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Sample records for activated carbon selective

  1. Selecting activated carbon for water and wastewater treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Chang, Q.G.; Liu, W.D.; Li, B.J.; Jiang, W.X.; Fu, L.J.; Ying, W.C.

    2007-10-15

    A series of follow-up investigations were performed to produce data for improving the four-indicator carbon selection method that we developed to identify high-potential activated carbons effective for removing specific organic water pollutants. The carbon's pore structure and surface chemistry are dependent on the raw material and the activation process. Coconut carbons have relatively more small pores than large pores; coal and apricot nutshell/walnut shell fruit carbons have the desirable pore structures for removing adsorbates of all sizes. Chemical activation, excessive activation, and/or thermal reactivation enlarge small pores, resulting in reduced phenol number and higher tannic acid number. Activated carbon's phenol, iodine, methylene blue, and tannic acid numbers are convenient indicators of its surface area and pore volume of pore diameters < 10, 10-15, 15-28, and > 28 angstrom, respectively. The phenol number of a carbon is also a good indicator of its surface acidity of oxygen-containing organic functional groups that affect the adsorptive capacity for aromatic and other small polar organics. The tannic acid number is an indicator of carbon's capacity for large, high-molecular-weight natural organic precursors of disinfection by-products in water treatment. The experimental results for removing nitrobenzene, methyl-tert-butyl ether, 4,4-bisphenol, humic acid, and the organic constituents of a biologically treated coking-plant effluent have demonstrated the effectiveness of this capacity-indicator-based method of carbon selection.

  2. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  3. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  4. Select metal adsorption by activated carbon made from peanut shells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kermit; Yang, Hong; Seo, Chung W; Marshall, Wayne E

    2006-12-01

    Agricultural by-products, such as peanut shells, contribute large quantities of lignocellulosic waste to the environment each growing season; but few, if any, value-added uses exist for their disposal. The objective of this study was to convert peanut shells to activated carbons for use in adsorption of select metal ions, namely, cadmium (Cd2+), copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+), nickel (Ni2+) and zinc (Zn2+). Milled peanut shells were pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen gas, and then activated with steam at different activation times. Following pyrolysis and activation, the carbons underwent air oxidation. The prepared carbons were evaluated either for adsorption efficiency or adsorption capacity; and these parameters were compared to the same parameters obtained from three commercial carbons, namely, DARCO 12x20, NORIT C GRAN and MINOTAUR. One of the peanut shell-based carbons had metal ion adsorption efficiencies greater than two of the three commercial carbons but somewhat less than but close to Minotaur. This study demonstrates that peanut shells can serve as a source for activated carbons with metal ion-removing potential and may serve as a replacement for coal-based commercial carbons in applications that warrant their use.

  5. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  6. Experimental selectivity curves of gaseous binary mixtures of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide on activated carbon and silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, M.G.; Jadot, R.

    1998-07-01

    The selectivity curves of gaseous binary mixtures of ethane + ethylene, methane + carbon dioxide at 303 K and 700 kPa and butane + 2 methylpropane at 318 K and 200 kPa have been determined on activated carbon and silica gel using an original apparatus. In this paper, a brief description of this apparatus is given. The difference in behavior of these two adsorbents is discussed.

  7. Selection of pecan shell based activated carbons for removal of organic and inorganic impurities from simulated well-water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbons are a byproduct from pyrolysis and have value as a purifying agent. The effectiveness of activated carbons is dependent on feedstock selection and pyrolysis conditions that modify its surface properties. Therefore, pecan shell-based activated carbons (PSACs) were prepared by soakin...

  8. Adsorption characteristics of selected hydrophilic and hydrophobic micropollutants in water using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Choi, Dae-Jin; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Her, Namguk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we investigated adsorption characteristics of nine selected micropollutants (six pharmaceuticals, two pesticides, and one endocrine disruptor) in water using an activated carbon. The effects of carbon dosage, contact time, pH, DOM (dissolved organic matter), and temperature on the adsorption removal of micropollutants were examined. Increasing carbon dosage and contact time enhanced the removal of micropollutants. Sorption coefficients of hydrophilic compounds (caffeine, acetaminophen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfamethazine) fit a linear isotherm and hydrophobic compounds (naproxen, diclofenac, 2, 4-D, triclocarban, and atrazine) fit a Freundlich isotherm. The removal of hydrophobic pollutants and caffeine were independent of pH changes, but acetaminophen, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole were adsorbed by mainly electrostatic interaction with activated carbon and so were affected by pH. The decrease in adsorption removal in surface water samples was observed and this decrease was more significant for hydrophobic than hydrophilic compounds. The decline in the adsorption capacity in surface water samples is caused by the competitive inhibition of DOM with micropollutants onto activated carbon. Low temperature (5°C) also decreased the adsorption removal of micropollutants, and affected hydrophobic compounds more than hydrophilic compounds. The results obtained in this study can be applied to optimize the adsorption capacities of micropollutants using activated carbon in water treatment process.

  9. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... Waste Incineration Units Model Rule-Emission Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2680 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction,...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... Waste Incineration Units Model Rule-Emission Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2680 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction,...

  11. Enhanced activity and selectivity of carbon nanofiber supported Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R; Werth, Charles J

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment.

  12. Physical and chemical properties of selected agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons and their ability to adsorb geosmin.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chilton; Losso, Jack N; Marshall, Wayne E; Rao, Ramu M

    2002-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate selected physical and chemical properties of agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons made from pecan shells and sugarcane bagasse, and compare those properties to a commercial coal-based activated carbon as well as to compare the adsorption efficiency of these carbons for geosmin. Comparison of the physical and chemical properties of pecan shell- and bagasse-based carbons to the commercial carbon, Calgon Filtrasorb 400, showed that pecan shell carbon, but not the bagasse carbon, compared favorably to Filtrasorb 400, especially in terms of surface area, bulk density, ash and attrition. A carbon dosage study done in a model system showed the amount of geosmin adsorbed to be greater for Filtrasorb 400 and the bagasse-based carbon at low carbon concentrations than for the pecan shell carbons, but geosmin adsorption was similar in all carbons at higher carbon dosages. Application of the Freundlich isotherm model to the adsorption data showed that carbons made by steam activation of pecan shells or sugarcane bagasse had geosmin adsorption characteristics most like those of the commercial carbon. In terms of physical, chemical and adsorptive properties, steam-activated pecan shell carbon most resembled the commercial carbon and has the potential to replace Filtrasorb 400 in applications involving removal of geosmin from aqueous environments.

  13. Soil washing using various nonionic surfactants and their recovery by selective adsorption with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ahn, C K; Kim, Y M; Woo, S H; Park, J M

    2008-06-15

    The performance of activated carbon in soil washing and subsequent selective adsorption for surfactant recovery from the washed solution was investigated. Sandy loam soil contaminated with phenanthrene at 200 mg kg(-1) was washed with four different nonionic surfactants: Tween 40, Tween 80, Brij 30 and Brij 35. The efficiency of soil washing was highest when using Brij 30 with the highest solubilizing ability for phenanthrene and low adsorption onto soil. In the selective adsorption step, surfactant recovery was quite effective for all surfactants ranging from 85.0 to 89.0% at 1 g L(-1) of activated carbon (Darco 20-40 mesh). Phenanthrene removal from the solution washed with Brij 30 was only 33.9%, even though it was 54.1-56.4% with other surfactants. The selectivity was larger than 7.02 except for Brij 30 (3.60). The overall performance considering both the washing and surfactant recovery step was effective when using Tween 80 and Brij 35. The results suggest that higher solubilizing ability of surfactants is a requirement for soil washing but causes negative effects on phenanthrene removal in the selective adsorption. Therefore, if a surfactant recovery process by selective adsorption is included in soil remediation by washing, the overall performance including the two steps should be considered for properly choosing the surfactant.

  14. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  15. Characterisation of novel modified active carbons and marine algal biomass for the selective adsorption of lead.

    PubMed

    Malik, D J; Strelko, V; Streat, M; Puziy, A M

    2002-03-01

    This paper discusses the sorption performance of novel materials for the removal of lead(II) and copper(II) from near-neutral aqueous solutions. Active carbons with surface heteroatoms of oxygen and phosphorus have been prepared. The surface functional groups display weakly acidic ion exchange characteristics. The optimum solution pH for maximum metal sorption is related to the pK values of the surface functional groups. In oxygenated active carbons, pK values are not distinct but can be obtained by describing proton binding to the heterogeneous adsorbent surface as a continuous proton affinity distribution. Information derived from zeta-potential measurements combined with knowledge of the pK distribution function and concentration of surface functional groups has been used to explain the selectivity of oxidised active carbons towards lead(lI) in the presence of copper(II) from multi-metal bearing solutions. Marine algal-based biosorbents have been challenged with lead(II) and copper(II)-bearing wastewater. The weakly acidic carboxyl groups of structural polysaccharides present within the algal matrix display high sorption capacity for both metals. The negative surface charge of algal particles results in electrostatic interactions as well as coordination between metal species and the adsorbent surface. Proton affinity for the algal surface lowers the negative surface potential at pH values around 2. The surface functional groups in algae unlike those in oxidised active carbons may be represented by discrete acid-dissociation constant values. The influence of conformational differences in uronic-acid segments upon metal ion selectivity is discussed.

  16. Limited adsorption selectivity of active carbon toward non-saccharide compounds in lignocellulose hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Zhuang, Jingshun; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Zongquan; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua

    2016-05-01

    Prehydrolysis of lignocellulose produces abundant hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS). To obtain pure HDS for application in food or pharmaceutical industries, the prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) must be refined to remove non-saccharide compounds (NSC) derived from lignin depolymerization and carbohydrate degradation. In this work, activated carbon (AC) adsorption was employed to purify HDS from NSC with emphasis on adsorption selectivity. The adsorption isotherms showed the priority of NSC to be absorbed over HDS at low AC level. However, increase of AC over 90% of NSC removal made adsorption non-selective due to competitive adsorption between NSC and HDS. Size exclusion chromatography showed that the adsorption of oligomeric HDS was dominant while monomeric HDS was inappreciable. The limited selectivity suggested that AC adsorption is infeasibility for HDS purification, but applicable as a pretreatment method.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase activators. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram are strong activators of isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Caccia, Silvio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2003-08-18

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram have been investigated for their ability to activate two carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, hCA I and hCA II, in parallel with two standard activators for which the X-ray structure (in complex with isozyme II) has been resolved: histamine and phenylalanine. All three SSRI activated both isozymes with potencies comparable to that of the standards although the profile was different: for hCA I, best activators were fluoxetine and histamine, with citalopram and sertraline showing weaker activity. For hCA II, the best activators were phenylalanine and citalopram, and the weakest histamine and sertraline, whereas fluoxetine showed an intermediate behavior. These results suggest that SSRI efficacy in major depression complicating Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to their ability to activate CA isozymes and may lead to the development of potent activators for the therapy of diseases associated with significant decreases in brain CA activity.

  18. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  19. Integrated basic treatment of activated carbon for enhanced CO2 selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelodun, Adedeji Adebukola; Jo, Young-Min

    2013-12-01

    We attempted the use of three chemical agents viz nitric acid (HN), calcium nitrate (CaN) and calcium ethanoate (CaEt) to achieve enhanced CO2 selective adsorption by activated carbon (AC). In dry phase treatment, microporous coconut shell-based carbon (CS) exhibits higher CO2 capacity than coal-based. However, upon wet-phase pre-treatment, modified CS samples showed lesser CO2 adsorption efficiency. Surface characterization with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of calcium and amine species on the samples with integrated treatment (A-CaN). These samples recorded the highest low-level CO2 capture despite calcinated CaEt-doped samples (C-CaEt) showing the highest value for pure and high level CO2 adsorption capacities. The slope and linearity values of isobaric desorption were used to estimate the proportion of CO2 chemisorbed and heterogeneity of the adsorbents’ surfaces respectively. Consequently, integrated basic impregnation provides the most efficient adsorbents for selective adsorption of both indoor and outdoor CO2 levels.

  20. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    PubMed Central

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M. Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ≫ RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  1. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-06-30

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.

  2. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Sinev, Ilya; Choi, Yong-Wook; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides are surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity. PMID:27356485

  3. Selection of pecan shell-based activated carbons for removal of organic and inorganic impurities from water.

    PubMed

    Niandou, Mohamed A S; Novak, Jeffrey M; Bansode, Rishipal R; Yu, Jianmei; Rehrah, Djaafar; Ahmedna, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons are a byproduct from pyrolysis and have value as a purifying agent. The effectiveness of activated carbons is dependent on feedstock selection and pyrolysis conditions that modify their surface properties. Therefore, pecan shell-based activated carbons (PSACs) were prepared by soaking shells in 50% (v/v) HPO or 25 to 50% of KOH-NaHCO followed by pyrolysis at 400 to 700°C under a N atmosphere. Physically activated PSACs were produced by pyrolysis at 700°C under N followed by activation with steam or CO at 700 to 900°C. Physicochemical, surface, and adsorption properties of the PSACs were compared with two commercially available activated carbons. The average mass yield of PSACs with respect to the initial mass of the biomass was about 20 and 34% for physically activated and chemically activated carbons, respectively. Acid-activated carbons exhibited higher surface area, higher bulk density, and lower ash content compared with steam- or CO-activated carbons and the two commercial products. Base activation led to the development of biochar with moderate to high surface area with surface charges suitable for adsorption of anionic species. Regardless of the activation method, PSACs had high total surface area ranging from 400 to 1000 m g, better pore size distribution, and more surface charges than commercial samples. Our results also showed that PSACs were effective in removing inorganic contaminants such as Cu and NO as well as organic contaminants such as atrazine and metolachlor. This study showed that pyrolysis conditions and activation had a large influence on the PSAC's surface characteristics, which can limit its effectiveness as a custom sorbent for targeted water contaminants.

  4. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, or an electrostatic... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Emission Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2115 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter,...

  5. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Emission Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2115 What if I do not use a wet scrubber,...

  6. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  7. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm−2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s−1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution. PMID:28272403

  8. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-08

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm(-2) and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s(-1) at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  9. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm-2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s-1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  10. Highly selective plasma-activated copper catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction to ethylene

    DOE PAGES

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Bonifacio, Cecile S.; ...

    2016-06-30

    There is an urgent need to develop technologies that use renewable energy to convert waste products such as carbon dioxide into hydrocarbon fuels. Carbon dioxide can be electrochemically reduced to hydrocarbons over copper catalysts, although higher efficiency is required. We have developed oxidized copper catalysts displaying lower overpotentials for carbon dioxide electroreduction and record selectivity towards ethylene (60%) through facile and tunable plasma treatments. Herein we provide insight into the improved performance of these catalysts by combining electrochemical measurements with microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that copper oxides aremore » surprisingly resistant to reduction and copper+ species remain on the surface during the reaction. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the roughness of oxide-derived copper catalysts plays only a partial role in determining the catalytic performance, while the presence of copper+ is key for lowering the onset potential and enhancing ethylene selectivity.« less

  11. Regeneration of field-spent activated carbon catalysts for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ki; Kim, Hyeonjoo; Park, Young-Kwon; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

    2011-10-15

    In the process of producing liquid crystal displays (LCD), the emitted NOx is removed over an activated carbon catalyst by using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 at low temperature. However, the catalyst rapidly deactivates primarily due to the deposition of boron discharged from the process onto the catalyst. Therefore, this study is aimed at developing an optimal regeneration process to remove boron from field-spent carbon catalysts. The spent carbon catalysts were regenerated by washing with a surfactant followed by drying and calcination. The physicochemical properties before and after the regeneration were investigated by using elemental analysis, TG/DTG (thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric) analysis, N2 adsorption-desorption and NH3 TPD (temperature programmed desorption). Spent carbon catalysts demonstrated a drastic decrease in DeNOx activity mainly due to heavy deposition of boron. Boron was accumulated to depths of about 50 {mu}m inside the granule surface of the activated carbons, as evidenced by cross-sectional SEM-EDX analysis. However, catalyst activity and surface area were significantly recovered by removing boron in the regeneration process, and the highest NOx conversions were obtained after washing with a non-ionic surfactant in H2O at 70 C, followed by treatment with N2 at 550 C.

