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  12. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  13. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  14. Co@Co3O4 core-shell particle encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cage hybrids as active and durable oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Wen, Lixin; Li, Feng; Yin, Guanlin; Chen, Wanmin; An, Xingcai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt-based nanomaterials are promising candidates as efficient, affordable, and sustainable alternative electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, the catalytic efficiency of traditional nanomaterials is still far below what is expected, because of their low stability in basic solutions and poor active site exposure yield. Here a unique hybrid nanomaterial comprising Co@Co3O4 core-shell nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cages on reduced graphene oxide (denoted as Co@Co3O4@NMCC/rGO) is successfully synthesized via a carbonization and subsequent oxidation strategy of a graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-organic framework (MOF). Impressively, the special carbon cage structure is very important for not only leading to a large active surface area, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, and easy release of gas bubbles, but also preventing Co@Co3O4 NPs from aggregation and peeling off during prolonged electrochemical reactions. As a result, in alkaline media, the resulting hybrid materials catalyze the OER with a low onset potential of ∼1.50 V (vs. RHE) and an over-potential of only 340 mV to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for at least 25 h. In addition, metallic Co cores in Co@Co3O4 provide an alternative way for electron transport and accelerate the OER rate. PMID:26914166

  15. A comparison of the photocatalytic activity between commercial and synthesized mesoporous and nanocrystalline titanium dioxide for 4-nitrophenol degradation: Effect of phase composition, particle size, and addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Piera; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Donzello, Maria Pia; Fierro, Giuseppe; Moretti, Giuliano

    2015-12-01

    The photodegradation of 4-nitrophenol in aqueous solution was studied by using titania-based photocatalysts, in particular standard commercial titania samples (anatase and rutile, Hunstmann; P25 and Aeroxide VP P90, Evonik) and a mesoporous and nanocrystalline titania synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. A comparison between the commercial products and our preparations made evident a different particle size and phase composition. Moreover, in order to investigate a possible synergism between TiO2 and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), further two samples were purposely synthesized by adding to the reaction mixture used for the catalyst preparation a small amount of single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Among the investigated solids, the nanocrystalline titania resulted to be the most active photocatalysts. The less active solids were rutile and mesoporous titania. The addition of a small amount of MWCNTs further increased the photoactivity of the nanocrystalline titania.

  16. PARTICLE TRACKING ANALYSIS & ANIMATIONS DEPICTING MOVEMENT OF THE CARBON TETRACHLORIDE PLUME REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MCMAHON, W.J.; ROHAY, V.J.

    2006-11-02

    The purpose of the hydraulic particle tracking animation files is to show where carbon tetrachloride that reached groundwater from the known discharge facilities would have been likely to travel fin the groundwater, and from where carbon tetrachloride presently observed in the aquifer likely would have started. These analyses support the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit activity to identify sources of carbon tetrachloride currently observed in groundwater or locations where carbon tetrachloride may have entered the groundwater. The animation files show travel paths (both forward and backward in time) for hypothetical particles of carbon tetrachloride carried in the groundwater. The travel paths represent the movement of the carbon tetrachloride at the average groundwater velocity. The particles only represent an estimation of where the carbon tetrachloride would be expected to be (or have come from) and do not indicate or imply what the concentration in the groundwater would be.

  17. Artificial neural network and particle swarm optimization for removal of methyl orange by gold nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and Tamarisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Ansari, A.; Mohammadi, F.; Vafaei, A.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of variables, namely initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage (g), stirrer speed (rpm) and contact time (min) on the removal of methyl orange (MO) by gold nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) and Tamarisk were investigated using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) and the variables were optimized by partial swarm optimization (PSO). Comparison of the results achieved using proposed models, showed the ANN model was better than the MLR model for prediction of methyl orange removal using Au-NP-AC and Tamarisk. Using the optimal ANN model the coefficient of determination (R2) for the test data set were 0.958 and 0.989; mean squared error (MSE) values were 0.00082 and 0.0006 for Au-NP-AC and Tamarisk adsorbent, respectively. In this study a novel and green approach were reported for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle and activated carbon by Tamarisk. This material was characterized using different techniques such as SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. The usability of Au-NP-AC and activated carbon (AC) Tamarisk for the methyl orange from aqueous solutions was investigated. The effect of variables such as pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage (g) and contact time (min) on methyl orange removal were studied. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models show the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. Kinetic models such as pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models indicate that the second-order equation and intraparticle diffusion models control the kinetic of the adsorption process. The small amount of proposed Au-NP-AC and activated carbon (0.015 g and 0.75 g) is applicable for successful removal of methyl orange (>98%) in short time (20 min for Au-NP-AC and 45 min for Tamarisk-AC) with high adsorption capacity 161 mg g-1 for Au-NP-AC and 3.84 mg g-1 for Tamarisk-AC.

  18. Artificial neural network and particle swarm optimization for removal of methyl orange by gold nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and Tamarisk.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Ghaedi, A M; Ansari, A; Mohammadi, F; Vafaei, A

    2014-11-11

    The influence of variables, namely initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage (g), stirrer speed (rpm) and contact time (min) on the removal of methyl orange (MO) by gold nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) and Tamarisk were investigated using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) and the variables were optimized by partial swarm optimization (PSO). Comparison of the results achieved using proposed models, showed the ANN model was better than the MLR model for prediction of methyl orange removal using Au-NP-AC and Tamarisk. Using the optimal ANN model the coefficient of determination (R2) for the test data set were 0.958 and 0.989; mean squared error (MSE) values were 0.00082 and 0.0006 for Au-NP-AC and Tamarisk adsorbent, respectively. In this study a novel and green approach were reported for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle and activated carbon by Tamarisk. This material was characterized using different techniques such as SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. The usability of Au-NP-AC and activated carbon (AC) Tamarisk for the methyl orange from aqueous solutions was investigated. The effect of variables such as pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage (g) and contact time (min) on methyl orange removal were studied. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models show the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. Kinetic models such as pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models indicate that the second-order equation and intraparticle diffusion models control the kinetic of the adsorption process. The small amount of proposed Au-NP-AC and activated carbon (0.015 g and 0.75 g) is applicable for successful removal of methyl orange (>98%) in short time (20 min for Au-NP-AC and 45 min for Tamarisk-AC) with high adsorption capacity 161 mg g(-1) for Au-NP-AC and 3.84 mg g(-1) for

  19. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  20. Spherical carbon particle growth in a methane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, Fumiya; Feng Zongbao; Kono, Akihiko; Nagai, Tatsuzo

    2006-10-23

    There is strong evidence that the spherical carbon particles composed of graphite carbon onions of ca. 10 nm are grown to micron size under the conditions of a heated Si (100) substrate surface exposed to irradiation by a CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma. Furthermore, it is described that these carbon particles of micron size are spherically grown in the plasma and then fall to the substrate surface.

  1. Carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Blanford, G. E.; Keller, L. P.; Klock, W.; McKay, D. S.

    1993-04-01

    We have studied nineteen anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) using analytical electron microscopy. We have determined a method for quantitative light element EDX analysis of small particles and have applied these techniques to a group of IDPs. Our results show that some IDPs have significantly higher bulk carbon abundances than do carbonaceous chondrites. We have also identified a relationship between carbon abundance and silicate mineralogy in our set of anhydrous IDPs. In general, these particles are dominated by pyroxene, olivine, or a subequal mixture of olivine and pyroxene. The pyroxene-dominated IDPs have a higher carbon abundance than those dominated by olivines. Members of the mixed mineralogy IDPs can be grouped with either the pyroxene- or olivine-dominated particles based on their carbon abundance. The high carbon, pyroxene-dominated particles have primitive mineralogies and bulk compositions which show strong similarities to cometary dust particles. We believe that the lower carbon, olivine-dominated IDPs are probably derived from asteroids. Based on carbon abundances, the mixed-mineralogy group represents particles derived from either comets or asteroids. We believe that the high carbon, pyroxene-rich anhydrous IDPs are the best candidates for cometary dust.

  2. ENHANCED TOXICITY OF CHARGED CARBON NANOTUBES AND ULTRAFINE CARBON BLACK PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Man-made carbonaceous nano-particles such as single and multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (CNT) and ultra-fine carbon black (UFCB) particles are finding increasing applications in industry, but their potential toxic effects is of concern. In aqueous media, these particles cluster in...

  3. Source contributions to atmospheric fine carbon particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Gray, H.; Cass, Glen R.

    A Lagrangian particle-in-cell air quality model has been developed that facilitates the study of source contributions to atmospheric fine elemental carbon and fine primary total carbon particle concentrations. Model performance was tested using spatially and temporally resolved emissions and air quality data gathered for this purpose in the Los Angeles area for the year 1982. It was shown that black elemental carbon (EC) particle concentrations in that city were dominated by emissions from diesel engines including both on-highway and off-highway applications. Fine primary total carbon particle concentrations (TC=EC+organic carbon) resulted from the accumulation of small increments from a great variety of emission source types including both gasoline and diesel powered highway vehicles, stationary source fuel oil and gas combustion, industrial processes, paved road dust, fireplaces, cigarettes and food cooking (e.g. charbroilers). Strategies for black elemental carbon particle concentration control will of necessity need to focus on diesel engines, while controls directed at total carbon particle concentrations will have to be diversified over a great many source types.

  4. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  5. Dressed active particles in spherical crystals.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei

    2016-08-17

    We investigate the dynamics of an active particle in two-dimensional spherical crystals, which provide an ideal environment to illustrate the interplay between active particles and crystallographic defects. A moving active particle is observed to be surrounded by localized topological defects, becoming a dressed active particle. Such a physical picture characterizes both the lattice distortion around the moving particle and the healing of the distorted lattice in its trajectory. We find that the dynamical behaviors of an active particle in both random and ballistic motions uniformly conform to this featured scenario, whether the particle is initially a defect or not. We further observe that the defect pattern around a dressed ballistic active particle randomly oscillates between two well-defined wing-like defect motifs regardless of its speed. The established physical picture of dressed active particles in this work partially deciphers the complexity of the intriguing nonequilibrium behaviors in active crystals, and opens the promising possibility of introducing the activity to engineer defects, which has strong connections with the design of materials. PMID:27491597

  6. Stable carbonous catalyst particles and method for making and utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.; Comolli, Alfred G.

    2005-06-14

    Stable carbonous catalyst particles composed of an inorganic catalytic metal/metal oxide powder and a carbonaceous binder material are formed having a basic inner substantially uniform-porous carbon coating of the catalytic powder, and may include an outer porous carbon coating layer. Suitable inorganic catalytic powders include zinc-chromite (ZnO/Cr.sub.2 03) and suitable carbonaceous liquid binders having molecular weight of 200-700 include partially polymerized furfuryl alcohol, which are mixed together, shaped and carbonized and partially oxidized at elevated temperature. Such stable carbonous catalyst particles such as 0.020-0.100 inch (0.51-2.54 mm) diameter extrudates, have total carbon content of 2-25 wt. % and improved crush strength of 1.0-5 1b/mn, 50-300 m.sup.2 /g surface area, and can be advantageously utilized in fixed bed or ebullated/fluidized bed reactor operations. This invention also includes method steps for making the stable carbonous catalyst particles having improved particle strength and catalytic activity, and processes for utilizing the active stable carbonous carbon-coated catalysts such as for syn-gas reactions in ebullated/fluidized bed reactors for producing alcohol products and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis liquid products.

  7. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  8. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  9. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  10. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  11. Dielectrophoresis in particle confinement: Aligned carbon particles in polymer matrix below percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaapila, M.; Høyer, H.; Helgesen, G.

    2014-09-01

    We review preparation and properties of confined, aligned string-like particle assemblies formed by dielectrophoresis under alternating electric fields. Particular attention is placed on carbon particles aligned in the oligomer matrix. In these systems the particle fraction is low, below the isotropic percolation threshold. The matrix is polymerized after alignment, which locks the aligned strings in place. Application examples are discussed including particle separation, conductivity enhancement and piezoresistive sensors.

  12. Carbonization behavior of pitches containing fine molybdenum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Atsushi; Wang, Xiangsheng; Kabe, Toshiaki . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Shono, Hiroaki . Mineral Fiber Research Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    In the carbonization of coal tar pitch and naphthalene pitch containing fine molybdenum particles, it was found by using a tritium tracer method that the fine molybdenum particles added into pitch in advance can selectively catalyze the dehydrogenation and polycondensation of saturated hydrocarbons below 700 C, and thereby the carbonization yield of coal tar pitch containing partially saturated structures or aliphatic side chains in its component molecules increased. Further, it could be inferred that the fine molybdenum particles mainly accelerate the release of the hydrogen which is difficult to isotopically exchange with water in the preparation of tritiated pitch in the presence of Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The initial development of carbon nanotube synthesis revolved heavily around the use of 3d valence transition metals such as Fe, Ni, and Co. More recently, noble metals (e.g. Au) and poor metals (e.g. In, Pb) have been shown to also yield carbon nanotubes. In addition, various ceramics and semiconductors can serve as catalytic particles suitable for tube formation and in some cases hybrid metal/metal oxide systems are possible. All-carbon systems for carbon nanotube growth without any catalytic particles have also been demonstrated. These different growth systems are briefly examined in this article and serve to highlight the breadth of avenues available for carbon nanotube synthesis. PMID:21711812

  14. Optically active particles of chiral polymers.

    PubMed

    Song, Ci; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Dong; Ren, Chonglei; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Particles constructed by chiral polymers (defined as PCPs) have emerged as a rapidly expanding research field in recent years because of their potentially wide-ranging applications in asymmetric catalysis, enantioselective crystallization, enantioselective release, amongst many others. The particles show considerable optical activity, due to the chirality of the corresponding polymers from which the particles are derived. This review article presents an overview on PCPs with emphasis on our group's recent achievements in the preparation of PCPs derived from optically active helical polymers and their applications. PCPs can be prepared via emulsion polymerization, precipitation polymerization, and suspension polymerization by starting from monomers. Emulsification of preformed chiral polymers and self-assembly approaches also can lead to PCPs. Chiral polymer-based core/shell particles, hollow particles, and magnetic particles are also covered because of their remarkable properties and significant potential applications. PMID:24030962

  15. Platinum particle size and support effects in NO(x) mediated carbon oxidation over platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villani, Kenneth; Vermandel, Walter; Smets, Koen; Liang, Duoduo; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A

    2006-04-15

    Platinum metal was dispersed on microporous, mesoporous, and nonporous support materials including the zeolites Na-Y, Ba-Y, Ferrierite, ZSM-22, ETS-10, and AIPO-11, alumina, and titania. The oxidation of carbon black loosely mixed with catalyst powder was monitored gravimetrically in a gas stream containing nitric oxide, oxygen, and water. The carbon oxidation activity of the catalysts was found to be uniquely related to the Pt dispersion and little influenced by support type. The optimum dispersion is around 3-4% corresponding to relatively large Pt particle sizes of 20-40 nm. The carbon oxidation activity reflects the NO oxidation activity of the platinum catalyst, which reaches an optimum in the 20-40 nm Pt particle size range. The lowest carbon oxidation temperatures were achieved with platinum loaded ZSM-22 and AIPO-11 zeolite crystallites bearing platinum of optimum dispersion on their external surfaces. PMID:16683615

  16. Diffusion of torqued active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Francisco J.

    An analytical approach is used to study the diffusion of active Brownian particles that move at constant speed in three-dimensional space, under the influence of passive (external) and active (internal) torques. The Smoluchowski equation for the position distribution of the particles is obtained from the Kramer-Fokker-Planck equation corresponding to Langevin equations for active Brownian particles subject to torques. In addition of giving explicit formulas for the mean square-displacement, the non-Gaussian behavior is analyzed through the kurtosis of the position distribution that exhibits an oscillatory behavior in the short-time limit. FJS acknowledges support from PAPIIT-UNAM through the grant IN113114

  17. Biological properties of different type carbon particles in vitro study on primary culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Czerniak-Reczulska, M; Niedzielski, P; Balcerczyk, A; Bartosz, G; Karowicz-Bilińska, A; Mitura, K

    2010-02-01

    Carbon powders have extended surface of carbon layers, which is of significant biomedical importance since the powders are employed to cover implants material. Carbon Powder Particles are produced by different methods: by a detonation method, by RF PACVD (Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) or MW/RF PCVD (Microwave/Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) and others. Our previous data showed that Carbon Powder Particles may act as antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory factor. However the mechanism of such behavior has been not fully understood. The aim of the work was tested influence carbon powders manufactured by Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition RFPACVD method and detonation method on selected parameters of human endothelial cells, which play a crucial role in the regulation of the circulation and vascular wall homeostasis. Graphite powder was used as a control substance. Endothelial cells are actively involved in a wide variety of processes e.g., inflammatory responses to a different type of stimuli (ILs, TNF-alpha) or regulating vasomotor tone via production of vasorelaxants and vasocontrictors. Biological activation is dependent on the type and quantity of chemical bonds on the surface of the powders. The effect of powders on the proliferation of HUVECs (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) was determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction assay. We found decreased cell proliferation after 72 h treatment with graphite as well as Carbon Powder Particles. PMID:20352757

  18. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  19. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  20. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles.

  1. Particle emission factors during cooking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.

    Exposure to particles emitted by cooking activities may be responsible for a variety of respiratory health effects. However, the relationship between these exposures and their subsequent effects on health cannot be evaluated without understanding the properties of the emitted aerosol or the main parameters that influence particle emissions during cooking. Whilst traffic-related emissions, stack emissions and concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter < 100 nm) in urban ambient air have been widely investigated for many years, indoor exposure to UFPs is a relatively new field and in order to evaluate indoor UFP emissions accurately, it is vital to improve scientific understanding of the main parameters that influence particle number, surface area and mass emissions. The main purpose of this study was to characterise the particle emissions produced during grilling and frying as a function of the food, source, cooking temperature and type of oil. Emission factors, along with particle number concentrations and size distributions were determined in the size range 0.006-20 μm using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). An infrared camera was used to measure the temperature field. Overall, increased emission factors were observed to be a function of increased cooking temperatures. Cooking fatty foods also produced higher particle emission factors than vegetables, mainly in terms of mass concentration, and particle emission factors also varied significantly according to the type of oil used.

  2. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  3. Retention and clearance of inhaled submicron carbon black particles.

    PubMed

    Strom, K A; Johnson, J T; Chan, T L

    1989-01-01

    Carbon black aerosols were used as a probe of the pulmonary retention and clearance of submicron particles. Male Fischer rats (COBS CD) were exposed for 20 h/d, 7 d/wk for 1, 3, or 6 wk to either 7 +/- 2 mg/m3 carbon black or filtered air. The submicron aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter, MMAD, 0.24 microns) was generated with a Wright dust feed-cyclone system. Lung and hilar lymph node particle burdens were determined immediately following the exposure and at preselected intervals up to 1 yr postexposure. After 1-, 3-, and 6-wk exposures, the lung burdens were 1.1 +/- 0.1, 3.5 +/- 0.2, and 5.9 +/- 0.1 mg, respectively. One year after a 1-, 3-, or 6-wk exposure, 8%, 46%, and 61% of the initial lung burden remained in the lungs. Initially, the hilar lymph nodes contained 0.2%, 0.9%, and 2.0% of the lung burdens in the 3 exposure groups, respectively. At 1 yr postexposure, particle translocation from the lungs led to a rise in lymph node burdens to 1%, 21%, and 27% of the initial lung burden. The retention of carbon black in both the lungs and lymph nodes combined was 9%, 67%, and 89% for the 1-, 3-, and 6-wk exposed animals. Lung clearance was modeled as a compartmental system consisting of four lung compartments and a regional lymph node compartment. The results from the model are similar for carbon black and diesel engine exhaust particles. However, the compartmental kinetics of carbon black differed in two ways: the deposition efficiency in the alveolar region was lower than that for diesel exhaust particles, and there was earlier transport of particles to the regional lymph nodes. These results showed that when lung burdens reached 0.8 mg, lung clearance was decreased by 50% and lymphatic transport of insoluble particles was increased. PMID:2466129

  4. Kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of carbon and oxygen during combustion of porous carbon particles in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gremyachkin, V.M.

    2006-05-15

    A model of combustion of a high-porosity carbon particle in oxygen is considered, which takes into account heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions inside the particles and radiative heat transfer. The boundaries of the domain where the burning rate depends on the particle temperature are determined. The possibility of two combustion regimes is demonstrated: regime with a high burning rate, where the carbon-oxygen reaction proceeds in a layer adjacent to the particle surface, and regime with a low burning rate, where the reaction proceeds in the entire particle volume. In the regime with a high burning rate, the main product of the reaction between carbon and oxygen is carbon monoxide, whereas both carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide can be formed in the regime with a low burning rate. The kinetic equations of heterogeneous reactions C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} and 2C + O{sub 2} = 2CO are determined, which reveal the retarding effect of carbon monoxide and dioxide on the rates of these reactions.

  5. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    DOEpatents

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  6. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES TO ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE EXPOSURES IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TD-02-042 (U. KODAVANTI) GPRA # 10108

    Cardiovascular Responses to Ultrafine Carbon Particle Exposures in Rats.
    V. Harder1, B. Lentner1, A. Ziesenis1, E. Karg1, L. Ruprecht1, U. Kodavanti2, A. Stampfl3, J. Heyder1, H. Schulz1
    GSF- Institute for Inhalation Biology1, I...

  7. Collective surfing of chemically active particles.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures. PMID:24724685

  8. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  9. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  10. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  11. Autonomous Particle Recognition and Analysis of Carbon Flux Explorer Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, C. M.; Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T.

    2013-12-01

    The biologically mediated export, or sedimentation, of particulate organic carbon to ocean depths below 100 m is approximately 10 Pg C per year and is highly variable in space and time. Despite the need to understand the biological drivers for export and the depth dependence of carbon remineralization for carbon cycle prediction, there are scant observations of sedimentation dynamics in the upper 1000 m. The Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE) is a robotic ocean profiling system, which combines the Scripps Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO) and the LBNL/Berkeley optical sedimentation recorder. The CFE is designed to conduct high-frequency (hourly) observations of particulate organic and inorganic carbon sedimentation to kilometer depths, absent of ships, in all sea conditions, be reprogrammable and adaptive once deployed, and relay data to shore in near real time via Iridium satellite links for seasons to years. The CFE operates by sequentially imaging settled particles at ~15 micrometer size resolution in transmitted, transmitted cross-polarized, and dark field illumination. At present, these images must be stored on the CFE until recovery. In other words, the CFE is deployable in the context of multi-month long process studies. Here we present progress on particle recognition and quantification methodology, which will enable a 100,000:1 compression of image data needed for efficient satellite telemetry and fully autonomous real-time operation. Our methodology includes corrective thresh-holding, cross imaging comparison, distinction of aggregates from organisms, and the classification of particle properties including particle fractal dimension. We also look at these findings in context of particle vertical velocity, float performance, and oceanic conditions. Data analysis examples drawing on recent CFE missions to California coastal and offshore waters and to the subarctic N Pacific ocean, some lasting 41 days, will be presented.

  12. TIME SERIES MODEL FOR CIGARETTE SMOKING ACTIVITY PATTERNS: MODEL VALIDATION FOR CARBON MONOXIDE AND RESPIRABLE PARTICLES IN A CHAMBER AND AN AUTOMOBILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity pattern-exposure models require accurate submodels for the exposures in microenvironments that people occupy, including those containing environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). his paper describes the Sequential Cigarette Exposure Model (SCEM), a general-purpose mathema...

  13. Design of activated carbon/activated carbon asymmetric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro-Prado, Isabel; Salinas-Torres, David; Ruiz Rosas, Ramiro; Morallon, Emilia; Cazorla-Amoros, Diego

    2016-03-01

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices that offer a high power density and a low energy density in comparison with batteries. Their limited energy density can be overcome by using asymmetric configuration in mass electrodes, where each electrode works within their maximum available potential window, rendering the maximum voltage output of the system. Such asymmetric capacitors must be optimized through careful electrochemical characterization of the electrodes for accurate determination of the capacitance and the potential stability limits. The results of the characterization are then used for optimizing mass ratio of the electrodes from the balance of stored charge. The reliability of the design largely depends on the approach taken for the electrochemical characterization. Therefore, the performance could be lower than expected and even the system could break down, if a well thought out procedure is not followed. In this work, a procedure for the development of asymmetric supercapacitors based on activated carbons is detailed. Three activated carbon materials with different textural properties and surface chemistry have been systematically characterized in neutral aqueous electrolyte. The asymmetric configuration of the masses of both electrodes in the supercapacitor has allowed to cover a higher potential window, resulting in an increase of the energy density of the three devices studied when compared with the symmetric systems, and an improved cycle life.

  14. Mercury binding on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bihter Padak; Michael Brunetti; Amanda Lewis; Jennifer Wilcox

    2006-11-15

    Density functional theory has been employed for the modeling of activated carbon (AC) using a fused-benzene ring cluster approach. Oxygen functional groups have been investigated for their promotion of effective elemental mercury binding on AC surface sites. Lactone and carbonyl functional groups yield the highest mercury binding energies. Further, the addition of halogen atoms has been considered to the modeled surface, and has been found to increase the AC's mercury adsorption capacity. The mercury binding energies increase with the addition of the following halogen atoms, F {gt} Cl {gt} Br {gt} I, with the fluorine addition being the most promising halogen for increasing mercury adsorption.

  15. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  16. Input related microbial carbon dynamic of soil organic matter in particle size fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gude, A.; Kandeler, E.; Gleixner, G.

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigated the flow of carbon into different groups of soil microorganisms isolated from different particle size fractions. Two agricultural sites of contrasting organic matter input were compared. Both soils had been submitted to vegetation change from C3 (Rye/Wheat) to C4 (Maize) plants, 25 and 45 years ago. Soil carbon was separated into one fast-degrading particulate organic matter fraction (POM) and one slow-degrading organo-mineral fraction (OMF). The structure of the soil microbial community were investigated using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), and turnover of single PLFAs was calculated from the changes in their 13C content. Soil enzyme activities involved in the degradation of carbohydrates was determined using fluorogenic MUF (methyl-umbelliferryl phosphate) substrates. We found that fresh organic matter input drives soil organic matter dynamic. Higher annual input of fresh organic matter resulted in a higher amount of fungal biomass in the POM-fraction and shorter mean residence times. Fungal activity therefore seems essential for the decomposition and incorporation of organic matter input into the soil. As a consequence, limited litter input changed especially the fungal community favouring arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Altogether, supply and availability of fresh plant carbon changed the distribution of microbial biomass, the microbial community structure and enzyme activities and resulted in different priming of soil organic matter. Most interestingly we found that only at low input the OMF fraction had significantly higher calculated MRT for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria suggesting high recycling of soil carbon or the use of other carbon sources. But on average all microbial groups had nearly similar carbon uptake rates in all fractions and both soils, which contrasted the turnover times of bulk carbon. Hereby the microbial carbon turnover was always faster than the soil organic carbon turnover and higher carbon input

  17. Global Civil Aviation Black Carbon Particle Mass and Number Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettler, M. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a product of incomplete combustion emitted by aircraft engines. In the atmosphere, BC particles strongly absorb incoming solar radiation and influence cloud formation processes leading to highly uncertain, but likely net positive warming of the earth's atmosphere. At cruise altitude, BC particle number emissions can influence the concentration of ice nuclei that can lead to contrail formation, with significant and highly uncertainty climate impacts. BC particles emitted by aircraft engines also degrade air quality in the vicinity of airports and globally. A significant contribution to the uncertainty in environmental impacts of aviation BC emissions is the uncertainty in emissions inventories. Previous work has shown that global aviation BC mass emissions are likely to have been underestimated by a factor of three. In this study, we present an updated global BC particle number inventory and evaluate parameters that contribute to uncertainty using global sensitivity analysis techniques. The method of calculating particle number from mass utilises a description of the mobility of fractal aggregates and uses the geometric mean diameter, geometric standard deviation, mass-mobility exponent, primary particle diameter and material density to relate the particle number concentration to the total mass concentration. Model results show good agreement with existing measurements of aircraft BC emissions at ground level and at cruise altitude. It is hoped that the results of this study can be applied to estimate direct and indirect climate impacts of aviation BC emissions in future studies.

  18. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  19. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  20. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  1. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  2. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  3. Evidence of old soil carbon in grass biosilica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyerson, P. E.; Alexandre, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Corbineau, R.; Martinez De La Torre, H. A.; Badeck, F.; Cattivelli, L.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-09-01

    Plant biosilica particles (phytoliths) contain small amounts of carbon called phytC. Based on the assumptions that phytC is of photosynthetic origin and a closed system, claims were recently made that phytoliths from grasslands play a significant role in atmospheric CO2 sequestration. However, anomalous phytC radiocarbon (14C) dates suggested contributions from a non-photosynthetic source to phytC. Here we address this non-photosynthetic source hypothesis using comparative isotopic measurements (14C and δ13C) of phytC, plant tissues, atmospheric CO2, and soil organic matter. State-of-the-art methods assured phytolith purity, while sequential stepwise-combustion revealed complex chemical-thermal decomposability properties of phytC. Although photosynthesis is the main source of carbon in plant tissue, it is found that phytC is partially derived from soil carbon that can be several thousand years old. The accumulation of old soil organic matter derived carbon in plant biosilica suggests that Si absorption and phytolith production promote old soil organic carbon mobilization. Although the magnitude of this mechanism still needs to be properly assessed at plant and ecosystem scales, its confirmation alone argues against attempts to use phytC as a proxy of plant carbon and call for the reexamination of phytolith atmospheric CO2 biosequestration estimates.

  4. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  5. SORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms and rate of elemental mercury (HgO) capture by activated carbons have been studied using a bench-scale apparatus. Three types of activated carbons, two of which are thermally activated (PC-100 and FGD) and one with elemental sulfur (S) impregnated in it (HGR), were...