  12. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 2. Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) naproxen and carbamazepine and one endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) nonylphenol was studied in pilot-scale granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers using post-sedimentation (PS) water from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. The GAC adsorbents were coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. Acidic naproxen broke through fastest while nonylphenol was removed best, which was consistent with the degree to which fouling affected compound removals. Model predictions and experimental data were generally in good agreement for all three compounds, which demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the pore and surface diffusion model (PSDM) used in combination with the time-variable parameter approach for predicting removals at environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., ng/L range). Sensitivity analyses suggested that accurate determination of film diffusion coefficients was critical for predicting breakthrough for naproxen and carbamazepine, in particular when high removals are targeted. Model simulations demonstrated that GAC carbon usage rates (CURs) for naproxen were substantially influenced by the empty bed contact time (EBCT) at the investigated conditions. Model-based comparisons between GAC CURs and minimum CURs for powdered activated carbon (PAC) applications suggested that PAC would be most appropriate for achieving 90% removal of naproxen, whereas GAC would be more suitable for nonylphenol. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Imine-Linked Polymer Based Nitrogen-Doped Porous Activated Carbon for Efficient and Selective CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Alabadi, Akram; Abbood, Hayder A.; Li, Qingyin; Jing, Ni; Tan, Bien

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (NACs) has received significant attention because of their applications in CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) owing to abundant nitrogen atoms on their surface and controllable pore structures by carefully controlled carbonization. We report high-surface-area porous N-doped activated carbons (NAC) by using soft-template-assisted self-assembly followed by thermal decomposition and KOH activation. The activation process was carried out under different temperature conditions (600–800 °C) using polyimine as precursor. The NAC-800 was found to have a high specific surface area (1900 m2 g−1), a desirable micropore size below 1 nm and, more importantly, a large micropore volume (0.98 cm3 g−1). NAC-800 also exhibits a significant capacity of CO2 capture i.e., over 6. 25 and 4.87 mmol g−1 at 273 K and 298 K respectively at 1.13 bar, which is one of among the highest values reported for porous carbons so far. Moreover, NAC also shows an excellent separation selectivity for CO2 over N2. PMID:27958305

  14. Imine-Linked Polymer Based Nitrogen-Doped Porous Activated Carbon for Efficient and Selective CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabadi, Akram; Abbood, Hayder A.; Li, Qingyin; Jing, Ni; Tan, Bien

    2016-12-01

    The preparation of nitrogen-doped activated carbon (NACs) has received significant attention because of their applications in CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) owing to abundant nitrogen atoms on their surface and controllable pore structures by carefully controlled carbonization. We report high-surface-area porous N-doped activated carbons (NAC) by using soft-template-assisted self-assembly followed by thermal decomposition and KOH activation. The activation process was carried out under different temperature conditions (600–800 °C) using polyimine as precursor. The NAC-800 was found to have a high specific surface area (1900 m2 g‑1), a desirable micropore size below 1 nm and, more importantly, a large micropore volume (0.98 cm3 g‑1). NAC-800 also exhibits a significant capacity of CO2 capture i.e., over 6. 25 and 4.87 mmol g‑1 at 273 K and 298 K respectively at 1.13 bar, which is one of among the highest values reported for porous carbons so far. Moreover, NAC also shows an excellent separation selectivity for CO2 over N2.

  15. Ion-Selective Deposition of Manganese Sulphate Solution from Trenggalek Manganese Ore by Active Carbon and Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyah, L.; Sulistiyono, E.

    2017-02-01

    One of the step in manganese dioxide manufacturing process for battery industry is a purification process of lithium manganese sulphate solution. The elimination of impurities such as iron removal is important in hydrometallurgical processes. Therefore, this paper present the purification results of manganese sulphate solution by removing impurities using a selective deposition method, namely activated carbon adsorption and NaOH. The experimental results showed that the optimum condition of adsorption process occurs on the addition of 5 g adsorbent and the addition of 10 ml NaOH 1 N, processing time of 30 minutes and the best is the activated carbon adsorption of Japan. Because the absolute requirement of the cathode material of lithium ion manganese are free of titanium then of local wood charcoal is good enough in terms of eliminating ions Ti is equal to 70.88%.

  16. Effects of sludge retention time, carbon and initial biomass concentrations on selection process: From activated sludge to polyhydroxyalkanoate accumulating cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Long; Wen, Qinxue; Zhang, Huichao; Guo, Zirui

    2017-02-01

    Four sequence batch reactors (SBRs) fed by fermented sugar cane wastewater were continuously operated under the aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) mode with different configurations of sludge retention time (SRT), carbon and initial biomass concentrations to enrich polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulating mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) from municipal activated sludge. The stability of SBRs was investigated besides the enrichment performance. The microbial community structures of the enriched MMCs were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The optimum operating conditions for the enrichment process were: SRT of 5days, carbon concentration of 2.52g COD/L and initial biomass concentration of 3.65g/L. The best enrichment performance in terms of both operating stability and PHA storage ability of enriched cultures (with the maximum PHA content and PHA storage yield (YPHA/S) of 61.26% and 0.68mg COD/mg COD, respectively) was achieved under this condition. Effects of the SRT, carbon concentration and initial biomass concentration on the PHA accumulating MMCs selection process were discussed respectively. A new model including the segmentation of the enrichment process and the effects of SRT on each phase was proposed.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY SELECTIVE PERMEATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , SEPARATION), (*PERMEABILITY, CARBON DIOXIDE ), POROUS MATERIALS, SILICON COMPOUNDS, RUBBER, SELECTION, ADSORPTION, TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, POLYMERS, FILMS, PLASTICS, MEMBRANES, HUMIDITY.

  18. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  19. Adsorption of Selected Pharmaceutical Compounds onto Activated Carbon in Dilute Aqueous Solutions Exemplified by Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, and Sulfamethoxazole

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E.-E.; Wan, Jan-Chi; Liang, Chung-Huei; Dai, Yung-Dun; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of three pharmaceuticals, namely, acetaminophen, diclofenac, and sulfamethoxazole onto granular activated carbon (GAC), was investigated. To study competitive adsorption, both dynamic and steady-state adsorption experiments were conducted by careful selection of pharmaceuticals with various affinities and molecular size. The effective diffusion coefficient of the adsorbate was increased with decease in particle size of GAC. The adsorption affinity represented as Langmuir was consistent with the ranking of the octanol-water partition coefficient, Kow. The adsorption behavior in binary or tertiary systems could be described by competition adsorption. In the binary system adsorption replacement occurred, under which the adsorbate with the smaller Kow was replaced by the one with larger Kow. Results also indicated that portion of the micropores could be occupied only by the small target compound, but not the larger adsorbates. In multiple-component systems the competition adsorption might significantly be affected by the macropores and less by the meso- or micropores. PMID:26078989

  20. Simultaneous removal of NO x and SO2 by low-temperature selective catalytic reduction over modified activated carbon catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Ning, Ping; Li, Kai; Tang, Lihong; Hao, Jiming; Song, Xin; Zhang, Guijian; Wang, Chi

    2017-03-01

    A series of modified porous activated carbon (AC) catalysts prepared by impregnation were investigated for the low-temperature (≤250°C) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO x with NH3 with simultaneous removal of SO2. The effects of various preparation conditions and reaction conditions on NO and SO2 conversions were observed, such as support type, active components, copper loading, calcination temperature and presence of H2O and O2. The modified AC catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, TG and TPX methods. The activity test results showed that the optimal catalyst is 15% Cu/WCSAC which can provide 52% NO conversion and 68% SO2 conversion simultaneously at 175°C with a space velocity of 30000 h‒1, and the optimal calcination temperature was 500°C. The presence of H2O could inhibit NO conversion and promote the SO2 conversion. The effect of O2 (0-5%) was evaluated, and the NO and SO2 conversions were best when the concentration of O2 was 3%. Research demonstrated that Cu/WCSAC catalyst was a kind of potential catalysts due to the amorphous phase, high specific areas and high active ability.

  1. Toward the use of surface modified activated carbon in speciation: selective preconcentration of selenite and selenate in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Yeuk-Ki; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2011-04-22

    This paper describes a novel application of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide-modified activated carbon (AC-TBAH) to the speciation of ultra-trace Se(IV) and Se(VI) using LC-ICP-DRC-MS. The anion exchange functionality was immobilized onto the AC surface enables selective preconcentration of inorganic Se anions in a wide range of working pHs. Simultaneous retention and elution of both analytes, followed by subsequent analysis with LC-ICP-DRC-MS, allows to accomplish speciation analysis in natural samples without complicated redox pre-treatment. The laboratory-made column of immobilized AC (0.4 g of sorbent packed in a 6 mL syringe barrel) has achieved analyte enrichment factors of 76 and 93, respectively, for Se(IV) and Se(VI), thus proving its superior preconcentration efficiency and selectivity over common AC. The considerable enhancement in sensitivity achieved by using the preconcentration column has improved the method's detection limits to 1.9-2.2 ng L(-1), which is a 100-fold improvement compared with direct injection. The analyte recoveries from heavily polluted river matrix were between 95.3 and 107.7% with less than 5.0% RSD. The robustness of the preconcentration and speciation method was validated by analysis of natural waters collected from rivers and reservoirs in Hong Kong. The modified AC material is hence presented as a low-cost yet robust substitute for conventional anion exchange resins for routine applications.

  2. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 1. Adsorption capacity and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative PhACs (naproxen and carbamazepine) and one EDC (nonylphenol) were evaluated on two granular activated carbons (GAC) namely coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. The primary objective was to investigate preloading effects by natural organic matter (NOM) on adsorption capacity and kinetics under conditions and concentrations (i.e., ng/L) relevant for drinking water treatment. Isotherms demonstrated that all compounds were significantly negatively impacted by NOM fouling. Adsorption capacity reduction was most severe for the acidic naproxen, followed by the neutral carbamazepine and then the more hydrophobic nonylphenol. The GAC with the wider pore size distribution had considerably greater NOM loading, resulting in lower adsorption capacity. Different patterns for the change in Freundlich KF and 1/n with time revealed different competitive mechanisms for the different compounds. Mass transport coefficients determined by short fixed-bed (SFB) tests with virgin and preloaded GAC demonstrated that film diffusion primarily controls mass transfer on virgin and preloaded carbon. Naproxen suffered the greatest deteriorative effect on kinetic parameters due to preloading, followed by carbamazepine, and then nonylphenol. A type of surface NOM/biofilm, which appeared to add an additional mass transfer resistance layer and thus reduce film diffusion, was observed. In addition, electrostatic interactions between NOM/biofilm and the investigated compounds are proposed to contribute to the reduction of film diffusion. A companion paper building on this work describes treatability studies in pilot-scale GAC adsorbers and the effectiveness of a selected fixed-bed model. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  4. Adsorption of Selected Pharmaceutical Compounds onto Activated Carbon in Dilute Aqueous Solutions Exemplified by Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, and Sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Wan, Jan-Chi; Kim, Hyunook; Liang, Chung-Huei; Dai, Yung-Dun; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of three pharmaceuticals, namely, acetaminophen, diclofenac, and sulfamethoxazole onto granular activated carbon (GAC), was investigated. To study competitive adsorption, both dynamic and steady-state adsorption experiments were conducted by careful selection of pharmaceuticals with various affinities and molecular size. The effective diffusion coefficient of the adsorbate was increased with decease in particle size of GAC. The adsorption affinity represented as Langmuir was consistent with the ranking of the octanol-water partition coefficient, K(ow). The adsorption behavior in binary or tertiary systems could be described by competition adsorption. In the binary system adsorption replacement occurred, under which the adsorbate with the smaller K(ow) was replaced by the one with larger K(ow). Results also indicated that portion of the micropores could be occupied only by the small target compound, but not the larger adsorbates. In multiple-component systems the competition adsorption might significantly be affected by the macropores and less by the meso- or micropores.

  5. Optimization of Cu/activated carbon catalyst in low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO process using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Amanpour, Javad; Salari, Dariush; Niaei, Aligholi; Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi; Panahi, Parvaneh Nakhostin

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of Cu/Activated Carbon (Cu/AC) catalyst was optimized for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by using response surface methodology. A central composite design (CCD) was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely pre-oxidization degree (HNO3%), Cu loading (wt.%) and calcination temperature on NO conversion efficiency. The CCD was consisted of 20 different preparation conditions of Cu/AC catalysts. The prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD and SEM techniques. Predicting NO conversion was carried out using a second order model obtained from designed experiments and statistical software Minitab 14. Regression and Pareto graphic analysis showed that all of the chosen parameters and some interactions were effective on the NO conversion. The optimal values were pre-oxidization in 10.2% HNO3, 6.1 wt.% Cu loading and 480°C for calcination temperature. Under the optimum condition, NO conversion (94.3%) was in a good agreement with predicted value (96.12%).

  6. Synthesis of N-doped microporous carbon via chemical activation of polyindole-modified graphene oxide sheets for selective carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Chandra, Vimlesh; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-06-28

    A polyindole-reduced graphene oxide (PIG) hybrid was synthesized by reducing graphene oxide sheets in the presence of polyindole. We have shown PIG as a material for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2). The PIG hybrid was chemically activated at temperatures of 400-800 °C, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped graphene sheets. The N-doped graphene sheets are microporous with an adsorption pore size of 0.6 nm for CO2 and show a maximum (Brunauer, Emmet and Teller) surface area of 936 m(2) g(-1). The hybrid activated at 600 °C (PIG6) possesses a surface area of 534 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.29 cm(3) g(-1). PIG6 shows a maximum CO2 adsorption capacity of 3.0 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 atm. This high CO2 uptake is due to the highly microporous character of the material and its N content. The material retains its original adsorption capacity on recycling even after 10 cycles (within experimental error). PIG6 also shows high adsorption selectivity ratios for CO2 over N2, CH4 and H2 of 23, 4 and 85 at 25 °C, respectively.

  7. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  8. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE PAGES

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; ...

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more » It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  9. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    PubMed

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,α)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  10. Mechanism of removal of undesirable residual amylase, insoluble starch, and select colorants from refinery streams by powdered activated carbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need in the world-wide sugar industry to find a practical and economical solution to remove or inactivate residual alpha-amylase that are high temperature stable from factory or refinery streams. A survey of refineries that used amylase and had activated carbon systems for decolorization,...

  11. Adsorption characteristics of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound-Naproxen, carbamazepine and nonylphenol-on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zirui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption of two representative pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) (naproxen and carbamazepine) and one endocrine disrupting compound (nonylphenol) were evaluated on two types of activated carbon. When determining their isotherms at environmentally relevant concentration levels, it was found that at this low concentration range (10-800 ng/L), removals of the target compounds were contrary to expectations based on their hydrophobicity. Nonylphenol (log K(ow) 5.8) was most poorly adsorbed, whereas carbamazepine (log K(ow) 2.45) was most adsorbable. Nonylphenol Freundlich isotherms at this very low concentration range had a much higher 1/n compared to isotherms at much higher concentrations. This indicates that extrapolation from an isotherm obtained at a high concentration range to predict the adsorption of nonylphenol at a concentration well below the range of the original isotherm, leads to a substantial overestimation of its removals. Comparison of isotherms for the target compounds to those for other conventional micropollutants suggested that naproxen and carbamazepine could be effectively removed by applying the same dosage utilized to remove odorous compounds (geosmin and MIB) at very low concentrations. The impact of competitive adsorption by background natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the target compounds was quantified by using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) in combination with the equivalent background compound (EBC) approach. The fulfilment of the requirements for applying the simplified IAST-EBC model, which leads to the conclusion that the percentage removal of the target compounds at a given carbon dosage is independent of the initial contaminant concentration, was confirmed for the situation examined in the paper. On this basis it is suggested that the estimated minimum carbon usage rates (CURs) to achieve 90% removal of these emerging contaminants would be valid at concentrations of less than 500 ng/L in

  12. Highly active and selective catalysis of copper diphosphine complexes for the transformation of carbon dioxide into silyl formate.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Kashiwame, Daiki; Takahashi, Naoki; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Baba, Toshihide

    2013-07-22

    Copper diphosphine complexes have been found to be highly active and selective homogeneous catalysts for the hydrosilylation of CO2. The structure of the phosphine ligands strongly affects their catalytic activity. Turnover number (TON) reaches 70,000 after 24 hours with 1,2-bis(diisopropylphosphino)benzene as a ligand under 1 atmosphere of CO2. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, carried out under the reaction conditions, showed the reaction mechanism through insertion of CO2 into Cu-H to afford Cu/formate species.

  13. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on activated carbon tin ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, A. B.; Iyuke, S. E.; Daud, W. R. W.; Kadhum, A. A. H.; Fisal, Z.; Al-Khatib, M. F.; Shariff, A. M.

    2000-09-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with 34.57% SnCl 2·2H 2O salt and then dried at 180°C to produce AC-SnO 2 to improve its adsorptive interaction with CO. Besides the fact that activated carbon has its original different pore sizes for normal gas phase CO adsorption (as in the case of pure carbon), the impregnated carbon has additional CO adsorption ability due to the presence of O -(ads) on the active sites. AC-SnO 2 proved to be a superior adsorber of CO than pure carbon when used for H 2 purification in a PSA system. Discernibly, the high adsorptive selectivity of AC-SnO 2 towards gas phase CO portrays a good future for the applicability of this noble adsorbent, since CO has become a notorious threat to the global ecosystem due to the current level of air pollution.

  14. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  15. Food security and climate change: on the potential to adapt global crop production by active selection to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Lewis H; Bunce, James A; Shimono, Hiroyuki; Gealy, David R; Baker, Jeffrey T; Newton, Paul C D; Reynolds, Matthew P; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Zhu, Chunwu; Howden, Mark; Wilson, Lloyd T

    2012-10-22

    Agricultural production is under increasing pressure by global anthropogenic changes, including rising population, diversion of cereals to biofuels, increased protein demands and climatic extremes. Because of the immediate and dynamic nature of these changes, adaptation measures are urgently needed to ensure both the stability and continued increase of the global food supply. Although potential adaption options often consider regional or sectoral variations of existing risk management (e.g. earlier planting dates, choice of crop), there may be a global-centric strategy for increasing productivity. In spite of the recognition that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is an essential plant resource that has increased globally by approximately 25 per cent since 1959, efforts to increase the biological conversion of atmospheric CO(2) to stimulate seed yield through crop selection is not generally recognized as an effective adaptation measure. In this review, we challenge that viewpoint through an assessment of existing studies on CO(2) and intraspecific variability to illustrate the potential biological basis for differential plant response among crop lines and demonstrate that while technical hurdles remain, active selection and breeding for CO(2) responsiveness among cereal varieties may provide one of the simplest and direct strategies for increasing global yields and maintaining food security with anthropogenic change.

  16. Porous carbon derived via KOH activation of a hypercrosslinked porous organic polymer for efficient CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2} adsorptions and high CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Modak, Arindam; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-12-15

    Microporous carbon having Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 2186 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and micropore volume of 0.85 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} has been synthesized via KOH induced high temperature carbonization of a non-conjugated hypercrosslinked organic polymer. Owing to the templating and activation by KOH, we have succeeded in making a microporous carbon from this porous polymer and the resultant carbon material showed high uptake for CO{sub 2} (7.6 mmol g{sup −1}) and CH{sub 4} (2.4 mmol g{sup −1}) at 1 atm, 273 K together with very good selectivity for the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (30.2) separation. Furthermore, low pressure (1 atm) H{sub 2} (2.6 wt%, 77 K) and water uptake (57.4 wt%, 298 K) ability of this polymer derived porous activated carbon is noteworthy. - Graphical abstract: Microporous carbon with BET surface area of 2186 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} has been synthesized via KOH activation of a porous organic polymer and it showed high uptake for CO{sub 2} (7.6 mmol g{sup −1}), CH{sub 4} (2.4 mmol g{sup −1}) and H{sub 2} (2.6 wt%) at 1 atm together with very good selectivity for CO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Porous carbon from hypercrosslinked organic polymer. • KOH activated carbon with BET surface area 2186 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. • High CO2 uptake (7.6 mmol g{sup −1}) and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity (30.2). • Porous carbon also showed high H{sub 2} (2.6 wt%) and H{sub 2}O (57.4 wt%) uptakes.

  17. Heat Treated Carbon Fiber Material Selection Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, M.; Patel, B.; Koenig, J.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibers are used in a variety high temperature applications and materials. However, one limiting factor in their transition into additional applications is an understanding of their functional properties during component processing and function. The requirements on the fibers are governed by the nature of the materials and the environments in which they will be used. The current carbon fiber vendor literature is geared toward the polymeric composite industry and not the ceramic composite industry. Thus, selection of carbon fibers is difficult, since their properties change as a function of heat treatment, processing or component operational temperature, which ever is greatest. To enable proper decisions to be made, a program was established wherein multiple fibers were selected and heat treated at different temperatures. The fibers were then examined for their physical and mechanical properties which are reported herein.

  18. Selectivity in the carbon-oxygen reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokova, Kristina A.

    The dependence of the carbon-oxygen reaction rate and the CO/COsb2 ratio on temperature, oxygen pressure, carbon crystallite size, concentration of surface C(O) complexes, and content of heteroatoms was studied. It was shown that the temperature dependence of the CO/COsb2 ratio obeys an Arrhenius-type relationship, but the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy depend on oxygen pressure and carbon nature. The Arrhenius parameters were found to be directly proportional to each other. This confirmed the importance of the compensation effect in carbon oxidation. It was explained by active site heterogeneity in carbon materials. For all experimental conditions, the CO/COsb2 ratio was lower for carbons with more ordered graphitic structure. It was shown that the CO/COsb2 ratio is inversely proportional to the surface coverage with reactive C(O) complexes. More ordered carbons were revealed to possess lower concentrations of stable complexes, higher surface coverages with reactive complexes and thus lower CO/COsb2 ratios. The influence of B and N heteroatoms on carbon reactivity and the CO/COsb2 ratio was studied. It was confirmed that B acts as an inhibitor of carbon oxidation due to the formation of a protective Bsb2Osb3 coating. The N presence in the carbon structure increases its rate of oxidation, maybe due to decreasing carbon crystallite dimensions. The CO/COsb2 ratio did not correlate with the N content in the carbon, but depended on the concentration of surface carbon-oxygen complexes. A new reaction mechanism is proposed. A key feature of the mechanism is that it takes into account the presence and mobility of oxygen atoms on the basal plane. It was shown with the aid of theoretical molecular orbital calculations that chemisorption on a pair of adjacent edge and basal sites is thermodynamically favorable as a parallel process to the generally accepted path of chemisorption on two edge carbon atoms. The former process can lead to the formation of a

  19. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by urea loaded on activated carbon fibre (ACF) and CeO2/ACF at 30 degrees C: the SCR mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zheng; Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Jiang, Xiao; Zhai, Yunbo; Fan, Xiaopeng

    2012-06-01

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by urea loaded on rayon-based activated carbon fibre (ACF) and CeO2/ACF (CA) was studied at ambient temperature (30 degrees C) to establish a basic scheme for its reduction. Nitric oxide was found to be reduced to N2 with urea deposited on the ACF and CA. When oxygen was present, the greater the amount of loaded urea (20-60%), the greater the NO(x) conversions, which were between 72.03% and 77.30%, whereas the NO(x) conversions were about 50% when oxygen was absent. Moreover, when the urea was loaded on CA, a catalyst containing 40% urea/ACF loaded with 10% CeO2 (UCA4) could yield a NO(x) conversion of about 80% for 24.5 h. Based on the experimental results, the catalytic mechanisms of SCR with and without oxygen are discussed. The enhancing effect of oxygen resulted from the oxidation of NO to NO2, and urea was the main reducing agent in the SCR of loaded catalysts. ACF-C was the catalytic centre in the SCR of NO of ACF, while CeO2 of urea-loaded CA was the catalytic centre.

  20. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon.

  1. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-23

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  2. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  3. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C.

  4. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  5. Activated carbon to the rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the response to pipeline spill of ethylene dichloride (EDC) on the property of an oil company. Activated carbon cleanup proceedure was used. During delivery, changeout, transport, storage, thermal reactivation, and return delivery to the site, the carbon never came into direct contact with operating personnel or the atmosphere. More than 10,000 tones of dredge soil and 50 million gallons of surface water were processed during the emergency response.

  6. Mo-Fe catalysts supported on activated carbon for synthesis of liquid fuels by the Fischer-Tropsch process: effect of Mo addition on reducibility, activity, and hydrocarbon selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wenping Ma; Edwin L. Kugler; James Wright; Dady B. Dadyburjor

    2006-12-15

    The effects of Mo loading (0-12 wt %) on the properties of activated-carbon- (AC-) supported Fe-Cu-K catalysts and their performance for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are studied. Physicochemical properties studied include particle size, reducibility, and dispersion, and catalytic properties include activity, selectivity, and stability. Catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and CO chemisorption. Catalyst performance was studied at 310-320{sup o}C, 2.2 MPa, 3 Nl/g-cat/h, and H{sub 2}/CO = 0.9. Reaction results in a fixed-bed reactor show that addition of 6% Mo into the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalyst improves catalyst stability without sacrificing activity, but activity is suppressed dramatically on a 12% Mo-loaded catalyst. Detectable hydrocarbons of C{sub 1} to C{sub 34} are produced on the Fe-Cu-K/AC catalysts with or without Mo. However, the addition of Mo results in the production of more CH{sub 4} and less C{sub 5+} hydrocarbons. The Mo promoter greatly enhances secondary reactions of olefins, leading to a large amount of internal olefins (i.e., other than 1-olefins) in the product. TPR shows that a strong interaction between Fe and Mo oxides is present, and the extent of reduction of Fe is suppressed after addition of Mo to the Fe-Cu-K catalyst. CO-chemisorption and XRD studies show increased iron dispersion and decreased particle size of the iron carbide and iron oxide after the addition of Mo. Segregation of iron active sites, thereby preventing them from agglomerating, and a larger number of active sites on the 6% Mo catalyst are possible reasons for the improved stability and higher activity of Mo-promoted catalysts. 54 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Herawan, S. G.; Hadi, M. S.; Ayob, Md. R.; Putra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced. PMID:23737721

  8. Characterization of activated carbons from oil-palm shell by CO2 activation with no holding carbonization temperature.

    PubMed

    Herawan, S G; Hadi, M S; Ayob, Md R; Putra, A

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied. The BET surface area of the activated carbon is investigated using N2 adsorption at 77 K with selected temperatures of 500, 600, and 700°C. These pyrolysis conditions for preparing the activated carbons are found to yield higher BET surface area at a pyrolysis temperature of 700°C compared to selected commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons thus result in well-developed porosities and predominantly microporosities. By using this activation method, significant improvement can be obtained in the surface characteristics of the activated carbons. Thus this study shows that the preparation time can be shortened while better results of activated carbon can be produced.

  9. Superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges for separation and absorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Liang, Weidong; Zhao, Xinhong; La, Peiqing; Deng, Weiqiao

    2013-06-01

    Highly porous activated carbon with a large surface area and pore volume was synthesized by KOH activation using commercially available activated carbon as a precursor. By modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), highly porous activated carbon showed superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 163.6°. The changes in wettability of PDMS- treated highly porous activated carbon were attributed to the deposition of a low-surface-energy silicon coating onto activated carbon (confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), which had microporous characteristics (confirmed by XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses). Using an easy dip-coating method, superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges were also fabricated; those exhibited excellent absorption selectivity for the removal of a wide range of organics and oils from water, and also recyclability, thus showing great potential as efficient absorbents for the large-scale removal of organic contaminants or oil spills from water.

  10. Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  11. Phenyl-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon for the effective removal of selected pharmaceutical and endocrine-disruptive compounds.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kien Tiek; Yoon, Yeomin; Snyder, Shane A; Jang, Min

    2016-06-01

    Triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS)-functionalized magnetic palm-based powdered activated carbon (MPPAC-TEPS) was prepared and characterized using various spectroscopic methods, and then tested for the removal of bisphenol A, carbamazepine, ibuprofen and clofibric acid. Magnetite film on MPPAC-TEPS was homogeneously coated on the outer surface of palm-based powdered activated carbon (PPAC) through a hydrothermal co-precipitation technique. Followed by silanization of phenyl-functionalized organosilane on MPPAC's magnetic film. As results, micro/mesopore surface area and volume increased without significant pore clogging and iron (Fe) dissolution under the acidic conditions was greatly decreased. The unique structural and chemical features of MPPAC-TEPS were found to be the main reasons for the enhanced adsorption rates and removal capacities of POPs. The presence of electrolytes and different pH values greatly affected the sorption efficiencies. The dominant sorption mechanism of POPs by MPPAC-TEPS was determined to be π-π interaction (physisorption), based on thermodynamic (ΔG°) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal regeneration at a low temperature (350 °C) was an effective method to desorb the retained POPs and enabled to reactivate MPPAC-TEPS with sustained sorption rates and capacities, whereas PPAC was largely exhausted. As a new type of sorbent for POPs, MPPAC-TEPS has operational advantages, such as magnetic separation and stable regeneration.

  12. The adsorption of sympathomimetic agents by activated carbon hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Horres, C R; Hill, J B; Ellis, F W

    1976-01-01

    Sympathomimetic agents with mixed and pure alpha and beta adrenergic activity are adsorbed by coconut shell activated carbon from blood, sufficiently rapidly to markedly reduce the activity of these agents. The results of this study suggest that the site of injection of sympathomimetic agents being considered for correcting hypotension during activated carbon hemoperfusion be selected to permit systemic mixing before circulation into the adsorption device.

  13. Photoconductivity of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity. 54 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  15. Molecular selectivity of brown carbon chromophores.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Roach, Patrick; Eckert, Peter; Gilles, Mary K; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and microspectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene SOA (LSOA) and α-pinene SOA (PSOA). The LSOA compounds readily formed adducts with Na(+) under electrospray ionization conditions, with only a small fraction of compounds detected in the protonated form. In contrast, a significant fraction of PSOA compounds appeared in the protonated form because of their increased molecular rigidity. Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas was detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl-imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the α-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  16. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system...

  1. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Modified Activated Carbon Perchlorate Sorbents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-25

    nitrosodimethylamine precursors in municipal wastewater treatment plants. Environ. Sci. Technol., 2004. 38: p. 1445-1454. 15. Shmidt, V., K. Rybakov...Engineering and Management, 1994. 141: p. 12. 33. Walker, G. and L. Weatherley, Biological Activated Carbon Treatment of Industrial Wastewater in... Treatment with Ammonia (NAC), Urea-formaldehyde Resin (UAC), and Hydrogen (HAC). Data are Indicated by the Symbol and Least Squares Fit of the Langmuir

  3. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  4. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  5. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  6. Highly Selective and Stable Reduction of CO2 to CO by a Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunyu; Tan, Tze Hao; Ng, Yun Hau; Amal, Rose

    2016-08-16

    A stable and selective electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction was fabricated by covalently attaching graphitic carbon nitride onto multiwall carbon nanotubes (g-C3 N4 /MWCNTs). The as-prepared composite is able to reduce CO2 exclusively to CO with a maximum Faraday efficiency of 60 %, and no decay in the catalytic activity was observed even after 50 h of reaction. The enhanced catalytic activity towards CO2 reduction is attributed to the formation of active carbon-nitrogen bonds, high specific surface area, and improved material conductivity of the g-C3 N4 /MWCNT composite.

  7. Preparation of binderless activated carbon monolith from pre-carbonization rubber wood sawdust by controlling of carbonization and activation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Deraman, M.; Taslim, R.; Iwantono

    2013-09-01

    Binderless activated carbon monolith (ACM) was prepared from pre-carbonized rubber wood sawdust (RWSD). The effect of the carbonization temperature (400, 500, 600, 700, 800 dan 900 °C) on porosity characteristic of the ACM have been studied. The optimum carbonization temperature for obtaining ACM with high surface area of 600 °C with CO2 activation at 800 °C for one hour. At this condition, the surface area as high as 733 m2 g-1 could be successfully obtained. By improved the activation temperature at 900 °C for 2.5 h, it was found that the surface area of 860 m2 g-1. For this condition, the ACM exhibit the specific capacitance of 90 F g-1. In addition the termogravimertic (TG)-differential termografimertic (DTG) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) measurement were also performed on the ACMs and the result has been studied. Finally, it was conclude that the high surface area of ACM from RWSD could be produced by proper selections of carbonization and activation condition.

  8. Method and apparatus for selective removal of carbon monoxide

    DOEpatents

    Borup, Rodney L.; Skala, Glenn W.; Brundage, Mark A.; LaBarge, William J.

    2000-01-01

    There is provided a method and apparatus for treatment of a hydrogen-rich gas to reduce the carbon monoxide content thereof by reacting the carbon monoxide in the gas with an amount of oxygen sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalyst in a desired temperature range without substantial reaction of hydrogen. The catalyst is an iridium-based catalyst dispersed on, and supported on, a carrier. In the presence of the catalyst, carbon monoxide in a hydrogen-rich feed gas is selectively oxidized such that a product stream is produced with a very low carbon monoxide content.

  9. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  10. Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes: Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Khare, Bishun

    2010-01-01

    An alternative method of low-temperature plasma functionalization of carbon nanotubes provides for the simultaneous attachment of molecular groups of multiple (typically two or three) different species or different mixtures of species to carbon nanotubes at different locations within the same apparatus. This method is based on similar principles, and involves the use of mostly the same basic apparatus, as those of the methods described in "Low-Temperature Plasma Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes" (ARC-14661-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 45. The figure schematically depicts the basic apparatus used in the aforementioned method, with emphasis on features that distinguish the present alternative method from the other. In this method, one exploits the fact that the composition of the deposition plasma changes as the plasma flows from its source in the precursor chamber toward the nanotubes in the target chamber. As a result, carbon nanotubes mounted in the target chamber at different flow distances (d1, d2, d3 . . .) from the precursor chamber become functionalized with different species or different mixtures of species. In one series of experiments to demonstrate this method, N2 was used as the precursor gas. After the functionalization process, the carbon nanotubes from three different positions in the target chamber were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the molecular groups that had become attached. On carbon nanotubes from d1 = 1 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-N and C=N. On carbon nanotubes from d2 = 2.5 cm, the attached molecular groups were found to be predominantly C-(NH)2 and/or C=NH2. (The H2 was believed to originate as residual hydrogen present in the nanotubes.) On carbon nanotubes from d3 = 7 cm no functionalization could be detected - perhaps, it was conjectured, because this distance is downstream of the plasma source, all of the free ions and free radicals of

  11. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  12. Methods for selective functionalization and separation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Marek, legal representative, Irene Marie (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  13. Selective removal of carbon-14 from ion exchange resins using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, S.A.; Krasznai, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Ion exchange resins (IX) are used extensively in CANDU-PHWR (Canada Deuterium Uranium - Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) and other reactor systems worldwide to remove ionic contaminants from various coolant circuits. Spent IX resins represent a significant volume of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The presence of long-lived C-14 which is found in significant quantities in IX resins from CANDU reactors, complicates the disposal of these resins. Several experiments were conducted with carbon dioxide under subcritical and supercritical conditions to determine the feasibility of removing C-14 present as carbonate and/or bicarbonate on IX resins. It has been established that resins containing inorganic C-14 undergo rapid isotopic exchange when exposed to inactive carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions. This treatment reduces the C-14 to the limits of detection and leaves other radioisotopes on the resins largely unaffected. This selective and highly efficient means to remove long-lived C-14 activity from CANDU spent IX resins allows the resin waste to be reclassified as low level waste. This lower classification simplifies the handling, transportation and eventual disposal of IX resins which translates to a very significant cost saving. Since the process is selective the C-14 can be enriched and recovered for commercial purposes.