  6. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation of stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole is presented. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the problem of ion and electron energization in solar flares, and is capable of accounting for a wide range of both neutral and charged particle emissions. It is also a component in diffusive shock acceleration, since pitch-angle scattering (which is necessary for multiple shock crossings) is accompanied by diffusion in momentum space, which in turn yields a net systematic energy gain; however, stochastic energization will dominate the first-order shock process only in certain parameter regimes. Although stochastic acceleration has been applied to particle energization in the lobes of radio galaxies, its application to the central regions of AGNs (active galactic nuclei) has only recently been considered, but not in detail. We proposed to systematically investigate the plasma processes responsible for stochastic particle acceleration in black hole magnetospheres along with the energy-loss processes which impede particle energization. To this end, we calculated acceleration rates and escape time scales for protons and electrons resonating with Alfven waves, and for electrons resonating with whistlers. We also considered the "hot" topic of gamma-ray line emission from the Orion complex. We proposed that the observed gamma-ray lines are produced by energetic ions that are stochastically accelerated by cascading Alfven waves in the accretion plasma near a black hole. Related research papers that were published in journals are listed.

  7. Studies and characterisations of various activated carbons used for carbon/carbon supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamby, J.; Taberna, P. L.; Simon, P.; Fauvarque, J. F.; Chesneau, M.

    Various activated carbons from the PICA Company have been tested in supercapacitor cells in order to compare their performances. The differences measured in terms of specific capacitance and cell resistance are presented. Porosity measurements made on activated carbon powders and electrode allowed a better understanding of the electrochemical behaviour of these activated carbons. In this way, the PICACTIF SC carbon was found to be an interesting active material for supercapacitors, with a specific capacitance as high as 125 F/g.

  8. Preparation of activated carbons from bituminous coals with zinc chloride activation

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.; Yeh, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by chemical activation from two Australian bituminous coals in this study. The preparation process consisted of zinc chloride impregnation followed by carbonization in nitrogen. The carbonization temperature ranges from 400 to 700 C. Experimental results reveal that an acid-washing process following the carbonization with ZnCl{sub 2} is necessary for preparing high-porosity carbons. Surface area, pore volume, and average pore diameter of the resulting carbons increase with the carbonization temperature to a maximum at 500 C and then begin to decrease. The maximum values of surface area and pore volume are larger for the carbon prepared from the coal with a lower O/C atomic ratio, while earlier findings from physical activation with CO{sub 2} have shown an opposite trend. An increase in particle size of the coal precursor leads to a reduction in porosity of the resulting carbons. The duration of the carbonization period affects the porosity of the resulting carbons, and the influence varies with the activation temperature.

  9. Particles size distribution and carbon flux across the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Sciandra, A.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study Large Particulate Matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) of this region. We found that spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and zooplankton activity at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while, the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At the lower oxycline, a deep nepheloid layer was associated to an increase of carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Zooplankton feeding on un-mineralized sinking particles in the OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. These results suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non-OMZ regions.

  10. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim’s first order perturbation theory, and use Flory–Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation.

  11. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; da Gama, Margarida M Telo

    2016-06-22

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim's first order perturbation theory, and use Flory-Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation. PMID:27115118

  12. Magnetorheological characteristics of carbon nanotube wrapped carbonyl iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fei Fei; Choi, Byung Il; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2009-02-01

    Carbonyl iron (CI) based magnetorheological (MR) fluid exhibits serious dispersion defect in general due to large density mismatch between CI particles and continuous medium, which restricts further MR application. Thus, various strategies were explored either to reduce the density or to prevent CI particle aggregation. Among them, polymer coating technology becomes more prevalent due to favorable morphology obtained and effective decrease in density by introducing polymeric shell; nevertheless, coating polymer on the surface of CI particles is always influenced by the selected grafting agent, mole ratio of reactant or the temperature of reaction. In this work, considering self-assembling trend of carbon nanotube (CNT) which exhibits similar density with polymer but better magnetic property due to the iron catalyst, we constructed a dense nest composed of CNT on the surface of CI particles by using 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a grafting agent under sonication. Thickness and morphology of the CNT nest were found to be related with sonication duration via SEM/TEM images. MR performances (yield stress behavior, shear viscosity) of the CI/CNT particles based MR fluid were investigated via controlled shear rate and controlled shear stress methods. Finally, sedimentation observation was checked to be improved.

  13. Adhesion between thermoplastic polymer particles and carbon and glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    High performance composites consist of polymer matrices reinforced with continuous fibers. Polymer powders can be coated and fused onto the fibers by various techniques to produce these composites. One such technique consists of spreading the fibers with an air banding jet, and then running the fibers through a fluidized bed of the powder. The fluidizing air is typically charged, imparting a charge to the powder particles. The fibers are grounded which leads to an attraction between the particles and the fibers. The particle-coated fibers then go through a tunnel oven, sintering the particles onto the fibers, leaving a flexible {open_quotes}tow-preg{close_quotes} which can then be processed into a preform for manufacture into a final part. To develop an initial understanding of the powder coating process, the adhesion of uncharged particles and fibers was studied. Contact mechanics predicts that the adhesion force between uncharged particles depends on the mutual (or equivalent) radius of curvature between the contacting objects, as well as their surface energies. For the materials of interest, the Derjaguin approximation is appropriate and is applied. PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) and PET (poly ethylene terephthalate) particles, cryogenically ground to nominal diameters of 10 to 100 {mu}m were brought into contact with themselves, with E-glass fibers (nominal diameter of 20 {mu}m), carbon fibers (nominal diameter of 8 {mu}m), and glass microscope slides using an AFM. Adhesion forces were measured and compared to predictions using Derjaguin`s approximation. SEM micrographs were used to determine the scale of the radii of curvature of contacting sites.

  14. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  15. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vapourization with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vapourizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial Fullerene-enriched Soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x<6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For Fullerene Soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x≫6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply-charged ions (n>1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C15 were present. When such signals were present, C1+/C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+/C3+ was <0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake, aging and heterogeneous chemistry.

  16. A hybrid artificial neural network and particle swarm optimization for prediction of removal of hazardous dye brilliant green from aqueous solution using zinc sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Ansari, A; Bahari, F; Ghaedi, A M; Vafaei, A

    2015-02-25

    In the present study, zinc sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnS-NP-AC) simply was synthesized in the presence of ultrasound and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. Then, this material was used for brilliant green (BG) removal. To dependency of BG removal percentage toward various parameters including pH, adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration and contact time were examined and optimized. The mechanism and rate of adsorption was ascertained by analyzing experimental data at various time to conventional kinetic models such as pseudo-first-order and second order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. Comparison according to general criterion such as relative error in adsorption capacity and correlation coefficient confirm the usability of pseudo-second-order kinetic model for explanation of data. The Langmuir models is efficiently can explained the behavior of adsorption system to give full information about interaction of BG with ZnS-NP-AC. A multiple linear regression (MLR) and a hybrid of artificial neural network and partial swarm optimization (ANN-PSO) model were used for prediction of brilliant green adsorption onto ZnS-NP-AC. Comparison of the results obtained using offered models confirm higher ability of ANN model compare to the MLR model for prediction of BG adsorption onto ZnS-NP-AC. Using the optimal ANN-PSO model the coefficient of determination (R(2)) were 0.9610 and 0.9506; mean squared error (MSE) values were 0.0020 and 0.0022 for the training and testing data set, respectively. PMID:25286113

  17. A hybrid artificial neural network and particle swarm optimization for prediction of removal of hazardous dye brilliant green from aqueous solution using zinc sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Ansari, A.; Bahari, F.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Vafaei, A.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, zinc sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnS-NP-AC) simply was synthesized in the presence of ultrasound and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. Then, this material was used for brilliant green (BG) removal. To dependency of BG removal percentage toward various parameters including pH, adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration and contact time were examined and optimized. The mechanism and rate of adsorption was ascertained by analyzing experimental data at various time to conventional kinetic models such as pseudo-first-order and second order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. Comparison according to general criterion such as relative error in adsorption capacity and correlation coefficient confirm the usability of pseudo-second-order kinetic model for explanation of data. The Langmuir models is efficiently can explained the behavior of adsorption system to give full information about interaction of BG with ZnS-NP-AC. A multiple linear regression (MLR) and a hybrid of artificial neural network and partial swarm optimization (ANN-PSO) model were used for prediction of brilliant green adsorption onto ZnS-NP-AC. Comparison of the results obtained using offered models confirm higher ability of ANN model compare to the MLR model for prediction of BG adsorption onto ZnS-NP-AC. Using the optimal ANN-PSO model the coefficient of determination (R2) were 0.9610 and 0.9506; mean squared error (MSE) values were 0.0020 and 0.0022 for the training and testing data set, respectively.

  18. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  19. A comparison of the electrochemical behavior of carbon aerogels and activated carbon fiber cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.D.; Alviso, C.T.; Hulsey, S.S.; Nielsen, J.K.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-05-10

    Electrochemical capacitative behavior of carbon aerogels and commercial carbon fiber cloths was studied in 5M KOH, 3M sulfuric acid, and 0.5M tetrethylammonium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate electrolytes. The resorcinol-formaldehyde based carbon aerogels with a range of denisty (0.2-0.85 g/cc) have open-cell structures with ultrafine pore sizes (5-50 nm), high surface area (400-700 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles or fibers with characteristic diameters of 10 nm. The commercial fiber cloths in the density range 0.2-04g/cc have high surface areas (1000-2500 m{sup 2}/g). The volumetric capacitances of high-density aerogels are shown to be comparable to or exceeding those from activated carbon fibers. Electrochemical behavior of these materials in various electrolytes is compared and related to their physical properties.

  20. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.

  1. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  2. Collective dynamics of soft active particles.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, Ruben; Pal, Anshuman; Goodrich, Carl P; Idema, Timon

    2015-03-01

    We present a model of soft active particles that leads to a rich array of collective behavior found also in dense biological swarms of bacteria and other unicellular organisms. Our model uses only local interactions, such as Vicsek-type nearest-neighbor alignment, short-range repulsion, and a local boundary term. Changing the relative strength of these interactions leads to migrating swarms, rotating swarms, and jammed swarms, as well as swarms that exhibit run-and-tumble motion, alternating between migration and either rotating or jammed states. Interestingly, although a migrating swarm moves slower than an individual particle, the diffusion constant can be up to three orders of magnitude larger, suggesting that collective motion can be highly advantageous, for example, when searching for food. PMID:25871143

  3. Collective dynamics of soft active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drongelen, Ruben; Pal, Anshuman; Goodrich, Carl P.; Idema, Timon

    2015-03-01

    We present a model of soft active particles that leads to a rich array of collective behavior found also in dense biological swarms of bacteria and other unicellular organisms. Our model uses only local interactions, such as Vicsek-type nearest-neighbor alignment, short-range repulsion, and a local boundary term. Changing the relative strength of these interactions leads to migrating swarms, rotating swarms, and jammed swarms, as well as swarms that exhibit run-and-tumble motion, alternating between migration and either rotating or jammed states. Interestingly, although a migrating swarm moves slower than an individual particle, the diffusion constant can be up to three orders of magnitude larger, suggesting that collective motion can be highly advantageous, for example, when searching for food.

  4. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  5. Particle size distribution and estimated carbon flux across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Sciandra, A.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study large particulate matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of this region. We propose that observed spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and enhanced biological processes mediated by bacteria and zooplankton at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the intermediate nepheloid layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At three stations, the lower oxycline was associated to a deep nepheloid layer, an increase of calculated carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Enhanced bacterial activity and zooplankton feeding in the deep OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. Estimated lower flux attenuation in the upper OMZ and re-aggregation at the lower oxycline suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non OMZ regions.

  6. Cobalt oxide and nitride particles supported on mesoporous carbons as composite electrocatalysts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Shao, Leng-Leng; Gao, Ze-Min; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-07-01

    The composite electrocatalysts of cobalt oxide/mesoporous carbon and cobalt nitride/mesoporous carbon are synthesized via a convenient oxidation and subsequent ammonia nitridation of cobalt particles-incorporated mesoporous carbon, respectively. The cobalt oxide and nitride particles are uniformly imbedded in mesoporous carbon matrix, forming the unique composites with high surface area and mesopore architecture, and the resultant composites are evaluated as counter electrode materials, exhibiting good catalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide. The composites of cobalt nitride and mesoporous carbon are superior to the counterparts of cobalt oxide and mesoporous carbon in catalyzing the triiodide reduction, and the dye-sensitized solar cell with the composites achieves an optimum power conversion efficiency of 5.26%, which is comparable to the one based on the conventional Pt counter electrode (4.88%).

  7. Particle Acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1997-01-01

    The high efficiency of energy generation inferred from radio observations of quasars and X-ray observations of Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is apparently achieved only by the gravitational conversion of the rest mass energy of accreting matter onto supermassive black holes. Evidence for the acceleration of particles to high energies by a central engine is also inferred from observations of apparent superluminal motion in flat spectrum, core-dominated radio sources. This phenomenon is widely attributed to the ejection of relativistic bulk plasma from the nuclei of active galaxies, and accounts for the existence of large scale radio jets and lobes at large distances from the central regions of radio galaxies. Reports of radio jets and superluminal motion from galactic black hole candidate X-ray sources indicate that similar processes are operating in these sources. Observations of luminous, rapidly variable high-energy radiation from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory show directly that particles are accelerated to high energies in a compact environment. The mechanisms which transform the gravitational potential energy of the infalling matter into nonthermal particle energy in galactic black hole candidates and AGNs are not conclusively identified, although several have been proposed. These include direct acceleration by static electric fields (resulting from, for example, magnetic reconnection), shock acceleration, and energy extraction from the rotational energy of Kerr black holes. The dominant acceleration mechanism(s) operating in the black hole environment can only be determined, of course, by a comparison of model predictions with observations. The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to investigate stochastic particle acceleration through resonant interactions with plasma waves that populate the magnetosphere surrounding an accreting black hole. Stochastic acceleration has been successfully applied to the

  8. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  9. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  10. Stokesian spherical swimmers and active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    2015-04-01

    The net steady state flow pattern of a distorting sphere is studied in the framework of the bilinear theory of swimming at low Reynolds number. It is argued that the starting point of a theory of interacting active particles should be based on such a calculation, since any arbitrarily chosen steady state flow pattern is not necessarily the result of a swimming motion. Furthermore, it is stressed that as a rule the phase of stroke is relevant in hydrodynamic interactions, so that the net flow pattern must be used with caution.

  11. Modified Activated Carbon to be Used in Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S.; de Silva, W. R. M.; de Silva, K. M. N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study a novel nano composite of hydroxyapatite nano particles impregnated activated carbon (C-HAp), which was synthesized in our own method, was used in iron adsorption studies. The study was conducted in order to investigate the potential of using C-HAp nanocomposite to be used in clinical detoxifications such as acute iron toxicity where the use of Activated carbon (GAC) is not very effective. Adsorption studies were conducted for synthetic solutions of Fe2+, Fe3+ and iron syrup using GAC, C-HAp and neat HAp as adsorbents. According to the results C-HAp nano composite showed improved properties than GAC in adsorbing Fe2+, Fe3+ and also Fe ions in iron syrup solutions. Thus the results of the in-vitro studies of iron adsorption studies indicated the potential of using C-HAp as an alternative to activated carbon in such clinical applications.

  12. Process for producing an activated carbon adsorbent with integral heat transfer apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing an integral adsorbent-heat exchanger apparatus useful in ammonia refrigerant heat pump systems. In one embodiment, the process wets an activated carbon particles-solvent mixture with a binder-solvent mixture, presses the binder wetted activated carbon mixture on a metal tube surface and thereafter pyrolyzes the mixture to form a bonded activated carbon matrix adjoined to the tube surface. The integral apparatus can be easily and inexpensively produced by the process in large quantities.

  13. Does carbonation of steel slag particles reduce their toxicity? An in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Ibouraadaten, Saloua; van den Brule, Sybille; Lison, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Mineral carbonation can stabilize industrial residues and, in the steel industry, may contribute to simultaneously valorize CO2 emissions and slag. We hypothesized that, by restricting the leaching of metals of toxicological concern such as Cr and V, carbonation can suppress the toxicity of these materials. The cytotoxic activity (WST1 assay) of slag dusts collected from a stainless and a Linz-Donawitz (LD) steel plant, before and after carbonation, was examined in J774 macrophages. The release of Cr, V, Fe, Mn and Ni was measured after incubation in artificial lung fluids mimicking the extracellular and phagolysosomal milieu to which particles are confronted after inhalation. LD slag had the higher Fe, Mn and V content, and was more cytotoxic than stainless steel slag. The cytotoxic activity of LD but not of stainless dusts was reduced after carbonation. The cytotoxic activity of the dusts toward J774 macrophages necessitated a direct contact with the cells and was reduced in the presence of inhibitors of phagocytosis (cytochalasin D) or phagolysosome acidification (bafilomycin), pointing to a key role of metallic constituents released in phagolysosomes. This in vitro study supports a limited reduction of the cytotoxic activity of LD, but not of stainless, steel dusts upon carbonation. PMID:25735930

  14. A review: Different methods producing different particles size and distribution in synthesis of calcium carbonate nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulimai, N. H.; Rusop, M.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonates exist as 73 percent of world crust carbon. Abundance and bioavailability of Calcium Carbonates offer reliable resources, costs saving and environmental friendly potentials in its applications. Studies proven nano-sized Calcium Cabonate (nCC) employs a more significant characteristics compared to larger sizes. Properties of nCC is affected by the dispersion of the particles in which agglomeration occurs. It is important to gain more understanding of the conditions contributing or stunting the agglomeration to gain more control of the particles morphology and dynamic. A few recent studies with different methods to prepare calcium carbonate nanoparticles were listed in Table 1 .Particle size and dispersity of calcium carbonate are affected by different conditions of its preparation. Other factors such as mechanical aggression, concentration of solution, temperature of precipitation, pH of reaction are all contributing factors towards particle sizes and distribution.

  15. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions. PMID:22663136

  16. Diminution of supercooling of electrolytes by carbon particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S.P.; Xu, K.; Zhang, S.S.; Jow, T.R.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G.L.

    1999-11-01

    A liquid solution composed of a pure or mixed solvent and a dissolved salt is the most common form of electrolyte used in electrochemical devices for energy storage and conversion, such as batteries and capacitors. For such an electrolyte, one of the most important properties is its crystallization temperature, which limits the low-temperature operation of a device containing such an electrolyte. If thermodynamic equilibria were strictly followed, crystallization of an electrolyte would start as soon as it is cooled to its liquidus temperature. But such is seldom the case, as an electrolyte by itself often supercools well below this temperature. This supercooling can delay or even eliminate the crystallization of an electrolyte, thus substantially extending its apparent liquid range. The authors studied the supercooling behavior of a number of solutions of LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate-ethyl methyl carbonate in 1:1 weight ratio with and without the presence of one of these carbons: activated carbon, carbon black, and mesocarbon microbeads. The results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the supercooling of less concentrated solutions is significantly diminished by the presence of a carbon, the degree and the nature of which depends on the concentration of the electrolyte and the type of carbon present. The results of conductivity measurements also indicate precipitation in some of the electrolytes at low temperatures, which correlates well with the DSC results. The authors therefore conclude that the temperature range in which an electrolyte supercools without a nucleating material is unreliable for the operation of an electrochemical device containing such an electrolyte. Instead, the liquidus temperature of an electrolyte should be used as the lower limit of operation if the possibility of its crystallization is to be excluded.

  17. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L.

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles.

  18. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles. PMID:27415318

  19. Unambiguous evidence of old soil carbon in grass biosilica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyerson, Paul E.; Alexandre, Anne; Harutyunyan, Araks; Corbineau, Remi; Martinez De La Torre, Hector A.; Badeck, Franz; Cattivelli, Luigi; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    Plant biosilica particles (phytoliths) contain small amounts of carbon called phytC. Based on the assumptions that phytC is of photosynthetic origin and a closed system, claims were recently made that phytoliths from several agriculturally important monocotyledonous species play a significant role in atmospheric CO2 sequestration. However, anomalous phytC radiocarbon (14C) dates suggested contributions from a non-photosynthetic source to phytC. Here we address this non-photosynthetic source hypothesis using comparative isotopic measurements (14C and δ13C) of phytC, plant tissues, atmospheric CO2, and soil organic matter. State-of-the-art methods assured phytolith purity, while sequential stepwise-combustion revealed complex chemical-thermal decomposability properties of phytC. Although photosynthesis is the main source of carbon in plant tissue, it was found that phytC is partially derived from soil carbon that can be several thousand years old. The fact that phytC is not uniquely constituted of photosynthetic C limits the usefulness of phytC either as a dating tool or as a significant sink of atmospheric CO2. It additionally calls for further experiments to investigate how SOM-derived C is accessible to roots and accumulates in plant biosilica, for a better understanding of the mechanistic processes underlying the silicon biomineralization process in higher plants.

  20. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  1. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  2. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  3. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon. PMID:25881437

  4. Determination of Effective Particle Density for Sterically Stabilized Carbon Black Particles: Effect of Diblock Copolymer Stabilizer Composition.

    PubMed

    Growney, David J; Fowler, Patrick W; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Fielding, Lee A; Derry, Matthew J; Aragrag, Najib; Lamb, Gordon D; Armes, Steven P

    2015-08-18

    Two poly(styrene-b-hydrogenated isoprene) (PS-PEP) copolymers and a poly(styrene-b-hydrogenated butadiene) (PS-PB) diblock copolymer of differing polystyrene content (20, 28 or 35 mol %) and molecular weight (117-183 kg mol(-1)) are examined. These copolymers form star-like micelles in n-dodecane, as judged by TEM, DLS, and SAXS studies. At ambient temperature, such micelles are known to adsorb intact onto a model colloidal substrate such as carbon black, conferring a high degree of dispersion (Growney, D. J.; Mykhaylyk, O. O.; Armes, S. P. Langmuir 2014, 30, 6047). Isotherms for micellar adsorption on carbon black at 20 °C are constructed using a supernatant depletion assay based on UV spectroscopy by utilizing the aromatic chromophore in the polystyrene block. Perhaps surprisingly, the diblock copolymer with the lowest polystyrene content has the strongest affinity for the carbon black particles. Assuming that the star-like diblock copolymer micelles adsorb onto carbon black to form hemi-micelles with a stabilizer layer thickness equal to the mean micelle radius, the effective particle density of the resulting sterically stabilized carbon black particles in n-dodecane can be estimated from the SAXS micelle dimensions based on geometric considerations. As an approximation, a spherical core-shell morphology was assumed, and the primary grain size of the carbon black particles was determined to be 74 nm diameter as judged by BET surface area analysis. Using this approach, effective particle densities of 0.90, 0.91, and 0.92 g cm(-3) were calculated for sterically stabilized carbon black particles prepared using the PS-PB20, PS-PEP28, and PS-PEP35 diblock copolymers, respectively. These densities are significantly lower than that of carbon black (1.89 g cm(-3)), which indicates that the sterically stabilized carbon black particles are substantially solvated. Since the rate of sedimentation of the sterically stabilized carbon black particles depends on the density

  5. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the results of research in which novel activated carbons have been examined for their efficacy in water treatment and, specifically, for the adsorption of a common herbicide and wood preservative, sodium pentachlorophenolate. To place this work in context, the introduction will discuss first some of the considerations of using activated carbons for water treatment, and then certain aspects of the authors research that has led to this particular topic.

  6. Three-particle correlation from a Many-Body Perspective: Trions in a Carbon Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Drüppel, Matthias; Rohlfing, Michael

    2016-05-13

    Trion states of three correlated particles (e.g., two electrons and one hole) are essential to understand the optical spectra of doped or gated nanostructures, like carbon nanotubes or transition-metal dichalcogenides. We develop a theoretical many-body description for such correlated states using an ab initio approach. It can be regarded as an extension of the widely used GW method and Bethe-Salpeter equation, thus allowing for a direct comparison with excitons. We apply this method to a semiconducting (8,0) carbon nanotube, and find that the lowest optically active trions are redshifted by ∼130  meV compared to the excitons, confirming experimental findings for similar tubes. Moreover, our method provides detailed insights in the physical nature of trion states. In the prototypical carbon nanotube we find a variety of different excitations, discuss the spectra, energy compositions, and correlated wave functions. PMID:27232034

  7. Three-particle correlation from a Many-Body Perspective: Trions in a Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Drüppel, Matthias; Rohlfing, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Trion states of three correlated particles (e.g., two electrons and one hole) are essential to understand the optical spectra of doped or gated nanostructures, like carbon nanotubes or transition-metal dichalcogenides. We develop a theoretical many-body description for such correlated states using an ab initio approach. It can be regarded as an extension of the widely used G W method and Bethe-Salpeter equation, thus allowing for a direct comparison with excitons. We apply this method to a semiconducting (8,0) carbon nanotube, and find that the lowest optically active trions are redshifted by ˜130 meV compared to the excitons, confirming experimental findings for similar tubes. Moreover, our method provides detailed insights in the physical nature of trion states. In the prototypical carbon nanotube we find a variety of different excitations, discuss the spectra, energy compositions, and correlated wave functions.

  8. Mass spectrometry of refractory black carbon particles from six sources: carbon-cluster and oxygenated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Sierau, B.; Gysel, M.; Laborde, M.; Keller, A.; Kim, J.; Petzold, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the major mass spectral features of different types of refractory carbonaceous particles, ionized after laser vaporization with an Aerodyne high-resolution soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated with a switchable 1064 nm laser and a 600 °C thermal vaporizer, yielding respective measurements of the refractory and non-refractory particle components. Six samples were investigated, all of which were composed primarily of refractory material: fuel-rich and fuel-lean propane/air diffusion-flame combustion particles; graphite-spark-generated particles; a commercial fullerene-enriched soot; Regal Black, a commercial carbon black; and nascent aircraft-turbine combustion particles. All samples exhibited a spectrum of carbon-cluster ions Cxn+ in their refractory mass spectrum. Smaller clusters (x < 6) were found to dominate the Cxn+ distribution. For fullerene soot, fuel-rich-flame particles and spark-generated particles, significant Cxn+ clusters at x ≫ 6 were present, with significant contributions from multiply charged ions (n > 1). In all six cases, the ions C1+ and C3+ contributed over 60% to the total C1 5 were present. When such signals were present, C1+ / C3+ was close to 1. When absent, C1+ / C3+ was < 0.8. This ratio may therefore serve as a proxy to distinguish between the two types of spectra in atmospheric SP-AMS measurements. Significant refractory oxygenated ions such as CO+ and CO2+ were also observed for all samples. We discuss these signals in detail for Regal Black, and describe their formation via decomposition of oxygenated moieties incorporated into the refractory carbon structure. These species may be of importance in atmospheric processes such as water uptake and heterogeneous chemistry. If atmospherically stable, these oxidized species may be useful for distinguishing

  9. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  10. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  11. Mixing in suspensions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri O.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-03-01

    Microscopic active particles self-propelling in the surrounding fluid create flows that eventually lead to emergence of non-equilibrium states with long-ranged fluctuations. One of the technologically important consequences of these fluctuations is enhanced mixing of the surrounding fluid. It is also critical for understanding the ecology of a particular type of biological active systems, bacterial suspension, as the enhanced mixing strongly alters the fluxes of nutrients. We consider the theoretical foundations of fluid mixing enhancement in dilute suspensions of active force-free swimmers. We describe the impediments to fluid mixing imposed by the physical nature of fluid flows created by swimmers, and different ways of overcoming them. We show that fluid mixing in 3D suspensions of force-free (dipolar) swimmers is dominated by the effect of curvature of their trajectories, and obtain an exact analytical expression for the corresponding effective diffusion coefficient. Our results highlight limitations of alternative ``effective temperature'' approaches and may serve as a quantitative tool for designing technological applications.

  12. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  13. Impacts of black carbon mixing state on black carbon nucleation scavenging: Insights from a particle-resolved model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, J.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an advancement of the recently developed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC (Particle Monte Carlo-Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry) to investigate the impacts of mixing state on cloud droplet formation and to provide a tool for the quantification of errors in cloud properties introduced by simplifying mixing state assumptions. We coupled PartMC-MOSAIC with a cloud parcel model. We initialized the cloud parcel simulation with hourly PartMC-MOSAIC model output from a 48-hour urban plume simulation. The cloud parcel model then explicitly simulated activation and condensational growth of the particles as the parcel underwent cooling at a specified rate and the particles of the aerosol population competed for water vapor. We used this capability to quantify the relative importance of size information versus composition information for the prediction of the cloud droplet number fraction, mass fraction of black carbon that is nucleation-scavenged, cloud droplet effective radius, and relative dispersion of the droplet size distribution by introducing averaging of particle-resolved information within prescribed bins. For the cloud droplet number fraction, both composition averaging and size-bin averaging individually led to an error of less than 25% for all cloud parcel simulations, while averaging in both size bins and composition resulted in errors of up to 34% for the base case cooling rate of 0.5 K/min. In contrast, for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon mass fraction, the results for size-bin averaging tracked the reference case well, while composition averaging, with or without size-bin averaging, led to overestimation of this quantity by up to 600%.

  14. Determining organic carbon distributions in soil particle size fractions as a precondition of lateral carbon transport modeling at large scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Seher, Wiebke; Pfeffer, Eduard; Schultze, Nico; Amorim, Ricardo S. S.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The erosional transport of organic carbon has an effect on the global carbon budget, however, it is uncertain, whether erosion is a sink or a source for carbon in the atmosphere. Continuous erosion leads to a massive loss of top soils including the loss of organic carbon historically accumulated in the soil humus fraction. The colluvial organic carbon could be protected from further degradation depending on the depth of the colluvial cover and local decomposing conditions. Another part of eroded soils and organic carbon will enter surface water bodies and might be transported over long distances. The selective nature of soil erosion results in a preferential transport of fine particles while less carbonic larger particles remain on site. Consequently organic carbon is enriched in the eroded sediment compared to the origin soil. As a precondition of process based lateral carbon flux modeling, carbon distribution on soil particle size fractions has to be known. In this regard the present study refers to the determination of organic carbon contents on soil particle size separates by a combined sieve-sedimentation method for different tropical and temperate soils Our results suggest high influences of parent material and climatic conditions on carbon distribution on soil particle separates. By applying these results in erosion modeling a test slope was simulated with the EROSION 2D simulation software covering certain land use and soil management scenarios referring to different rainfall events. These simulations allow first insights on carbon loss and depletion on sediment delivery areas as well as carbon gains and enrichments on deposition areas on the landscape scale and could be used as a step forward in landscape scaled carbon redistribution modeling.

  15. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  16. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  18. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  19. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A. Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-15

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ∼0.3%.

  20. Anisotropy measurement of pyrolytic carbon layers of coated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesyolkin, Ju. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Trushkina, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Equipment at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute intended for the anisotropy determination of pyrolytic carbon layers in coated particles (CPs) of the GT-MGR reactor is tested and calibrated. The dependence of the anisotropy coefficient on the size of the measurement region is investigated. The results of measuring the optical anisotropy factor (OPTAF) for an aluminum mirror, rutile crystal, and available CP samples with the known characteristics measured previously using ORNL equipment (United States) are presented. In addition, measurements of CP samples prepared at VNIINM are performed. A strong dependence of the data on the preparation quality of metallographic sections is found. Our investigations allow us to make the conclusion on the working capacity of the existing equipment for measuring the anisotropy of pyrolytic carbon CP coatings using the equipment at the Kurchatov Institute with the relative error of about 1%. It is shown that the elimination of the errors caused by the stochastic fluctuations in a measuring path by mathematical processing of the signal allows us to decrease the relative error of OPTAF measurements to ~0.3%.

  1. Synthesis of Graphenic Carbon Materials on Nickel Particles with Controlled Quantity of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grehov, V.; Kalnacs, J.; Mishnev, A.; Kundzins, K.

    2016-02-01

    A cheap, comparatively simple and effective method is proposed for the large quantity production of the sheets of graphenic carbon materials (GCM) by annealing the mixture of nickel powder with a suitable carbon amount at the temperatures close to 1000 ºC. The number of graphene layers in the sheets of GCM may be varied by altering the amount of carbon in the mixture and parameters of annealing and drying of the obtained products. Samples of GCM were prepared in the form of heat-dried GCM paper and in the form of graphene sponge with freeze-drying. The appearance of GCM on the surface of Ni particles was identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a low accelerating voltage of 5 kV. The thickness and properties of the layers were investigated by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The fabrication processes were carried out at the concentrations of added carbon from 0 to 1 at%. The results obtained are fully consistent with the well-known solid phase reactions of carbon dissolution in Ni at 1000 °C and graphene or graphite precipitation on the surface with cooling down to the room temperatures.

  2. Optically active biological particle distinguishing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Kupperman, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to organic particle sorting and identification. High frequency pulses of circularly polarized light, alternating between left and right, intersect a fast moving stream of organic particles. Circular intensity differential scattering and linear intensity differential scattering are monitored to uniquely identify a variety of organic particles.

  3. Brown carbon and internal mixing in biomass burning particles

    PubMed Central

    Lack, Daniel A.; Langridge, Justin M.; Bahreini, Roya; Cappa, Christopher D.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Schwarz, Joshua P.

    2012-01-01

    Biomass burning (BB) contributes large amounts of black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) to the atmosphere and contributes significantly to the earth’s radiation balance. BB particles can be a complicated optical system, with scattering and absorption contributions from BC, internal mixtures of BC and POM, and wavelength-dependent absorption of POM. Large amounts of POM can also be externally mixed. We report on the unique ability of multi-wavelength photo-acoustic measurements of dry and thermal-denuded absorption to deconstruct this complicated wavelength-dependent system of absorption and mixing. Optical measurements of BB particles from the Four Mile Canyon fire near Boulder, Colorado, showed that internal mixtures of BC and POM enhanced absorption by up to 70%. The data supports the assumption that the POM was very weakly absorbing at 532 nm. Enhanced absorption at 404 nm was in excess of 200% above BC absorption and varied as POM mass changed, indicative of absorbing POM. Absorption by internal mixing of BC and POM contributed 19( ± 8)% to total 404-nm absorption, while BC alone contributed 54( ± 16)%. Approximately 83% of POM mass was externally mixed, the absorption of which contributed 27( ± 15)% to total particle absorption (at 404 nm). The imaginary refractive index and mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of POM at 404 nm changed throughout the sampling period and were found to be 0.007 ± 0.005 and 0.82 ± 0.43 m2 g-1, respectively. Our analysis shows that the MAE of POM can be biased high by up to 50% if absorption from internal mixing of POM and BC is not included. PMID:22927381

  4. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  5. Physicochemical characteristics and toxic effects of ozone-oxidized black carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Shang, Jing; Zhu, Tong

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) or soot particles formed by combustion are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have a significant effect on climate and human health. Oxidation can change the physicochemical characteristics of BC, thereby increasing its toxicity. The physicochemical properties of BC and ozone-oxidized BC are investigated in this study through transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance. The contents of oxygen-containing functional groups, hydrophilicity, water-soluble organic compounds, and free radicals increased after ozone treatment. The redox capacity and cytotoxicity of BC particles were enhanced by ozone oxidation as detected by dithiothreitol (DTT) and 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays. The redox activities of different BC particles are compared. Particle phase contributed significantly to total redox activity as detected by the DTT assay. Results indicate that BC particles that have undergone aging in the atmosphere may be more toxic and harmful to human health.

  6. Carbon nanotubes for stabilization of nanostructured lipid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Baker, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development of combination therapies employing both CNTs and nanostructured lipid self-assembly together as carriers of different drugs.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are increasingly studied for innovative biotechnological applications particularly where they are combined with essential biological materials like lipids. Lipids have been used earlier for enhancing the dispersibility of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Here we report a novel application of CNTs for stabilization of internally self-assembled nanostructured lipid particles of 2-5 μm size. Single-walled (pristine) as well as -OH and -COOH functionalized multi-walled CNTs were employed to produce nanostructured emulsions which stayed stable for months and could be re-dispersed after complete dehydration. Concentrations of CNTs employed for stabilization were very low; moreover CNTs were well-decorated with lipid molecules. These features contribute towards reducing their toxicity and improving biocompatibility for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Our approach paves the way for future development

  7. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Jodoin, Vincent J

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  8. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  9. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  10. Estimating Black Carbon Aging Time-Scales with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-01-13

    Understanding the aging process of aerosol particles is important for assessing their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity, radiative properties and health impacts. In this study we investigate the aging of black carbon containing particles in an idealized urban plume using a new approach, the particleresolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC. We present a method to estimate aging time-scales using an aging criterion based on cloud condensation nuclei activation. The results show a separation into a daytime regime where condensation dominates and a nighttime regime where coagulation dominates. For the chosen urban plume scenario, depending on the supersaturation threshold, the values for the aging timescales vary between 0.06 hours and 10 hours during the day, and between 6 hours and 20 hours during the night.

  11. INDOOR-OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPS OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time instrumentation for measuring particles, PAH, and black carbon (soot) has been operated since May of 1998 in an occupied 3-story town house in Reston, VA. Indoor and outdoor concentrations have been measured every five minutes for the particles and black carbon and ev...

  12. Surface area of particle administered versus mass in determining the pulmonary toxicity of ultrafine and fine carbon black: comparison to ultrafine titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Tina M; Castranova, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles are characterized by having a high surface area per mass. Particulate surface area has been reported to play an important role in determining the biological activity of nanoparticles. However, recent reports have questioned this relationship. This study was conducted to determine whether mass of particles or surface area of particles is the more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In this study, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine and fine carbon black. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat) as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium). In an additional study, the pulmonary responses to instillation of ultrafine carbon black were compared to equivalent particle surface area doses of ultrafine titanium dioxide. Results Ultrafine carbon black particles caused a dose dependent but transient inflammatory and cytotoxic response. On a mass basis, these responses were significantly (65 fold) greater than those for fine sized carbon black. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles given, the ultrafine carbon black particles were only slightly (non-significantly) more inflammogenic and cytotoxic compared to the fine sized carbon black. At one day post-exposure, inflammatory potencies of the ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles were similar. However, while the pulmonary reaction to ultrafine carbon black resolved with time, the inflammatory effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide were more persistent over a 42 day post-exposure period. Conclusion These results indicate that for low toxicity low solubility materials, surface area of particles administered rather than mass burden of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In addition, ultrafine titanium

  13. Cobalt and iron oxides dispersed onto activated carbons: The size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankina, G. V.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Kazak, V. O.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    The effect the nature of activated carbons prepared from natural renewable resources has on the metal particle size in cobalt- and iron-containing systems that can be used as catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is studied. The highest dispersity is observed for the Co3O4-WS (wood sawdust) system. The average particle size is 9.5 nm.

  14. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant. PMID:27174910

  15. Microcystin-LR Adsorption by Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Schumann, Russell; Wong, Shiaw Hui

    2001-08-01

    We use a selection of wood-based and coconut-based activated carbons to investigate the factors controlling the removal of the hepatotoxin microcystin-LR (m-LR) from aqueous solutions. The wood carbons contain both micropores and mesopores. The coconut carbons contain micropores only. Confirming previously published observations, we also find that the wood-based carbons adsorb more microcystin than the coconut-based carbons. From a combination of a judicious modification of a wood-based carbon's surface chemistry and of the solution chemistry, we demonstrate that both surface and solution chemistry play minor roles in the adsorption process, with the adsorbent surface chemistry exhibiting less influence than the solution chemistry. Conformational changes at low solution pH probably contribute to the observed increase in adsorption by both classes of adsorbent. At the solution pH of 2.5, the coconut-based carbons exhibit a 400% increased affinity for m-LR compared with 100% increases for the wood-based carbons. In an analysis of the thermodynamics of adsorption, using multiple temperature adsorption chromatography methods, we indicate that m-LR adsorption is an entropy-driven process for each of the carbons, except the most hydrophilic and mesoporous carbon, B1. In this case, exothermic enthalpy contributions to adsorption also exist. From our overall observations, since m-LR contains molecular dimensions in the secondary micropore width range, we demonstrate that it is important to consider both the secondary micropore and the mesopore volumes for the adsorption of m-LR from aqueous solutions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11446779

  16. Kinetics of the Reduction of Hematite Concentrate Particles by Carbon Monoxide Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Zhang, Shengqin; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-08-01

    A novel ironmaking process is under development at the University of Utah to produce iron directly from iron oxides concentrates by the gas-solid flash reaction using gaseous fuels and reductants. This process will reduce energy consumption and minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Having investigated the hydrogen reduction kinetics of magnetite and hematite concentrate particles relevant to the novel flash ironmaking process, the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) was determined in the temperature range 1473 K to 1623 K (1200 °C to 1350 °C) under various carbon monoxide partial pressures. At 1623 K (1350 °C) and residence time 5 seconds, the reduction degree of hematite concentrate particles was more than 90 pct under a pure carbon monoxide. This is slower than reduction by hydrogen but still significant, indicating that CO will contribute to the reduction of hematite concentrate in the flash process. The kinetics of CO reduction separately from hydrogen is important for understanding and analyzing the complex kinetics of hematite reduction by the H2 + CO mixtures. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter n = 1.0 adequately described the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles. The reduction rate is of 1st order with respect to the partial pressure of carbon monoxide and the activation energy of the reaction was 231 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor where X is the fraction of oxygen removed from iron oxide, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  17. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  18. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  19. Methanol Decomposition over Palladium Particles Supported on Silica: Role of Particle Size and Co-Feeding Carbon Dioxide on the Catalytic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hokenek, Selma; Kuhn, John N.

    2012-10-23

    Monodisperse palladium particles of six distinct and controlled sizes between 4-16 nm were synthesized in a one-pot polyol process by varying the molar ratios of the two palladium precursors used, which contained palladium in different oxidation states. This difference permitted size control by regulation of the nucleation rate because low oxidation state metals ions nucleate quickly relative to high oxidation state ions. After immobilization of the Pd particles on silica by mild sonication, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and applied toward catalytic methanol decomposition. This reaction was determined as structure sensitive with the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency) increasing with increasing particle size. Moreover, observed catalytic deactivation was linked to product (carbon monoxide) poisoning. Co-feeding carbon dioxide caused the activity and the amount of deactivation to decrease substantially. A reaction mechanism based on the formation of the {pi}-bond between carbon and oxygen as the rate-limiting step is in agreement with antipathetic structure sensitivity and product poisoning by carbon monoxide.

  20. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan Wu, Jian-Chun

    2014-03-07

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities)

  1. Frequency dispersion of electrokinetically activated Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boymelgreen, Alicia; Balli, Tov; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2015-11-01

    We examine the influence of the applied frequency of the electric field on the induced-charge electroosmotic flow around a metallo-dielectric Janus particle. Previously, we have used three dimensional-two component micro-particle-image-velocimetry (3D-2C μ PIV) around a stagnant particle, to illustrate the presence of a number of competing effects including dielectrophoresis and electrohydrodynamic flow which distort both the strength and shape of the frequency dispersion predicted for pure induced-charge effects. Here, we extend this work by examining the frequency dispersion of mobile Janus particles of different sizes (3 - 15 μm in diameter) at different electrolyte concentrations. In all cases, towards the DC limit, and in the frequency domain where previously EHD flow was shown to dominate, the velocity of a mobile particle decays to zero. At the same time significant variations in the frequency dispersion, including its shape and the value for maximum velocity are recorded as a function of both electrolyte concentration and particle size. This work is of both fundamental and practical importance and may be used to further refine non-linear electrokinetic theory and optimize the application of Janus particles as carriers in lab-on-a-chip analysis systems.

  2. In-situ observation of sputtered particles for carbon implanted tungsten during energetic isotope ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Y.; Sato, M.; Uchimura, H.; Okuno, K.; Ashikawa, N.; Sagara, A.; Yoshida, N.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is a candidate for plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors. During DT plasma operations, carbon as an impurity will bombard tungsten, leading to the formation of tungsten-carbon (WC) layer and affecting tritium recycling behavior. The effect of carbon implantation for the dynamic recycling of deuterium, which demonstrates tritium recycling, including retention and sputtering, has been investigated using in-situ sputtered particle measurements. The C{sup +} implanted W, WC and HOPG were prepared and dynamic sputtered particles were measured during H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation. It has been found that the major hydrocarbon species for C{sup +} implanted tungsten is CH{sub 3}, while for WC and HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) it is CH{sub 4}. The chemical state of hydrocarbon is controlled by the H concentration in a W-C mixed layer. The amount of C-H bond and the retention of H trapped by carbon atom should control the chemical form of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation and the desorption of CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2} are due to chemical sputtering, although that for CH is physical sputtering. The activation energy for CH{sub 3} desorption has been estimated to be 0.4 eV, corresponding to the trapping process of hydrogen by carbon through the diffusion in W. It is concluded that the chemical states of hydrocarbon sputtered by H{sub 2}{sup +} irradiation for W is determined by the amount of C-H bond on the W surface. (authors)

  3. Sedimentation and polar order of active bottom-heavy particles.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Katrin; Hahn, Aljoscha M; Stark, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Self-propelled particles in an external gravitational field have been shown to display both an increased sedimentation length and polar order even without particle interactions. Here, we investigate self-propelled particles which additionally are bottom-heavy, that is they feel a torque aligning them to swim against the gravitational field. For bottom-heavy particles the gravitational field has the two opposite effects of i) sedimentation and ii) upward alignment of the particles' swimming direction. We perform a multipole expansion of the one-particle distribution of non-interacting particles with respect to orientation and derive expressions for sedimentation length and mean particle orientation which we check against Brownian Dynamics simulations. For large strength of gravity or small particle speeds and aligning torque, we observe sedimentation with increased sedimentation length compared with passive colloids but also active colloids without bottom-heaviness. Increasing, for example, swimming speed the sedimentation profile is inverted and the particles swim towards the top wall of the enclosing box. We find maximal orientational order at intermediate swimming speeds for both cases of particles with bottom-heaviness and those without. Ordering unsurprisingly is increased for the bottom-heavy particles, but this difference disappears at higher levels of activity and for very high activities ordering goes to zero in both cases. PMID:23612748

  4. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  5. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  6. EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research into Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) for use in drinking water treatment has a long history in the Drinking Water Research Division and its predecessor organizations. tudies were conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in the late fifties and early sixties to examine...

  7. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  8. ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT OF KRAFT BLEACHING EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of color and organic contaminants by adsorption on activated carbon from the effluent of a kraft pulp bleaching plant was investigated in a pilot plant. The caustic bleach effluent, which contains 80% of the color from pulp bleaching, was decolorized successfully when...

  9. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  10. Biological uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls by Macoma balthica from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine J.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    This work characterizes the efficacy of activated carbon amendment in reducing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) bioavailability to clams (Macoma balthica) from field-contaminated sediment (Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) Test methods were developed for the use of clams to investigate the effects of sediment amendment on biological uptake. Sediment was mixed with activated carbon for one month. Bioaccumulation tests (28 d) were employed to assess the relationships between carbon dose and carbon particle size on observed reductions in clam biological uptake of PCBs. Extraction and cleanup protocols were developed for the clam tissue. Efficacy of activated carbon treatment was found to increase with both increasing carbon dose and decreasing carbon particle size. Average reductions in bioaccumulation of 22, 64, and 84% relative to untreated Hunters Point sediment were observed for carbon amendments of 0.34, 1.7, and 3.4%, respectively. Average bioaccumulation reductions of 41, 73, and 89% were observed for amendments (dose = 1.7% dry wt) with carbon particles of 180 to 250, 75 to 180, and 25 to 75 ??m, respectively, in diameter, indicating kinetic phenomena in these tests. Additionally, a biodynamic model quantifying clam PCB uptake from water and sediment as well as loss through elimination provided a good fit of experimental data. Model predictions suggest that the sediment ingestion route contributed 80 to 95% of the PCB burdens in the clams. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  11. Stochastic dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Minjung; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock; Park, Pyeong Jun

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a model for Brownian dynamics of coupled active particles in an overdamped limit. Our system consists of several identical active particles and one passive particle. Each active particle is elastically coupled to the passive particle and there is no direct coupling among the active particles. We investigate the dynamics of the system with respect to the number of active particles, viscous friction, and coupling between the active and passive particles. For this purpose, we consider an intracellular transport process as an application of our model and perform a Brownian dynamics simulation using realistic parameters for processive molecular motors such as kinesin-1. We determine an adequate energy conversion function for molecular motors and study the dynamics of intracellular transport by multiple motors. The results show that the average velocity of the coupled system is not affected by the number of active motors and that the stall force increases linearly as the number of motors increases. Our results are consistent with well-known experimental observations. We also examine the effects of coupling between the motors and the cargo, as well as of the spatial distribution of the motors around the cargo. Our model might provide a physical explanation of the cooperation among active motors in the cellular transport processes.

  12. Production of activated carbon from coconut shell char in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, P.M.S.; Ahmed, J.; Krishnaiah, K.

    1997-09-01

    Activated carbon is produced from coconut shell char using steam or carbon dioxide as the reacting gas in a 100 mm diameter fluidized bed reactor. The effect of process parameters such as reaction time, fluidizing velocity, particle size, static bed height, temperature of activation, fluidizing medium, and solid raw material on activation is studied. The product is characterized by determination of iodine number and BET surface area. The product obtained in the fluidized bed reactor is much superior in quality to the activated carbons produced by conventional processes. Based on the experimental observations, the optimum values of process parameters are identified.

  13. Temporal succession in carbon incorporation from macromolecules by particle-attached bacteria in marine microcosms.

    PubMed

    Mayali, Xavier; Stewart, Benjamin; Mabery, Shalini; Weber, Peter K

    2016-02-01

    We investigated bacterial carbon assimilation from stable isotope-labelled macromolecular substrates (proteins; lipids; and two types of polysaccharides, starch and cellobiose) while attached to killed diatom detrital particles during laboratory microcosms incubated for 17 days. Using Chip-SIP (secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of RNA microarrays), we identified generalist operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the Gammaproteobacteria, belonging to the genera Colwellia, Glaciecola, Pseudoalteromonas and Rheinheimera, and from the Bacteroidetes, genera Owenweeksia and Maribacter, that incorporated the four tested substrates throughout the incubation period. Many of these OTUs exhibited the highest isotope incorporation relative to the others, indicating that they were likely the most active. Additional OTUs from the Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria exhibited generally (but not always) lower activity and did not incorporate all tested substrates at all times, showing species succession in organic carbon incorporation. We also found evidence to suggest that both generalist and specialist OTUs changed their relative substrate incorporation over time, presumably in response to changing substrate availability as the particles aged. This pattern was demonstrated by temporal succession from relatively higher starch incorporation early in the incubations, eventually switching to higher cellobiose incorporation after 2 weeks. PMID:26525158

  14. Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim

    2011-03-29

    Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

  15. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  16. Organic Carbon Influences on Soil Particle Density and Rheological Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    Soil particle density (rs) is not routinely measured and is assumed to range between 2.60 and 2.70 Mgm23 or to be a constant (2.65 Mgm23) when estimating essential properties such as porosity, and volumetric water and air relations. Values of rs for the same soil may, however, differ significantly from the standard range due to management induced changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations. We quantified the rs and Atterberg limits of a Rayne silt loam for five long-term (.22 yr) moldboard-plowed continuous corn (Zea mays L.; MP), no-till continuous corn (NT), no-till continuous corn with beef cattle manure (NTm), pasture, and forest systems.We also assessed the relationships of SOC concentration with rs and the Atterberg limits and the impact of rs on soil porosity. Mean rs across NT, NTm, and pasture (2.35 Mg m23) was |7% lower than that for MP in the 0- to 10-cm soil depth (2.52 Mg m23, P , 0.01). Forest had the lowest rs of all soils (1.79 Mg m23). The NTm caused a greater reduction in rs and a greater increase in SOC concentration, liquid limit (LL), plastic limit (PL), and plasticity index (PI) than NT. Surface soils under MP had the highest rs and rb and the lowest SOC concentration, LL, PL, and PI. The SOC concentration was correlated negatively with rs (r 2 5 0.75) and positively with Atterberg limits (r 2 . 0.64) at .20-cm depth. Estimates of soil porosity for NT, NTm, and pasture using the constant rs overestimated the ''true'' porosity by 12% relative to that using the measured rs.

  17. Stochastic thermodynamics of active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Chandrima; Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2013-09-01

    Examples of self-propulsion in strongly fluctuating environments are abundant in nature, e.g., molecular motors and pumps operating in living cells. Starting from the Langevin equation of motion, we develop a stochastic thermodynamic description of noninteracting self-propelled particles using simple models of velocity-dependent forces. We derive fluctuation theorems for entropy production and a modified fluctuation-dissipation relation, characterizing the linear response in nonequilibrium steady states. We study these notions in a simple model of molecular motors, and in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz and energy-depot models of self-propelled particles.

  18. Nickel nano-particle modified nitrogen-doped amorphous hydrogenated diamond-like carbon film for glucose sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Aiping; Jin, Chunyan; Cho, Sang-Jin; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Lim, Dong Chan; Kim, Doo Hwan; Hong, Byungyou; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-10-15

    Electrochemical method has been employed in this work to modify nitrogen-doped hydrogen amorphous diamond-like carbon (N-DLC) film to fabricate nickel nano-particle-modified N-DLC electrodes. The electrochemical behavior of the nickel nano-particle-modified N-DLC electrodes has been characterized at the presence of glucose in electrolyte. Meanwhile, the N-DLC film structure and the morphology of metal nano-particles on the N-DLC surface have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The nickel nano-particle-modified N-DLC electrode exhibits a high catalytic activity and low background current. This result shows that the nickel nano-particle deposition on N-DLC surface could be a promising method to fabricate novel electrode materials for glucose sensing.

  19. Photocurrent spectroscopy of exciton and free particle optical transitions in suspended carbon nanotube pn-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Theiss, Jesse; Hazra, Jubin; Aykol, Mehmet; Kapadia, Rehan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2015-08-03

    We study photocurrent generation in individual, suspended carbon nanotube pn-junction diodes formed by electrostatic doping using two gate electrodes. Photocurrent spectra collected under various electrostatic doping concentrations reveal distinctive behaviors for free particle optical transitions and excitonic transitions. In particular, the photocurrent generated by excitonic transitions exhibits a strong gate doping dependence, while that of the free particle transitions is gate independent. Here, the built-in potential of the pn-junction is required to separate the strongly bound electron-hole pairs of the excitons, while free particle excitations do not require this field-assisted charge separation. We observe a sharp, well defined E{sub 11} free particle interband transition in contrast with previous photocurrent studies. Several steps are taken to ensure that the active charge separating region of these pn-junctions is suspended off the substrate in a suspended region that is substantially longer than the exciton diffusion length and, therefore, the photocurrent does not originate from a Schottky junction. We present a detailed model of the built-in fields in these pn-junctions, which, together with phonon-assistant exciton dissociation, predicts photocurrents on the same order of those observed experimentally.

  20. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  1. Long-term carbon stabilization through sorption of dissolved aromatic acids to reactive particles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. G.; Sanderman, J.; Chadwick, O.; Chorover, J.; Vitousek, P.

    2010-12-01

    Short-range order minerals are highly reactive soil constituents that are found in all soils and in particularly high quantities in volcanic soils. They retain large quantities of soil carbon, thereby acting as a long-term sink for carbon dioxide, but the main source for this carbon accumulation in soil is not yet known. We evaluated the biochemistry of solid and dissolved organic carbon in horizons containing differing short-range ordered mineral concentrations using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, stable isotope measurements and soil column leaching experiments across a well-constrained chronosequence of volcanic soils in Hawai’i. Molecular mixing model results, isotopic and elemental measurements, indicate that the oldest and most persistent C stores across the chronosequence are comprised not of highly microbially processed organic matter (e.g. proteins or lipids), but rather of partially oxidized aromatic plant compounds (up to 62% of the total soil C) preserved through chemical bonding to reactive soil minerals via carboxyl-rich functionalities. NMR spectra obtained from deep soil horizons containing an abundance of SRO minerals, showed strong chemical resemblance to that of DOM derived from plant litter. Solublization and high production rates of recalcitrant DOM controlled substantially by microbial activity were observed in the soil column leaching experiments. When the DOM-rich solution derived from organic horizons was leached through mineral soil horizons, the quantity of DOM sorbed was dependent on the abundance of SRO minerals present in the soil. These results suggest that microbial-driven DOM formation derived from plant litter and the subsequent binding of the aromatic acids in the DOM to reactive mineral surfaces is a dominant source for long-term soil carbon stabilization in these soils. This potentially globally significant carbon sink may be unresponsive to climate change over decadal to centennial timescales due to

  2. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  3. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  4. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices. PMID:27144475

  5. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  6. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  7. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  8. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

    PubMed Central

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  9. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field.

    PubMed

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  10. Active microrheology of driven granular particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Grob, Matthias; Zippelius, Annette; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    When pulling a particle in a driven granular fluid with constant force Fex, the probe particle approaches a steady-state average velocity v. This velocity and the corresponding friction coefficient of the probe ζ=Fex/v are obtained within a schematic model of mode-coupling theory and compared to results from event-driven simulations. For small and moderate drag forces, the model describes the simulation results successfully for both the linear as well as the nonlinear region: The linear response regime (constant friction) for small drag forces is followed by shear thinning (decreasing friction) for moderate forces. For large forces, the model demonstrates a subsequent increasing friction in qualitative agreement with the data. The square-root increase of the friction with force found in [Fiege et al., Granul. Matter 14, 247 (2012)] is explained by a simple kinetic theory. PMID:24827243

  11. Formation of nanostructured solid-state carbon particles by laser ablation of graphite in isopropyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Sin-Iti; Abe, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shunya

    2005-02-01

    Nanostructured solid-state carbon particles with sizes of 1 10 μm are successfully formed from graphite target by applying laser ablation technique in isopropyl alcohol. In the laser ablation in liquid, the diffusion of the evaporated atomic carbon particles is prevented. It follows that the shock front is condensed in the high-density condition, and evaporated carbon particles are clustered and aggregated. Nanostructured solid-state carbon particles are formed by repeatedly gathering. In this study, the influence of laser ablation process on isopropyl alcohol solvent and graphite target is analyzed, and it is revealed that the possible influences on chemical reactions with isopropyl alcohol and the direct exfoliation from the target can be excluded in this condensation process.

  12. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  13. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  14. The production of activated carbon using the equipment of thermal power plants and heating plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osintsev, K. V.; Osintsev, V. V.; Dzhundubaev, A. K.; Kim, S. P.; Al'musin, G. T.; Akbaev, T. A.; Bogatkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The production technology of activated carbon using the conventional equipment of the thermal power stations and boiler houses is proposed. The obtained product is directed into the systems of chemical water preparation and water drain of enterprises. The production cycle is invariable when producing the activated carbon by the proposed technology. The fuel consumption and heat losses are considerably reduced when implementing this technology compared with the known analogs of the carbon sorbent. The production efficiency increases if small dust particles are preliminary separated and coal is activated in narrow ranges of fraction sizes.

  15. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  16. Magnetic carbon nanotubes with particle-free surfaces and high drug loading capacity.