  14. Physicochemical effect of activation temperature on the sorption properties of pine shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wasim, Agha Arslan; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin

    2017-03-01

    Activated carbons produced from a variety of raw materials are normally selective towards a narrow range of pollutants present in wastewater. This study focuses on shifting the selectivity of activated carbon from inorganic to organic pollutants using activation temperature as a variable. The material produced from carbonization of pine shells substrate was activated at 250°C and 850°C. Both adsorbents were compared with commercial activated carbon for the sorption of lead, cadmium, methylene blue, methyl blue, xylenol orange, and crystal violet. It was observed that carbon activated at 250°C was selective for lead and cadmium whereas the one activated at 850°C was selective for the organic dyes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study revealed that AC850 had less surface functional groups as compared to AC250. Point of zero charge and point of zero salt effect showed that AC250 had acidic groups at its surface. Scanning electron microscopy depicted that increase in activation temperature resulted in an increase in pore size of activated carbon. Both AC250 and AC850 followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Temkin isotherm model was a best fit for empirical data obtained at equilibrium. The model also showed that sorption process for both AC250 and AC850 was physisorption.

  15. Enhanced CO2/N2 Selectivity in Amidoxime-Modified Porous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Gorka, Joanna; Nelson, Kimberly M; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the use of the amidoxime functional group grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from combustion streams. Measured CO2/N2 ideal selectivity values for the amidoxime-grafted carbon were significantly higher than the pristine porous carbon with improvements of 65%. Though the overall CO2 capacity decreased slightly for the activated carbon from 4.97 mmol g-1 to 4.24 mmol g-1 after surface modification due to a reduction in the total surface area, the isosteric heats of adsorption increased after amidoxime incorporation indicating an increased interaction of CO2 with the sorbent. Total capacity was reproducible and stable after multiple adsorption/desorption cycles with no loss of capacity suggesting that modification with the amidoxime group is a potential method to enhance carbon capture.

  16. [Study on influence between activated carbon property and immobilized biological activated carbon purification effect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-zhi; Li, Wei-guang; He, Wen-jie; Han, Hong-da; Ding, Chi; Ma, Xiao-na; Qu, Yan-ming

    2006-10-01

    By means of immobilizing five kinds of activated carbon, we studied the influence between the chief activated carbon property items and immobilized bioactivated carbon (IBAC) purification effect with the correlation analysis. The result shows that the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.7 include molasses, abrasion number, hardness, tannin, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter; the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.5 include pH, iodine, butane and tetrachloride. In succession, the partial correlation analysis shows that activated carbon property items mostly influencing on IBAC purification effect include molasses, hardness, abrasion number, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter. The causation of these property items bringing influence on IBAC purification is that the activated carbon holes distribution (representative activated carbon property item is molasses) provides inhabitable location and adjust food for the dominance bacteria; the mechanical resist-crash property of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: abrasion number and hardness) have influence on the stability of biofilm; and the particle diameter size and distribution of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter) can directly affect the force of water in IBAC filter bed, which brings influence on the dominance bacteria immobilizing on activated carbon.

  17. Highly selective and stable carbon dioxide uptake in polyindole-derived microporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Tiwari, Jitendra N; Kemp, K Christain; Yousuf, Muhammad; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-05-21

    Adsorption with solid sorbents is considered to be one of the most promising methods for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO₂) from power plant flue gases. In this study, microporous carbon materials used for CO₂ capture were synthesized by the chemical activation of polyindole nanofibers (PIF) at temperatures from 500 to 800 °C using KOH, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped carbon materials. The N-doped carbon materials were found to be microporous with an optimal adsorption pore size for CO₂ of 0.6 nm and a maximum (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) BET surface area of 1185 m(2) g(-1). The PIF activated at 600 °C (PIF6) has a surface area of 527 m(2) g(-1) and a maximum CO₂ storage capacity of 3.2 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 bar. This high CO₂ uptake is attributed to its highly microporous character and optimum N content. Additionally, PIF6 material displays a high CO₂ uptake at low pressure (1.81 mmol g(-1) at 0.2 bar and 25 °C), which is the best low pressure CO₂ uptake reported for carbon-based materials. The adsorption capacity of this material remained remarkably stable even after 10 cycles. The isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated to be in the range of 42.7-24.1 kJ mol(-1). Besides the excellent CO₂ uptake and stability, PIF6 also exhibits high selectivity values for CO₂ over N₂, CH₄, and H₂ of 58.9, 12.3, and 101.1 at 25 °C, respectively, and these values are significantly higher than reported values.

  18. Surface selective membranes for carbon dioxide separation

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, hybrid membranes have been developed for the selective separation of CO2 from mixtures containing H2. Beginning with commercially available Pall alumina membrane tubes with nominal pore diameter of 5 nm, hybrids were produced by silation with a variety of functionalities designed to facilitate the selective adsorption of CO2 onto the pore surface. The goal is to produce a membrane which can harness the power of surface diffusion to give the selectivity of polymer membranes with the permeance of inorganic membranes.

  19. Carbon cycles and climate: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.S.; Allison, L.J.; Collier, B.N.

    1980-05-01

    This partially annotated bibliography contains the first 1000 references from a computerized file of literature on the global ecological implications of carbon cycles and climatic changes. Many early citations originated from the Biogeochemical Ecological Information Center established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1968 and from profiles of computerized files such as Government Research Abstracts (GRA) and Biological Abstracts (BA). Later citations have been extracted from the open literature through 1978 and early 1979, from government reports and impact statements, and from profiles of GRA, BA, and the Energy Data Base of the Department of Energy Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The subject categories covered by this bibliography may be divided into two main topics: carbon cycling and climate system analysis. Volume 3 provides indexes for author, organization (corporate authority), keywords (or free index terms), taxonomic category, subject category, Chemical Abstracts codes, Biological Abstracts codes (crosscode), and COSATI/Weekly Government Abstracts codes concentrated with permuted title words.

  20. Polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate inspired by biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Il Won

    This dissertation primarily examines bioinspired mineralization, focusing on the polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate. (1) The effect of epitaxy on the polymorphic control of calcium carbonate was studied with aragonite-type inorganic substrates. The critical epitaxial mismatch for aragonite growth, when conditions disfavor aragonite, seems to be less than 7.1%. Larger epitaxial strain appeared to prohibit aragonite formation even though the substrates had the same crystal structure. The epitaxy required for aragonite nucleation seems to be more precise than that often suggested for biological systems. (2) Polymers of different aqueous-solution properties were tested to observe the effect on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. Near exclusive formation of aragonite was attained through the inhibition of more stable calcite with poly(vinyl alcohol). The contributing characteristics of poly(vinyl alcohol) seemed to be its ability to hydrogen bond and its tendency to adsorb non-specifically onto solid surfaces. Similar inhibition activity is suggested for various biomacromolecules involved in biogenic aragonite formation of mollusks, with the biomacromolecules acting in the same way as poly(vinyl alcohol). (3) Polymer surfaces imprinted by aragonite-type crystals (strontium carbonate) were studied as substrates for the crystallization of calcium carbonate. Only calcite formed under vaterite-, aragonite-, and calcite-favorable conditions. This result seemed to arise from the nature of functional groups, rather than from the molecular structure of the imprint. Interaction between the functional groups and calcium carbonate is suggested to have enhanced the crystallization rate, resulting in the rapid formation of the thermodynamically stable calcite irrespective of the bulk crystallization conditions. (4) A catechol-based monomer was synthesized in the course of developing a dental adhesive, which mimics the functionalities of mussel adhesive

  1. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture. PMID:24367077

  2. Sorption of boron trifluoride by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Polevoi, A.S.; Petrenko, A.E.

    1988-01-10

    The sorption of born trifluoride on AG-3, SKT, SKT-3, SKT-7, SKT-4A, SKT-6A, and SKT-2B carbons was investigated. The sorption isotherms for both vapors and gas were determined volumetrically. The coefficients of two equations described the sorption of BF/sub 3/ in the sorption of BF/sub 3/ on active carbons. Heats of sorption of BF/sub 3/ on the activated carbons are shown and the sorption isotherms and temperature dependences of the equilibrium pressure of BF/sub 3/ for activated carbons were presented. The values of the heats of sorption indicated the weak character of the reaction of BF/sub 3/ with the surface of the carbons. The equations can be used for calculating the phase equilibrium of BF/sub 3/ on carbons in a wider range of temperatures and pressures.

  3. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  4. Catalytic activation of carbon-carbon bonds in cyclopentanones.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Lu, Gang; Liu, Peng; Dong, Guangbin

    2016-11-24

    In the chemical industry, molecules of interest are based primarily on carbon skeletons. When synthesizing such molecules, the activation of carbon-carbon single bonds (C-C bonds) in simple substrates is strategically important: it offers a way of disconnecting such inert bonds, forming more active linkages (for example, between carbon and a transition metal) and eventually producing more versatile scaffolds. The challenge in achieving such activation is the kinetic inertness of C-C bonds and the relative weakness of newly formed carbon-metal bonds. The most common tactic starts with a three- or four-membered carbon-ring system, in which strain release provides a crucial thermodynamic driving force. However, broadly useful methods that are based on catalytic activation of unstrained C-C bonds have proven elusive, because the cleavage process is much less energetically favourable. Here we report a general approach to the catalytic activation of C-C bonds in simple cyclopentanones and some cyclohexanones. The key to our success is the combination of a rhodium pre-catalyst, an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand and an amino-pyridine co-catalyst. When an aryl group is present in the C3 position of cyclopentanone, the less strained C-C bond can be activated; this is followed by activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond in the aryl group, leading to efficient synthesis of functionalized α-tetralones-a common structural motif and versatile building block in organic synthesis. Furthermore, this method can substantially enhance the efficiency of the enantioselective synthesis of some natural products of terpenoids. Density functional theory calculations reveal a mechanism involving an intriguing rhodium-bridged bicyclic intermediate.

  5. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  6. Copper crystallite in carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfurfuryl alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  7. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  8. An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S.

    2007-07-01

    Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

  9. Selective Formation of Trimethylene Carbonate (TMC): Atmospheric Pressure Carbon Dioxide Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Benjamin R; Patel, Anish P; Wijayantha, K G Upul

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide utilisation (CDU) is currently gaining increased interest due to the abundance of CO2 and its possible application as a C1 building block. We herein report the first example of atmospheric pressure carbon dioxide incorporation into oxetane to selectively form trimethylene carbonate (TMC), which is a significant challenge as TMC is thermodynamically less favoured than its corresponding co-polymer. PMID:26213485

  10. Selective Cell Growth on Fibronectin-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Seon; Park, Sung Young; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Minbaek; Nam, Jwa-Min; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been considered a promising material for biological applications including biosensors, therapeutic application, and nano-structured scaffolds. However, there are still controversies associated with toxicity and biocompatibility of CNTs on live cells. Here, we report general strategy to functionalize CNTs with cell adhesion molecules (fibronectins) for selective and stable adhesion of cells on CNTs. Interestingly, more fibronectins were adsorbed and activated on CNTs rather than on hydrophobic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) or bare substrates (SiO2). We demonstrate the functionality of fibronectins on CNTs with immunofluorescence and molecule-level force measurement study using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These fibronectin-CNT hybrid nanostructures were successfully applied to attract cells selectively onto predefined regions on the substrate. Our strategy was generally available on various cell types including mesenchymal stem cells, KB cells, and NIH3T3 fibroblast cells (Advanced Materials 19, 2530-2534 (2007)). We will also discuss about its impacts on cell biology combined with CNTs.

  11. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon.

  12. The mechanism of selective molecular capture in carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Xudong; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-28

    Recently, air pollution issues have drawn significant attention to the development of efficient air filters, and one of the most promising materials for this purpose is nanofibers. We explore here the mechanism of selective molecular capture of volatile organic compounds in carbon nanotube networks by performing atomistic simulations. The results are discussed with respect to the two key parameters that define the performance of nanofiltration, i.e. the capture efficiency and flow resistance, which demonstrate the advantages of carbon nanotube networks with high surface-to-volume ratio and atomistically smooth surfaces. We also reveal the important roles of interfacial adhesion and diffusion that govern selective gas transport through the network.

  13. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Selective Membranes: A Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dushyant Shekhawat; David R. Luebke; Henry W. Pennline

    2003-12-01

    Carbon dioxide selective membranes provide a viable energy-saving alternative for CO2 separation, since membranes do not require any phase transformation. This review examines various CO2 selective membranes for the separation of CO2 and N2, CO2 and CH4, and CO2 and H2 from flue or fuel gas. This review attempts to summarize recent significant advances reported in the literature about various CO2 selective membranes, their stability, the effect of different parameters on the performance of the membrane, the structure and permeation properties relationships, and the transport mechanism applied in different CO2 selective membranes.

  14. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Solvent recovery improved with activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    A non-woven net of activated carbon fibers as absorbing media, representing a major advancement in vapor recovery technology, is presented. The carbon fiber exhibits mass transfer coefficients for adsorption description of up to 100 times that of conventional systems.

  16. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  17. Chemical activation of carbon mesophase pitches.

    PubMed

    Mora, E; Blanco, C; Pajares, J A; Santamaría, R; Menéndez, R

    2006-06-01

    This paper studies the chemical activation of mesophase pitches of different origins in order to obtain activated carbons suitable for use as electrodes in supercapacitors. The effect that the activating agent (NaOH, LiOH, and KOH), the alkaline hydroxide/pitch ratio, and the activation temperature had on the characteristics of the resultant activated carbons was studied. LiOH was found to be a noneffective activating agent, while activation with NaOH and KOH yielded activated carbons with high apparent surface areas and pore volumes. The increase of the KOH/pitch ratio caused an increase of the chemical attack on the carbon, producing higher burnoffs and development of porosity. Extremely high apparent surface areas were obtained when the petroleum pitch was activated with 5:1 KOH/carbon ratio. The increase of the activation temperature caused an increase of the burnoff, although the differences were not as significant as those derived from the use of different proportions of activating agent.

  18. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  19. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  20. Carbon nanotube nanoweb-bioelectrode for highly selective dopamine sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Weimin; Sherrell, Peter; Razal, Joselito M; Huang, Xu-Feng; Minett, Andrew I; Chen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective dopamine sensor was fabricated with the unique 3D carbon nanotube nanoweb (CNT-N) electrode. The as-synthesised CNT-N was modified by oxygen plasma to graft functional groups in order to increase selective electroactive sites at the CNT sidewalls. This electrode was characterized physically and electrochemically using HRSEM, Raman, FT-IR, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Our investigations indicated that the O(2)-plasma treated CNT-N electrode could serve as a highly sensitive biosensor for the selective sensing of dopamine (DA, 1 μM to 20 μM) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA, 1000 μM).

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Mennati, Afsaneh; Jafari, Samira; Khezri, Khadejeh; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery. PMID:25789215

  2. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by pecan shell- and almond shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of using pecan and almond shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of health concern and known toxic compounds (such as bromo-dichloromethane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloromethane, chloroform, and 1,1-dichloromethane) compared to the adsorption efficiency of commercially used carbons (such as Filtrasorb 200, Calgon GRC-20, and Waterlinks 206C AW) in simulated test medium. The pecan shell-based GACs were activated using steam, carbon dioxide or phosphoric acid. An almond shell-based GAC was activated with phosphoric acid. Our results indicated that steam- or carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were superior in total VOC adsorption to phosphoric acid-activated pecan shell or almond shell carbons, inferring that the method of activation selected for the preparation of activated carbons affected the adsorption of VOCs and hence are factors to be considered in any adsorption process. The steam-activated, pecan shell carbon adsorbed more total VOCs than the other experimental carbons and had an adsorption profile similar to the two coconut shell-based commercial carbons, but had greater adsorption than the coal-based commercial carbon. All the carbons studied adsorbed benzene more effectively than the other organics. Pecan shell, steam-activated and acid-activated GACs showed higher adsorption of 1,1,1-trichloroethane than the other carbons studied. Multivariate analysis was conducted to group experimental carbons and commercial carbons based on their physical, chemical, and adsorptive properties. The results of the analysis conclude that steam-activated and acid-activated pecan shell carbons clustered together with coal-based and coconut shell-based commercial carbons, thus inferring that these experimental carbons could potentially be used as alternative sources for VOC adsorption in an aqueous environment.

  3. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine; Karra, Reddy

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  4. Graphene-carbon nanotube composite aerogel for selective detection of uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Tang, Jie; Wang, Zonghua; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2013-12-01

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite aerogel has been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The restacking of graphene is effectively reduced by SWNTs inserted in between graphene layers in order to make available more active sites and reactive surface area. Electrochemical experiments show that the graphene-SWNT composite electrode has superior catalytic performance in selective detection of uric acid (UA).

  5. Arundo donax cane as a precursor for activated carbons preparation by phosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, T; Bonelli, P R; Cerrella, E G; Cukierman, A L

    2002-06-01

    Canes from Arundo donax, a herbaceous rapid-growing plant, were used as precursor for activated carbon preparation by phosphoric acid activation under a self-generated atmosphere. The influence of the carbonization temperature in the range 400-550 degrees C and of the weight ratio phosphoric acid to precursor (R = 1.5-2.5) on the developed porous structure of the resulting carbons was studied for 1 h of carbonization time. Surface properties of the activated carbons were dependent on a combined effect of the conditions employed. Carbons developed either with R = 1.5 over the range 400-500 degrees C, or with R = 2 at 500 degrees C exhibited surface areas of around 1100 m2/g, the latter conditions promoting a larger pore volume and enhanced mesoporous character. For both ratios, temperature above 500 degrees C led to reduction in porosity development. A similar effect was found for the highest ratio (R = 2.5) and 500 degrees C. The influence of carrying out the carbonization either for times shorter than 1 h or under flowing N2 was also examined at selected conditions (R = 2, 500 degrees C). Shorter times induced increase in the surface area (approximately 1300 m2/g), yielding carbons with smaller mean pore radius. Activated carbons obtained under flowing N2 possessed predominant microporous structures and larger ash contents than the samples derived in the self-generated atmosphere.

  6. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  7. Selective and Efficient Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide on Oxide-Derived Nanostructured Silver Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Trześniewski, Bartek J; Xie, Jie; Smith, Wilson A

    2016-08-08

    In this work, the selective electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide on oxide-derived silver electrocatalysts is presented. By a simple synthesis technique, the overall high faradaic efficiency for CO production on the oxide-derived Ag was shifted by more than 400 mV towards a lower overpotential compared to that of untreated Ag. Notably, the Ag resulting from Ag oxide is capable of electrochemically reducing CO2 to CO with approximately 80 % catalytic selectivity at a moderate overpotential of 0.49 V, which is much higher than that (ca. 4 %) of untreated Ag under identical conditions. Electrokinetic studies show that the improved catalytic activity is ascribed to the enhanced stabilization of COOH(.) intermediate. Furthermore, highly nanostructured Ag is likely able to create a high local pH near the catalyst surface, which may also facilitate the catalytic activity for the reduction of CO2 with suppressed H2 evolution.

  8. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  9. Deposition of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Activated Carbons and Preparation of Magnetic Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahani, S. A.; Hamadanian, M.; Vandadi, O.

    2007-08-01

    Magnetic activated carbons (MACs) for gold recovery from alkaline cyanide solutions have been developed by mixing a magnetic precursor with a carbon source, and treating the mixture under controlled conditions. As would be expected, these activated carbons have high specific surface areas due to their microporous structure. In addition, the small particle size of the MACs produced allows rapid adsorption of gold in solution, and the magnetic character of these MACs enables recovery from suspension by magnetic separation.

  10. Selecting the Politically Active Social Studies Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, James; Troshynski, Hugh

    1973-01-01

    This article outlines an innovative selection program to hire politically responsible social studies teachers. The objective is to produce aware and active citizens who know how to participate in the political process. (Editor)

  11. Infusing and selecting V&V activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    The evolving nature of software development poses a continuing series of challenges for V&V. In response, the V&V community selectively adapts the use of existing V&V activities, and introduces new and improved ones.

  12. Carbon induced selective regulation of cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts by ethylene treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, Pei-Pei; Xie, Jinglin; Liu, Jin-Xun; Zhao, Huabo; Lin, Lili; Zhao, Bo; Su, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Qingjun; Li, Wei-Xue; Ma, Ding

    2017-02-10

    Various carbonaceous species were controllably deposited on Co/Al2O3 catalysts using ethylene as carbon source during the activation process for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). Atomic, polymeric and graphitic carbon were distinguished by Raman spectroscopy, thermoanalysis and temperature programmed hydrogenation. Significant changes occurred in both the catalytic activity and selectivity toward hydrocarbon products after ethylene treatment. The activity decreased along with an increase in CH4 selectivity, at the expense of a remarkable decrease of heavy hydrocarbon production, resulting in enhanced selectivity for the gasoline fraction. In situ XPS experiments show the possible electron transfer from cobalt to carbon and the blockage of metallic cobalt sites, which is responsible for the deactivation of the catalyst. DFT calculations reveal that the activation barrier (Ea) of methane formation decreases by 0.61 eV on the carbon-absorbed Co(111) surface, whereas the Ea of the CH + CH coupling reaction changes unnoticeably. Hydrogenation of CHx to methane becomes the preferable route among the elementary reactions on the Co(111) surface, leading to dramatic changes in the product distribution. Detailed coke-induced deactivation mechanisms of Co-based catalysts during FTS are discussed.

  13. New solar selective coating based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Thomas; Leupolt, Beate; Mäder, Gerrit; Härtel, Paul; Grählert, Wulf; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan; Beyer, Eckhard

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be applied to assemble a new type of solar selective coating system for solar thermal applications. In this work the predominant absorption processes occurring by interaction with π-plasmon and Van Hove singularities (VHS) were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Not only optical properties for as deposited SWCNT thin films itself, but also the potential for systematic tailoring will be presented. Besides low cost technologies required, the adjustability of optical properties, as well as their thermal stability render CNT based solar selective coatings as promising alternative to commercially available coating systems.

  14. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Haijie; Liu, Enhui; Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  15. Long-term Carbon Loss and Recovery Following Selective Logging in Amazon Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Asner, Gregory P.

    2010-09-30

    Amazon deforestation contributes significantly to global carbon (C) emissions. In comparison, the contribution from selective logging to atmospheric CO2 emissions, and its impact on regional C dynamics, is highly uncertain. Using a new geographically-based modeling approach in combination with high resolution remote sensing data from 1999-2002, we estimate that C emissions were 0.04 – 0.05 Pg C yr-1 due to selective logging from a ~2,664,960 km2 region of the Brazilian Amazon. Selective logging was responsible for 15-19% higher carbon emissions than reported from deforestation (clear-cutting) alone. Our simulations indicated that forest carbon lost via selective logging lasts two to three decades following harvest, and that the original live biomass takes up to a century to recover, if the forests are not subsequently cleared. The two- to three-decade loss of carbon results from the biomass damaged by logging activities, including leaves, wood, and roots, estimated to be 89.1 Tg C yr-1 from 1999-2002 over the study region, leaving 70.0 Tg C yr-1 and 7.9 Tg C yr-1 to accumulate as coarse woody debris and soil C, respectively. While avoided deforestation is central to crediting rainforest nations for reduced carbon emissions, the extent and intensity of selective logging are also critical to determining carbon emissions in the context of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD). We show that a combination of automated high-resolution satellite monitoring and detailed forest C modeling can yield spatially explicit estimates of harvest related C losses and subsequent recovery in support of REDD and other international carbon market mechanisms.

  16. Long-term carbon loss and recovery following selective logging in Amazon forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Maoyi; Asner, Gregory P.

    2010-09-01

    Amazon deforestation contributes significantly to global carbon (C) emissions. In comparison, the contribution from selective logging to atmospheric CO2 emissions, and its impact on regional C dynamics, is highly uncertain. Using a new geographically based modeling approach in combination with high resolution remote sensing data from 1999 to 2002, we estimate that C emissions were 0.04-0.05 Pg C yr-1 due to selective logging from a ˜2,664,960 km2 region of the Brazilian Amazon. Selective logging was responsible for 15-19% higher carbon emissions than reported from deforestation (clear-cutting) alone. Our simulations indicated that forest carbon lost via selective logging lasts two to three decades following harvest, and that the original live biomass takes up to a century to recover, if the forests are not subsequently cleared. The two- to three-decade loss of carbon results from the biomass damaged by logging activities, including leaves, wood, and roots, estimated to be 89.1 Tg C yr-1 from 1999 to 2002 over the study region, leaving 70.0 Tg C yr-1 and 7.9 Tg C yr-1 to accumulate as coarse woody debris and soil C, respectively. While avoided deforestation is central to crediting rain forest nations for reduced carbon emissions, the extent and intensity of selective logging are also critical to determining carbon emissions in the context of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD). We show that a combination of automated high-resolution satellite monitoring and detailed forest C modeling can yield spatially explicit estimates of harvest-related C losses and subsequent recovery in support of REDD and other international carbon market mechanisms.

  17. Selective and Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Capture by Highly Polarizing Porous Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngtak; Le, Viet-Duc; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Hwang, Jin Ok; Park, Woo Jin; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Youn-Sang; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-22

    Energy-efficient CO2 capture is a stringent demand for green and sustainable energy supply. Strong adsorption is desirable for high capacity and selective capture at ambient conditions but unfavorable for regeneration of adsorbents by a simple pressure control process. Here we present highly regenerative and selective CO2 capture by carbon nitride functionalized porous reduced graphene oxide aerogel surface. The resultant structure demonstrates large CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient conditions (0.43 mmol·g(-1)) and high CO2 selectivity against N2 yet retains regenerability to desorb 98% CO2 by simple pressure swing. First-principles thermodynamics calculations revealed that microporous edges of graphitic carbon nitride offer the optimal CO2 adsorption by induced dipole interaction and allows excellent CO2 selectivity as well as facile regenerability. This work identifies a customized route to reversible gas capture using metal-free, two-dimensional carbonaceous materials, which can be extended to other useful applications.

  18. 75 FR 61697 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Extension of... activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') covering the period April 1, 2009, through... Administrative Review of Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Selection of...

  19. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  20. Preparation of activated carbons with mesopores by use of organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshio; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Furuta, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbons are commercially produced by steam or CO{sub 2} activation of coal, coconut shell and so on. In general the carbons obtained give pores with a broad range of distribution. The objective of this study was to prepare activated carbons from coal by use of various organometallic compounds. The carbons were evaluated for pore size by nitrogen adsorption experiments.

  1. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    15 111-7 GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS THERMALLY REACTIVATED CARBON .............. 16 I IV-1 PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM FOR... PROCESSING COST OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL REGENERATION BY SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS ........................... 25 l IV-4 SENSITIVITY OF GAC...regenerate adsorbents such as granular activated carbon loaded with a broad variety of organic adsorbates. This regeneration process uses a supercritical

  2. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  3. Adsorption of Hydantoins on Activated Carbon,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    performed for single solute, bisolute, and trisolute solutions as well as an undiluted coal gasification wastewater containing predominantly hydantoin...hydantoin, 5,5-dimethylhydantoin, and 5-ethyl-5-methylhydantoin. Absorption using activated carbon did not appear to be an effective treatment process for the removal of hydantoins from the coal gasification wastewater.

  4. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment is a physicochemical process that removes a wide variety of contaminants by adsorbing them from liquid and gas streams [1, p. 6-3]. This treatment is most commonly used to separate organic contaminants from water or air; however, it can b...

  5. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  6. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  7. Removal performance and mechanism of ibuprofen from water by catalytic ozonation using sludge-corncob activated carbon as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Liqiu; Qi, Fei; Wang, Xue; Li, Lu; Feng, Li

    2014-09-01

    To discover the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon in catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen, the performance of sludge-corncob activated carbon and three selected commercial activated carbons as catalysts in catalytic ozonation was investigated. The observation indicates the degradation rate of Ibuprofen increases significantly in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon and the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon is much higher than that of the other three commercial activated carbons. Ibuprofen's removal rate follows pseudo-first order kinetics model well. It is also found that the adsorption removal of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon is less than 30% after 40 min. And the removal efficiency of Ibuprofen in the hybrid ozone/sludge-corncob activated carbon system is higher than the sum of sludge-corncob activated carbon adsorption and ozonation alone, which is a supportive evidence for catalytic reaction. In addition, the results of radical scavenger experiments demonstrate that catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon follows a hydroxyl radical reaction pathway. During ozonation of Ibuprofen in the presence of activated carbon, ozone could be catalytically decomposed to form hydrogen peroxide, which can promote the formation of hydroxyl radical. The maximum amount of hydrogen peroxide occurs in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon, which can explain why sludge-corncob activated carbon has the best catalytic activity among four different activated carbons.

  8. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process.

  9. Selectively deuterated and optically active cyclic ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Y.; Asai, T.; Umeyama, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    1982-08-27

    The synthesis of selectively deuterated epihalohydrins (F, Cl, Br, I) and 3,3-bis(chloromethyl)-d/sub 2/)oxetane and some observations on the stereochemistry of each transformation are reported. Further, the synthesis of optically active epihalohydrins, especially the optically active epifluorohydrin, from (S)-glycerol 1,2-acetonide ((S)-2), using mainly KX-18-CR-6 (X = F, Br, I), is reported. This is the first report on the synthesis of optically active epifluorohydrin. The direct halogenation of the presynthesized optically active epichlorohydrin with the same reagents gave the racemized products. The selectively deuterated or optically active compounds reported herein are expected to find a variety of uses in organic chemistry.

  10. Nylon-3 polymers with selective antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Hayouka, Zvi; Chakraborty, Saswata; Falk, Shaun P; Weisblum, Bernard; Masters, Kristyn S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2013-04-10

    Host-defense peptides inhibit bacterial growth but show little toxicity toward mammalian cells. A variety of synthetic polymers have been reported to mimic this antibacterial selectivity; however, achieving comparable selectivity for fungi is more difficult because these pathogens are eukaryotes. Here we report nylon-3 polymers based on a novel subunit that display potent antifungal activity (MIC = 3.1 μg/mL for Candida albicans ) and favorable selectivity (IC10 > 400 μg/mL for 3T3 fibroblast toxicity; HC10 > 400 μg/mL for hemolysis).

  11. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  12. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  13. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  14. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  15. Activated carbon and tungsten oxide supported on activated carbon catalysts for toluene catalytic combustion.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Merino, M A; Ribeiro, M F; Silva, J M; Carrasco-Marín, F; Maldonado-Hódar, F J

    2004-09-01

    We have used activated carbon (AC) prepared from almond shells as a support for tungsten oxide to develop a series of WOx/AC catalysts for the catalytic combustion of toluene. We conducted the reaction between 300 and 350 degrees C, using a flow of 500 ppm of toluene in air and space velocity (GHSV) in the range 4000-7000 h(-1). Results show that AC used as a support is an appropriate material for removing toluene from dilute streams. By decreasing the GHSV and increasing the reaction temperature AC becomes a specific catalyst for the total toluene oxidation (SCO2 = 100%), but in less favorable conditions CO appears as reaction product and toluene-derivative compounds are retained inside the pores. WOx/AC catalysts are more selective to CO2 than AC due to the strong acidity of this oxide; this behavior improves with increased metal loading and reaction temperature and contact time. The catalytic performance depends on the nonstoichiometric tungsten oxide obtained during the pretreatment. In comparison with other supports the WOx/AC catalysts present, at low reaction temperatures, higher activity and selectivity than WO, supported on SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, or Y zeolite. This is due to the hydrophobic character of the AC surface which prevents the adsorption of water produced from toluene combustion thus avoiding the deactivation of the active centers. However, the use of WOx/AC system is always restricted by its gasification temperature (around 400 degrees C), which limits the ability to increase the conversion values by increasing reaction temperatures.

  16. Estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of selected selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    POP, ANCA; LUPU, DIANA IOANA; CHERFAN, JULIEN; KISS, BELA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most prescribed classes of psychotropics. Even though the SSRI class consists of 6 molecules (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline), only fluoxetine was intensively studied for endocrine disruptive effects, while the other SSRIs received less attention. This study was designed to evaluate the estrogenic/antiestrogenic effect of fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine. Methods The in vitro (anti)estrogenic activity was assessed using a firefly luciferase reporter construct in the T47D-KBluc breast cancer cell line. These cells express nuclear estrogen receptors that can activate the transcription of the luciferase reporter gene upon binding of estrogen receptor agonists. Results All three compounds were found to interact with the estrogen receptor. Fluoxetine had dual properties, weak estrogenic at lower concentrations and antiestrogenic effect at higher concentrations. Sertraline shared the same properties with fluoxetine, but also increased the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Paroxetine presented only one type of effect, the ability to increase the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Conclusions Overall, our results indicate a possible interaction of SSRIs with the estrogen receptor. As SSRIs are being used by all categories of population, including pregnant women or children, establishing whether they can affect the endocrine mediated mechanisms should be a priority. PMID:26609273

  17. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  18. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  19. Separation of a toluene/ethanol mixture by pervaporation using active carbon-filled polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, J.M. ); Folkers, B.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A. ); Desgrandchamps, G. )

    1994-02-01

    In order to improve the separation properties of dense polymeric membranes toward a toluene/ethanol mixture, various active carbons and two types of zeolites were introduced into a thin polymeric film in order to form a heterogeneous membrane composed of solid particles surrounded by a polymer phase. Active carbons show a high adsorption selectivity for an aromatic compound over ethanol in the low concentration range of the aromatic component. Sorption and pervaporation experiments were carried out with a toluene/ethanol mixture, and they showed no improvement in selectivity and a decrease in flux for membranes filled with active carbons. For zeolite-filled membranes, both selectivity and flux decreased. A permeability model derived for heterogeneous systems was used. It confirmed that the carbon particles have a closed porous structure, allowing no transport from one side to the other, and that the zeolites have an ethanol selective permeation behavior. 21 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  1. Identification and Selection of Major Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

    2011-06-30

    A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of CO2 is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs due to rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents selected for co-sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g. density, viscosity, interfacial tension) behavior of CO2 in the deep subsurface. These impurities and concentrations are a function of both the industrial source(s) of the CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for geologic sequestration. This report summarizes the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon-capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, we selected four test fluid compositions for use in geochemical experiments. These included: 1) a pure CO2 stream representative of food grade CO2 used in most enhanced oil recovery projects: 2) a test fluid composition containing low concentrations (0.5 mole %) SO2 and NOx (representative of that generated from cement production), 3) a test fluid composition with higher concentrations (2.5 mole %) of SO2, and 4) and test fluid composition containing 3 mole % H2S.