    PubMed

    Vermisoglou, Eleni C; Pilatos, George; Romanos, George E; Devlin, Eamon; Kanellopoulos, Nick K; Karanikolos, Georgios N

    2011-09-01

    Open-ended, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated within their graphitic walls (magCNTs) were fabricated by a combined action of templated growth and a ferrofluid catalyst/carbon precursor, and tested as drug hosts. The hybrid nanotubes are stable under extreme pH conditions due to particle protection provided by the graphitic shell. The magCNTs are promising for high capacity drug loading given that the magnetic functionalization did not block any of the active sites available for drug attachment, either from the CNT internal void or on the internal and external surfaces. This is in contrast to typical approaches of loading CNTs with particles that proceed through surface attachment or capillary filling of the tube interior. Additionally, the CNTs exhibit enhanced hydrophilic character, as shown by water adsorption measurements, which make them suitable for biological applications. The morphological and structural characteristics of the hybrid CNTs are evaluated in conjunction to their magnetic properties and ability for drug loading (diaminophenothiazine). The fact that the magnetic functionality is provided from 'inside the walls' can allow for multimode functionalization of the graphitic surfaces and makes the magCNTs promising for targeted therapeutic applications. PMID:21817779

  17. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. PMID:25644627

  18. Stable Carbon Fractionation In Size Segregated Aerosol Particles Produced By Controlled Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Ceburnis, Darius; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Puida, Egidijus; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is the largest source of primary fine fraction carbonaceous particles and the second largest source of trace gases in the global atmosphere with a strong effect not only on the regional scale but also in areas distant from the source . Many studies have often assumed no significant carbon isotope fractionation occurring between black carbon and the original vegetation during combustion. However, other studies suggested that stable carbon isotope ratios of char or BC may not reliably reflect carbon isotopic signatures of the source vegetation. Overall, the apparently conflicting results throughout the literature regarding the observed fractionation suggest that combustion conditions may be responsible for the observed effects. The purpose of the present study was to gather more quantitative information on carbonaceous aerosols produced in controlled biomass burning, thereby having a potential impact on interpreting ambient atmospheric observations. Seven different biomass fuel types were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size segregated particles. Size segregated aerosol particles were collected using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The largest negative fractionation was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation was observed during the buckwheat shells combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in

  19. APPRAISAL OF POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESSES FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powdered activated carbon has been the subject of several developmental efforts directed towards producing improved methods for treating municipal wastewaters. Granular activated carbon has proven itself as an effective means of reducing dissolved organic contaminant levels, but ...

  20. Removal of mercury from stack gases by activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    On combustion, the trace elements in the incinerator feed stream are partitioned between the bottom ash (slag) stream, and a flue gas stream containing suspended fly ash and vapors of volatile elements or compounds. A further partitioning of the flue gas stream takes place in the particulate emission control devices that efficiently remove larger fly ash particles but are less efficient for vapors and finer particles. Environmental control agencies, researchers, and general public have become increasingly concerned with the mobilization of trace elements to the environment from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. Mercury is the trace element of particular concern since, during combustion, most of the mercury present in the influent stream is transferred into the vapor phase due to its high volatility. There is a considerable evidence in the literature that currently used pollution abatement technologies (flue gas clean-up and particulate control devices) are not capable of controlling gas phase mercury emissions. Activated carbon adsorption is a unit process that offers great promise for achieving high quality air emissions with respect to mercury and other trace elements that might be present in gases emitted from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. This study is designed to evaluate the rate of vapor-phase mercury removal by virgin and sulfur impregnated activated carbons under various process conditions. The specific process conditions that will be evaluated for their effect on the rate and mechanism of mercury uptake include temperature, moisture content, oxygen partial pressure, and presence of other compounds and trace elements in the vapor-phase. Accurate description of the kinetics of mercury removal by activated carbon is an essential component in establishing design procedures that would ensure successful application of this efficient technology for mercury control.

  1. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  2. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath.

  3. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-14

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath. PMID:26671400

  4. EFFECTS OF CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES ON HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the leading theories concerning the toxicology of ambient particulate matter (PM) attributes health effects associated with PM inhalation to ultrafine particles (UF). UF numbers dwarf those of fine and coarse particles present in the ambient air as a result of fossil fuel ...

  5. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF-carbon

  6. Additivity, density fluctuations, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Subhadip; Mishra, Shradha; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Using an additivity property, we study particle-number fluctuations in a system of interacting self-propelled particles, called active Brownian particles (ABPs), which consists of repulsive disks with random self-propulsion velocities. From a fluctuation-response relation, a direct consequence of additivity, we formulate a thermodynamic theory which captures the previously observed features of nonequilibrium phase transition in the ABPs from a homogeneous fluid phase to an inhomogeneous phase of coexisting gas and liquid. We substantiate the predictions of additivity by analytically calculating the subsystem particle-number distributions in the homogeneous fluid phase away from criticality where analytically obtained distributions are compatible with simulations in the ABPs.

  7. REACTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to determine whether aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide react with activated carbon, or with compounds adsorbed on activated carbon, to produce compounds that would not form in the absence of activated carbon. The experimental conditions were...

  8. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  10. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY TOXICITY OF SYNTHETIC AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES CONTAINING METAL SULFATES COMPARED TO CARBON BLACK AND DIESEL.

    M Daniels, A Ranade* & MJ Selgrade & MI Gilmour.
    Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. * Particle Technology, College Par...

  11. MULTIYEAR REAL-TIME MONITORING OF PARTICLES, PAH, AND BLACK CARBON IN AN OCCUPIED HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and black carbon have been measured continuously (every 1 to 5 minutes) in an occupied townhouse for 2-3 years. Also, since the summer of 1999, temperature (outdoors...

  12. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-02-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g-1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g-1 (95 F cc-1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors.

  13. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  14. Mixing state of individual submicron carbon-containing particles and their seasonal variation in urban Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Bi, X.; Li, L.; Chan, L. Y.; Li, M.; Wang, X.; Sheng, G.; Fu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that size-resolved mixing state of carbon-containing particles is very critical in determining their optical properties, atmospheric lifetime, and impact on the environment. However, still little is known about the mixing state of particles in urban area of Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China. To investigate the mixing state of submicron carbon-containing particles, measurements were carried out during spring and fall periods of 2010 using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). Approximate 700 000 particles for each period were detected. This is the first report on the size-resolved mixing state of carbon-containing particles by direct observations in PRD region. Cluster analysis of single particle mass spectra was applied to identify carbon-containing particle classes. These classes represented ~80% and ~90% of all the detected particles for spring and fall periods, respectively. Carbon-containing particle classes mainly consisted of biomass/biofuel burning particles (Biomass), organic carbon (OC), fresh elemental carbon (EC-fresh), internally mixed OC and EC (ECOC), internally mixed EC with sulfate (EC-Sulfate), vanadium-containing ECOC (V-ECOC), and amines-containing particles (Amine). In spring, the top three ranked carbon-containing particle classes were ECOC (26.1%), Biomass (23.6%) and OC (10%), respectively. However, the fraction of Biomass particles increased remarkably and predominated (61.0%), while the fraction of ECOC (3.0%) and V-ECOC (0.1%) significantly decreased in fall. To highlight the influence of monsoon on the properties of carbon-containing particles in urban Guangzhou, their size distribution, mixing state, and aerosol acidity were compared between spring and fall seasons. In addition, a case study was also performed to investigate how the formation of fog and haze influenced the mixing state of carbon-containing particles. These results are of importance in understanding atmospheric chemistry and

  15. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  16. Multidimensional stationary probability distribution for interacting active particles.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Claudio; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive the stationary probability distribution for a non-equilibrium system composed by an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom that are subject to Gaussian colored noise and a conservative potential. This is based on a multidimensional version of the Unified Colored Noise Approximation. By comparing theory with numerical simulations we demonstrate that the theoretical probability density quantitatively describes the accumulation of active particles around repulsive obstacles. In particular, for two particles with repulsive interactions, the probability of close contact decreases when one of the two particle is pinned. Moreover, in the case of isotropic confining potentials, the radial density profile shows a non trivial scaling with radius. Finally we show that the theory well approximates the "pressure" generated by the active particles allowing to derive an equation of state for a system of non-interacting colored noise-driven particles. PMID:26021260

  17. Huge light scattering from active anisotropic spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Shen, Zexiang; Luk'yanchuk, Boris

    2010-11-22

    The light scattering by a spherical particle with radial anisotropic permittivity ε and permeability μ are discussed in detail by expanding Mie theory. With the modified vector potential formulation, the electric anisotropy effects on scattering efficiency are addressed by studying the extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross sections following the change of the transverse permittivity ε(t), the longitudinal permittivity ε(r) and the particle size q. The huge scattering cross sections are shown by considering the possible coupling between active medium and plasmon polaritons and this will be possible to result in spaser from the active plasmons of small particle. PMID:21164832

  18. Theoretical study of carbon dioxide activation by metals (Co, Cu, Ni) supported on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Van Khu, Le; Cam, Le Minh

    2015-12-01

    The activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) by catalytic systems comprising a transition metal (Co, Cu,Ni) on an activated carbon (AC) support was investigated using a combination of different theoretical calculation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, DFT and DFT-D, molecular dynamics (MD), and a climbing image nudged elastic band (CI-NEB) method. The results obtained indicate that CO2 is easily adsorbed by AC or MAC (M: Cu, Co, Ni). The results also showed that the process of adsorbing CO2 does not involve a transition state, and that NiAC and CoAC are the most effective of the MAC catalysts at adsorbing CO2. Adsorption on NiAC led to the strongest activation of the C-O bond, while adsorption on CuAC led to the weakest activation. Graphical Abstract Models of CO2 activation on: a)- activated carbon; b)- metal supported activated carbon (M-AC), where M: Co, Cu, Ni. PMID:26637187

  19. Carbon dust particle size distributions around mass-losing AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jura, M.

    1997-03-01

    Solids of presolar SiC and interstellar carbon have qualitatively similar relative size distribution for particles with radii, a, in the range 0.35 μmcarbon-rich single AGB stars such as the well studied IRC+10216 seem to be smaller than the interstellar or presolar particles. The close binary system, the Red Rectangle, appears to produce much larger grains than does IRC+10216, and we suggest that many of the interstellar and presolar particles with radii >0.35 μm are produced by interacting binary systems rather than single mass-losing stars.

  20. CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological evidence suggests that ultrafine particles are associated with adverse cardiovascular effects, specifically in elderly individuals with preexisting cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was (i) to assess cardiopulmonary responses in adult ...

  1. Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V.; Rasmussen, R.A.

    1992-09-20

    Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  3. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  4. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  5. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  6. Influence of carbon black and indium tin oxide absorber particles on laser transmission welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aden, Mirko; Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    For laser transmission welding of polypropylene carbon black and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used as absorber particles. Additionally, the colorant titanium dioxide is mixed to the absorbing part, while the transparent part is kept in natural state. The absorption coefficients of ITO and carbon black particles are obtained, as well as the scattering properties of polypropylene loaded with titanium dioxide (TiO2). At similar concentrations the absorption coefficient of ITO is an order of magnitude smaller than that of carbon black. Simulations of radiation propagation show that the penetration depth of laser light is smaller for carbon black. Therefore, the density of the released heat is higher. Adding TiO2 changes the distribution of heat in case of ITO, whereas for carbon black the effect is negligible. Thermal simulations reveal the influence of the two absorbers and TiO2 on the heat affected zone. The results of the thermal simulations are compared to tensile test results.

  7. Synthesis and electrochemical performances of amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particles as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhong; Tian Wenhuai; Liu Xiaohe; Yang Rong; Li Xingguo

    2007-12-15

    The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles. The as-prepared composite materials show much improved electrochemical performances as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries compared with Sn-Sb alloy and carbon alone. This amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particle is extremely promising anode materials for lithium secondary batteries and has a high potentiality in the future use. - Graphical abstract: The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles.

  8. Aerosol synthesis of self-organized nanostructured hollow and porous carbon particles using a dual polymer system.

    PubMed

    Balgis, Ratna; Ogi, Takashi; Wang, Wei-Ning; Anilkumar, Gopinathan M; Sago, Sumihito; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2014-09-30

    A facile method for designing and synthesizing nanostructured carbon particles via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of a self-organized dual polymer system comprising phenolic resin and charged polystyrene latex is reported. The method produces either hollow carbon particles, whose CO2 adsorption capacity is 3.0 mmol g(-1), or porous carbon particles whose CO2 adsorption capacity is 4.8 mmol g(-1), although the two particle types had similar diameters of about 360 nm. We investigate how the zeta potential of the polystyrene latex particles, and the resulting electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged phenolic resin, influences the particle morphology, pore structure, and CO2 adsorption capacity. PMID:25211031

  9. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minghong, Wu; Borong, Bao; Ruimin, Zhou; Jinliang, Zhu; Longxin, Hu

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption

  10. Strongly Accelerated Margination of Active Particles in Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic nanoparticles and other stiff objects injected into a blood vessel filled with red blood cells are known to marginate toward the vessel walls. By means of hydrodynamic lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we show that active particles can strongly accelerate their margination by moving against the flow direction: particles located initially in the channel center migrate much faster to their final position near the wall than in the nonactive case. We explain our findings by an enhanced rate of collisions between the stiff particles and the deformable red blood cells. Our results imply that a significantly faster margination can be achieved either technically by the application of an external magnetic field (if the particles are magnetic) or biologically by self-propulsion (if the particles are, e.g., swimming bacteria). PMID:26789773

  11. Guiding Catalytically Active Particles with Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, W. E.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2016-07-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemiosmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemiosmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemiosmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials or follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  12. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of carbon in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Bradley, John P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    The nature of the carbon-bearing phases in IDP's provides information regarding the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation and evolution of the early solar system. Several carbon-bearing materials have been observed in IDP's, but details of their nature, abundance, and distribution are still poorly known. A knowledge of the abundance and nature of carbon in IDP's is useful in constraining the sources of IDP's and for comparisons with other chondritic materials. Estimates of carbon abundance in anhydrous and hydrated IDP's indicate that most of these particles have significantly higher carbon than the carbonaceous chondrites. Mineralogical analyses show that carbonates are only a minor component of most hydrated IDP's, and so the high carbon abundances in this group of IDP's indicates that other carbon-bearing phases are present in significant concentrations. Using the technique of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), we have identified two forms of carbon in a hydrated IDP, oxidized carbon (carbonates), and amorphous elemental carbon.

  13. Preparation of binderless activated carbon monolith from pre-carbonization rubber wood sawdust by controlling of carbonization and activation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Taslim, R.; Iwantono

    2013-09-01

    Binderless activated carbon monolith (ACM) was prepared from pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust (RWSD). The effect of the carbonization temperature (400, 500, 600, 700, 800 dan 900 °C) on porosity characteristic of the ACM have been studied. The optimum carbonization temperature for obtaining ACM with high surface area of 600 °C with CO2 activation at 800 °C for one hour. At this condition, the surface area as high as 733 m2 g-1 could be successfully obtained. By improved the activation temperature at 900 °C for 2.5 h, it was found that the surface area of 860 m2 g-1. For this condition, the ACM exhibit the specific capacitance of 90 F g-1. In addition the termogravimertic (TG)-differential termografimertic (DTG) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) measurement were also performed on the ACMs and the result has been studied. Finally, it was conclude that the high surface area of ACM from RWSD could be produced by proper selections of carbonization and activation condition.

  14. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1986-01-01

    An understanding of carbonaceous matter in primitive extraterrestrial materials is an essential component of studies on dust evolution in the interstellar medium and the early history of the Solar System. Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) on carbonaceous material in two Chondritic Porous (CP) aggregrates is presented. The study suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may also be preserved in these materials.

  15. Detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon aerosol particles in atmosphere using fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a brief review on the detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon (OC) aerosol particles in atmosphere using laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) signatures. It focuses on single individual particles or aggregates in the micron and super-micron size range when they are successively drawn through the interrogation volume of a point detection system. Related technologies for these systems that have been developed in last two decades are also discussed. These results should provide a complementary view for studying atmospheric aerosol particles, particularly bioaerosol and OC aerosol particles from other analytical technologies.

  16. Flowable conducting particle networks in redox-active electrolytes for grid energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2015-01-09

    This paper reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributions (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Additionally, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.

  17. Flowable conducting particle networks in redox-active electrolytes for grid energy storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2015-01-09

    This paper reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributionsmore » (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Additionally, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.« less

  18. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE ON NANO-PARTICLES ACTIVATES CNS MACROPHAGES (MICROGLIA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  19. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon. PMID:25848862

  20. Diffusion of passive particles in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafai, Salima; John, Thomas; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-11-01

    We study how an active suspension consisting of a definite volume fraction of the microswimmer Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii modifies the Brownian movement of small to medium size microspheres. We present measurements and simulations of trajectories of microspheres with a diameter of 20 μm in suspensions of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a so called ``puller,'' and show that the mean squared displacement of such trajectories consist of parabolic and a linear part. The linear part is due to the hydrodynamic noise of the microswimmers while the parabolic part is a consequence of directed motion events that occur randomly, when a microsphere is transported by a microswimmer on a timescale that is in higher order of magnitude than the Brownian like hydrodynamic interaction. In addition, we theoretically describe this effect with a dimensional analysis that takes the force dipole model used to describe ``puller'' like Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii into account.

  1. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-10-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  2. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  3. Optofluidics incorporating actively controlled micro- and nano-particles

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Aminuddin A.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ward, Stephanie A.; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    The advent of optofluidic systems incorporating suspended particles has resulted in the emergence of novel applications. Such systems operate based on the fact that suspended particles can be manipulated using well-appointed active forces, and their motions, locations and local concentrations can be controlled. These forces can be exerted on both individual and clusters of particles. Having the capability to manipulate suspended particles gives users the ability for tuning the physical and, to some extent, the chemical properties of the suspension media, which addresses the needs of various advanced optofluidic systems. Additionally, the incorporation of particles results in the realization of novel optofluidic solutions used for creating optical components and sensing platforms. In this review, we present different types of active forces that are used for particle manipulations and the resulting optofluidic systems incorporating them. These systems include optical components, optofluidic detection and analysis platforms, plasmonics and Raman systems, thermal and energy related systems, and platforms specifically incorporating biological particles. We conclude the review with a discussion of future perspectives, which are expected to further advance this rapidly growing field. PMID:23864925

  4. Caramel popcorn shaped silicon particle with carbon coating as a high performance anode material for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Meinan; Sa, Qina; Liu, Gao; Wang, Yan

    2013-11-13

    Silicon is a very promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. It has a 4200 mAh/g theoretical capacity, which is ten times higher than that of commercial graphite anodes. However, when lithium ions diffuse to Si anodes, the volume of Si will expand to almost 400% of its initial size and lead to the crack of Si. Such a huge volume change and crack cause significant capacity loss. Meanwhile, with the crack of Si particles, the conductivity between the electrode and the current collector drops. Moreover, the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), which is generated during the cycling, reduces the discharge capacity. These issues must be addressed for widespread application of this material. In this work, caramel popcorn shaped porous silicon particles with carbon coating are fabricated by a set of simple chemical methods as active anode material. Si particles are etched to form a porous structure. The pores in Si provide space for the volume expansion and liquid electrolyte diffusion. A layer of amorphous carbon is formed inside the pores, which gives an excellent isolation between the Si particle and electrolyte, so that the formation of the SEI layer is stabilized. Meanwhile, this novel structure enhances the mechanical properties of the Si particles, and the crack phenomenon caused by the volume change is significantly restrained. Therefore, an excellent cycle life under a high rate for the novel Si electrode is achieved. PMID:24111737

  5. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  6. Climatology of black and organic carbon particles from 1950 to 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liousse, C.; Cachier, H.; Michel, C.; Guillaume, B.; Grégoire, J. M.; Chiapello, I.

    2003-04-01

    Increasing interest for carbonaceous aerosol studies is due to the recognized effect of such particles on regional and global radiative balance and climate. Recent calculations (Jacobson et al.,2002) have shown for example that reduction of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) particle emissions by fossil fuel combustions especially diesel combustions, may slow the global warming more efficiently that any reductions of carbon dioxide. Such studies rely on very different existing BC inventories with different budgets (Penner et al., 1993, Cooke and Wilson, 1996, Liousse et al., 1996, Cooke et al., 1999, Lavoué et al., 2000) while other developments for the global (Bond, Shulz or Chin works) and regional scales (Streets, Reddy, Michel, Liousse works) are currently underway. Yearly global BC emissions from Bond is roughly half of those given by Cooke et al., 1999. In this work, some intercomparisons conducted between different existing inventories will be firstly presented for a few specific years focusing on the main reasons for such differences. Then, changes of fossil fuel BC emissions will be scrutinized for the 1950-2100 period. From 1950 to present, the BC inventory which has been used, has been created following Cooke et al. (1999) including new recent developments. Projections for 2020 and 2100 have been obtained by using fuel consumption data and population change proposed by IPCC report for two extreme scenarii. For any situation from the past to future, emission factors for carbonaceous aerosols were carefully adapted with attention to the nature of fuel, fuel usage and partition between transport, industrial and domestic sectors. The state of development of each country was also taken into account. These source inventories were then introduced in the European TM3 model, a 3D global off-line transport model. Global trends for modeled BC concentrations have been studied with focus on some relevant sites located in China, India and Europe. An inventory

  7. REACTIONS OF CHLORITE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON AND WITH VANILLIC ACID AND INDAN ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction between chlorite (CO2(-1)) and vanillic acid, at pH 6.0 in the presence of granular activated carbon (GAC), yielded several reaction products identifiable by GC/MS; no products were found in the absence of GAC. Indan and ClO2 or ClO2(-1) reacted in aqueous solution a...

  8. Livestock Air Treatment Using PVA-Coated Powdered Activated Carbon Biofilter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ideal biofilter media provide surface for attachment of microorganisms responsible for removing air-born contaminants while facilitating passage of air. This study evaluated the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated powdered activated carbon particles as a biofiltration medium. This material e...

  9. Livestock air treatment using PVA-coated powdered activated carbon biofilter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) biofilters was studied using bench-scale biofilters and air from aerobically-treated swine manure. The PVA-coated powdered activated carbon particles showed excellent properties as a biofiltration medium: water holding capacity of 1.39 g H2O/g-dry PVA; wet por...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  11. Production of carbon monoxide by charged particle deposition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Sawada, T.; Edgar, B. C.; Uman, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies of electron energy deposition in CO2 and CO based upon a large set of electron impact cross sections are utilized to estimate the telluric CO directly produced by various charged-particle deposition mechanisms. The mechanisms considered are (1) lightning, (2) cloud coronal discharges, (3) background radioactivity, (4) natural electrostatic discharges, (5) photoelectrons in the ionosphere, (6) auroral electrons, (7) auroral protons, (8) cosmic rays, and (9) solar wind. 'Ball park' estimates of the global CO production by each of these mechanisms are given. Apart from mechanisms 1, 2, and 5, all CO production mechanisms are estimated to be small compared to artificial sources. If, as appears to be the case, the hot oxygen atoms and ions and other atomic species immediately produced by these three charged-particle deposition mechanisms react rapidly with CO2 to produce CO, these mechanisms can readily lead to CO production levels in the multimegaton-per-year range.

  12. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  13. Ignition and devolatilization of pulverized bituminous coal particles during oxygen/carbon dioxide coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Molina; Christopher R. Shaddix

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen/carbon dioxide recycle coal combustion is actively being investigated because of its potential to facilitate CO{sub 2} sequestration and to achieve emission reductions. In the work reported here, the effect of enhanced oxygen levels and CO{sub 2} bath gas is independently analyzed for their influence on single-particle pulverized coal ignition of a U.S. eastern bituminous coal. The experiments show that the presence of CO{sub 2} and a lower O{sub 2} concentration increase the ignition delay time but have no measurable effect on the time required to complete volatile combustion, once initiated. For the ignition process observed in the experiments, the CO{sub 2} results are explained by its higher molar specific heat and the O{sub 2} results are explained by the effect of O{sub 2} concentration on the local mixture reactivity. Particle ignition and devolatilization properties in a mixture of 30% O{sub 2} in CO{sub 2} are very similar to those in air. 23 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Discontinuous fluidization transition in dense suspensions of actively deforming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    Collective dynamics of self-propelled particles at high density have been shown to display a glass-like transition with a critical slowing down of 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. In this talk, we propose a new mechanism of injecting energy or activity via volume fluctuations. We show that the behaviour of actively deforming particles is strikingly different from that of self-propelled particles. In particular, we find a discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition from a flowing state to an arrested state. Our minimal model might also explain the collective dynamics in epithelial tissues. In particular, without needing self-propulsion or cell-cell adhesion, volume fluctuations of individual cells alone might be sufficient to give rise to an active fluidization and collective dynamics in densely packed tissues.

  15. Quiet time particle fluxes and active phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, Vitaly; Zeldovich, Mariya; Logachev, Yurii; Kecskemety, Karoly

    Using ACE, SOHO and STEREO data the connection of quiet time particle fluxes with active processes on the Sun is examined in the 23rd SC. Investigation of the intervals selected in the conditions of low solar activity supports our assumption that the active structures on the Sun arising during minimum solar activity are mostly responsible for background particle fluxes. Sources on the Sun of charged particles with energies 0.3-8 MeV/nucleon have been determined during quiet time periods over all solar cycle by comparison with solar wind fluxes. It is shown that at the solar maximum a part of background fluxes with abundances of C and Fe corresponding to mean values in solar corona resulted from equatorial coronal holes. Bipolar structures arising in the hole area (bright X-ray points) were accompanied in most cases by the ejection of solar plasma according to HINOTORI satellite. The speed of a part of such emissions and open magnetic field lines above coronal holes can allow energetic particles to escape into the interplanetary space. During solar minimum abundances of C and Fe in majority of quiet time fluxes corresponded to solar wind values possibly indicating the common origin of energetic particle and solar wind fluxes.

  16. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure. PMID:24730680

  17. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  18. Influence of sorption on sound propagation in granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2016-08-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) has numerous applications due to its ability to adsorb and desorb gas molecules. Recently, it has been shown to exhibit unusually high low frequency sound absorption. This behavior is determined by both the multi-scale nature of the material, i.e., the existence of three scales of heterogeneities, and physical processes specific to micro- and nanometer-size pores, i.e., rarefaction and sorption effects. To account for these processes a model for sound propagation in GAC is developed in this work. A methodology for characterizing GAC which includes optical granulometry, flow resistivity measurements, and the derivation of the inner-particle model parameters from acoustical and non-acoustical measurements is also presented. The model agrees with measurements of normal incidence surface impedance and sound absorption coefficient on three different GAC samples. PMID:27586708

  19. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  20. Physisorption of enzymatically active chymotrypsin on titania colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Derr, Ludmilla; Dringen, Ralf; Treccani, Laura; Hildebrand, Nils; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-10-01

    In this study we use a straightforward experimental method to probe the presence and activity of the proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin adsorbed on titania colloidal particles. We show that the adsorption of α-chymotrypsin on the particles is irreversible and pH-dependent. At pH 8 the amount of adsorbed chymotrypsin is threefold higher compared to the adsorption at pH 5. However, we observe that the adsorption is accompanied by a substantial loss of enzymatic activity, and only around 6-9% of the initial enzyme activity is retained. A Michaelis-Menten kinetics analysis of both unbound and TiO2-bound chymotrypsin shows that the K(M) value is increased from ∼10 μM for free chymotrypsin to ∼40 μM for the particle bound enzyme. Such activity decrease could be related by the hindered accessibility of substrate to the active site of adsorbed chymotrypsin, or by adsorption-induced structural changes. Our simple experimental method does not require any complex technical equipment, can be applied to a broad range of hydrolytic enzymes and to various types of colloidal materials. Our approach allows an easy, fast and reliable determination of particle surface-bound enzyme activity and has high potential for development of future enzyme-based biotechnological and industrial processes. PMID:26072448

  1. Merging allylic carbon-hydrogen and selective carbon-carbon bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Didier, Dorian; Zabrodski, Tamar; Schinkel, Marvin; Ackermann, Lutz; Marek, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century, many synthetic organic chemists have focused on developing new strategies to regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectively build carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds in a predictable and efficient manner. Ideal syntheses should use the least number of synthetic steps, with few or no functional group transformations and by-products, and maximum atom efficiency. One potentially attractive method for the synthesis of molecular skeletons that are difficult to prepare would be through the selective activation of C-H and C-C bonds, instead of the conventional construction of new C-C bonds. Here we present an approach that exploits the multifold reactivity of easily accessible substrates with a single organometallic species to furnish complex molecular scaffolds through the merging of otherwise difficult transformations: allylic C-H and selective C-C bond activations. The resulting bifunctional nucleophilic species, all of which have an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centre, can then be selectively derivatized by the addition of two different electrophiles to obtain more complex molecular architecture from these easily available starting materials.

  2. Naphthalene SOA: redox activity and naphthoquinone gas-particle partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-10-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox-active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. These results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. Also, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  3. Circumpolar measurements of ozone, particles, and carbon monoxide from a commercial airliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, R.; Falconer, P.

    1979-01-01

    Trace constituent data are presented from the unique flight of an airliner around the world over both poles. Relatively high resolution and simultaneous measurements of ozone, carbon monoxide, light-scattering particles, condensation nuclei, and meteorological parameters were obtained. The mutual variations of the data in the polar stratospheres, and in the tropical upper troposphere, are discussed in their meteorological setting. The data from the Arctic lower stratosphere are consistent with a tropospheric source of condensation nuclei, but not of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide mixing ratios in the Antarctic stratosphere averaged 44 ppbv. In the tropical troposphere they averaged 66 ppbv over the Pacific versus 89 ppbv over Africa. A local area of higher concentration (115 ppbv) was encountered over tropical Africa; its possible relation to carbon monoxide production by vegetation and deep convection is discussed. Evidence was found in the tropical upper troposphere of distinct boundaries between air masses of different temperature, ozone content, and particle content.