  2. All-solid-state carbonate-selective electrode based on screen-printed carbon paste electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Lyu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Zhan; Rong, Yuanzhen; Hu, Ruifen; Luo, Zhiyuan; Wang, You

    2017-02-01

    A novel disposable all-solid-state carbonate-selective electrode based on a screen-printed carbon paste electrode using poly(3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (POT) as an ion-to-electron transducer has been developed. The POT was dropped onto the reaction area of the carbon paste electrode covered by the poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane, which contains N,N-Dioctyl-3α,12α-bis(4-trifluoroacetylbenzoyloxy)-5β-cholan-24-amide as a carbonate ionophore. The electrode showed a near-Nernstian slope of  -27.5 mV/decade with a detection limit of 3.6 * 10-5 mol l-1. Generally, the detection time was 30 s. Because these electrodes are fast, convenient and low in cost, they have the potential to be mass produced and used in on-site testing as disposable sensors. Furthermore, the repeatability, reproducibility and stability have been studied to evaluate the properties of the electrodes. Measurement of the carbonate was also conducted in a human blood solution and achieved good performance.

  3. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies.

  4. Calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures for the selective capture of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jahyun; Bae, Hyeonhu; Kang, Lei; Huang, Bing; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-10-26

    The development of advanced materials for CO2 capture is of great importance for mitigating climate change. In this paper, we outline our discovery that calcium-decorated carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), carbyne, and graphyne, have great potential for selective CO2 capture, as demonstrated via first-principles calculations. Our findings show that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can bind up to three CO2 molecules at each Ca atom site with an adsorption energy of ∼-0.8 eV per CO2, making them suitable for reversible CO2 capture. They adsorb CO2 molecules preferentially, compared with other gas molecules such as H2, N2, and CH4. Moreover, based on equilibrium thermodynamical simulations, we confirm that Ca-decorated ZGNRs can capture CO2 selectively from a gas mixture with a capacity of ∼4.5 mmol g(-1) under ambient conditions. Similar results have been found in other carbon nanomaterials, indicating the generality of carbon based nanostructures for selective CO2 capture under ambient conditions.

  5. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  6. 78 FR 13894 - Certain Activated Carbon From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Activated Carbon From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4381 (February 2013), entitled Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  8. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  9. Hierarchically structured activated carbon for ultracapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Park, Sun-Min; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    To resolve the pore-associated bottleneck problem observed in the electrode materials used for ultracapacitors, which inhibits the transport of the electrolyte ions, we designed hierarchically structured activated carbon (HAC) by synthesizing a mesoporous silica template/carbon composite and chemically activating it to simultaneously remove the silica template and increase the pore volume. The resulting HAC had a well-designed, unique porous structure, which allowed for large interfaces for efficient electric double-layer formation. Given the unique characteristics of the HAC, we believe that the developed synthesis strategy provides important insights into the design and fabrication of hierarchical carbon nanostructures. The HAC, which had a specific surface area of 1,957 m2 g−1, exhibited an extremely high specific capacitance of 157 F g−1 (95 F cc−1), as well as a high rate capability. This indicated that it had superior energy storage capability and was thus suitable for use in advanced ultracapacitors. PMID:26878820

  10. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  11. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna; Dunkel, Jorn

    2016-11-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such non-equilibrium networks. By connecting concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory and transition rate theory, we show how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Through theoretical and numerical analysis we identify symmetry-based rules to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. Our conceptual framework is applicable to a broad class of biological and non-biological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a new correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models.

  12. Reversible Assembly of Graphitic Carbon Nitride 3D Network for Highly Selective Dyes Absorption and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuye; Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jianhai; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-09-27

    Responsive assembly of 2D materials is of great interest for a range of applications. In this work, interfacial functionalized carbon nitride (CN) nanofibers were synthesized by hydrolyzing bulk CN in sodium hydroxide solution. The reversible assemble and disassemble behavior of the as-prepared CN nanofibers was investigated by using CO2 as a trigger to form a hydrogel network at first. Compared to the most widespread absorbent materials such as active carbon, graphene and previously reported supramolecular gel, the proposed CN hydrogel not only exhibited a competitive absorbing capacity (maximum absorbing capacity of methylene blue up to 402 mg/g) but also overcame the typical deficiencies such as poor selectivity and high energy-consuming regeneration. This work would provide a strategy to construct a 3D CN network and open an avenue for developing smart assembly for potential applications ranging from environment to selective extraction.

  13. Nanosized Pd-Au bimetallic phases on carbon nanotubes for selective phenylacetylene hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghua; Xin, Zhiling; Huang, Xing; Yu, Weizhen; Niu, Shuo; Shao, Lidong

    2017-02-22

    Palladium (Pd)-catalyzed selective hydrogenation of alkynes has been one of the most studied hydrogenation reactions in the last century. However, kinetic studies conducted to reveal the catalyst's active centers have been hindered because of dynamic surface changes on Pd during the reaction. In the present study, bimetallic Pd-Au nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes have been synthesized at room temperature as catalysts for selective hydrogenation of phenylacetylene, which show effectively enhanced selectivity compared to their monometallic counterparts. Structural and surface analyses of fresh and reacted catalysts reveal that selective hydrogenation of phenylacetylene is favored over nanosized Pd-Au bimetallic phases due to modifications in the Pd surface in terms of neighboring site isolation and electron density reduction.

  14. Passivation oxide controlled selective carbon nanotube growth on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Bult, J B; Sawyer, W G; Ajayan, P M; Schadler, L S

    2009-02-25

    Vertically aligned arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) are grown on Inconel 600, a nickel-based super-alloy. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of the MWNTs it is shown that a stable oxidation barrier is required for the stabilization of iron on the substrate and subsequent nanotube growth. This evidence for passivation oxide supported growth of MWNTs was then used to grow MWNTs on patterned oxidized substrates in a selective growth furnace. The unique advantage of this patterned growth on Inconel 600 is found to be the chromia passivation layer's electrical conductivity (measured value of 1.08 micro Omega m), creating the opportunity for low resistivity electrodes made from nanotubes. Inconel substrates with 100 microm long aligned MWNTs are demonstrated to exhibit an average resistance value of 2 Omega.

  15. Antioxidant activity of selected Indian spices.

    PubMed

    Shobana, S; Naidu, K A

    2000-02-01

    Spices and vegetables possess antioxidant activity that can be applied for preservation of lipids and reduce lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The potential antioxidant activities of selected spices extracts (water and alcohol 1:1) were investigated on enzymatic lipid peroxidation. Water and alcoholic extract (1:1) of commonly used spices (garlic, ginger, onion, mint, cloves, cinnamon and pepper) dose-dependently inhibited oxidation of fatty acid, linoleic acid in presence of soybean lipoxygenase. Among the spices tested, cloves exhibited highest while onion showed least antioxidant activity. The relative antioxidant activities decreased in the order of cloves, cinnamon, pepper, ginger, garlic, mint and onion. Spice mix namely ginger, onion and garlic; onion and ginger; ginger and garlic showed cumulative inhibition of lipid peroxidation thus exhibiting their synergistic antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of spice extracts were retained even after boiling for 30 min at 100 degrees C, indicating that the spice constituents were resistant to thermal denaturation. The antioxidant activity of these dietary spices suggest that in addition to imparting flavor to the food, they possess potential health benefits by inhibiting the lipid peroxidation.

  16. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  17. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION GUIDELINES FOR GEOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-08-31

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a key technology pathway to substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for the state of California and the western region. Current estimates suggest that the sequestration resource of the state is large, and could safely and effectively accept all of the emissions from large CO2 point sources for many decades and store them indefinitely. This process requires suitable sites to sequester large volumes of CO2 for long periods of time. Site characterization is the first step in this process, and the state will ultimately face regulatory, legal, and technical questions as commercial CCS projects develop and commence operations. The most important aspects of site characterizations are injectivity, capacity, and effectiveness. A site can accept at a high rate a large volume of CO2 and store it for a long time is likely to serve as a good site for geological carbon sequestration. At present, there are many conventional technologies and approaches that can be used to estimate, quantify, calculate, and assess the viability of a sequestration site. Any regulatory framework would need to rely on conventional, easily executed, repeatable methods to inform the site selection and permitting process. The most important targets for long-term storage are deep saline formations and depleted oil and gas fields. The primary CO2 storage mechanisms for these targets are well understood enough to plan operations and simulate injection and long-term fate of CO2. There is also a strong understanding of potential geological and engineering hazards for CCS. These hazards are potential pathway to CO2 leakage, which could conceivably result in negative consequences to health and the environmental. The risks of these effects are difficult to quantify; however, the hazards themselves are sufficiently well understood to identify, delineate, and manage those risks effectively. The primary hazard elements are wells and faults, but may include other

  18. Selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol with carbon nanotubes supported Pt-Co catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Peng-Fei; Zhou, Ren-Xian

    2008-02-01

    The Pt-Co catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been prepared by wet impregnation and the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde (CMA) to the corresponding cinnamyl alcohol (CMO) over the catalysts has been studied in ethanol at different reaction conditions. The results show that Pt-0.17 wt%Co/CNTs catalyst exhibits the highest activity and selectivity at a reaction temperature of 60 °C under a pressure of around 2.5 MPa, and 92.4% for the conversion of CMA and 93.6% for the selectivity of CMA to CMO, respectively. The selective hydrogenation for the C dbnd O double bond in CMA would be improved as increasing the H 2 pressure, and the selective hydrogenation for the C dbnd C double bond in CMA is enhanced as increasing the reaction temperature. In addition, these catalysts have also been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H 2-temperature programmed reduction (H 2-TPR) and H 2-temperature programmed desorption (H 2-TPD) techniques. The results show that Pt particles are dispersed more homogeneously on the outer surface of the nanotubes, while the strong interaction between Pt and Co would improve the increasing of activated hydrogen number because of the hydrogen spillover from reduced Pt 0 onto CNTs and increase the catalytic activity and selectivity of CMA to CMO.

  19. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing ‘waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si–Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2. PMID:27981967

  20. Enhanced selectivity of zeolites by controlled carbon deposition

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Kartin, Mutlu

    2006-05-09

    A method for carbonizing a zeolite comprises depositing a carbon coating on the zeolite pores by flowing an inert carrier gas stream containing isoprene through a regenerated zeolite at elevated temperature. The carbonized zeolite is useful for the separation of light hydrocarbon mixtures due to size exclusion and the differential adsorption properties of the carbonized zeolite.

  1. Activation of carbon dioxide on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.D.; Chuang, S.S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The environmental concern about the impact of CO{sub 2} has grown recently due to its rapidly increasing concentration. Deforestation strongly affects the natural reduction of CO{sub 2} by water into carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Industrial utilization of CO{sub 2} by heterogeneous catalytic reactions can be one of the effective ways to cut the CO{sub 2} level. The first step in catalytic reaction of CO{sub 2} is the adsorption. The objective of this study is to investigate the adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces. Rh is selected for this study because of its unique activity to catalyze a number of CO{sub 2} related reactions. In situ infrared results show that CO{sub 2} adsorbed on the alumina oxide support as bidentate carbonate and non-coordinated carbon which are the dominant species during the CO{sub 2} adsorption.

  2. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  3. Charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.

    1995-12-01

    High quality charcoal has been produced with very high yields of 50% to 60% from macadamia nut and kukui nut shells and of 44% to 47% from Eucalyptus and Leucaena wood in a bench scale unit at elevated pressure on a 2 to 3 hour cycle, compared to commercial practice of 25% to 30% yield on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Neither air pollution nor tar is produced by the process. The effects of feedstock pretreatments with metal additives on charcoal yield are evaluated in this paper. Also, the influences of steam and air partial pressure and total pressure on yields of activated carbon from high yield charcoal are presented.

  4. Active Learning With Optimal Instance Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yifan; Zhu, Xingquan; Elmagarmid, A K

    2013-04-01

    Active learning (AL) traditionally relies on some instance-based utility measures (such as uncertainty) to assess individual instances and label the ones with the maximum values for training. In this paper, we argue that such approaches cannot produce good labeling subsets mainly because instances are evaluated independently without considering their interactions, and individuals with maximal ability do not necessarily form an optimal instance subset for learning. Alternatively, we propose to achieve AL with optimal subset selection (ALOSS), where the key is to find an instance subset with a maximum utility value. To achieve the goal, ALOSS simultaneously considers the following: 1) the importance of individual instances and 2) the disparity between instances, to build an instance-correlation matrix. As a result, AL is transformed to a semidefinite programming problem to select a k-instance subset with a maximum utility value. Experimental results demonstrate that ALOSS outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for AL.

  5. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes based upon distance traveled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or NH.sub.3 or NF.sub.3 or F.sub.2 or CF.sub.4 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. The predominant species that are deposited on the CNT array vary with the distance d measured along a path from the precursor gas to the CNT array; two or three different predominant species can be deposited on a CNT array for distances d=d1 and d=d2>d1 and d=d3>d2.

  6. Film electrode prepared from oppositely charged silicate submicroparticles and carbon nanoparticles for selective dopamine sensing.

    PubMed

    Celebanska, Anna; Tomaszewska, Dorota; Lesniewski, Adam; Opallo, Marcin

    2011-07-15

    Film electrodes prepared from oppositely charged silicate submicroparticles and carbon nanoparticles was applied for selective dopamine sensing. Mesoporous silicate submicroparticles with tetraalkylammonium functionalities were prepared by sol-gel method. They were immobilised on an indium tin oxide film surface together with phenylsulphonated carbon nanoparticles by layer-by-layer method: alternative immersion into their suspensions. As it is shown by scanning electron microscopy the obtained film is composed of silicate submicroparticles covered by carbon nanoparticles. The nanoparticulate film is stable and its electroactive surface is significantly larger than substrate. Accumulation of redox active cations indicates that only fraction charged functionalities of carbon nanoparticles are employed in film formation. The obtained electrode exhibits catalytic properties towards dopamine oxidation and its interferences as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen. This allows for selective determination of tenth micromolar concentration of dopamine in the presence of these interferences at milimolar level. The detection limit and linear range were determined to 0.1 × 10⁻⁶ mol dm⁻³ and 0.3-18 × 10⁻⁶ mol dm⁻³ respectively.

  7. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  8. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER.

  9. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  10. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-07

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon.

  11. Surface modification of activated carbons for CO 2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevida, C.; Plaza, M. G.; Arias, B.; Fermoso, J.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J. J.

    2008-09-01

    The reduction of anthropogenic CO 2 emissions to address the consequences of climate change is a matter of concern for all developed countries. In the short term, one of the most viable options for reducing carbon emissions is to capture and store CO 2 at large stationary sources. Adsorption with solid sorbents is one of the most promising options. In this work, two series of materials were prepared from two commercial activated carbons, C and R, by heat treatment with gaseous ammonia at temperatures in the 200-800 °C range. The aim was to improve the selectivity and capacity of the sorbents to capture CO 2, by introducing basic nitrogen-functionalities into the carbons. The sorbents were characterised in terms of texture and chemical composition. Their surface chemistry was studied through temperature-programmed desorption tests and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The capture performance of the carbons was evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analyser to record mass uptakes by the samples when exposed to a CO 2 atmosphere.

  12. Preparation of activated carbons from bituminous coal pitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañan, J.; González-García, C. M.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Macías-García, A.; Díaz-Díez, M. A.

    2004-11-01

    High-porosity carbons were prepared from bituminous coal pitches by combining chemical and physical activation. The chemical activation process consisted of potassium hydroxide impregnation followed by carbonization in nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of the KOH impregnation ratio on the surface area and pore volumes evolution of the carbons derived from mesophase pitch was studied. The optimum KOH:pitch ratio was fixed to realize a physical activation process in order to increase the textural parameters of the KOH-activated carbons. Physical activation was performed by carbonizing the KOH-activated carbons followed by gasifying with air. The influence of the carbonization temperature and the residence time of the gasification with air were explored to optimize those preparation parameters.