  4. Geochemical and petrographical characterization of fine-grained carbonate particles along proximal to distal transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, Mélanie; Emmanuel, Laurent; Immenhauser, Adrian; Renard, Maurice

    2012-12-01

    The origin of carbonate ooze particles is often poorly understood. This is due to their polygenic origin and potential post-depositional alteration. Here, the outcome of a physical separation study with regard to different component classes of micritic carbonates is shown. The focus is on grain size and morphology, mineralogy and isotope signatures. Two contrasting proximal-to-distal transects were investigated: (1) the Miocene leeward margin of Great Bahama Bank (ODP Leg 166) and (2) the transition between the Maiella platform and the Umbria-Marche basin in central Italy near the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary. In both case settings, carbonate particles of biogenic origin include at least three groups of organisms: (i) planktonic foraminifera, (ii) calcareous nannofossils and (iii) fragments of unspecified neritic skeletal material. Two further particle types lack diagnostic structures, and based on particle size and mineralogy, are here referred to as (iv) macroparticles (5-20 μm, mainly xenomorphic) and (v) microparticles (< 12 μm, mainly automorphic to sub-automorphic). Macro- and microparticles represent 50 to 80% of the carbonate phase in slope and toe-of-slope domains and share characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope signatures. Macro- and microparticles are considered shallow-water precipitation products subsequently exported into the slope and toe-of-slope domains. Macroparticles are probably related to the fragmentation of neritic skeletal components while microparticles point to inorganic and/or bioinduced precipitation in the water column. In some cases, macro- and microparticles may have an early diagenetic origin. The identification of the origin of fine-grained particles allows for a quantitative assessment of exported, in situ and diagenetic carbonate materials in periplatform environments. The data shown here represent an important step towards a more complete characterization of carbonate ooze and micrite.

  5. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  6. A Carbon Source Apportionment Shift in Mexico City Atmospheric Particles During 2003-2004 as Determined with Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Veneroni, D. G.; Vega, E.

    2013-05-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric particles (PM2.5) was measured at La Merced (MER), a commercial site in the eastern sector, and at Xalostoc (XAL) an industrial site in the NE sector of Mexico City, during three sampling periods in autumn 2003, and spring and autumn 2004. At each site and sampling campaign particle samples were collected daily with minivol samplers during two week periods. Ancillary data included organic and elemental carbon, trace elements and ionic species. This data base was complement with air quality data from the RAMA (Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network). In general, particle concentrations, ionic species and some air quality species showed higher concentrations in autumn and lowest values in spring. Moreover, the concentrations of these chemical species were highest at XAL compared to MER. The stable carbon isotope composition of PM2.5 during autumn 2003 and spring 2004 had and average value of -26.04 (± 1.54) ‰ vs. PDB. Differences in the isotopic composition between the two sites were non significant. The average δ13C during these seasons were 1 ‰ lighter relative to data collected previously at these sites during 2000 and 2001, and is consistent with a predominant source of hydrocarbon combustion. In autumn 2004, however, average δ13C at XAL and MER increased to -22.8 (± 0.9) and -20.6 (± 3.1) ‰, respectively. Organic carbon concentrations during this period increased concomitantly at these sites. The shift in the isotopic composition in ambient particles suggests a predominance of soil-derived carbon during this period. The possible causes and implications of this are discussed.

  7. Method of evaluating the integrity of the outer carbon layer of triso-coated reactor fuel particles

    DOEpatents

    Caputo, Anthony J.; Costanzo, Dante A.; Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Layton, Frank L.; Stinton, David P.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for determining defective final layers of carbon on triso-coated fuel particles and the like. Samples of the particles are subjected to a high temperature treatment with gaseous chlorine and thereafter radiographed. The chlorine penetrates through any defective carbon layer and reacts with the underlying silicon carbide resulting in the volatilization of the silicon as SiCl.sub.4 leaving carbon as a porous layer. This porous carbon layer is easily detected by the radiography.

  8. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  9. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui; Zhu, Hongjun

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  10. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  11. Growth dynamics of carbon-metal particles and nanotubes synthesized by CO2 laser vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    To study the growth of carbon-Co/Ni particles and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by 20 ms CO2 laser-pulse irradiation of a graphite-Co/Ni (1.2 at.%) target in an Ar gas atmosphere (600 Torr), we used emission imaging spectroscopy and shadowgraphy with a temporal resolution of 1.67 ms. Wavelength-selected emission images showed that C2 emission was strong in the region close to the target (within 2 cm), while for the same region the blackbody radiation from the large clusters or particles increased with increasing distance from the target. Shadowgraph images showed that the viscous flow of carbon and metal species formed a mushroom or a turbulent cloud spreading slowly into the Ar atmosphere, indicating that particles and SWNTs continued to grow as the ejected material cooled. In addition, emission imaging spectroscopy at 1200 °C showed that C2 and hot clusters and particles with higher emission intensities were distributed over much wider areas. We discuss the growth dynamics of the particles and SWNTs through the interaction of the ambient Ar with the carbon and metal species released from the target by the laser pulse.

  12. Glycerol electro-oxidation over glassy-carbon-supported Au nanoparticles: direct influence of the carbon support on the electrode catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Janaina F; Gasparotto, Luiz H S; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2013-07-01

    Glycerol is at present abundantly co-produced in the biodiesel fabrication and can be used as fuel in Direct Glycerol Fuel Cells (DGFC) for cogeneration of electricity, value-added chemicals and heat. With this motivation, in the present work, we investigated at a fundamental level the oxidation of glycerol over glassy carbon (GC) supported Au nanoparticles in alkaline medium using cyclic voltammetry. By controlling the Au deposition time, we varied the GC supported Au coverage from 0.4% to 30% maintaining a regular particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 200 nm. An influence of the carbon support on the activity of the GC-supported Au nanoparticles was evidenced. Results from studies on the oxidation of glycerol and ethylene glycol on Au and Pt nanoparticles supported on a glassy carbon, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and dimensionally stable anode under different pH conditions indicate that the carbon support participates actively in the oxidation of glycerol and other alcohols. We propose that active oxygenated species are gradually formed on the glassy carbon by potential cycling (up to the saturation of the carbon area) and these oxygenated species are additional oxygen suppliers for the oxidation of glycerol residues adsorbed on the Au particles, following a mechanism consisting of the synergism of two active elements: gold and carbon. PMID:23666524

  13. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  14. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  15. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  16. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  17. Kinetics of small particle activation in supersaturated vapors

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, R.; Wang, J.

    2010-08-29

    We examine the nucleated (with barrier) activation of perfectly wetting (zero contact angle) particles ranging from bulk size down to one nanometer. Thermodynamic properties of the particles, coated with liquid layers of varying thickness and surrounded by vapor, are analyzed. Nano-size particles are predicted to activate at relative humidity below the Kelvin curve on crossing a nucleation barrier, located at a critical liquid layer thickness such that the total particle size (core + liquid layer) equals the Kelvin radius (Fig. 1). This barrier vanishes precisely as the critical layer thickness approaches the thin layer limit and the Kelvin radius equals the radius of the particle itself. These considerations are similar to those included in Fletcher's theory (Fletcher, 1958) however the present analysis differs in several important respects. Firstly, where Fletcher used the classical prefactor-exponent form for the nucleation rate, requiring separate estimation of the kinetic prefactor, we solve a diffusion-drift equation that is equivalent to including the full Becker-Doering (BD) multi-state kinetics of condensation/evaporation along the growth coordinate. We also determine the mean first passage time (MFPT) for barrier crossing (Wedekind et al., 2007), which is shown to provide a generalization of BD nucleation kinetics especially useful for barrier heights that are considerably lower than those typically encountered in homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation, and make explicit comparisons between the MFPT and BD kinetic models. Barrier heights for heterogeneous nucleation are computed by a thermo-dynamic area construction introduced recently to model deliquescence and efflorescence of small particles (McGraw and Lewis, 2009). In addition to providing a graphical representation of the activation process that offers new insights, the area construction provides a molecular approach that avoids explicit use of the interfacial tension. Typical barrier profiles for

  18. Removal of organic dyes using Cr-containing activated carbon prepared from leather waste.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luiz C A; Coura, Camila Van Zanten; Guimarães, Iara R; Gonçalves, Maraisa

    2011-09-15

    In this work, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and oxidation of organics in aqueous medium were studied in the presence of activated carbon prepared from wet blue leather waste. The wet blue leather waste, after controlled pyrolysis under CO(2) flow, was transformed into chromium-containing activated carbons. The carbon with Cr showed high microporous surface area (up to 889 m(2)g(-1)). Moreover, the obtained carbon was impregnated with nanoparticles of chromium oxide from the wet blue leather. The chromium oxide was nanodispersed on the activated carbon, and the particle size increased with the activation time. It is proposed that these chromium species on the carbon can activate H(2)O(2) to generate HO radicals, which can lead to two competitive reactions, i.e. the hydrogen peroxide decomposition or the oxidation of organics in water. In fact, in this work we observed that activated carbon obtained from leather waste presented high removal of methylene blue dye combining the adsorption and oxidation processes. PMID:21752544

  19. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  20. Study on the removal of pesticide in agricultural run off by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Ahmad; Hartini, W J H; Ali, Nora'aini; Endut, A

    2011-05-01

    In this batch study, the adsorption of malathion by using granular activated carbon with different parameters due to the particle size, dosage of carbons, as well as the initial concentration of malathion was investigated. Batch tests were carried out to determine the potential and the effectiveness of granular activated carbon (GAC) in removal of pesticide in agricultural run off. The granular activated carbon; coconut shell and palm shells were used and analyzed as the adsorbent material. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms models were applied to describe the characteristics of adsorption behavior. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model and Freundlich model with maximum adsorption capacity of 909.1mg/g. The results indicate that the GAC could be used to effectively adsorb pesticide (malathion) from agricultural runoff. PMID:21232934

  1. Effect of bead milling on chemical and physical characteristics of activated carbons pulverized to superfine sizes.

    PubMed

    Partlan, Erin; Davis, Kathleen; Ren, Yiran; Apul, Onur Guven; Mefford, O Thompson; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2016-02-01

    Superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is an adsorbent material with particle size between roughly 0.1-1 μm. This is about an order of magnitude smaller than conventional powdered activated carbon (PAC), typically 10-50 μm. S-PAC has been shown to outperform PAC for adsorption of various drinking water contaminants. However, variation in S-PAC production methods and limited material characterization in prior studies lead to questions of how S-PAC characteristics deviate from that of its parent PAC. In this study, a wet mill filled with 0.3-0.5 mm yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide grinding beads was used to produce S-PAC from seven commercially available activated carbons of various source materials, including two coal types, coconut shell, and wood. Particle sizes were varied by changing the milling time, keeping mill power, batch volume, and recirculation rate constant. As expected, mean particle size decreased with longer milling. A lignite coal-based carbon had the smallest mean particle diameter at 169 nm, while the wood-based carbon had the largest at 440 nm. The wood and coconut-shell based carbons had the highest resistance to milling. Specific surface area and pore volume distributions were generally unchanged with increased milling time. Changes in the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) and oxygen content of the milled carbons were found to correlate with an increasing specific external surface area. However, the isoelectric point (pH(IEP)), which measures only external surfaces, was unchanged with milling and also much lower in value than pH(PZC). It is likely that the outer surface is easily oxidized while internal surfaces remain largely unchanged, which results in a lower average pH as measured by pH(PZC). PMID:26657354

  2. Effect of particle size on the chemisorption and decomposition of carbon monoxide by palladium and nickel clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    The chemisorption of gases on well-defined, supported metal particles is a model for basic processes in heterogeneous catalysis. In this study, the chemisorption and decomposition of carbon monoxide on palladium and nickel particles was examined as a function of particle size. Particulate films with average particle sizes ranging from 1 to 10 nm were grown by vapor deposition on UHV-cleaved mica. Successive CO adsorption-desorption cycles resulted in the accumulation of carbon on the particles, which suppressed CO adsorption. The rate of carbon accumulation was strongly dependent on particle size and was higher for Ni than for Pd over the same size range. Carbon was removed from both metals by oxygen treatments at elevated temperatures. However, a mixture of CO and O2 was effective for monitoring the removal of carbon from palladium.

  3. Active Brownian Particles. From Individual to Collective Stochastic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Bär, M.; Ebeling, W.; Lindner, B.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2012-03-01

    We review theoretical models of individual motility as well as collective dynamics and pattern formation of active particles. We focus on simple models of active dynamics with a particular emphasis on nonlinear and stochastic dynamics of such self-propelled entities in the framework of statistical mechanics. Examples of such active units in complex physico-chemical and biological systems are chemically powered nano-rods, localized patterns in reaction-diffusion system, motile cells or macroscopic animals. Based on the description of individual motion of point-like active particles by stochastic differential equations, we discuss different velocity-dependent friction functions, the impact of various types of fluctuations and calculate characteristic observables such as stationary velocity distributions or diffusion coefficients. Finally, we consider not only the free and confined individual active dynamics but also different types of interaction between active particles. The resulting collective dynamical behavior of large assemblies and aggregates of active units is discussed and an overview over some recent results on spatiotemporal pattern formation in such systems is given.

  4. Activated carbons from North Dakota lignite and leonardite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Olson, E.S.; Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The EERC is undertaking a research and development program on carbon development, part of which is directed towards investigating the key parameters in the preparation of activated carbons from low-rank coals indigenous to North Dakota. Carbons have been prepared and characterized for potential sorption applications in flue gas and waste liquid streams. Lignite, owing to its wide occurrence and variability in properties, has received significant attention as a precursor of active carbon manufacture. Mineral matter content and its alkaline nature are two highly variable properties that can have important consequences on the production of suitable activated carbons. Other factors affecting the production include carbonizing conditions, the activation agents, activation temperature, and activation time. However, as previously noted, the relationship between the above factors and the sorption activity is particularly complex. Part of the difficulty is that sorption activity encompasses at least three parameters, namely, surface area, pore distribution, and surface acidity/basicity. The presence of mineral matter in the coal can affect not only carbonization but also the activation and subsequent sorption and desorption processes. This paper presents results of an investigation of demineralization, carbonization temperature, activation temperature, and activation time for one lignite and leonardite from North Dakota.

  5. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of nano-TiCx particles with different shapes by using carbon nano-tube as C source

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With using the carbon nano-tube (CNT) of high chemical activity, nano-TiCx particles with different growth shapes were synthesized through the self-propagating high temperature in the 80 wt.% metal (Cu, Al, and Fe)-Ti-CNT systems. The growth shapes of the TiCx particles are mainly octahedron in the Cu- and Al-Ti-CNT systems, while mainly cube- and sphere-like in the Fe-Ti-CNT system. PMID:21878133

  6. Phenol adsorption by activated carbon produced from spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cínthia S; Abreu, Anelise L; Silva, Carmen L T; Guerreiro, Mário C

    2011-01-01

    The present work highlights the preparation of activated carbons (ACs) using spent coffee grounds, an agricultural residue, as carbon precursor and two different activating agents: water vapor (ACW) and K(2)CO(3) (ACK). These ACs presented the microporous nature and high surface area (620-950 m(2) g(-1)). The carbons, as well as a commercial activated carbon (CAC) used as reference, were evaluated as phenol adsorbent showing high adsorption capacity (≈150 mg g(-1)). The investigation of the pH solution in the phenol adsorption was also performed. The different activating agents led to AC with distinct morphological properties, surface area and chemical composition, although similar phenol adsorption capacity was verified for both prepared carbons. The production of activated carbons from spent coffee grounds resulted in promising adsorbents for phenol removal while giving a noble destination to the residue. PMID:22105129

  7. COHN analysis: Body composition measurements based on the associated particle imaging and prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of the body's carbon (C), oxygen (O), hydrogen (H), and nitrogen (N) content can be used to calculate the relative amounts of fat, protein, and water. A system based on prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), coupled with the associated particle imaging (API) technique, is...

  8. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  9. Particle-associated extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial community composition across the Canadian Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Colleen T E; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Microbial enzymatic hydrolysis of marine-derived particulate organic carbon (POC) can be a dominant mechanism for attenuating carbon flux in cold Arctic waters during spring and summer. Whether this mechanism depends on composition of associated microbial communities and extends into other seasons is not known. Bacterial community composition (BCC) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA, for leucine aminopeptidases, glucosidases and chitobiases) were measured on small suspended particles and potentially sinking aggregates collected during fall from waters of the biologically productive North Water and river-impacted Beaufort Sea. Although other environmental variables appeared influential, both BCC and EEA varied along a marine productivity gradient in the two regions. Aggregates harbored the most distinctive bacterial communities, with a small number of taxa driving differences between particle-size classes (1.0-60 and > 60 μm) and free-living bacteria (0.2-1.0 μm). Significant relationships between patterns in particle-associated BCC and EEA suggest strong links between these two variables. Calculations indicated that up to 80% of POC in the euphotic zone of the North Water, and 20% in the Beaufort Sea, may be hydrolyzed enzymatically, underscoring the importance of this mechanism in attenuating carbon fluxes in Arctic waters even as winter approaches. PMID:24666253

  10. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  11. Silver Nanoparticle Impregnated Bio-Based Activated Carbon with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, R.; Suriyaraj, S. P.; Jayavignesh, V.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-08-01

    The present study involves the production of silver nanoparticles using a novel yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae BU-MBT CY-1 isolated from coconut cell sap. The biological reduction of silver nitrate by the isolate was deducted at various time intervals. The yeast cells after biological silver reduction were harvested and subjected to carbonization at 400°C for 1 h and its properties were analyzed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope attached with energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The average size of the silver nanoparticles present on the surface of the carbonized silver containing yeast cells (CSY) was 19 ± 9 nm. The carbonized control yeast cells (CCY) did not contain any particles on its surface. The carbonized silver nanoparticles containing yeast cells (CSY) were made into bioactive emulsion and tested for its efficacy against various pathogenic Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The antimicrobial activity studies indicated that CSY bioactive nanoemulsion was effective against Gram negative organisms than Gram positive organism.

  12. Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations near an industrial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Zandveld, P.; Henzing, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations were investigated in urban areas of the city of Rotterdam (the Netherlands) situated near an industrial area. Several monitoring campaigns were conducted in the period 2011-2014 at three local locations and at a regional background site. Black carbon levels showed minor elevation due to industrial emissions. In contrast, particle number concentrations (PNC) increased during periods with wind directions from the industrial area, by 1000 to 23,000 particles per cm3 depending on the distance to the area from 1 to 40 km. The size distribution of elevated PNC was characterized by two modes: 10-20 nm (nucleation particles) and 20-100 nm (Aitken particles). Five dominant industrial sources were identified and used as input for dispersion modelling of PN in 2012. The results showed that in Rotterdam about 70,000 addresses were exposed to an additional annual PNC of 5000-10,000 particles per cm3 and about 55,000 addresses to additional PNC of 10,000-20,000 particles per cm3 for 39% of the time. More measurements of PNC up- and downwind of the industrial area are recommended to identify more accurately the PN emission sources and to validate the dispersion modelling.

  13. Growth mechanism for spherical carbon particles in a dc methane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Tatsuzo; Feng Zongbao; Kono, Akihiko; Shoji, Fumiya

    2008-05-15

    The growth mechanism for spherical carbon particles of micron sizes observed in a vertically excited CH{sub 4}/Ar columnar plasma [F. Shoji, Z. Feng, A. Kono, and T. Nagai, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 171504 (2006)] is investigated theoretically, based on a model in which the particles are negatively charged in the plasma sheath region where they grow by capturing graphite onions with a diameter of ca. 10 nm and a positive charge. A balance of gravity and electric force keeps the particles in the sheath region during their growth. It is found that the particle radius initially increases linearly with time and then approaches a saturation radius, and that the center of gravity of the particle executes a simple harmonic oscillation about its balance position with a characteristic frequency of the order of 10 Hz determined by its specific charge, gravity, and sheath structure.

  14. Synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles directly from active carbon via a one-step ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao; He, Xiaodie; Liu, Yang; Yu, Hang; Kang, Zhenhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-15

    Water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles were synthesized directly from active carbon by a one-step hydrogen peroxide-assisted ultrasonic treatment. The carbon nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, optical fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that the surface of carbon nanoparticles was rich of hydroxyl groups resulting in high hydrophilicity. The carbon nanoparticles could emit bright and colorful photoluminescence covering the entire visible-to-near infrared spectral range. Furthermore, these carbon nanoparticles also had excellent up-conversion fluorescent properties.

  15. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  16. The influence of hydroxyapatite particles on osteoclast cell activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, J S; Lin, F H; Hung, T Y; Tsuang, Y H; Chang, W H; Liu, H C

    1999-06-15

    Aseptic loosening after total joint arthroplasty is a major problem in orthopedic surgery. Small particles from material wear have been reported as the main cause of implant failure. For this reason, investigation into possible wear particles from the materials used in the implant may lead to longevity after arthroplasty. Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been extensively investigated and reported as an excellent biomaterial with excellent biocompatibility. In this study, we used an in vitro osteoblast/osteoclast model to test the biocompatibility of various-sized HA particles. Primary osteoclasts/osteoblasts were co-cultured with different-sized HA particles (0.5-3.0 microm, 37-53 microm, 177-205 microm, and 420-841 microm) for 3 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days. Cellular responses to the HA particles were evaluated by changes in cell counts and the secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin (PGE2), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the supernatant of the culture media. The results showed that osteoblasts/osteoclasts co-cultured with HA particles smaller than 53 microm undergo the most significant changes. Cellular counts significantly decreased, and the changes were more obvious in the osteoblast population. There also was a significant decrease in TGF-beta1 concentration and a significant increase in PGE2 and LDH concentration, but there were no changes in the TNF-alpha or ALP titer. It can be concluded that larger HA particles may be quite compatible with bone cells while smaller-sized HA particles can both activate the osteoclasts and decrease the cell population of the osteoblasts. Justification for the additional expense incurred with the use of hydroxyapatite in primary total hip arthroplasty should be further evaluated. PMID:10321703

  17. Carbon in southeastern U.S. aerosol particles: Empirical estimates of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Hidy, George M.; Tanenbaum, Shelley; Edgerton, Eric; Hartsell, Benjamin; Jansen, John

    Fine particles in the southeastern United States are rich in carbon: Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network measurements from 2001 through 2004 indicate that fine particles less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM 2.5) at two inland urban sites, Atlanta, GA and Birmingham, AL, contain 9 and 11% black carbon (BC) by mass, respectively, on average. For neighboring rural or urban Gulf Coast sites, the range is 4-7% BC. Organic carbon (OC) ranges from 25 to 27% in the inland cities, and 19-24% at the rural or Gulf Coast locations. Evidence in the literature suggests that a substantial fraction of the OC found in the Southeast is produced by atmospheric chemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Estimation of the fraction of OC from primary and secondary sources is difficult from first principles, because the chemistry is complex and incompletely understood, and the emission sources are both anthropogenic and natural. As an alternative, measurement-based models can be used to estimate empirically the primary and secondary source contributions. Three complementary empirical models are described and applied using the SEARCH database. The methods include (a) a multiple regression model employing markers for primary and secondary carbon using gas and particle data, (b) a carbon mass balance using carbon and CO data, along with certain assumptions about the OC/CO ratios in primary emissions for different urban and rural conditions, and (c) exploitation of isotopic measurements of carbon along with the BC and OC data. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) represents ˜20-60% of mean OC, depending upon location and season. The results are sensitive to estimates of emissions of primary OC and BC.

  18. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  19. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  20. Carbon Mineralization in Two Ultisols Amended with Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g., particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal informa...

  1. Carbon mineralization in two ultisols: effects of sources and particle sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g. particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal information on the potential...

  2. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  3. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES IN UNRESTRAINED WKY-RATS TO INHALED ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    This study provides evidence for adverse cardiac effects of inhaled ultrafine particles (UFPs) in healthy WKY rats. Short term exposure (24 h) with carbon UFPs (180 ?g?m ?) induced a moderate but significant heart rate increase of 18 bpm (4.8 %) in association with a ...

  4. On-bicycle exposure to particulate air pollution: Particle number, black carbon, PM2.5, and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankey, Steve; Marshall, Julian D.

    2015-12-01

    Inhalation of air pollution during transport is an important exposure pathway, especially for certain modes of travel and types of particles. We measured concentrations of particulate air pollution (particle number [PN], black carbon [BC], fine particles [PM2.5], particle size) using a mobile, bicycle-based monitoring platform during morning and afternoon rush-hour to explore patterns of exposure while cycling (34 days between August 14 and October 16, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN). Measurements were geo-located at 1 ​s intervals along 3 prescribed monitoring routes totaling 85 h (1426 km) of monitoring. Mean morning [afternoon] on-road concentrations were 32,500 [16,600] pt cm-3, 2.5 [0.7] μg m-3 BC, 8.7 [8.3] μg m-3 PM2.5, and 42 [39] nm particle diameter. Concentrations were correlated with street functional class and declined within small distances from a major road (e.g., for PN and BC, mean concentration decreased ∼20% by moving 1 block away from major roads to adjacent local roads). We estimate the share of on-bicycle exposure attributable to near-traffic emissions (vs. regional pollution) is ∼50% for PN and BC; ∼25% for PM2.5. Regression models of instantaneous traffic volumes, derived from on-bicycle video recordings of nearby traffic, quantify the increase in particle-concentrations associated with each passing vehicle; for example, trucks were associated with acute, high concentration exposure events (average concentration-increase per truck: 31,000 pt cm-3, 1.0 μg m-3 PM2.5, 1.6 μg m-3 BC). Our findings could be used to inform design of low-exposure bicycle networks in urban areas.

  5. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Manakova, Irina A. Ozernoy, Alexey N. Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh. Vereshchak, Mikhail F. Volodin, Valeriy N. Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-27

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α‐Fe(C)+Fe{sub 3}C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  6. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakova, Irina A.; Ozernoy, Alexey N.; Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh.; Vereshchak, Mikhail F.; Volodin, Valeriy N.; Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-01

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α- Fe ( C )+ Fe3C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  7. Geomembranes containing powdered activated carbon have the potential to improve containment of chlorinated aromatic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Surdo, Erin M; Cussler, Edward L; Novak, Paige J; Arnold, William A

    2009-12-01

    Breakthrough across high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was measured for 2,3',4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl and a higher-solubility surrogate, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Addition of powdered activated carbon (0.14 g carbon/cm(3) membrane) reduced pseudo-steady-state flux through thin HDPE membranes by approximately 60%. Breakthrough curves for activated carbon-containing membranes were best described by a model in which sorption to the carbon was limited by the rate of diffusion from the bulk membrane to the carbon particle surfaces. Field-scale estimates based on this model show a substantial (over 10 orders of magnitude) reduction in flux for the activated carbon-containing HDPE compared with pure HDPE. The flux of 2,3',4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl through a composite membrane with thin layers of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 0.05 g carbon/cm(3) and pure HDPE was 69% lower than expected for a similar layered membrane without the sorptive scavenger. This flux reduction was achieved with less than a third of the carbon used in the HDPE case, an improvement that is likely the result of better solute uptake in the hydrophilic PVA layer. PMID:19943666

  8. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption. PMID:25162630

  9. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    particles penetrates from outside to inside. Observed isotope ratio depletion indicates that information about aerosol sources can be lost if measurements are performed only inside house. Using carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios data set, we were able to identify and distinguish main aerosol sources (traffic, heating activities) and penetration of aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor. Acknowledgment This work was supported by Research Council of Lithuania under grant "Pollution Control in Biomass Combustion: from Pollutant Formation to Human Exposure" (BioMassPoll), Project no. ATE05/2012. EPA Ireland is acknowledged for the fellowship grant of D. Ceburnis 1. Garbaras, A. Masalaite, I. Garbariene, D. Ceburnis, E. Krugly V. Remeikis, E. Puida K. Kvietkus, D. Martuzevicius, Stable carbon fractionation in size-segregated aerosol particles produced by controlled biomass burning, Journal of Aerosol Science, Vol. 79, p. 86-96 (2015); 2. D. Ceburnis, A. Garbaras, S. Szidat, M. Rinaldi, S. Fahrni, N. Perron, L. Wacker, S. Leinert, V. Remeikis, M. C. Facchini, A. S. H. Prevot, S. G. Jennings, and C. D. O'Dowd, Quantification of the carbonaceous matter origin in submicron marine aerosol particles by dual carbon isotope analysis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol 11, pp. 8593-8606 (2011); 3. V. Ulevicius, S. Bycenkiene, V. Remeikis, A. Garbaras, S. Kecorius, J. Andriejauskiene, D. Jasineviciene, G. Mocnik, Characterization of pollution events in the East Baltic region affected by regional biomass fire emissions, Atmospheric Research, Vol. 98 (2-4), pp. 190-200 (2010).

  10. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  11. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  12. The IR emission features - Emission from PAH molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Given the current understanding of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the spectroscopic data suggest that are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: (1) free molecule-sized PAHs producing the narrow features and (2) amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily composed of an irregular 'lattice' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the IR fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules demonstrates that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. It is concluded that, since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is required along with an observational program focusing on the spatial characteristics of the spectra.

  13. The IR emission features - Emission from PAH molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for the assessment of the importance of the various forms of PAHs, and recent infrared observations concerning the PAH problem, are considered. Spectroscopic data suggest that the observed interstellar spectrum is due to both free molecule-sized PAHs producing the narrow features, and amorphous carbon particles contributing to the broad underlying components. Explanations for the multicomponent emission spectrum are discussed. A model of the emission mechanism for the example of chrysene is presented, and an exact treatment of the IR fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing 20-30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra more closely resemble those of amorphous carbon particles. It is suggested that future emphasis should be placed on the spatial characteristics of the component spectra.