  13. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  14. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  15. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  16. Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Samuel; Fàbregas, Esteve; Pumera, Martin

    2009-01-07

    Electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polysulfone composite electrodes for enhanced heterogeneous electron transfer is studied. The physicochemical insight into the electrochemical activation of carbon nanotube/polymer composites was provided by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Dopamine, ascorbic acid, NADH, and ferricyanide are used as a model redox system for evaluating the performance of activated carbon nanotube/polymer composite electrodes. We demonstrate that polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes is subject to defects and to partial removal during activation. Such tunable activation of electrodes would enable on-demand activation of electrodes for satisfying the needs of sensing or energy storage devices.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  18. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  19. Selective detection and quantification of carbon nanotubes in soil.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Junhoe; Lee, Yong-ju; Hwang, Yu sik; Hong, In Seok

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely applied in many industrial fields. As world production of CNTs increases, the risk of environmental exposure to CNTs also increases. Therefore, to evaluate the impact on the environment, many cell and animal studies have reported on the toxicity of CNTs. It is important to determine the degree of contamination of CNTs in soil and to find the pollution pathways for assessment of the environmental toxicity of CNTs. However, selective detection methods for CNTs in soil or water have rarely been reported. In the present study, a novel technique was developed to quantify the amount of CNTs in soil mixtures using fluorescent SYBR Green I dye after isolation of the CNTs with specific DNA oligomers. As a result, a limit of detection of CNTs in soil was obtained in the range of 250 ppb. This limit can easily be extended to the level of 10 ppb using magnetic well plates with a greater capacity. This method also worked well in the presence of graphene oxide and could be applied to the detection of CNTs in a variety of surroundings (e.g., fish and other tissues).

  20. Recent Data Analysis of Carbon ACtivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui Ming; Smith, Elizabeth; Padalino, Stephen; Baumgart, Leigh; Suny Geneseooltz, Katie; Colburn, Robyn; Fuschino, Julia

    2002-10-01

    A method for measuring tertiary neutrons produced in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactions has been developed using carbon activation. Ultra pure samples of carbon, free from positron-emitting contaminants must be used in the detection. Our primary goal has been to reduce the contamination level by refining purification and packaging procedures. This process involves baking the disks in a vacuum oven to 1000¢XC @ 200 microns for a prescribed bake time without exposing the disks to nitrogen in the air which is a major contaminant. Recent experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bake time for purification. Disks were baked for varying times, from one hour to five hours, and then exposed to high-neutron-yield ( 5 x 1013) shots on OMEGA. Data collected was normalized to the same time interval and the same primary neutron yield, and no significant difference in the number of background counts was seen. Experimental results also indicated that disks that were exposed to air for short time intervals showed a significant increase in the number of contamination counts. This further supports our findings that the gaseous diffusion through graphite disks is very high. Experimental results of these findings will be presented. Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy.

  1. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Tsouris, Costas; Burchell, Timothy D

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  2. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Reiher, Markus; Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F{sub 2}, ozone, and NO{sub 2}), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr{sub 2}). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions

  3. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Janowski, Tomasz; Reiher, Markus; Pulay, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F2, ozone, and NO2), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr2). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions are discussed

  4. Influence of selected physicochemical parameters on microbiological activity of mucks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Całka, A.; Sokołowska, Z.; Warchulska, P.; Dąbek-Szreniawska, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the basic factor decided about soil fertility are microorganisms that together with flora, determine trend and character of biochemical processes as well totality of fundamental transformations connected with biogeochemistry and physicochemical properties of soil. Determination of general bacteria number, quantity of selected groups of microorganisms and investigation of respiration intensity let estimate microbiological activity of soil. Intensity of microbiological processes is directly connected with physicochemical soil parameters. In that case, such structural parameters as bulk density, porosity, surface or carbon content play significant role. Microbiological activity also changes within the bounds of mucks with different stage of humification and secondary transformation. Knowledge of relations between structural properties, microorganism activity and degree of transformation and humification can lead to better understanding microbiological processes as well enable to estimate microbiological activity at given physicochemical conditions and at progressing process of soil transformation. The study was carried out on two peaty-moorsh (muck) soils at different state of secondary transformation and humification degree. Soil samples were collected from Polesie Lubelskie (layer depth: 5 - 25 cm). Investigated mucks originated from soils formed from low peatbogs. Soil sample marked as I belonged to muck group weakly secondary transformed. Second sample (II) represented soil group with middle stage of secondary transformation. The main purpose of the research was to examine the relations between some physicochemical and surface properties and their biological activity. Total number and respiration activity of microorganisms were determined. The effectiveness of utilizing the carbon substances from the soil by the bacteria increased simultaneously with the transformation state of the peat-muck soils. Quantity of organic carbon decreased distinctly in the soil

  5. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  6. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  7. Enhanced adsorption of humic acids on ordered mesoporous carbon compared with microporous activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengling; Xu, Zhaoyi; Wan, Haiqin; Wan, Yuqiu; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-04-01

    Humic acids are ubiquitous in surface and underground waters and may pose potential risk to human health when present in drinking water sources. In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon was synthesized by means of a hard template method and further characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transition electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate adsorption of two humic acids from coal and soil, respectively, on the synthesized carbon. For comparison, a commercial microporous activated carbon and nonporous graphite were included as additional adsorbents; moreover, phenol was adopted as a small probe adsorbate. Pore size distribution characterization showed that the synthesized carbon had ordered mesoporous structure, whereas the activated carbon was composed mainly of micropores with a much broader pore size distribution. Accordingly, adsorption of the two humic acids was substantially lower on the activated carbon than on the synthesized carbon, because of the size-exclusion effect. In contrast, the synthesized carbon and activated carbon showed comparable adsorption for phenol when the size-exclusion effect was not in operation. Additionally, we verified by size-exclusion chromatography studies that the synthesized carbon exhibited greater adsorption for the large humic acid fraction than the activated carbon. The pH dependence of adsorption on the three carbonaceous adsorbents was also compared between the two test humic acids. The findings highlight the potential of using ordered mesoporous carbon as a superior adsorbent for the removal of humic acids.

  8. Carbonic anhydrase II-induced selection of inhibitors from a dynamic combinatorial library of Schiff's bases.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Gihane; Petit, Eddy; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves; Barboiu, Mihail

    2009-11-01

    A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) has been generated under thermodynamic control by using the aminocarbonyl/imine interconversion as reversible chemistry, combined with non-covalent binding within the active site of the metalloenzyme human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II, EC 4.2.1.1). The high affinity of hCA II isozyme towards some sulfonamide inhibitors obtained here was used to select from the dynamic library specific inhibitors of this isoform. These results point out to the possibility of identifying sulfonamide amplified compounds presenting potent inhibition and high yield of formation in the presence of the isoform(s) towards which the inhibitors were designed.

  9. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects.

  10. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used

  11. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals.

  12. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  13. Selective actuation of arrays of carbon nanotubes using magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Volodin, Alexander; Santini, Claudia A; De Gendt, Stefan; Vereecken, Philippe M; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2013-07-23

    We introduce the use of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to actuate mechanical resonances in as grown arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) loaded with Ni particles (Ni-CNTs). This contactless method is closely related to the magnetic resonance force microscopy technique and provides spatial selectivity of actuation along the array. The Ni-CNT arrays are grown by chemical vapor deposition and are composed of homogeneous CNTs with uniform length (~600 nm) and almost equal diameter (~20 nm), which are loaded with Ni catalyst particles at their tips due to the tip growth mode. The vibrations of the Ni-CNTs are actuated by relying on the driving force that appears due to the FMR excited at about 2 GHz in the Ni particles (diameter ~100 nm). The Ni-CNT oscillations (frequency ~40 MHz) are detected mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The acquired oscillation images of the Ni-CNT uniform array reveal clear maxima in the spatial distribution of the oscillation amplitudes. We attribute these maxima to the "sensitive slices", i.e., the spatial regions of the Ni-CNT array where the FMR condition is met. Similar to magnetic resonance imaging, the sensitive slice is determined by the magnetic field gradient and moves along the Ni-CNT array as the applied magnetic field is ramped. Our excitation method does not require the presence of any additional microfabricated electrodes or coils near the CNTs and is particularly advantageous in cases where the traditional electrical actuation methods are not effective or cannot be implemented. The remote actuation can be effectively implemented also for arrays of other magnetic nanomechanical resonators.

  14. Adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: a comparative study on granular activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-08-15

    Adsorption of three aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) by four types of carbonaceous adsorbents [a granular activated carbon (HD4000), an activated carbon fiber (ACF10), two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT, SWNT-HT), and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)] with different structural characteristics but similar surface polarities was examined in aqueous solutions. Isotherm results demonstrated the importance of molecular sieving and micropore effects in the adsorption of AOCs by carbonaceous porous adsorbents. In the absence of the molecular sieving effect, a linear relationship was found between the adsorption capacities of AOCs and the surface areas of adsorbents, independent of the type of adsorbent. On the other hand, the pore volume occupancies of the adsorbents followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT, indicating that the availability of adsorption site was related to the pore size distributions of the adsorbents. ACF10 and HD4000 with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption affinities to low molecular weight AOCs than SWNT and MWNT with higher mesopore and macropore volumes. Due to their larger pore sizes, SWNTs and MWNTs are expected to be more efficient in adsorption of large size molecules. Removal of surface oxygen-containing functional groups from the SWNT enhanced adsorption of AOCs.

  15. Selective adsorption for removal of nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon streams over carbon-based adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarri, Masoud S.

    desulfurization of model diesel fuel, which contains equimolar concentrations of nitrogen (i.e., quinoline and indole), sulfur (i.e., dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene), and aromatic compounds (naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, and fluorene), was examined. The results revealed that when both nitrogen and sulfur compounds coexist in the fuel, the type and density of oxygen functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon are crucial for selective adsorption of nitrogen compounds but have negligible positive effects for sulfur removal. The adsorption of quinoline and indole is largely governed by specific interactions. There is enough evidence to support the importance of dipole--dipole and acid-base-specific interactions for the adsorption of both quinoline and indole. Modified carbon is a promising material for the efficient removal of the nitrogen compounds from light cycle oil (LCO). Adsorptive denitrogenation of LCO significantly improved the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) performance, especially for the removal of the refractory sulfur compounds such as 4-methyldibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene. An essential factor in applying activated carbon for adsorptive denitrogenation and desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon streams is regeneration after saturation. The regeneration method of the saturated adsorbents consisted of toluene washing followed by heating to remove the remaining toluene. The results show that the spent activated carbon can be regenerated to completely recover the adsorption capacity. The high capacity and selectivity of activated carbon for nitrogen compounds, along with their ability to be regenerated, indicate that activated carbon is a promising adsorbent for the deep denitrogenation of liquid hydrocarbon streams.

  16. Ion-selective electrodes using carbon nanotubes as ion-to-electron transducers.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-02-15

    This study developed a new type of all-solid-state ion-selective electrode based on a transducing layer of a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The extraordinary capacity of carbon nanotubes to promote electron transfer between heterogeneous phases made the presence of electroactive polymers or any other ion-to-electron-transfer promoter unnecessary. The new transducer layer was characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The stability of the electrical potential of the new solid-contact electrode was examined by performing current-reversal chronopotentiometry, and the influence of the interfacial water film was assessed by the potentiometric water layer test. The performance of the new electrode was evaluated by determining K+ with an ion-selective membrane that contained the well-known valinomycin ion carrier. The new electrode had a Nernstian slope (58.4 mV/decade), dynamic ranges of four logarithmic units, and selectivities and limits of detection comparable to other solid-contact electrodes. The short response time (less than 10 s for activities higher than 10(-5.5) M) and the stability of the signal over several days makes these new electrodes very promising candidates for attaining true miniaturization.

  17. High-surface-area carbon molecular sieves for selective CO(2) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wahby, Anass; Ramos-Fernández, José M; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2010-08-23

    A series of carbon molecular sieves (CMSs) has been prepared, either as powders or monoliths, from petroleum pitch using potassium hydroxide as the activating agent. The CMS monoliths are prepared without the use of a binder based on the self-sintering ability of the mesophase pitch. Characterization results show that these CMSs combine a large apparent surface area (up to ca. 3100 m(2) g(-1)) together with a well-developed narrow microporosity (V(n) up to ca. 1.4 cm(3) g(-1)). The materials exhibit high adsorption capacities for CO(2) at 1 bar and 273 K (up to ca. 380 mg CO(2) g sorbent(-1)). To our knowledge, this is the best result obtained for CO(2) adsorption using carbon-based materials. Furthermore, although the CO(2) adsorption capacity for activated carbons has usually been considered lower than that of zeolites, the reported values exceed the total amount adsorbed on traditional 13X and 5A zeolites (ca. 230 mg and 180 mg CO(2) g sorbent(-1), respectively), under identical experimental conditions. Additionally, the narrow pore openings found in the CMS samples (ca. 0.4 nm) allows for the selective adsorption of CO(2) from molecules of similar dimensions (e.g., CH(4) and N(2)).

  18. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Phillips, Jana Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  19. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  20. Activated Carbon Modified with Copper for Adsorption of Propanethiol

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Tirano, Joaquín; Salamanca, Brisa; Giraldo, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbons were characterized texturally and chemically before and after treatment, using surface area determination in the BET model, Boehm titration, TPR, DRX and immersion calorimetry. The adsorption capacity and the kinetics of sulphur compound removal were determined by gas chromatography. It was established that the propanethiol retention capacity is dependent on the number of oxygenated groups generated on the activated carbon surface and that activated carbon modified with CuO at 0.25 M shows the highest retention of propanethiol. Additionally is proposed a mechanism of decomposition of propenothiol with carbon-copper system. PMID:20479992

  1. Utilization of zinc chloride for surface modification of activated carbon derived from Jatropha curcas L. for absorbent material.

    PubMed

    Pratumpong, P; Toommee, S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this research is to produce the low-cost activated carbon from Jatropha curcas L. by chemical activation using zinc chloride ZnCl2. The effects of the impregnation ratio on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon were investigated. The impregnation ratio was selected at the range of 1:1-10:1 for investigation. The optimum conditions resulted in an activated carbon with a carbon content of 80% wt, while the specific surface area evaluated using nitrogen adsorption isotherm corresponds to 600 m(2)/g.

  2. Selective protein adsorption and blood compatibility of hydroxy-carbonate apatites.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Kusudo, Yuko; Tsuru, Kanji; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Takashima, Seisuke

    2004-06-01

    We examined the blood compatibility and protein adsorption on hydroxyapatite and hydroxy-carbonate apatite. Those apatites were synthesized under a 0, 5, or 15% CO(2)-containing N(2) atmosphere by a wet-chemical method with a strong ammonia alkali solution of calcium nitrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (5:3 in molar ratio) and subsequent calcination in the range of 105-700 degrees C. From infrared (IR) analysis, the carbonate ions substituted both phosphate ions and hydroxyl ions in the hydroxyapatite lattice; the intensities of IR bands assignable to phosphate ions and hydroxyl ions were reduced on calcinations. The specific surface areas of synthesized apatites decreased with increasing calcination temperature. Blood-clotting properties were evaluated in terms of active partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and the amount of fibrinogen for the plasma in contact with the apatites, indicating that all the apatites barely influenced the blood clotting system. The apatites were in contact with a solution containing both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)-MG), and the amounts of those proteins adsorbed on them were examined: the amount of absorbed BSA and beta(2)-MG gradually increased with the calcination temperature below 500 degrees C, while it showed a sudden increase when more than 600 degrees C. Hydroxy-carbonate apatite synthesized under a 15% CO(2)-containing N(2) atmosphere and calcined below 400 degrees C had the greatest selectivity in adsorbing beta(2)-MG. Thus, a higher selectivity for beta(2)-MG adsorption was empirically correlated to carbonate ions incorporated in the hydroxyapatite lattice.

  3. Adsorption of methylene blue onto bamboo-based activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; Din, A T M; Ahmad, A L

    2007-03-22

    Bamboo, an abundant and inexpensive natural resource in Malaysia was used to prepare activated carbon by physiochemical activation with potassium hydroxide (KOH) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as the activating agents at 850 degrees C for 2h. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue dye on such carbon were then examined at 30 degrees C. Adsorption isotherm of the methylene blue (MB) on the activated carbon was determined and correlated with common isotherm equations. The equilibrium data for methylene blue adsorption well fitted to the Langmuir equation, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 454.2mg/g. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of methylene blue could be best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The kinetic parameters of this best-fit model were calculated and discussed.

  4. Carbon-Water-Energy Relations for Selected River Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    A biophysical process-based model was run using satellite, assimilated and ancillary data for four years (1987-1990) to calculate components of total evaporation (transpiration, interception, soil and snow evaporation), net radiation, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and net primary productivity over the global land surface. Satellite observations provided fractional vegetation cover, solar and photosynthetically active radiation incident of the surface, surface albedo, fractional cloud cover, air temperature and vapor pressure. The friction velocity and surface air pressure are obtained from a four dimensional data assimilation results, while precipitation is either only surface observations or a blended product of surface and satellite observations. All surface and satellite data are monthly mean values; precipitation has been disaggregated into daily values. All biophysical parameters of the model are prescribed according to published records. From these global land surface calculations results for river basins are derived using digital templates of basin boundaries. Comparisons with field observations (micrometeorologic, catchment water balance, biomass production) and atmospheric water budget analysis for monthly evaporation from six river basins have been done to assess errors in the calculations. Comparisons are also made with previous estimates of zonal variations of evaporation and net primary productivity. Efficiencies of transpiration, total evaporation and radiation use, and evaporative fraction for selected river basins will be presented.