  14. Activated Carbon Modified with Copper for Adsorption of Propanethiol

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Tirano, Joaquín; Salamanca, Brisa; Giraldo, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbons were characterized texturally and chemically before and after treatment, using surface area determination in the BET model, Boehm titration, TPR, DRX and immersion calorimetry. The adsorption capacity and the kinetics of sulphur compound removal were determined by gas chromatography. It was established that the propanethiol retention capacity is dependent on the number of oxygenated groups generated on the activated carbon surface and that activated carbon modified with CuO at 0.25 M shows the highest retention of propanethiol. Additionally is proposed a mechanism of decomposition of propenothiol with carbon-copper system. PMID:20479992

  15. Comparison of the activities of fine-particle size catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of the fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETCs Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The standard procedures use Blind Canyon coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design with temperatures from 350{degrees}C to 400{degrees}C, reaction times from 20 to 60 minutes, and catalyst loadings up to 1 wt%. Catalytic activity is measured in terms of tetrahydrofuran conversion, heptane conversion, the amount of 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene in the product, and the gas yield. Several catalysts have been evaluated including a commercially available pyrite, a sulfated iron oxide from the University of Pittsburgh, and several preparations of 6-line ferrihydrites from Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Results have demonstrated that significant differences in activity can be detected among these catalysts.

  16. Clustering and phase behaviour of attractive active particles with hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ricard Matas; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2015-10-14

    We simulate clustering, phase separation and hexatic ordering in a monolayered suspension of active squirming disks subject to an attractive Lennard-Jones-like pairwise interaction potential, taking hydrodynamic interactions between the particles fully into account. By comparing the hydrodynamic case with counterpart simulations for passive and active Brownian particles, we elucidate the relative roles of self-propulsion, interparticle attraction, and hydrodynamic interactions in determining clustering and phase behaviour. Even in the presence of an attractive potential, we find that hydrodynamic interactions strongly suppress the motility induced phase separation that might a priori have been expected in a highly active suspension. Instead, we find only a weak tendency for the particles to form stringlike clusters in this regime. At lower activities we demonstrate phase behaviour that is broadly equivalent to that of the counterpart passive system at low temperatures, characterized by regimes of gas-liquid, gas-solid and liquid-solid phase coexistence. In this way, we suggest that a dimensionless quantity representing the level of activity relative to the strength of attraction plays the role of something like an effective non-equilibrium temperature, counterpart to the (dimensionless) true thermodynamic temperature in the passive system. However there are also some important differences from the equilibrium case, most notably with regards the degree of hexatic ordering, which we discuss carefully. PMID:26278520

  17. Virial pressure in systems of spherical active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Roland G; Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    The pressure of suspensions of self-propelled objects is studied theoretically and by simulation of spherical active Brownian particles (ABPs). We show that for certain geometries, the mechanical pressure as force/area of confined systems can be equally expressed by bulk properties, which implies the existence of a nonequilibrium equation of state. Exploiting the virial theorem, we derive expressions for the pressure of ABPs confined by solid walls or exposed to periodic boundary conditions. In both cases, the pressure comprises three contributions: the ideal-gas pressure due to white-noise random forces, an activity-induced pressure ("swim pressure"), which can be expressed in terms of a product of the bare and a mean effective particle velocity, and the contribution by interparticle forces. We find that the pressure of spherical ABPs in confined systems explicitly depends on the presence of the confining walls and the particle-wall interactions, which has no correspondence in systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our simulations of three-dimensional ABPs in systems with periodic boundary conditions reveal a pressure-concentration dependence that becomes increasingly nonmonotonic with increasing activity. Above a critical activity and ABP concentration, a phase transition occurs, which is reflected in a rapid and steep change of the pressure. We present and discuss the pressure for various activities and analyse the contributions of the individual pressure components. PMID:26221908

  18. Hygroscopic Growth and Activation of Particles containing Algea-Exudate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Fuentes, Elena; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Voigtländer, Jens; Clauss, Tina; Kiselev, Alexei; Green, David; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    A large amount of the Earth is covered by oceans, which provide a constant source of marine aerosol particles, produced due to bubble bursting processes that depend on wind speed (O'Dowd and de Leeuw, 2007). In general, marine particles can be assumed to play an important role for the Earth atmosphere on a global scale, due to their abundance and due to their effect on clouds. E.g. marine stratus and stratocumulus clouds contribute about 30% to 40% to the Earth's albedo (Randall et al., 1984). The activation of aerosol particles to cloud droplets depends on the hygroscopic properties of the particles, which, in turn, depend on their chemical composition. For marine particles, is has been and still is discussed what the effects of organic substances being present in the particles might be. These substances originate from marine biota where they enrich at the ocean surface. To mimic marine aerosol particles, algae-exudates of different algae species were mixed with artificial sea-water. These samples were used in the laboratory to produce particles via a bubble bursting process (Fuentes et al., 2009). The hygroscopic growth and activation of the (size selected) particles was measured, using LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Stratmann et al., 2004) and the DMT-CCNc (Cloud Condensation Nucleus counter from Droplet Measurement Technologies, Roberts and Nenes, 2005). The hygroscopic growth was measured twice, 3 and 10 seconds after humidification, and no difference in the grown size was detected, i.e. no kinetic effect was observed for the examined time range. From LACIS and CCNc measurements, the hygroscopicity was deduced through determination of the amount of ions being effective in the particle / droplet solution (Rho(ion), Wex et al., 2007). A concentration dependent non-ideal behaviour was found for particles produced from an artificial sea-water sample that contained only inorganic salts, as can be expected (see e.g. Niedermeier et al., 2008

  19. CO2, NOx, and particle emissions from aircraft and support activities at a regional airport.

    PubMed

    Klapmeyer, Michael E; Marr, Linsey C

    2012-10-16

    The goal of this research was to quantify emissions of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), particle number, and black carbon (BC) from in-use aircraft and related activity at a regional airport. Pollutant concentrations were measured adjacent to the airfield and passenger terminal at the Roanoke Regional Airport in Virginia. Observed NO(x) emission indices (EIs) for jet-powered, commuter aircraft were generally lower than those contained in the International Civil Aviation Organization databank for both taxi (same as idle) and takeoff engine settings. NO(x) EIs ranged from 1.9 to 3.7 g (kg fuel)(-1) across five types of aircraft during taxiing, whereas EIs were consistently higher, 8.8-20.6 g (kg fuel)(-1), during takeoff. Particle number EIs ranged from 1.4 × 10(16) to 7.1 × 10(16) (kg fuel)(-1) and were slightly higher in taxi mode than in takeoff mode for four of the five types of aircraft. Diurnal patterns in CO(2) and NO(x) concentrations were influenced mainly by atmospheric conditions, while patterns in particle number concentrations were attributable mainly to patterns in aircraft activity. CO(2) and NO(x) fluxes measured by eddy covariance were higher at the terminal than at the airfield and were lower than found in urban areas. PMID:22963581

  20. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of manufacturing a carbonized and activated nonwoven made by cotton fiber was investigated in this paper. The study was focused on the acoustic application and nonwoven composites with cotton nonwoven as a base layer and glass fiber nonwoven, cotton nonwoven, and carbonized and activated...

  1. Preparation of nitrogen-enriched activated carbons from brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Pietrzak; Helena Wachowska; Piotr Nowicki

    2006-05-15

    Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons were prepared from a Polish brown coal. Nitrogen was introduced from urea at 350{sup o}C in an oxidizing atmosphere both to carbonizates obtained at 500-700{sup o}C and to activated carbons prepared from them. The activation was performed at 800{sup o}C with KOH in argon. It has been observed that the carbonization temperature determines the amount of nitrogen that is incorporated (DC5U, 8.4 wt % N{sup daf}; DC6U, 6.3 wt % N{sup daf}; and DC7U, 5.4 wt % N{sup daf}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have shown that nitrogen introduced both at the stage of carbonizates and at the stage of activated carbons occurs mainly as -6, -5, and imine, amine and amide groups. On the other hand, the activation of carbons enriched with nitrogen results in the formation of pyridonic nitrogen and N-Q. The introduction of nitrogen at the activated carbon stage leads to a slight decrease in surface area. It has been proven that the most effective way of preparing microporous activated carbons enriched with nitrogen to a considerable extent and having high surface area ({approximately} 3000 m{sup 2}/g) is the following: carbonization - activation - reaction with urea. 40 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  4. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  5. Utilization of date stones for production of activated carbon using phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Haimour, N.M. . E-mail: nomanhaimour@hotmail.com; Emeish, S. . E-mail: s_emiesh@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    Date stone wastes have been utilized for production of activated carbon by chemical activation with phosphoric acid using a fluidized-bed reactor. The effects of the activation time, activation temperature, impregnation ratio, and particle size on the yield and the adsorptive capacity towards iodine were studied. The yield and the quality of the activated carbon prepared by using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were compared with that prepared from date stones using the same equipment, and under similar conditions by using ZnCl{sub 2} as an oxidizing agent. The maximum value of the iodine number of the activated carbon produced using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in this work was about 495 under the following conditions: impregnation ratio 0.4, activation time 60 min, activation temperature 800 deg. C, particle size 0.60 mm. The iodine number for the produced activated carbon was higher when phosphoric acid was used, compared to that when zinc chloride was used as impregnation reagent; however, the yield obtained when H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was used was lower than the yield when ZnCl{sub 2} was used. The iodine number increases significantly with increasing the activation temperature. By increasing the impregnation ratio at the same temperature, the iodine number decreased sharply and an oscillation is noticed for all the cases but it was clearer at 800 deg. C. The average variation of the iodine number for the whole range of particle size used in this work is {+-}10%.

  6. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  7. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150-1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC), inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) (R2 = 0.91). Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC) particles into four classes: (i) EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass), (ii) EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic), (iii) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx), and (iv) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx). Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65-0.68 respectively, n = 552). The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568). Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88% and 12% of EC particle mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data

  8. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    An Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed to investigate the size-resolved chemical composition of single particles at an urban background site in Paris, France, as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in January/February 2010. ATOFMS particle counts were scaled to match coincident Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) data in order to generate hourly size-resolved mass concentrations for the single particle classes observed. The total scaled ATOFMS particle mass concentration in the size range 150-1067 nm was found to agree very well with the sum of concurrent High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) mass concentration measurements of organic carbon (OC), inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) (R2 = 0.91). Clustering analysis of the ATOFMS single particle mass spectra allowed the separation of elemental carbon (EC) particles into four classes: (i) EC attributed to biomass burning (ECbiomass), (ii) EC attributed to traffic (ECtraffic), (iii) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium sulfate (ECOCSOx), and (iv) EC internally mixed with OC and ammonium nitrate (ECOCNOx). Average hourly mass concentrations for EC-containing particles detected by the ATOFMS were found to agree reasonably well with semi-continuous quantitative thermal/optical EC and optical BC measurements (r2 = 0.61 and 0.65-0.68, respectively, n = 552). The EC particle mass assigned to fossil fuel and biomass burning sources also agreed reasonably well with BC mass fractions assigned to the same sources using seven-wavelength aethalometer data (r2 = 0.60 and 0.48, respectively, n = 568). Agreement between the ATOFMS and other instrumentation improved noticeably when a period influenced by significantly aged, internally mixed EC particles was removed from the intercomparison. 88 % and 12 % of EC particle mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data

  9. Emissions of Black Carbon Particles in Anthropogenic and Biomass Plumes over California during CARB 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, L. K.; Kondo, Y.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.; Zhao, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Wisthaler, A.; Huey, L. G.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) and other chemical species were made from the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the CARB campaign conducted over California in June 2008. We operated an SP2 system that measured BC and scattering particles. The vertical profiles of BC and scattering particles show enhancements in the lower troposphere. We have used relations of CO-CH3CN-SO2 to identify the sources of major plumes. The plumes originating from anthropogenic activities, mainly due to the use of fossil fuels (FF), were observed near the surface. However, the influence of smoke plumes from wild fire or biomass-burning (BB) sources was observed up to 3 km. Overall, the 1-minute average BC mass concentrations were in the ranges of about 90-500 ng/m3 and 300-700 ng/m3 in FF and BB plumes, respectively. The shell/core diameter ratios were much lagerer in BB plumes than those in FF plumes. Namely, the median shell/core ratios were 1.2-1.4 for FF plumes, while they were 1.4-1.7 for BB plumes. In both FF and BB plumes, the mass-size distributions of BC were single mode lognormal. However, the mass median diameters FF plumes were considerably smaller. The BC-CO2 regression slopes were 19±9 ng m-3/ppmv and 270±90 ng m-3/ppmv for FF and BB plumes, respectively. On the other hand the regression slopes of BC-CO were about 3.3 ng m-3/ppbv in both the plumes. Conversely, the regression slopes of BC with other co-emitted combustions products can be used to estimate the contributions of emissions from different sources.

  10. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  11. Potential application of activated carbon from maize tassel for the removal of heavy metals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olorundare, O. F.; Krause, R. W. M.; Okonkwo, J. O.; Mamba, B. B.

    Water-pollution problems worldwide have led to an acute shortage of clean and pure water for both domestic and human consumption. Various technologies and techniques are available for water treatment which includes the use of activated carbon. In this study activated carbons used for the removal of lead (II) ions from water samples were prepared from maize tassels (an agricultural waste residue) which were modified using physical and chemical activation. In the physical activation CO2 was used as the activating agent, while in chemical activation H3PO4 with an impregnation ratio ranging from 1 to 4 was employed. The maize tassel was pyrolysed at different temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 700 °C in an inert atmosphere for a period of 60 min and activated at 700 °C for 30 min. The effects of activation temperature, impregnation ratio and duration were examined. The resultant modified tassels were characterised by measuring their particle-size distribution, porosities, pore volume, and pore-size distribution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The activated carbon produced by chemical activation had the highest BET surface area ranging from 623 m2 g-1 to 1 262 m2 g-1. The surface chemistry characteristics of the modified tassels were determined by FT-IR spectroscopy and Boehm’s titration method. The experimental data proved that properties of activated carbon depend on final temperature of the process, impregnation ratio and duration of the treatment at final temperature. The adsorption studies showed that chemically prepared activated carbon performed better than physically prepared activated carbon.

  12. Self-propelled activated carbon Janus micromotors for efficient water purification.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Gao, Wei; Santos, Luis; Fedorak, Yuri; Singh, Virendra V; Orozco, Jahir; Galarnyk, Michael; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-27

    Self-propelled activated carbon-based Janus particle micromotors that display efficient locomotion in environmental matrices and offer effective 'on-the-fly' removal of wide range of organic and inorganic pollutants are described. The new bubble-propelled activated carbon Janus micromotors rely on the asymmetric deposition of a catalytic Pt patch on the surface of activated carbon microspheres. The rough surface of the activated carbon microsphere substrate results in a microporous Pt structure to provide a highly catalytic layer, which leads to an effective bubble evolution and propulsion at remarkable speeds of over 500 μm/s. Such coupling of the high adsorption capacity of carbon nanoadsorbents with the rapid movement of these catalytic Janus micromotors, along with the corresponding fluid dynamics and mixing, results in a highly efficient moving adsorption platform and a greatly accelerated water purification. The adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms have been investigated. The remarkable decontamination efficiency of self-propelled activated carbon-based Janus micromotors is illustrated towards the rapid removal of heavy metals, nitroaromatic explosives, organophosphorous nerve agents and azo-dye compounds, indicating considerable promise for diverse environmental, defense, and public health applications. PMID:25207503

  13. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  14. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-12

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface. PMID:26919022

  15. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  16. Materials for Active Engagement in Nuclear and Particle Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loats, Jeff; Schwarz, Cindy; Krane, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Physics education researchers have developed a rich variety of research-based instructional strategies that now permeate many introductory courses. Carrying these active-engagement techniques to upper-division courses requires effort and is bolstered by experience. Instructors interested in these methods thus face a large investment of time to start from scratch. This NSF-TUES grant, aims to develop, test and disseminate active-engagement materials for nuclear and particle physics topics. We will present examples of these materials, including: a) Conceptual discussion questions for use with Peer Instruction; b) warm-up questions for use with Just in Time Teaching, c) ``Back of the Envelope'' estimation questions and small-group case studies that will incorporate use of nuclear and particle databases, as well as d) conceptual exam questions.

  17. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  18. The nature of carbon-bearing phases in hydrated interplanetary dust particles. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    We have been quantitatively measuring C abundances in hydrated interplanetary dust particles for the past few years, but in general, we have had to infer the distribution and nature of the C-bearing materials within these particles because of the complex microtextures of hydrated IDPs. Aside from rare carbonate grains, other C-bearing phases are difficult to distinguish from the fine-grained, poorly crystalline phyllosilicates that comprise the bulk of these particles. We know that carbonates alone cannot account for the high C abundances observed in most hydrated IDPs and that additional C-bearing phases must be present. We have recently applied the technique of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) to identify and form the distribution of C-bearing phases in hydrated IDPs. These preliminary data show that several C-rich hydrated IDPs contain a mixture of two major forms of C, Mg-Fe carbonate and amorphous C. The near-edge structure in the C k-edges from these IDPs shows no evidence for the development of graphite or even poorly graphitized C. We conclude that the 'elemental' C in these IDPs is either very poorly ordered or is exceedingly fine-grained (we refer to this C as 'amorphous C'). The amorphous C is intimately intergrown with the fine-grained phyllosilicates and is evenly distributed within three of the four IDPs analyzed (only G1 contains discrete 'hot spots' of amorphous C). Not all hydrated IDPs contain carbonates.

  19. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  20. Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry of carbon particles flow using an autocorrelation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In order to measure the axial flowing velocity of carbon particle suspension with particle diameter of tens of micrometers, the photoacoustic Doppler (PAD) frequency shift is calculated based on a series of individual A scans using an autocorrelation method. A 532 nm pulsed laser with repetition rate of 20 Hz is used as a pumping source to generate photoacoustic signal. The photoacoustic signals are detected using a focused piezoelectric (PZT) ultrasound transducer with central frequency of 5 MHz. The suspension of carbon particles is driven by a syringe pump. The complex photoacoustic signal is calculated by the Hilbert transformation from time-domain photoacoustic signal, and then it is autocorrelated to calculate the Doppler frequency shift. The photoacoustic Doppler frequency shift is calculated by averaging the autocorrelation results of some individual A scans. The advantage of the autocorrelation method is that the time delay in autocorrelation can be defined by user, and the requirement of high pulse repetition rate is avoided. The feasibility of the proposed autocorrelation method is preliminarily demonstrated by quantifying the motion of a carbon particle suspension with flow velocity from 5 mm/s to 60 mm/s. The experimental results show that there is an approximately linear relation between the autocorrelation result and the setting velocity.

  1. Redox activity of urban quasi-ultrafine particles from primary and secondary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Ning, Zhi; Cho, Arthur K.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-12-01

    To characterize the redox activity profiles of atmospheric aerosols from primary (traffic) and secondary photochemical sources, ambient quasi-ultrafine particles were collected near downtown Los Angeles in two different time periods - morning (6:00-9:00 PDT) and afternoon (11:00-14:00 PDT) in the summer of 2008. Detailed chemical analysis of the collected samples, including water-soluble elements, inorganic ions, organic species and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was conducted and redox activity of the samples was measured by two different assays: the dithiothreitol (DTT) and the macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Tracers of secondary photochemical reactions, such as sulfate and organic acids were higher (2.1 ± 0.6 times for sulfate, and up to 3 times for the organic acids) in the afternoon period. WSOC was also elevated by 2.5 ± 0.9 times in the afternoon period due to photo-oxidation of primary particles during atmospheric aging. Redox activity measured by the DTT assay was considerably higher for the samples collected during the afternoon; on the other hand, diurnal trends in the ROS-based activity were not consistent between the morning and afternoon periods. A linear regression between redox activity and various PM chemical constituents showed that the DTT assay was highly correlated with WSOC ( R2 = 0.80), while ROS activity was associated mostly with water soluble transition metals (Vanadium, Nickel and Cadmium; R2 > 0.70). The DTT and ROS assays, which are based on the generation of different oxidizing species by chemical PM constituents, provide important information for elucidating the health risks related to PM exposure from different sources. Thus, both primary and secondary particles possess high redox activity; however, photochemical transformations of primary emissions with atmospheric aging enhance the toxicological potency of primary particles in terms of generating oxidative stress and leading to subsequent damage in cells.

  2. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  3. Physicochemical characteristics, oxidative capacities and cytotoxicities of sulfate-coated, 1,4-NQ-coated and ozone-aged black carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Shang, Jing; Liu, Jia; Xu, Weiwei; Feng, Xiang; Li, Rui; Zhu, Tong

    2015-02-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles play important roles in climate change, visibility impairment, atmospheric reaction process, and health effect. The aging processes of BC alter not only atmospheric composition, but also the physicochemical characteristics of BC itself, thus impacting the environment and health effects. Here, three types of BC including sulfate-coated, 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ)-coated, and O3-aged BC are presented. The morphologies, structures, extraction components, the amount of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and free radical intensities of the three types of BC particles are examined by transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, total organic carbon detector and electron paramagnetic resonance, respectively. Dithiothreitol (DTT) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays are utilized to assess the changes in oxidative capacity and cytotoxicity towards murine alveolar macrophage cells. The orders of DTT activities and cytotoxicities of the particles are both arranged as follows: BC/1,4-NQ > BC/O3 > BC > BC/sulfate, mainly because 1,4-NQ owned high oxidative potential and cytotoxicity, while sulfate did not exhibit oxidative capacity and cytotoxicity. The insoluble components of particles contribute most of the total DTT activity, whereas either water or methanol extract is minor contributor. DTT activity was positively correlated with both WSOC content and free radical intensity, with the correlation between DTT activity and WSOC content was stronger than that between DTT activity and free radical intensity.

  4. Evaluation of initial collision-attachment efficiency between carbon dioxide bubbles and algae particles for separation and harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sug; Kwak, Dong-Heui

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have been regarded as a pollutant causing algal blooms in lakes or reservoirs but have recently been considered as a useful source of biomass to produce biofuel or feed for livestock. For the algae particle separation process, carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the main greenhouse gases, is dissolved into a body of water rather than being emitted into atmosphere. This study aims at determining the feasibility of CO2 bubbles as an algae particle separation collector in a flotation process and providing useful information for effective algae harvesting by describing optimal operating conditions of dissolved carbon dioxide flotation or dissolved air flotation. The first step is to develop a flotation model for bi-functional activity, algae control and algae harvesting at the same time. A series of model simulations is run to investigate algae particle separation possibilities such as an initial collision-attachment efficiency that depends upon separation characteristics due to an algae life cycle, including: pH, size distribution, zeta potential, cell surface charge, density, electric double layer, alkalinity, and so on. Based on the separation characteristics, conditions required to form flocculation are predicted in order to obtain the optimal flotation efficiency. PMID:24960011

  5. Impact of Sulfur Oxides on Mercury Capture by Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACI, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  6. Particle size distribution and its relationship to black carbon in two urban and one rural site in Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Gramsch, E; Reyes, E; Oyola, P; Ma, Rubio; López, G; Pérez, P; Martínez, R

    2014-07-01

    The size distribution of particles has been studied in three sites in the Metropolitan area of Santiago de Chile in the winter of 2009 and a comparison with black carbon was performed. Two sites are located near busy streets in Santiago and the other site is located in a rural area about 40 km west of Santiago with little influence from vehicles, but large influence from wood burning. The campaign lasted 1 or 2 weeks in each site. We have divided the particle size measurements into four groups (10-39 nm, 40-62 nm, 63-174 nm, and 175-700 nm) in order to compare with the carbon monitor. In the sites near the street, black carbon has a high correlation (R = 0.85) with larger particles (175-700 nm). The correlation decreased when black carbon was compared with smaller particles, having very small correlation with the smallest sizes (10-39 nm). In the rural site, black carbon also has a high correlation (R = 0.86) with larger particles (175-700 nm), but the correlation between black carbon and the finest particles (10-39 nm) decreases to near 0. These measurements are an indication that wood burning does not generate particles smaller than -50 nm. In the urban sites, particle size distribution is peaked toward smaller particles (10-39 nm) only during rush hours, but at other times, particles size distribution is peaked toward larger sizes. When solar radiation was high, evidence of secondary particle formation was seen in the rural site, but not in the urban sites. The correlation between the number of secondary particles and solar radiation was R2 = 0.46, indicating that it there may be other variables that play a role in ultrafine particle formation. Implications: A study of the size distribution of particles and black carbon concentration in two street sites and one rural site shows that in the last site the number of particles ultrafine particles (d < 40 nm) is 10 times lower but the number of larger particles is about 2 times lower. Thus, the rural site has less of

  7. Agglomerates of ultrafine particles of elemental carbon and TiO2 induce generation of lipid mediators in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Speier, I; Dayal, N; Karg, E; Maier, K L; Roth, C; Ziesenis, A; Heyder, J

    2001-01-01

    Agglomerates of ultrafine particles (AUFPs) may cause adverse health effects because of their large surface area. To evaluate physiologic responses of immune cells, we studied whether agglomerates of 77-nm elemental carbon [(EC); specific surface area 750 m2/g] and 21 nm titanium dioxide (TiO(2) particles (specific surface area 50 m(2)/g) affect the release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages (AMs). After 60-min incubation with 1 microg/mL AUFP-EC (corresponding to 7.5 cm(2) particle surface area), canine AMs (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) released arachidonic acid (AA) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) products prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2), thromboxane B(2), and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid but not 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products. AUFP-TiO(2) with a 10-fold higher mass (10 microg/mL) than AUFP-EC, but a similar particle surface area (5 cm(2) also induced AMs to release AA and COX products. Agglomerates of 250 nm TiO(2) particles (specific surface area 6.5 m(2)/g) at 100 microg/mL mass concentration (particle surface area 6.5 cm(2) showed the same response. Interestingly, 75 cm(2)/mL surface area of AUFP-EC and 16 cm(2)/mL surface area of AUFP-TiO(2) additionally induced the release of the 5-LO products leukotriene B(4) and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Respiratory burst activity of stimulated canine neutrophils was partially suppressed by supernatants of AMs treated with various mass concentrations of the three types of particles. Inhibition of neutrophil activity was abolished by supernatants of AMs treated with COX inhibitors prior to AUFP-incubation. This indicates that anti-inflammatory properties of PGE(2) dominate the overall response of lipid mediators released by AUFP-affected AMs. In conclusion, our data indicate that surface area rather than mass concentration determines the effect of AUFPs, and that activation of phospholipase A(subscript)2(/subscript) and COX pathway occurs at a lower particle surface area than that of 5-LO-pathway. We hypothesize a

  8. Coherent coexistence of nanodiamonds and carbon onions in icosahedral core-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir Ya. Madison, Alexey E.; Mackay, Alan L.

    2007-03-01

    In icosahedral carbon nanoparticles, the diamond-like core can undergo a reversible topological transition into and coexist coherently with the onion shells. The general approach for describing and designing complex hierarchical icosahedral structures is discussed. Structural models of icosahedral carbon nanoparticles in which the local arrangement of atoms is virtually identical to that in diamond are derived. It is shown that icosahedral diamond-like particles can be transformed into onion-like shell structures (and vice versa) by the consecutive smoothing (puckering) of atomic networks without disturbance of their topological integrity. The possibility of coherent coexistence of icosahedral diamond-like core with onion shells is shown.

  9. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction. PMID:24020801

  10. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  11. Preparation and study on microwave absorbing materials of boron nitride coated pyrolytic carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Xiao, Peng; Li, Yang

    2012-09-01

    Boron nitride coatings were synthesized on pyrolytic carbon (BN-coated PyC) particles via chemical reaction of boric acid and urea in nitrogen. The results of Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FI-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show the formation of boron nitride coating. The TGA curves indicate that the oxidation resistance of the PyC particles is improved by incorporating BN coating on the surface. The mass of the BN-coated PyC particles remains over 60% at 1200 °C whereas the PyC particles are oxidized completely at 920 °C. The investigation of microwave absorbing property reveals that compared with the PyC particles, the BN-coated PyC particles have lower permittivity (ɛ', ɛ″) and better absorbing property. The BN-coated PyC particles show a strong absorbing peak at 10.64 GHz, where the lowest reflectivity -21.72 dB is reached. And the reflectivity less than -10 dB is over the range of 9.6-12 GHz.

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  13. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  14. Purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes by using ultrafine gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihey, Fumiyuki; Mizoguti, Eiji; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kazuo

    2000-03-01

    The purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is needed to enable detailed characterization and some application of this material. We report a purification method utilizing ultrafine gold particles as catalysts to selectively oxidize carbonaceous impurities in SWNT soot. The ultrafine gold particles with a diameter of 20 nm were dispersed in the soot in combination with benzalkonium chloride as surfactant. Thermogravimetric analyses and electron microscopy observations revealed that oxidation occured at about 330^circC for carbonaceous impurities and at about 410^circC for SWNTs. This selective oxidation enabled us to purify SWNTs and make the quantitative analyses of SWNTs.

  15. Passive vibration damping of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with PZT particles and SMA powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Woo Il; Lee, Dasom; Park, Sungho; Moon, Sungnam

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) has been used various industrial fields, because of high strength, light weight, corrosion resistance and other properties. In this study, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles which is one of typical piezoelectric material and shape memory alloy powder dispersed in CFRP laminate in order to improve the vibration damping by dissipating vibration energy quickly. The loss factor (tanδ) is measured in Dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) which is used to measure the viscoelastic behavior of a material to verify the change in vibration damping. The results show that there exists difference on vibration damping ability between CFRP with PZT ceramic particles and CFRP with SMA powder.

  16. DUSTER: collection of meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles in the upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Ferrari, M.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-04-01

    Nanometer CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38-km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval), a balloon-borne instrument for the non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 microns. We report the collection of micron sized CaCO3 (calcite) grains. Their morphologies show evidence of melting and condensation after vaporization suggest at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. The formation environment of the collected grains was probably a dense dust cloud formed by the disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Reprocessing of used tires into activated carbon and other products

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, H.; Serio, M.A.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    Landfilling used tires which are generated each year in the US is increasingly becoming an unacceptable solution. A better approach, from an environmental and economic standpoint, is to thermally reprocess the tires into valuable products such as activated carbon, other solid carbon forms (carbon black, graphite, and carbon fibers), and liquid fuels. In this study, high surface area activated carbons (> 800 m{sup 2}/g solid product) were produced in relatively high yields by pyrolysis of tires at up to 900 C, followed by activation in CO{sub 2} at the same temperature. The surface areas of these materials are comparable with those of commercial activated carbons. The efficiency of the activation process (gain in specific surface area/loss in mass) was greatest (up to 138 m{sup 2}/g original tire) when large pieces of tire material were used ({approximately} 170 mg). Oxygen pretreatment of tires was found to enhance both the yield and the surface area of the carbon product. High-pressure treatment of tires at low temperatures (< 400 C) is an alternative approach if the recovery of carbon black or fuel oils is the primary objective.

  18. Measurements of meteor smoke particles during the ECOMA-2006 campaign: 1. Particle detection by active photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Markus; Strelnikova, Irina

    2009-03-01

    We present a new design of an in situ detector for the study of meteor smoke particles (MSPs) in the middle atmosphere. This detector combines a classical Faraday cup with a xenon-flashlamp for the active photoionization/photodetachment of MSPs and the subsequent detection of corresponding photoelectrons. This instrument was successfully launched in September 2006 from the Andøya Rocket Range in Northern Norway. A comparison of photocurrents measured during this rocket flight and measurements performed in the laboratory proves that observed signatures are truly due to photoelectrons. In addition, the observed altitude cut-off at 60 km (i.e., no signals were observed below this altitude) is fully understood in terms of the mean free path of the photoelectrons in the ambient atmosphere. This interpretation is also proven by a corresponding laboratory experiment. Consideration of all conceivable species which can be ionized by the photons of the xenon-flashlamp demonstrates that only MSPs can quantitatively explain the measured currents below an altitude of 90 km. Above this altitude, measured photocurrents are most likely due to photoionization of nitric oxide. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the active photoionization and subsequent detection of photoelectrons provides a promising new tool for the study of MSPs in the middle atmosphere. Importantly, this new technique does not rely on the a priori charge of the particles, neither is the accessible particle size range severely limited by aerodynamical effects. Based on the analysis described in this study, the geophysical interpretation of our measurements is presented in the companion paper by Strelnikova, I., et al. [2008. Measurements of meteor smoke particles during the ECOMA-2006 campaign: 2. results. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.011].

  19. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems.

    PubMed

    Steimel, Joshua P; Aragones, Juan L; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-04-26

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  20. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg−1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg−1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  1. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg‑1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  2. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  3. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  4. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  5. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μm

  6. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  7. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  8. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  9. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption. PMID:19576692

  10. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  11. The role of destabilization of palladium hydride on the hydrogen uptake of Pd-containing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on differences in stability of Pd hydride phases in palladium particles with various degrees of contact with microporous carbon supports. A sample containing Pd embedded in activated carbon fiber (Pd-ACF; 2 wt% Pd) was compared with commercial Pd nanoparticles deposited on microporous activated carbon (Pd-catalyst, 3 wt% Pd) and with support-free nanocrystalline palladium (Pd-black). The morphology of materials was characterized by electron microscopy, and the phase transformations were analyzed over a large range of hydrogen partial pressures (0.003 - 10 bar) and at several temperatures using in-situ X-ray diffraction. The results were verified with volumetric hydrogen uptake measurements. Results indicate that higher degree of Pd-carbon contacts for Pd particles embedded in a microporous carbon matrix induce efficient pumping of hydrogen out of -PdHx. It was also found that thermal cleaning of carbon surface groups prior to exposure to hydrogen further enhances the hydrogen pumping power of the microporous carbon support. In brief, this study highlights that the stability of -PdHx phase supported on carbon depends on the degree of contact between Pd-carbon and the nature of the carbon surface.

  12. Online single particle measurements of black carbon coatings, structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, James; Liu, Dantong; Taylor, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael; Williams, Paul; Morgan, William; Whitehead, James; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of black carbon on meteorology and climate remain a major source of uncertainty, owing in part to the complex relationship between the bulk composition of the particulates and their optical properties. A particular complication stems from how light interacts with particles in response to the microphysical configuration and any 'coatings', i.e. non-black carbon material that is either co-emitted or subsequently obtained through atmospheric processing. This may cause the particle to more efficiently absorb or scatter light and may even change the sign of its radiative forcing potential. While much insight has been gained through measurements of bulk aerosol properties, either while suspended or after collection on a filter or impactor substrate, this does not provide a complete picture and thus may not adequately constrain the system. Here we present an overview of recent work to better constrain the properties of black carbon using online, in situ measurements of single particles, primarily using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We have developed novel methods of inverting the data produced and combining the different metrics derived so as to give the most effective insights into black carbon sources, processes and properties. We have also used this measurement in conjunction with other instruments (sometimes in series) and used the data to challenge many commonly used models of optical properties such as core-shell Mie, Rayleigh-Debeye-Gans and effective medium. This work has been carried out in a variety of atmospheric environments and with laboratory-produced soots, e.g. from a diesel engine rig. Highlights include the finding that with real-world atmospheric aerosols, bulk optical measurements may be insufficient to derive brown carbon parameters without detailed morphological data. We also show that the enhancement of absorption for both ambient and laboratory generated particles only occurs after the coating mass fraction reaches a certain

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; George Alexander

    2004-11-15

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates, and the overall reaction being exothermic. However, the primary drawback to mineral carbonation is the reaction kinetics. To accelerate the reaction, aqueous carbonation processes are preferred, where the minerals are firstly dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface controlled. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, the serpentine can be ground to very fine particle size (<37 {micro}m), but this is a very energy intensive process. Alternatively, magnesium could be chemically extracted in aqueous solution. Phase I showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve the magnesium from the serpentine minerals (particle size {approx}100 {micro}m), and furthermore, the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 650 psig) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >1850 psig and <37 {micro}m particle size. Phase I also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature leaving amorphous SiO{sub 2} with surface areas {approx} 330m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of Phase 2 of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process developed in Phase I in order to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. During the current reporting period, Task 1 ''Mineral activation'' was initiated and focused on a parametric study to optimize the operation conditions for the mineral activation, where serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted, as following the results from Phase 1. Several experimental factors were outlined as having a potential influence on the mineral activation. This study has focused to date on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle

  14. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  15. Orientation control of liquid crystals using carbon-nanotube-magnetic particle hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Youn, Sang Cheon; Kim, Yun Ho; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-06-28

    We have developed a simple yet versatile method for aligning liquid crystals (LCs) by using magnetic-field oriented single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that were modified with magnetic particles. A high degree of homeotropic/planar LC alignment was achieved by SWNTs being exposed to a very low strength magnetic field, combined with strong π-π interactions between the biphenyl group in the LCs and the wall of the SWNTs. PMID:23676827

  16. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  17. Precompaction irradiation effects: Particles from an early active sun?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffee, M. W.; Goswami, J. N.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Swindle, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two recent studies have shown that solar flare irradiated grains from Murchison and Kapoeta have excess spallogenic Ne-21 compared to unirradiated grains, indicating large precompaction particle irradiation effects. The quantity of cosmogenic neon in these grains presents serious difficulties for either galactic cosmic ray or normal solar flare sources. In the first study it was suggested that the effect might be the result of exposure to an early active sun. The more recent experiment both confirms the earlier results and provides constraints on the characteristic energy spectrum on the irradiation. The first results were obtained from Murchison olivines and Kapoeta pyroxenes by mass spectrometric analysis of sets of grains selected on the basis of the presence or absence of solar flare particle tracks. In the second work plagioclase feldspar grains from Kapoeta were studied.

  18. Activated carbons from North Dakota lignite and leonardite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Olson, E.S.; Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-01

    In a research and development program on carbon development, the EERC investigated key factors in the preparation of activated carbons from low-rank coals indigenous to North Dakota. The carbons were prepared for potential sorption applications with flue gas and waste liquid streams. Testing involved as-received, physically cleaned, and demineralized samples of a lignite and a leonardite. The following variables were examined: mineral matter content (7-19 wt%), carbonization temperature (350{degrees}-550{degrees}C), activation temperature (700{degrees}-1000{degrees}C), and activation time (10-60 minutes). Activated carbon samples were characterized by sorption of gaseous sulfur dioxide and liquid iodine. For both lignite and leonardite, sorption activity increased with lower mineral content and correlated with medium carbonization temperature and relatively high activation temperature but relatively short activation time. Steam activation did not significantly enhance the char`s sorptive capacity. Physically cleaned leonardite char had SO{sub 2} sorptive capacities as high as 10.9% of the sample weight at ambient temperatures.

  19. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A MOBILE ACTIVATED CARBON REGENERATOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activated carbon adsorption has become a standard procedure for the cleanup of contaminated water streams. To facilitate such cleanup at hazardous waste and spill sites, mobile carbon adsorption units have been constructed and are now in use. Their primary drawback is the logisti...

  20. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  1. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  2. The importance of gradients in particle activity during sediment transport: Insights from a probabilistic description of particle motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment particles transported by rainsplash, by bioturbation, and as bedload in turbulent flows, undergo motions that are quasi-random in magnitude and direction. Moreover, these motions characteristically are intermittent, in that particles are mostly at rest most of the time, and heterogeneous, in that the volumetric or areal concentration of particles in motion at any instant is spatially patchy. These particle motions can be formulated as a stochastic processes involving both advective and dispersive parts. By taking into account the intermittent activity of particles, and separating this activity from the physics of motion in the parametric description of transport, the formulation indicates that gradients in particle activity can have a key role in transport. The formulation illustrates, for example, how the growth of soil mounds beneath desert shrubs involves differential rainsplash that initially causes more grains to be splashed inward beneath protective shrub canopies than outward. This ‘harvesting' of nearby soil material, including nutrients, means that shrubs locally participate in regulating the rate sediment transport down a hillslope. With soil bioturbation, spatial variations in the disturbance frequency strongly influence the mixing of soil constituents, including distinct particle fractions (such as specific size or mineral fractions, seeds, or debitage), or elements and compounds adsorbed to particles. The formulation also provides a probabilistic version of the Exner equation. During bedload transport, gradients in particle activity, through both advective and dispersive effects, may contribute importantly to the local divergence of the particle flux, thereby influencing initial bedform growth.

  3. Textural and electronic characteristics of mechanochemically activated composites with nanosilica and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Zaulychnyy, Ya. V.; Ilkiv, B. I.; Zarko, V. I.; Nychiporuk, Yu. M.; Pakhlov, E. M.; Ptushinskii, Yu. G.; Leboda, R.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.

    2011-11-01

    Nanosilicas (A-50, A-300, A-500)/activated carbon (AC, SBET = 1520 m2/g) composites were prepared using short-term (5 min) mechanochemical activation (MCA) of powder mixtures in a microbreaker. Smaller silica nanoparticles of A-500 (average diameter dav = 5.5 nm) can more easily penetrate into broad mesopores and macropores of AC microparticles than larger nanoparticles of A-50 (dav = 52.4 nm) or A-300 (dav = 8.1 nm). After MCA of silica/AC, nanopores of non-broken AC nanoparticles remained accessible for adsorbed N2 molecules. According to ultra-soft X-ray emission spectra (USXES), MCA of silica/AC caused formation of chemical bonds Si-O-C; however, Si-C and Si-Si bonds were practically not formed. A decrease in intensity of OKα band in respect to CKα band of silica/AC composites with diminishing sizes of silica nanoparticles is due to both changes in the surface structure of particles and penetration of a greater number of silica nanoparticles into broad pores of AC microparticles and restriction of penetration depth of exciting electron beam into the AC particles.

  4. Energy loss of tens keV charged particles traveling in the hot dense carbon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, ZhenGuo; Wang, ZhiGang; He, Bin; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The energy loss of charged particles, including electrons, protons, and α-particles with tens keV initial energy E 0, traveling in the hot dense carbon (C) plasma for densities from 2.281 to 22.81 g/cm3 and temperatures from 400 to 1500 eV is systematically and quantitatively studied by using the dimensional continuation method. The behaviors of different charged particles are readily distinguishable from each other. Firstly, because an ion is thousands times heavier than an electron, the penetration distance of the electron is much longer than that of proton and α-particle traveling in the plasma. Secondly, most energy of electron projectile with E 0 < 100 keV deposits into the electron species of C plasma, while for the cases of proton and α-particle with E 0 < 100 keV, about more than half energy transfers into the ion species of C plasma. A simple decreasing law of the penetration distance as a function of the plasma density is fitted, and different behaviors of each projectile particle can be clearly found from the fitted data. We believe that with the advanced progress of the present experimental technology, the findings shown here could be confirmed in ion-stopping experiments in the near future.

  5. Particle number scaling for diffusion-induced dissipation in graphene and carbon nanotube nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhén, Christin; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    When a contaminant diffuses on the surface of a nanomechanical resonator, the motions of the two become correlated. Despite being a high-order effect in the resonator-particle coupling, such correlations affect the system dynamics by inducing dissipation of the resonator energy. Here, we consider this diffusion-induced dissipation in the cases of multiple particles adsorbed on carbon nanotube and graphene resonators. By solving the stochastic equations of motion, we simulate the ringdown of the resonator, in order to determine the resonator energy decay rate. We find two different scalings with the number of adsorbed particles K and particle mass m . In the regime where the adsorbates are inertially trapped at an antinode of vibration, the dissipation rate Γ scales with the total adsorbed mass Γ ∝K m . In contrast, in the regime where particles diffuse freely over the resonator, the dissipation rate scales as the product of the total adsorbed mass and the individual particle mass: Γ ∝K m2 .

  6. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  7. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  8. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  9. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content. PMID:23962383

  10. Biocompatible Label-Free Detection of Carbon Black Particles by Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bové, Hannelore; Steuwe, Christian; Fron, Eduard; Slenders, Eli; D'Haen, Jan; Fujita, Yasuhiko; Uji-I, Hiroshi; vandeVen, Martin; Roeffaers, Maarten; Ameloot, Marcel

    2016-05-11

    Although adverse health effects of carbon black (CB) exposure are generally accepted, a direct, label-free approach for detecting CB particles in fluids and at the cellular level is still lacking. Here, we report nonincandescence related white-light (WL) generation by dry and suspended carbon black particles under illumination with femtosecond (fs) pulsed near-infrared light as a powerful tool for the detection of these carbonaceous materials. This observation is done for four different CB species with diameters ranging from 13 to 500 nm, suggesting this WL emission under fs near-infrared illumination is a general property of CB particles. As the emitted radiation spreads over the whole visible spectrum, detection is straightforward and flexible. The unique property of the described WL emission allows optical detection and unequivocal localization of CB particles in fluids and in cellular environments while simultaneously colocalizing different cellular components using various specific fluorophores as shown here using human lung fibroblasts. The experiments are performed on a typical multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy platform, widely available in research laboratories. PMID:27104759

  11. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: -26.2‰ to -23.5‰, avg. -25.2 ± 0.9‰), approaching those of the airborne pollen (-28.0‰) collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C). Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  13. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  14. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  15. PREDICTING PREFERENTIAL ADSORPTION OF ORGANICS BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferential adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was studied to develop a comprehensive theoretical basis for predicting adsorption of multicomponent solutes. The research program investigates why some solutes are strong adsorbers, ...

  16. A strain sensor based on an aligned carbon particle string in a UV-cured polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyer, H.; Knaapila, M.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, J.; Liu, X.; Helgesen, G.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate micro-mechanical strain sensors by aligning carbon black particles into single wirelike strings in a polymer matrix using an alternating electric field (dielectrophoresis) when the particle fraction is 0.1 vol. %. The strings are stabilized by UV-curing the polymer matrix and characterized electrically and electromechanically. Particle alignment makes the material conductive, and the stretching of such strings in polymer matrices gives a reversible change in resistivity. A gauge factor of about 150 is demonstrated. Nonaligned films containing 12 vol. % of carbon particles in the same polymer are conductive but not sensitive to similar stretching.

  17. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  18. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  19. Optimization of membrane bioreactors by the addition of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choon Aun; Sun, Darren; Bashir, Mohammed J K; Wai, Soon Han; Wong, Ling Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Wu, Bing; Fane, Anthony G

    2013-06-01

    It was found that with replenishment, powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) would develop biologically activated carbon (BAC) which could enhance filtration performance of a conventional MBR. This paper addresses two issues (i) effect of PAC size on MBR (BAC) performance; and (ii) effect of sludge retention time (SRT) on the MBR performance with and without PAC. To interpret the trends, particle/floc size, concentration of mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS), total organic carbon (TOC), short-term filtration properties and transmembrane pressure (TMP) versus time are measured. The results showed improved fouling control with fine, rather than coarse, PAC provided the flux did not exceed the deposition flux for the fine PAC. Without PAC, the longer SRT operation gave lower fouling at modest fluxes. With PAC addition, the shorter SRT gave better fouling control, possibly due to greater replenishment of the fresh PAC. PMID:23612160

  20. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  1. Effects of CO 2 activation on porous structures of coconut shell-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shenghui; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Kunbin; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shimin; Xia, Hongying

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, textural characterization of an activated carbon derived from carbonized coconut shell char obtained at carbonization temperature of 600 °C for 2 h by CO 2 activation was investigated. The effects of activation temperature, activation time and flow rate of CO 2 on the BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield of activated carbons prepared were evaluated systematically. The results showed that: (i) enhancing activation temperature was favorable to the formation of pores, widening of pores and an increase in mesopores; (ii) increasing activation time was favorable to the formation of micropores and mesopores, and longer activation time would result in collapsing of pores; (iii) increasing flow rate of CO 2 was favorable to the reactions of all active sites and formation of pores, further increasing flow rate of CO 2 would lead carbon to burn out and was unfavorable to the formation of pores. The degree of surface roughness of activated carbon prepared was measured by the fractal dimension which was calculated by FHH (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill) theory. The fractal dimensions of activated carbons prepared were greater than 2.6, indicating the activated carbon samples prepared had very irregular structures, and agreed well with those of average micropore size.

  2. Characterization and Control of Airborne Particles Emitted During Production of Epoxy / Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    This work characterized airborne particles that were generated from the weighing of bulk, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratiô1). The particles generated during sanding were predominately micron-sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator’s breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m3) compared to those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m3; p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  3. Characterization and control of airborne particles emitted during production of epoxy/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    This work characterized airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratio ∼1). The particles generated during sanding were predominantly micron sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m(3) compared with those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m(3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m(3); p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  4. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  5. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  6. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  7. [Comparison of Monitoring Methods of Organic Carbon and Element Carbon in Atmospheric Fine Particles].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Ji, Dong-sheng; Liu, Zi-rui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yue-si

    2016-04-15

    Accurate measurement of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in atmospheric fine particulate is an important scientific basis for studying the formation and source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol. The selection of different analysis programs will lead to difference in the OC and EC concentrations, and further result in the misjudgment of the results. The OC and EC concentrations observed using three temperature protocols including RT-Quartz ( R) , NIOSH 5040 (N) and Fast-TC (F) were compared and analyzed in combination with the degree of air pollution in Beijing. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the TC (TC = OC + EC), OC and EC concentrations observed using R, N and F protocols and certain deviation was found among the TC (TC = OC + EC) , OC and EC concentrations. For TC, the results observed using R protocol were 5% lower than those using N protocol; hut 1% higher than those using F protocol. For OC, the results obtained using R were 9% lower than those using N protocol and 1% higher than those using F protocol. For EC, the results obtained using R were 20% higher than those using N protocol and 11% lower than those using F protocol. The variation coefficients for TC, OC and EC obtained based on R protocol were less than the other two temperature protocols under different air quality degrees. The slopes of regression curves of TC, OC and EC between on-line analysis using R protocol and off-line analysis were 1.21,1. 14 and 1.35, respectively. The correlation coefficients of TC, OC and EC were 0.99, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. In contrast with the Black carbon ( BC) concentrations monitored by multi-angle absorption spectrophotometer (MAAP), the EC concentrations measured by on-line OC/EC analyzer using R protocol were obviously lower. When the BC concentrations were less than or equal to 8 gg*m3, the EC/BC ratio was 0.39. While the EC/BC ratio was 0.88, when the BC concentrations were greater than 8 ggm3. The variation

  8. Springtime carbon episodes at Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate the carbon episodes at Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia during spring of 2007 and 2008, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The carbon episodes at the Gosan site were categorized as long-range transported anthropogenic pollutant (LTP) from Asian continent, Asian dust (AD) accompanying with LTP, and local pollen episodes. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during the pollen episodes (range: -26.2 ‰ to -23.5 ‰, avg.: -25.2 ± 0.9 ‰), followed by the LTP episodes (range: -23.5 ‰ to -23.0 ‰, avg.: -23.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and the AD episodes (range: -23.3 to -20.4 %, avg.: -21.8 ± 2.0 ‰). The δ13CTC of the airborne pollens (-28.0 ‰) collected at the Gosan site showed value similar to that of tangerine fruit (-28.1 ‰) produced from Jeju Island. Based on the carbon isotope mass balance equation and the TN and TC regression approach, we found that ∼40-45 % of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollens from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. The δ13C of citric acid in the airborne pollens (-26.3 ‰) collected at the Gosan site was similar to that in tangerine fruit (-27.4 ‰). The negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC were obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollens and then transported to the Gosan site. Based on the thermal evolution pattern of organic aerosols during the carbon episodes, we found that organic aerosols originated from East China are more volatile on heating and are more likely to form pyrolized organic carbon than the pollen-enriched organic aerosols and organic

  9. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  10. An Auger electron spectroscopy study of the activation of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. II. Carbon monoxide activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G. ); Datye, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Activation procedures can have a dramatic effect on the activity of iron-based catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. CO conversion over a 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst (parts by weight) can vary by nearly a factor of 3, depending on activation treatment. In contrast, a 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst displays little dependence of F-T activity on activation treatment. An ultra-high vacuum surface analysis chamber coupled to an atmospheric reactor has been used to measure the surface composition of these catalysts following activation in carbon monoxide at 280[degrees]C, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and BET surface area measurements have been used to investigate catalyst morphology. CO activation of the 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO[sub 2] catalyst at 280[degrees]C results in partial reduction of iron to a mixture of Fe[sub x]O and Fe[sub 3]O[sub 4], and an overall surface composition very similar to that obtained following hydrogen activation at 220 or 280[degrees]C, consistent with the invariance of F-T activity with activation treatment for this catalyst. Activation of the 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst in CO at 280[degrees]C results in the formation of iron carbide particles, growth of graphitic carbon (C[sub g]) filaments, and formation of a thick, porous, C[sub g] layer covering the carbide particles. Differences in F-T activity between the hydrogen- and CO-activated 100 Fe/3 Cu/0.2 K catalyst are discussed in terms of surface composition and catalyst morphology. The difference in sensitivity of the two catalysts to activation conditions is related to differences in the extent of reduction of the catalysts. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  12. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  13. Characterization of carbon fractions for atmospheric fine particles and nanoparticles in a highway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chong-Shu; Chen, Cheng-Chieh; Cao, Jun-Ji; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Liu, Shaw-Chen; Roam, Gwo-Dong

    2010-07-01

    Fine particles (PM 2.5) and nanoparticles (PM 0.1) were sampled using Dichotomous sampler and MOUDI, respectively, in Xueshan Tunnel, Taiwan. Eight carbon fractions were analyzed using IMPROVE thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) method. The concentrations of different temperature carbon fractions (OC1-OC4, EC1-EC3) in both PM 2.5 and PM 0.1 were measured and the correlations between OC and EC were discussed. Results showed that the ratios of OC/EC were 1.26 and 0.67 for PM 2.5 and PM 0.1, respectively. The concentration of EC1 was found to be more abundant than other elemental carbon fractions in PM 2.5, while the most abundant EC fraction in PM 0.1 was found to be EC2. The variation of contributions for elemental carbon fractions was different among PM 2.5 and PM 0.1 samples, which was partly owing to the metal catalysts for soot oxidation. The correlations between char-EC and soot-EC showed that char-EC dominated EC in PM 2.5 while soot-EC dominated EC in PM 0.1. Using eight individual carbon fractions, the gasoline and diesel source profiles of PM 0.1 and PM 2.5 were extracted and analyzed with the positive matrix factorization (PMF) method.

  14. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions. PMID:24978345

  15. Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    George Alexander; Parvana Aksoy; John Andresen; Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-14

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, <37 {micro}m, but this is a very energy-intensive process. Previous work in our laboratory showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve magnesium from the serpentine (of particle size {approx} 100 {micro}m) and that the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 4.6 MPa) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >13 MPa, and <37 {micro}m particle size. This work also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature, leaving an amorphous silica with surface area of about 330 m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation

  16. Microfluidic rheology of active particle suspensions: Kinetic theory.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Matilla, Roberto; Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the effective rheology of a dilute suspension of self-propelled slender particles confined between two infinite parallel plates and subject to a pressure-driven flow. We use a continuum kinetic model to describe the configuration of the particles in the system, in which the disturbance flows induced by the swimmers are taken into account, and use it to calculate estimates of the suspension viscosity for a range of channel widths and flow strengths typical of microfluidic experiments. Our results are in agreement with previous bulk models, and in particular, demonstrate that the effect of activity is strongest at low flow rates, where pushers tend to decrease the suspension viscosity whereas pullers enhance it. In stronger flows, dissipative stresses overcome the effects of activity leading to increased viscosities followed by shear-thinning. The effects of confinement and number density are also analyzed, and our results confirm the apparent transition to superfluidity reported in recent experiments on pusher suspensions at intermediate densities. We also derive an approximate analytical expression for the effective viscosity in the limit of weak flows and wide channels, and demonstrate good agreement between theory and numerical calculations. PMID:27375827

  17. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    PubMed Central

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ −10 °C (INPs−10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  18. State of mixture of atmospheric submicrometer black carbon particles and its effect on particulate light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Heintzenberg, Jost; Okada, Kikuo; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Zaizen, Yuji; Kobayashi, Eriko; Yamazaki, Akihiro

    The state of mixture of light-absorbing carbonaceous particles was investigated in relation to light absorption properties using electron microscopic examinations, black carbon (BC) analyses of quartz filter by thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method, measurements with two continuous light-absorbing photometers at a suburban site of Tsukuba, about 60 km northeast of Tokyo. The volume fraction of water-soluble material ( ɛ) in individual particles is important for assessing particulate light-absorbing and/or scattering of atmospheric aerosols. The values of ɛ in BC particles were evaluated by electron micrographs before and after dialysis (extraction) of water-soluble material. The mass absorption coefficient (MAC in units of m 2 g -1) tended to increase with increasing the average ɛ in BC particles with the radius range of 0.05-0.5 μm. Thus, our results indicate that coatings of water-soluble material around BC particles can enhance the absorption of solar radiation. Moreover, the single scattering albedo (SSA) will increase because a large amount of coating material will scatter more light.

  19. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  20. Detecting Extracellular Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Using Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Delacruz, Joannalyn; Mikulski, Rose; Tu, Chingkuang; Li, Ying; Wang, Hai; Shiverick, Kathleen T.; Frost, Susan C.; Horenstein, Nicole A.; Silverman, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Current research into the function of carbonic anhydrases in cell physiology emphasizes the role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases, such as carbonic anhydrase IX that has been identified in malignant tumors and is associated with extracellular acidification as a response to hypoxia. We present here a mass spectrometric method to determine the extent to which total carbonic anhydrase activity is due to extracellular carbonic anhydrase in whole cell preparations. The method is based on the biphasic rate of depletion of 18O from CO2 measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. The slopes of the biphasic depletion are a sensitive measure of the presence of carbonic anhydrase outside and inside of the cells. This property is demonstrated here using suspensions of human red cells in which external carbonic anhydrase was added to the suspending solution. It is also applied to breast and prostate cancer cells which both express exofacial carbonic anhydrase IX. Inhibition of external carbonic anhydrase is achieved by use of a membrane impermeant inhibitor that was synthesized for this purpose, p-aminomethylbenzenesulfonamide attached to a polyethyleneglycol polymer. PMID:20417171

  1. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or

  2. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; van Benthem, Klaus; Li, Sa; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Pennycook, Stephen J; Jena, Puru; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by meltspinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an organometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 oC and 20 bar on Pd- ACF exceeded the expected capacity based solely on Pd hydride formation and hydrogen physisorption on the microporous carbon support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub- ngstrom spatial resolution provided unambiguous identification of isolated Pd atoms occurring in the carbon matrix that coexist with larger Pd particles. First principles calculations revealed that each single Pd atom can form Kubas-type complexes by binding up to three H2 molecules in the pressure range of adsorption measurements. Based on Pd atom concentration determined from STEM images, the contribution of various mechanisms to the excess hydrogen uptake measured experimentally was evaluated. With consideration of Kubas binding as a viable mechanism (along with hydride formation and physisorption to carbon support) the role of hydrogen spillover in this system may be smaller than previously thought.

  3. Markedly enhanced direct radiative forcing of black carbon particles under polluted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Liming; Shao, Min; Wu, Yusheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles, produced from incomplete fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have profound impacts on air quality, human health, weather, and climate. For example, in areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many urban centers and megacities worldwide, solar heating by BC particles has been shown to be comparable to warming due to the greenhouse gases2. Although BC represents a key short-lived climate forcer, its direct radiative forcing remains highly uncertain. In particular, the available results of absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging are conflicting from the previous studies, leading to a large uncertainty in global radiative transfer calculation. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China and Houston, US, using a novel chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages - initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and the subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a maximum absorption enhancement factor of 2.4. The variation in BC direct radiative forcing is highly dependent of the rate and timescale of aging, with an estimated increase of 0.45 (0.21 - 0.80) W m-2 from fresh to fully aged particles. Our results reveal a high climatic impact in polluted environments due to rapid aging and a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries for BC particles, highlighting a larger than recognized co-benefit in air quality improvement and climate protection by BC mediation.

  4. Mechanism of Methylene Blue adsorption on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube particles.

    PubMed

    Manilo, Maryna; Lebovka, Nikolai; Barany, Sandor

    2016-04-01

    The kinetics of adsorption and parameters of equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue (MB) on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube (NT) particles in aqueous suspensions were determined. The laponite platelets were used in order to facilitate disaggregation of NTs in aqueous suspensions and enhance the adsorption capacity of hybrid particles for MB. Experiments were performed at room temperature (298K), and the laponite/NT ratio (Xl) was varied in the range of 0-0.5. For elucidation of the mechanism of MB adsorption on hybrid particles, the electrical conductivity of the system as well as the electrokinetic potential of laponite-NT hybrid particles were measured. Three different stages in the kinetics of adsorption of MB on the surface of NTs or hybrid laponite-NT particles were discovered to be a fast initial stage I (adsorption time t=0-10min), a slower intermediate stage II (up to t=120min) and a long-lasting final stage III (up to t=24hr). The presence of these stages was explained accounting for different types of interactions between MB and adsorbent particles, as well as for the changes in the structure of aggregates of NT particles and the long-range processes of restructuring of laponite platelets on the surface of NTs. The analysis of experimental data on specific surface area versus the value of Xl evidenced in favor of the model with linear contacts between rigid laponite platelets and NTs. It was also concluded that electrostatic interactions control the first stage of adsorption at low MB concentrations. PMID:27090704

  5. Carbon mineralization in two ultisols amended with different sources and particle sizes of pyrolyzed biochar.

    PubMed

    Sigua, G C; Novak, J M; Watts, D W; Cantrell, K B; Shumaker, P D; Szögi, A A; Johnson, M G

    2014-05-01

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g., particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal information on the potential effects of biochar particle sizes on their breakdowns by soil microorganism, so it is unknown if the particle size of biochar influences C mineralization rate and/or stability in soils. In order to evaluate the effect of different sources (BS) and particle sizes (BF) of biochar on C loss and/or stability in soils, an incubation study on C mineralization of different biochar sources and particle sizes was established using two soils (ST): Norfolk soil (fine loamy, kaolinitic, thermic, typic Kandiudults) and Coxville soil (fine loamy kaolinitic, thermic, Paleaquults). In separate incubation vessels, these soils were amended with one of two manure-based biochars (poultry litters, PL; swine solids, SS) or one of two lignocellulosic-based biochars (switchgrass, SG; pine chips, PC) which were processed into two particle sizes (dust, <0.42 mm; pellet, >2 mm). The amount of CO2 evolved varied significantly between soils (p≤0.0001); particle sizes (p≤0.0001) and the interactions of biochar source (p≤0.001) and forms of biochars (p≤0.0001) with soil types. Averaged across soils and sources of biochar, CO2-C evolved from dust-sized biochar (281 mg kg(-1)) was significantly higher than pellet-sized biochar (226 mg kg(-1)). Coxville soils with SS biochar produced the greatest average CO2-C of 428 mg kg(-1) and Norfolk soils with PC had the lowest CO2-C production (93 mg kg(-1)). Measured rates of carbon mineralization also varied with soils and sources of biochar (Norfolk: PL>SS>SG≥PC; Coxville: PC>SG>SS>PL). The average net CO2-C evolved from the Coxville soils (385 mg kg(-1)) was about threefold more than the CO2-C evolved from the Norfolk soils (123 mg kg(-1)). Our

  6. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  7. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4 : 1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations. PMID:20945969

  8. Investigation of unburned carbon particles in fly ash by means of laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R. Q.; Morlacchi, R.; Calabria, R.; Massoli, P.

    2011-02-01

    A new optical method to determine the percentage of unburned carbon particles in fly ash from combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The technique exploits the different properties of particles of ash and coal in the elastic scattering of polarized light. The polarization measurements were performed using a linearly polarized laser source and a receiving system able to simultaneously detect the scattered radiation polarized in parallel and orthogonal planes, under the scattering angle of 60°. The parallel and perpendicular components of the scattered light intensities are measured in order to determine the polarization ratio. The operation of the system was tested under various conditions using monodisperse glass spheres. The performance of the novel device was assessed in several sets of measurements with samples of fly ash produced from coal fired power plants. A correlation between the relative content of coal and ashes and the polarization ratio of scattered light was demonstrated. The resulting polarization ratio showed values ranging from 1.25 to 0.94 for a carbon content of 1.17 wt% and 16.3 wt%, respectively. The uncertainty on the measured percentage of unburned carbon was about 1%. The proposed device represents an attractive tool for monitoring real-time burnout and combustion efficiency.

  9. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir S.; Milutinović, Svetlana; Marinov, Irina; Cabré, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth system models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing methods to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 µm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 µm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 µm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e., oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have high biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global climatological, spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield ˜ 0.25 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms and several state-of-the-art Earth system models. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass

  10. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  11. Activated carbon amendment for in-situ remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmquist, M.; Brändli, R.; Henriksen, T.; Hartnik, T.; Cornelissen, G.

    2009-04-01

    easy technique that can be performed to a relatively low cost. However, the AC particles may also sorb other constituents of the effluent water such as DOC and nutrients which in turn may lead to reduced plant growth rate. Therefore, the long-term effects of this amendment technique have to be studied more closely. Reference Rahel C. Brändli, Thomas Hartnik, Thomas Henriksen, Gerard Cornelissen, (2008) Sorption of native polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to black carbon and amended activated carbon in soil, Chemosphere doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2008.08.034

  12. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  13. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  14. Survival of selected bacterial species in sterilized activated carbon filters and biological activated carbon filters.

    PubMed Central

    Rollinger, Y; Dott, W

    1987-01-01

    The survival of selected hygienically relevant bacterial species in activated carbon (AC) filters on a bench scale was investigated. The results revealed that after inoculation of the test strains the previously sterilized AC absorbed all bacteria (10(6) to 10(7)). After a period of 6 to 13 days without countable bacteria in the effluent, the numbers of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas putida increased up to 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml of effluent and 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g of AC. When Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis were used, no growth in filters could be observed. The numbers of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida, however, decreased immediately and showed no regrowth in nonsterile AC from a filter which had been continuously connected to running tap water for 2 months. Under these conditions an autochthonous microflora developed on the carbon surface which could be demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and culturing methods (heterotrophic plate count). These bacteria reduced E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. putida densities in the effluent by a factor of more than 10(5) within 1 to 5 days. The hypothesis that antagonistic substances of the autochthonous microflora were responsible for the elimination of the artificial contamination could not be confirmed because less than 1% of the isolates of the autochthonous microflora were able to produce such substances as indicated by in vitro tests. Competition for limiting nutrients was thought to be the reason for the observed effects. PMID:3579281

  15. Black Carbon Particle Number Distribution Measurements during the ATHENS-2013 Winter Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, Georgios; Papanastasiou, Dimitris; Florou, Kalliopi; Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Louvaris, Eyaggelos; Bezentakos, Spiridon; Biskos, Georgios; Pandis, Spuros

    2014-05-01

    Black Carbon (BC) particles emitted by anthropogenic sources play an important role both in climate change and in air quality degradation. Open burning in forests and savannas, combustion of diesel and solid fuels for cooking and heating in homes represent the majority of BC emissions. Earlier work has focused on the BC atmospheric direct radiative forcing that is mostly related to its mass concentration and optical properties of the corresponding particles. A variety of measurement techniques are used to measure the mass concentration of BC by taking advantage of its optical or physical properties. Moreover, the carbonaceous particles containing BC are also important for the indirect forcing of climate. This effect is mostly related to the number concentration of BC particles. The number distribution of BC particles especially below 100 nm is quite uncertain due to limitations of the existing measurement techniques. In this work we employed a thermodenuder-based method as an approach for the measurement of the BC number distribution. More specifically, we combined a thermodenuder (TD) operating at temperatures up to 300 ° C, with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF AMS). Aerosol size and composition measurements were carried out both at ambient and at elevated TD temperatures in Athens field campaign during January and February of 2013. In parallel, a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) provided information about the BC mass concentration while a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) measured the mixing state and the hygroscopicity of the particles as a function of their size. These measurements were then combined to estimate the number concentration of BC particles. Our analysis focused on different periods during the study. During some of them one source dominated the carbonaceous aerosol concentration. Such periods included rush hour traffic, nighttime wood

  16. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on.

  17. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  18. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  19. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS THROUGH A POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine carbon particles induce IL-8 expression in human airway
    epithelial cells through a post-transcritpional mechanism
    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to
    particulate matter (PM) - induced adverse health effects. IL-8 is an
    i...

  20. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  1. Charged particle detectors with active detector surface for partial energy deposition of the charged particles and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Gerts, David W; Bean, Robert S; Metcalf, Richard R

    2013-02-19

    A radiation detector is disclosed. The radiation detector comprises an active detector surface configured to generate charge carriers in response to charged particles associated with incident radiation. The active detector surface is further configured with a sufficient thickness for a partial energy deposition of the charged particles to occur and permit the charged particles to pass through the active detector surface. The radiation detector further comprises a plurality of voltage leads coupled to the active detector surface. The plurality of voltage leads is configured to couple to a voltage source to generate a voltage drop across the active detector surface and to separate the charge carriers into a plurality of electrons and holes for detection. The active detector surface may comprise one or more graphene layers. Timing data between active detector surfaces may be used to determine energy of the incident radiation. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed herein.

  2. Combining activated carbon adsorption with heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation: lack of synergy for biologically treated greywater and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

    PubMed

    Gulyas, Holger; Argáez, Angel Santiago Oria; Kong, Fanzhuo; Jorge, Carlos Liriano; Eggers, Susanne; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the addition of activated carbon in the photocatalytic oxidation of biologically pretreated greywater and of a polar aliphatic compound gives synergy, as previously demonstrated with phenol. Photocatalytic oxidation kinetics were recorded with fivefold concentrated biologically pretreated greywater and with aqueous tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether solutions using a UV lamp and the photocatalyst TiO2 P25 in the presence and the absence of powdered activated carbon. The synergy factor, SF, was quantified as the ratio of photocatalytic oxidation rate constant in the presence of powdered activated carbon to the rate constant without activated carbon. No synergy was observed for the greywater concentrate (SF approximately 1). For the aliphatic compound, tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether, addition of activated carbon actually had an inhibiting effect on photocatalysis (SF < 1), while synergy was confirmed in reference experiments using aqueous phenol solutions. The absence of synergy for the greywater concentrate can be explained by low adsorbability of its organic constituents by activated carbon. Inhibition of the photocatalytic oxidation of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether by addition of powdered activated carbon was attributed to shading of the photocatalyst by the activated carbon particles. It was assumed that synergy in the hybrid process was limited to aromatic organics. Regardless of the lack of synergy in the case of biologically pretreated greywater, the addition of powdered activated carbon is advantageous since, due to additional adsorptive removal of organics, photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a 60% lower organic concentration when activated carbon was present after the same UV irradiation time. PMID:24191472

  3. Combining activated carbon adsorption with heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation: Lack of synergy for biologically treated greywater and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether

    PubMed Central

    Gulyas, Holger; Argáez, Ángel Santiago Oria; Kong, Fanzhuo; Jorge, Carlos Liriano; Eggers, Susanne; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the addition of activated carbon in the photocatalytic oxidation of biologically pretreated greywater and of a polar aliphatic compound gives synergy, as previously demonstrated with phenol. Photocatalytic oxidation kinetics were recorded with fivefold concentrated biologically pretreated greywater and with aqueous tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether solutions using a UV lamp and the photocatalyst TiO2 P25 in the presence and the absence of powdered activated carbon. The synergy factor, SF, was quantified as the ratio of photocatalytic oxidation rate constant in the presence of powdered activated carbon to the rate constant without activated carbon. No synergy was observed for the greywater concentrate (SF ≈ 1). For the aliphatic compound, tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether, addition of activated carbon actually had an inhibiting effect on photocatalysis (SF < 1), while synergy was confirmed in reference experiments using aqueous phenol solutions. The absence of synergy for the greywater concentrate can be explained by low adsorbability of its organic constituents by activated carbon. Inhibition of the photocatalytic oxidation of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether by addition of powdered activated carbon was attributed to shading of the photocatalyst by the activated carbon particles. It was assumed that synergy in the hybrid process was limited to aromatic organics. Regardless of the lack of synergy in the case of biologically pretreated greywater, the addition of powdered activated carbon is advantageous since, due to additional adsorptive removal of organics, photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a 60% lower organic concentration when activated carbon was present after the same UV irradiation time. PMID:24191472

  4. Effect of Nano-sized Carbon Black Particles on Lung and Circulatory System by Inhalation Exposure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Gu; Cho, Hae-Won; Han, Jeong-Hee; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Rim, Kyung-Taek; Yang, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Hwa; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to establish a novel method to generate nano-sized carbon black particles (nano-CBPs) with an average size smaller than 100 nm for examining the inhalation exposure risks of experimental rats. We also tested the effect of nano-CBPs on the pulmonary and circulatory systems. Methods We used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) without the addition of any additives to generate nano-CBPs with a particle size (electrical mobility diameter) of less than 100nm to examine the effects of inhalation exposure. Nano-CBPs were applied to a nose-only inhalation chamber system for studying the inhalation toxicity in rats. The effect on the lungs and circulatory system was determined according to the degree of inflammation as quantified by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The functional alteration of the hemostatic and vasomotor activities was measured by plasma coagulation, platelet activity, contraction and relaxation of blood vessels. Results Nano-CBPs were generated in the range of 83.3-87.9 nm. Rats were exposed for 4 hour/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks to 4.2 × 106, 6.2 × 105, and 1.3 × 105 particles/cm3. Exposure of nano-CBPs by inhalation resulted in minimal pulmonary inflammation and did not appear to damage the lung tissue. In addition, there was no significant effect on blood functions, such as plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation, or on vasomotor function. Conclusion We successfully generated nano-CBPs in the range of 83.3-87.9 nm at a maximum concentration of 4.2 × 106 particles/cm3 in a nose-only inhalation chamber system. This reliable method can be useful to investigate the biological and toxicological effects of inhalation exposure to nano-CBPs on experimental rats. PMID:22953212

  5. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon aerogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Fengshou

    2014-03-01

    Activated carbon aerogel spheres (A-CAS) were successfully prepared by imposing KOH activation on aerogel spheres. It was found that the activation treatment did not destroy the order of the surface of the carbon aerogel spheres (CAS), but it improved the pore structure and adsorption performance of the products. With increasing burn-off, the amount of mesopores first decreased and then increased, with the amount of micropores continuously increasing. The highest measured BET surface area and micropore surface area reached 1198 and 786 m2/g, respectively. The adsorption capacity of benzene organic vapour on the A-CAS is more than eight times as large as that on CAS.

  6. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment. PMID:16290775

  7. Thermochemically activated carbon as an electrode material for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Ostafiychuk, Bogdan K; Budzulyak, Ivan M; Rachiy, Bogdan I; Vashchynsky, Vitalii M; Mandzyuk, Volodymyr I; Lisovsky, Roman P; Shyyko, Lyudmyla O

    2015-01-01

    The results of electrochemical studies of nanoporous carbon as electrode material for electrochemical capacitors (EC) are presented in this work. Nanoporous carbon material (NCM) was obtained from the raw materials of plant origin by carbonization and subsequent activation in potassium hydroxide. It is established that there is an optimal ratio of 1:1 between content of KOH and carbon material at chemical activation, while the maximum specific capacity of NCM is 180 F/g. An equivalent electrical circuit, which allows modeling of the impedance spectra in the frequency range of 10(-2) to 10(5) Hz, is proposed, and a physical interpretation of each element of the electrical circuit is presented. PMID:25852362

  8. Measured Enthalpies of Adsorption of Boron-Doped Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Dohnke, E.; Singh, A.; Schaeperkoetter, J.; Stalla, D.; Burress, J.; Jalisatgi, S.; Suppes, G.; Hawthorne, M. F.; Yu, P.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2012-02-01

    There is significant interest in the properties of boron-doped activated carbons for their potential to improve hydrogen storage.ootnotetextMultiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage, P. Pfeifer et al. DOE Hydrogen Program 2011 Annual Progress Report, IV.C.3, 444-449 (2011). Boron-doped activated carbons have been produced using a process involving the pyrolysis of decaborane (B10H14) and subsequent high-temperature annealing. In this talk, we will present a systematic study of the effect of different boron doping processes on the samples' structure, hydrogen sorption, and surface chemistry. Initial room temperature experiments show a 20% increase in the hydrogen excess adsorption per surface area compared to the undoped material. Experimental enthalpies of adsorption will be presented for comparison to theoretical predictions for boron-doped carbon materials. Additionally, results from a modified version of the doping process will be presented.

  9. Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry of carbon particles flow using an autocorrelation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao

    2014-09-01

    In order to measure the axial flowing velocity of a suspension carbon particles of tens of micometer-scale, the photoacoustic doppler frequency shift was calculated from a series of individual A scans using a autocorrelation method. A 532nm pulsed laser with the repetition rate of 20Hz was used as a pumping source to generate photoacoustic signal. The photoacoustic signals were detected using a focused PZT ultrasound transducer with central frequency of 5MHz. The suspension of carbon particles was driven by a syringe pump. Firstly, the complex photoacoustic signal was calculated by the Hilbert transformation from time-domain photoacoustic signal. The complex photoacoustic signal was then autocorrelated to calculate doppler frequency shift. The flow velocity was calculated by averaging the autocorrelation results of individual A scans. In comparison , the previously reported data processing methods using cross-correlation method in time domain or frequency domain require high sequential scanning rate or high laser repetition rate up to several kHz to avoid aliasing or uncorrelation between sequential waveform pairs. But it is difficult to get several kHz repetition rate for a single pulsed laser and the correlation between waveform pairs of sequential A scans were also limited by the laser repetition rate. To solve the problem, we used the autocorrelation method of individual A scans to calculated Doppler frequency shift. The time delay can be user defined to avoid aliasing. The feasibility of the proposed autocorrelation method was preliminarily demonstrated by quantifying the motion of a carbon particles suspension flow from 5 to 60 mm/s. The experimental results showed that the autocorrelation result approximately agreed with the setting velocity linearly.

  10. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very Hight Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lumin Wang; Gary Was

    2010-07-30

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  11. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  12. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  13. Characterization and ciprofloxacin adsorption properties of activated carbons prepared from biomass wastes by H3PO4 activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Li, Hong; Li, Guangci; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Xuebing

    2016-10-01

    As biomass wastes, Arundo donax Linn and pomelo peel were used as precursors for activated carbons (ALAC and PPAC) preparation by phosphoric acid activation. The pore structure and surface acidic functional groups of both carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiment, NH3-temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A batch of experiments was carried out to investigate the adsorption performances of ciprofloxacin under different conditions. Results showed that PPAC exhibited larger surface area (1252m(2)/g) and larger portion of mesoporous, while ALAC was typical of microporous materials. Results from NH3-TPD suggested that ALAC was characteristic of more acidic functional group than PPAC. The maximum monolayer adsorption capability was 244mg/g for ALAC and 400mg/L for PPAC. Kinetics studies showed intra-particle diffusion was not the unique rate-controlling step. Boundary layer resistance existed between adsorbent and adsorbate. PMID:27034157

  14. Fullerenic particles for the growth of carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Guermoune, Abdeladim; Hilke, Michael

    2016-04-29

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of stacks of planar graphene layers with open edges that grow almost vertically on a substrate. Their morphology makes them a promising material for field emission, batteries, light absorbers and enhanced detectors for electrochemical and gas sensors. However, three main challenges prevent the fast development of CNWs: the synthesis is energetically demanding, poorly transferable to suitable substrates, and the growth mechanism is not understood. Here, we present a simple method to grow carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene through fullerenic particles using thermal CVD and copper. The hydrophobicity of the fabricated hybrid material facilitates its transfer to any substrate. Our findings can boost the understanding of the physical properties and the practical applicability of CNWs. At the same time, our work is a concrete example of the role of multilayer graphene as a platform to one-step synthesis of new transferable graphenic materials. PMID:26987385

  15. Fullerenic particles for the growth of carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermoune, Abdeladim; Hilke, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of stacks of planar graphene layers with open edges that grow almost vertically on a substrate. Their morphology makes them a promising material for field emission, batteries, light absorbers and enhanced detectors for electrochemical and gas sensors. However, three main challenges prevent the fast development of CNWs: the synthesis is energetically demanding, poorly transferable to suitable substrates, and the growth mechanism is not understood. Here, we present a simple method to grow carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene through fullerenic particles using thermal CVD and copper. The hydrophobicity of the fabricated hybrid material facilitates its transfer to any substrate. Our findings can boost the understanding of the physical properties and the practical applicability of CNWs. At the same time, our work is a concrete example of the role of multilayer graphene as a platform to one-step synthesis of new transferable graphenic materials.

  16. Enhanced dielectric breakdown performances of propylene carbonate modified by nano-particles under microsecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yanpan; Zhang, Jiande; Zhang, Zicheng

    2016-06-01

    Propylene carbonate shows appealing prospects as an energy storage medium in the compact pulsed power sources because of its large permittivity, high dielectric strength, and broad operating temperature range. In this paper, TiO2 nano-particles coated with γ-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane coupling agent are homogeneously dispersed into propylene carbonate and these nano-fluids (NFs) exhibit substantially larger breakdown voltages than those of pure propylene carbonate. It is proposed that interfaces between nano-fillers and propylene carbonate matrix may provide myriad trap sites for charge carriers. The charge carriers can be easily captured at the interfaces between NFs and the electrode, resulting in an increased barrier height and suppressed charge carriers injection, and in the bulk of NFs, the charge carriers' mean free path can be greatly shortened by the scattering effect. As a result, in order for charge carriers acquiring enough energy to generate a region of low density (the bubble) and initiate breakdown in NFs, much higher applied field is needed.

  17. Loading Capacity versus Enzyme Activity in Anisotropic and Spherical Calcium Carbonate Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Donatan, Senem; Yashchenok, Alexey; Khan, Nazimuddin; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Cocquyt, Melissa; Pinchasik, Bat-El; Khalenkow, Dmitry; Möhwald, Helmuth; Konrad, Manfred; Skirtach, Andre

    2016-06-01

    A new method of fabrication of calcium carbonate microparticles of ellipsoidal, rhomboidal, and spherical geometries is reported by adjusting the relative concentration ratios of the initial salt solutions and/or the ethylene glycol content in the reaction medium. Morphology, porosity, crystallinity, and loading capacity of synthesized CaCO3 templates were characterized in detail. Particles harboring dextran or the enzyme guanylate kinase were obtained through encapsulation of these macromolecules using the layer-by-layer assembly technique to deposit positively and negatively charged polymers on these differently shaped CaCO3 templates and were characterized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy, fluorometric techniques, and enzyme activity measurements. The enzymatic activity, an important application of such porous particles and containers, has been analyzed in comparison with the loading capacity and geometry. Our results reveal that the particles' shape influences morphology of particles and that, as a result, affects the activity of the encapsulated enzymes, in addition to the earlier reported influence on cellular uptake. These particles are promising candidates for efficient drug delivery due to their relatively high loading capacity, biocompatibility, and easy fabrication and handling. PMID:27166641

  18. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  19. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  20. Carbon dioxide-activated carbons from almond tree pruning: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán, J.; González, J. F.; González-García, C. M.; Ramiro, A.; Sabio, E.; Román, S.

    2006-06-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from almond tree pruning by non-catalytic and catalytic gasification with carbon dioxide and their surface characteristics were investigated. In both series a two-stage activation procedure (pyrolysis at 800 °C in nitrogen atmosphere, followed by carbon dioxide activation) was used for the production of activated samples. In non-catalytic gasification, the effect of the temperature (650-800 °C for 1 h) and the reaction time (1-12 h at 650 °C) on the surface characteristics of the prepared samples was investigated. Carbons were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The textural parameters of the carbons present a linear relation with the conversion degree until a value of approximately 40%, when they come independent from both parameters studied. The highest surface area obtained for this series was 840 m 2 g -1. In the catalytic gasification the effect of the addition of one catalyst (K and Co) and the gasification time (2-4 h) on the surface and porosity development of the carbons was also studied. At the same conditions, Co leads to higher conversion values than K but this last gives a better porosity development.

  1. Magnetically Active Carbon Nanotubes at Work.

    PubMed

    Stopin, Antoine; Pineux, Florent; Marega, Riccardo; Bonifazi, Davide

    2015-06-22

    Endohedral and exohedral assembly of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) recently gave birth to a large body of new hybrid nanomaterials (MNPs-CNTs) featuring properties that are otherwise not in reach with only the graphitic or metallic cores themselves. These materials feature enhanced magnetically guided motions (rotation and translation), magnetic saturation and coercivity, large surface area, and thermal stability. By guiding the reader through the most significant examples in this Concept paper, we describe how researchers in the field engineered and exploited the synergistic combination of these two types of nanoparticles in a large variety of current and potential applications, such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia therapeutics and in magnetic resonance imaging to name a few. PMID:26017389

  2. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition.

    PubMed

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C; Bauer, Susanne E; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  3. Emergent smectic order in simple active particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Chaté, Hugues; Chen, Leiming; Ngo, Sandrine; Toner, John

    2016-06-01

    Novel ‘smectic-P’ behavior, in which self-propelled particles form rows and move on average along them, occurs generically within the orientationally ordered phase of simple models that we simulate. Both apolar (head–tail symmetric) and polar (head–tail asymmetric) models with aligning and repulsive interactions exhibit slow algebraic decay of smectic order with system size up to some finite length scale, after which faster decay occurs. In the apolar case, this scale is that of an undulation instability of the rows. In the polar case, this instability is absent, but traveling fluctuations disrupt the rows in large systems and motion and smectic order may spontaneously globally rotate. These observations agree with a new hydrodynamic theory which we present here. Variants of our models also exhibit active smectic ‘A’ and ‘C’ order, with motion orthogonal and oblique to the layers respectively.

  4. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Milutinović, S.; Marinov, I.; Cabré, A.

    2015-05-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth System models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing algorithms to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 μm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 μm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e. oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have large biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield on average ~0.2-0.3 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms, and several state-of-the-art Earth System models. However, the range of phytoplankton C biomass spatial variability globally is larger than estimated by any other models considered here, because the PSD-based algorithm is not a priori empirically constrained and introduces improvement over the assumptions of the other approaches. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm

  5. DUSTER: collection of meteoric CaO and carbon smoke particles in the upper stratosphere .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Rotundi, A.; Ferrari, M.; Palumbo, P.

    Nanometer- to micrometer-size particles present in the upper stratosphere are a mixture of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial origins. They can be extraterrestrial particles condensed after meteor ablation. Meteoric dust in bolides is occasionally deposited into the lower stratosphere around 20 km altitude. Nanometer CaO and pure carbon smoke particles were collected at 38 km altitude in the upper stratosphere in the Arctic during June 2008 using DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval), a balloon-borne instrument for the non-destructive collection of solid particles between 200 nm to 40 microns. We report the collection of micron sized CaCO_3 (calcite) grains. Their morphologies show evidence of melting and condensation after vaporization suggest at temperatures of approximately 3500 K. The formation environment of the collected grains was probably a dense dust cloud formed by the disintegration of a carbonaceous meteoroid during deceleration in the Earth� atmosphere. For the first time, DUSTER collected meteor ablation products that were presumably associated with the disintegration of a bolide crossing the Earth's atmosphere. The collected mostly CaO and pure carbon nanoparticles from the debris cloud of a fireball, included: 1) intact fragments; 2) quenched melted grains; and 3) vapor phase condensation products. The DUSTER project was funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), PRIN2008/MIUR (Ministero dell'Istruzione dell'Universitá e della Ricerca), PNRA 2013(Piano Nazionale Ricerca Antartide). CNES graciously provided this flight opportunity. We thank E. Zona and S. Inarta at the Laboratorio di Fisica Cosmica INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte-Universitá di Napoli Parthenope. F.J.M.R. was supported by grant NNX07AI39G from the NASA Cosmochemistry Program. We thank three anonymous reviewers who assisted us in introducing our new instrument.

  6. Ice nucleating particles from biomass combustion: emission rates and the role of refractory black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; McCluskey, C. S.; Carrico, C. M.; Nakao, S.; Stockwell, C.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) allow initial ice crystal formation in clouds at temperatures warmer than about -36 °C and are thus important for cloud and precipitation development. One potential source of INPs to the atmosphere is biomass combustion, such as wildfires, prescribed burning and agricultural burning, which emits large quantities of particulate matter into the atmosphere and is a major source of black carbon (BC) aerosol. To better understand and constrain INP emissions from biomass combustion, globally relevant fuels were used in a series of burns during a study called FLAME 4 at the USFS Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, MT. Concentrations of immersion mode INPs were measured using a Colorado State University Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC). During the first part of the study, emissions were measured in real time as fires progressed from ignition to flaming and smoldering phases. INP emissions were observed predominately during periods of intensely flaming combustion. Roughly 75% of measured burns produced detectable INP concentrations and these had, on average, higher combustion efficiencies and higher BC emissions. During the second half of FLAME 4, we directly measured the contribution of refractory black carbon (rBC) to INP concentrations by selectively removing these particles via laser-induced incandescence (LII) using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; Droplet Measurement Technologies). The SP2 uses a 1064 nm Na:YAG laser to heat rBC aerosol to their vaporization temperatures, thus removing them from the sampled aerosol. By passing combustion aerosol through the SP2 with the laser on and off while measuring the remaining aerosol with the CFDC, we were able to determine the contribution of rBC to the INP population. Reductions in INPs of 0 - 70% were observed when removing rBC from the combustion aerosol, indicating the importance of rBC particles to INP concentrations for some burn scenarios.

  7. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-28

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active pol