  5. Preparation of nitrogen-enriched activated carbons from brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Pietrzak; Helena Wachowska; Piotr Nowicki

    2006-05-15

    Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons were prepared from a Polish brown coal. Nitrogen was introduced from urea at 350{sup o}C in an oxidizing atmosphere both to carbonizates obtained at 500-700{sup o}C and to activated carbons prepared from them. The activation was performed at 800{sup o}C with KOH in argon. It has been observed that the carbonization temperature determines the amount of nitrogen that is incorporated (DC5U, 8.4 wt % N{sup daf}; DC6U, 6.3 wt % N{sup daf}; and DC7U, 5.4 wt % N{sup daf}). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have shown that nitrogen introduced both at the stage of carbonizates and at the stage of activated carbons occurs mainly as -6, -5, and imine, amine and amide groups. On the other hand, the activation of carbons enriched with nitrogen results in the formation of pyridonic nitrogen and N-Q. The introduction of nitrogen at the activated carbon stage leads to a slight decrease in surface area. It has been proven that the most effective way of preparing microporous activated carbons enriched with nitrogen to a considerable extent and having high surface area ({approximately} 3000 m{sup 2}/g) is the following: carbonization - activation - reaction with urea. 40 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  6. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol over Carbon-Supported AuPd Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchie,W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-supported AuPd bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated as catalysts in the aqueous-phase selective oxidation of glycerol. The bimetallic catalysts were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involved the deposition of Au onto the surface of 3-nm supported Pd particles by catalytic reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution by H{sub 2}. The second method used the formation of a AuPd sol that was subsequently deposited onto a carbon support. Characterization of the catalysts using analytical transmission electron microscopy, H{sub 2} titration, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L{sub III} and Pd K-edges confirmed that the first synthesis method successfully deposited Au onto the Pd particles. Results from the AuPd sol catalyst also revealed that Au was preferentially located on the surface. Measurement of glycerol oxidation rates (0.3 M glycerol, 0.6 M NaOH, 10 atm O{sub 2}, 333 K) in a semibatch reactor gave a turnover frequency (TOF) of 17 s{sup -1} for monometallic Au and 1 s{sup -1} for monometallic Pd, with Pd exhibiting a higher selectivity to glyceric acid. Although the activity of the bimetallic AuPd catalysts depended on the amount of Au present, none of them had a TOF greater than that of the monometallic Au catalyst. However, the AuPd catalysts had higher selectivity to glyceric acid compared with the monometallic Au. Because a physical mixture of monometallic Au and Pd catalysts also gave higher selectivity to glyceric acid, the Pd is proposed to catalyze the decomposition of the side product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} that is also formed over the Au but is detrimental to the selectivity toward glyceric acid.

  7. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  8. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Ion-selective electrodes with colloid-imprinted mesoporous carbon as solid contact.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinbo; Zou, Xu U; Stein, Andreas; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2014-07-15

    A new type of solid-contact ion-selective electrode (SC-ISE) has been developed that uses colloid-imprinted mesoporous (CIM) carbon with 24 nm diameter, interconnected mesopores as the intermediate layer between a gold electrode and an ionophore-doped ISE membrane. For a demonstration, valinomycin was used as K(+) ionophore, and a good Nernstian response with a slope of 59.5 mV/decade in the range from 10(-5.2) to 10(-1.0) M was observed. The high purity, low content of redox-active surface functional groups and intrinsic hydrophobic characteristics of CIM carbon prepared from mesophase pitch lead to outstanding performance of these sensors, with excellent resistance to the formation of a water layer and no interference caused by light, O2, and CO2. When a redox couple is introduced as an internal reference species, calibration-free SC-ISEs can be made with a standard deviation of E° as low as 0.7 mV. Moreover, the interconnected mesopore structure of ISE membrane-infused CIM carbon facilitates both ion and electron conduction and provides a large interfacial area with good ion-to-electron transduction. Because of the large double layer capacitance of CIM carbon, CIM carbon-based SC-ISEs exhibit excellent potential stability, as shown by chronopotentiometry and continuous potentiometric measurements. The capacitance of these electrodes as determined by chronopotentiometry is 1.0 mF, and the emf drift over 70 h is as low as 1.3 μV/h, making these electrodes the most stable SC-ISEs reported so far.

  10. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  11. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  12. Activated carbons from flax shive and cotton gin waste as environmental adsorbents for the chlorinated hydrocarbon trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M; Marshall, Wayne E; Akin, Danny E

    2009-11-01

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this paper is to show that flax shive and cotton gin waste can serve as a precursor for activated carbon that can be used for adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from both the liquid and gas phases. Testing was conducted on carbon activated with phosphoric acid or steam. The results show that activated carbon made from flax shive performed better than select commercial activated carbons, especially at higher TCE concentrations. The activation method employed had little effect on TCE adsorption in gas or vapor phase studies but liquid phase studies suggested that steam activation is slightly better than phosphoric acid activation. As expected, the capacity for the activated carbons depended on the fluid phase equilibrium concentration. At a fluid concentration of 2 mg of TCE/L of fluid, the capacity of the steam activated carbon made from flax shive was similar at 64 and 80 mg TCE/g of carbon for the vapor and liquid phases, respectively. Preliminary cost estimates suggest that the production costs of such carbons are $1.50 to $8.90 per kg, depending on activation method and precursor material; steam activation was significantly less expensive than phosphoric acid activation.

  13. Fractal analysis of granular activated carbons using isotherm data

    SciTech Connect

    Khalili, N.R.; Pan, M.; Sandi, G.

    1997-08-01

    Utilization of adsorption on solid surfaces was exercised for the first time in 1785. Practical application of unactivated carbon filters, and powdered carbon were first demonstrated in the American water treatment plant, and a municipal treatment plant in New Jersey, in 1883 and 1930, respectively. The use of activated carbon became widespread in the next few decades. At present, adsorption on carbons has a wide spread application in water treatment and removal of taste, odor, removal of synthetic organic chemicals, color-forming organics, and desinfection by-products and their naturally occurring precursors. This paper presents an analysis of the surface fractal dimension and adsorption capacity of a group of carbons.

  14. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  15. Preparation of activated carbon monolith by application of phenolic resins as carbon precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajad, Mehran; Kazemzad, Mahmood; Hosseinnia, Azarmidokht

    2014-04-01

    In the current work, activated carbon monoliths have been prepared by application of different phenolic hydrocarbons namely catechol and resorcinol as carbon precursors. For synthesis of carbon monolith, the precursors have been mixed with Genapol PF-10 as template and then polymerized in the presence of lysine as catalyst. Then the polymerized monolith carbonized in inert atmosphere at 700°C and activated by water steam at 550°C. It was found that resorcinol polymerization is easier than catechol and occurred at 90°C while for polymerization of catechol elevated temperature of 120°C at hydrothermal condition is necessary. The prepared activated carbon samples have been characterized by various analysis methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurement, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorptions of three different aromatic hydrocarbons by the prepared activated carbon samples have also been investigated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. It was found that carbon monolith prepared by catechol as carbon precursor has higher adsorpability and strength in comparison with the other sample. The higher performance of carbon monolith prepared by catechol can be associated with its higher active sites in comparison with resorcinol.

  16. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  17. Production and characterization of lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Namazi, A B; Jia, C Q; Allen, D G

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to establish the technical feasibility of producing activated carbon from pulp mill sludges. KOH chemical activation of four lignocellulosic biomass materials, two sludges from pulp mills, one sludge for a linerboard mill, and cow manure, were investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of KOH/biomass ratio (1/1, 1.5/1 and 2/1), activation temperature (400-600 °C) and activation time (1 to 2 h) on the development of porosity. The activation products were characterized for their physical and chemical properties using a surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out to establish the effectiveness of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon in removing methylene blue (MB), a surrogate of large organic molecules. The results show that the activated carbon are highly porous with specific surface area greater than 500 m²/g. The yield of activated carbon was greater than the percent of fixed carbon in the dry sludge, suggesting that the activation process was able to capture a substantial amount of carbon from the organic matter in the sludge. While 400 °C was too low, 600 °C was high enough to sustain a substantial rate of activation for linerboard sludge. The KOH/biomass ratio, activation temperature and time all play important roles in pore development and yield control, allowing optimization of the activation process. MB adsorption followed a Langmuir isotherm for all four activated carbon, although the adsorption capacity of NK-primary sludge-derived activated carbon was considerably lower than the rest, consistent with its lower specific surface area.

  18. Production of granular activated carbon from food-processing wastes (walnut shells and jujube seeds) and its adsorptive properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Jongho; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-08-01

    Commercial activated carbon is a highly effective absorbent that can be used to remove micropollutants from water. As a result, the demand for activated carbon is increasing. In this study, we investigated the optimum manufacturing conditions for producing activated carbon from ligneous wastes generated from food processing. Jujube seeds and walnut shells were selected as raw materials. Carbonization and steam activation were performed in a fixed-bed laboratory electric furnace. To obtain the highest iodine number, the optimum conditions for producing activated carbon from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 2 hr and 1.5 hr (carbonization at 700 degrees C) followed by 1 hr and 0.5 hr (activation at 1000 degrees C), respectively. The surface area and iodine number of activated carbon made from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 1,477 and 1,184 m2/g and 1,450 and 1,200 mg/g, respectively. A pore-distribution analysis revealed that most pores had a pore diameter within or around 30-40 angstroms, and adsorption capacity for surfactants was about 2 times larger than the commercial activated carbon, indicating that waste-based activated carbon can be used as alternative. Implications: Wastes discharged from agricultural and food industries results in a serious environmental problem. A method is proposed to convert food-processing wastes such as jujube seeds and walnut shells into high-grade granular activated carbon. Especially, the performance of jujube seeds as activated carbon is worthy of close attention. There is little research about the application ofjujube seeds. Also, when compared to two commercial carbons (Samchully and Calgon samples), the results show that it is possible to produce high-quality carbon, particularly from jujube seed, using a one-stage, 1,000 degrees C, steam pyrolysis. The preparation of activated carbon from food-processing wastes could increase economic return and reduce pollution.

  19. Adsorption characteristics of SO2 on activated carbon prepared from coconut shell with potassium hydroxide activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Whan; Park, Jin-Won; Choung, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Dae-Ki

    2002-03-01

    The adsorption characteristics of SO2 were studied with KOH-impregnated granular activated carbon (K-IAC). To confirm selective SO2 adsorptivity of K-IAC using a fixed bed adsorption column, experiments were conducted on the effects of KOH and of linear velocity, temperature, and concentration. In addition, changes in features before and after adsorption were observed by utilizing FTIR, XRD, ToF-SIMS, and AES/SAM, examining the surface chemistry. K-IAC adsorbed 13.2 times more SO2 than did general activated carbon (GAC). The amount of SO2 adsorbed increased as linear velocity and concentration increased and as temperature decreased. At lower temperature, the dominant reaction between KOH and SO2 produces K2-SO3 and H2O. Any H2O remaining on the surface is converted into H2SO4 as SO2 and O2 are introduced. Then, the KOH and SO2 reaction produces K2SO4 and H2O. The surface characterization results proved that adsorption occurred through chemical reaction between KOH and SO2. The SO2 adsorbed K-IAC exists in the form of stable oxide crystal, K2SO3 and K2SO4, due to potassium. The basic feature given to the surface of activated carbon by KOH impregnation was confirmed to be acting as the main factor in enhancing SO2 adsorptivity.

  20. Surface modification of oil fly ash and its application in selective capturing of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaumi, Ali L.; Hussien, Ibnelwaleed A.; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2013-02-01

    Oil fly ash from power generation plants was activated with 30% NH4OH and used for selective adsorption of carbon dioxide from CO2/N2 mixture. The treated samples were characterized for their surface area, morphology, crystalline phase, chemical composition and surface functional groups. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed an increase in the carbon contents from 45 to 73 wt% as a result of leaching out metal oxides. XRD proved that chemical activation of ash resulted in diminishing of major crystalline phases of zeolite, and other alumino-silicates leaving only quartz and mullite. BET analysis showed an increase in surface area from 59 to 318 m2/g after chemical activation and the pore volume increased from 0.0368 to 0.679 cm3/g. This increase in pore volume is supported by the results of SEM, where more micropores were opened with well-defined particle sizes and porous structure. The TGA of the treated fly ash showed stability at higher temperature as the weight loss decreased with increasing temperature. For treated ash, the FTIR displayed new peaks of amine functional group. The treated ash was used for the removal of CO2 from CO2/N2 mixture and the maximum adsorption/capturing capacity was found to be 240 mg/g. This capacity increases with increase in initial gas concentration, inlet flow rate and temperature suggesting the endothermic nature of the interaction between the gas molecules and the surface of the ash.

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  2. Mathematical evaluation of activated carbon adsorption for surfactant recovery in a soil washing process.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chi K; Lee, Min W; Lee, Dae S; Woo, Seung H; Park, Jong M

    2008-12-15

    The performances of various soil washing processes, including surfactant recovery by selective adsorption, were evaluated using a mathematical model for partitioning a target compound and surfactant in water/sorbent system. Phenanthrene was selected as a representative hazardous organic compound and Triton X-100 as a surfactant. Two activated carbons that differed in size (Darco 20-40 mesh and >100 mesh sizes) were used in adsorption experiments. The adsorption isotherms of the chemicals were used in model simulations for various washing scenarios. The optimal process conditions were suggested to minimize the dosage of activated carbon and surfactant and the number of washings. We estimated that the requirement of surfactant could be reduced to 33% of surfactant requirements (from 265 to 86.6g) with a reuse step using 9.1g activated carbon (>100 mesh) to achieve 90% removal of phenanthrene (initially 100mg kg-soil(-1)) with a water/soil ratio of 10.

  3. Soil Inorganic Carbon in Deserts: Active Carbon Sink or Inert Reservoir?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monger, H. C.; Cole, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the third largest C pool in the active global carbon cycle, containing at least 800 petagrams of carbon. Although carbonate dissolution-precipitation reactions have been understood for over a century, the role of soil inorganic carbon in carbon sequestration, and in particular pedogenic carbonate, is a deceptively complex process because it involves interdependent connections among climate, plants, microorganisms, silicate minerals, soil moisture, pH, and Ca supply via rain, dust, or in situ weathering. An understanding of soil inorganic carbon as a sink or reservoir also requires examination of the system at local to continental scales and at seasonal to millennial time scales. In desert soils studied in North America, carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon dates were measured in combination with electron microscopy, lab and field experiments with biological calcite formation, and field measurements of carbon dioxide emissions. These investigations reveal that soil inorganic carbon is both an active sink and a inert reservoir depending on the spatial and temporal scale and source of calcium.

  4. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction.

  5. Grain-based activated carbons for natural gas storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengyan; Walawender, Walter P; Fan, L T

    2010-03-01

    Natural gas has emerged as a potential alternative to gasoline due to the increase in global energy demand and environmental concerns. An investigation was undertaken to explore the technical feasibility of implementing the adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage in the fuel tanks of motor vehicles with activated carbons from biomass, e.g., sorghum and wheat. The grain-based activated carbons were prepared by chemical activation; the experimental parameters were varied to identify the optimum conditions. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was evaluated through nitrogen adsorption; and the storage capacity, through methane adsorption. A comparative study was also carried out with commercial activated carbons from charcoal. The highest storage factor attained was 89 for compacted grain-based activated carbons from grain sorghum with a bulk density of 0.65 g/cm(3), and the highest storage factor attained is 106 for compacted commercial activated carbons (Calgon) with a bulk density of 0.70 g/cm(3). The storage factor was found to increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density and to be independent of the extent of compaction. This implies that the grain-based activated carbons are the ideal candidates for the ANG storage.

  6. Chiral Selection of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Murine Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heddleston, John; Bhirde, Ashwin; Wang, Zhe; Khripin, Constantine; Fagan, Jeffrey; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Hight Walker, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have garnered significant interest as innovative tools for biomedical applications. They are being used for a variety of purposes, e.g. to deliver drug payloads, monitor cellular activity, or as in vivo imaging tools. However our current understanding of how SWCNTs behave in biological systems is limited. In this work we use Raman spectroscopy to measure the radial breathing modes (RBMs) of SWCNTs in murine organs following intravenous administration. We identify RBMs in multiple homogenized organs and can additionally measure the less SWCNT-specific carbon Raman peaks in others. Further, we quantify significant changes in the relative contribution of different SWCNTs chiralities to the overall RBM distribution. We observe this change in SWCNTs with a smaller diameter (7.6 A) but not in larger diameter tubes (14 A). These data are among the first to measure RBMs in organs and suggest that chiral selection can occur in biological systems with susceptibility for selection dependent on SWCNT diameter.

  7. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  8. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-07

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions.

  9. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  10. Synthesis of fullerene-, carbon nanotube-, and graphene-TiO₂ nanocomposite photocatalysts for selective oxidation: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min-Quan; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-02-01

    A series of TiO(2)-graphene (GR), -carbon nanotube (CNT), and -fullerene (C(60)) nanocomposite photocatalysts with different weight addition ratios of carbon contents are synthesized via a combination of sol-gel and hydrothermal methods. Their structures and properties are determined by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and photoelectrochemical measurements. Photocatalytic selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde is employed as a model reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of the TiO(2)-carbon (GR, CNT, and C(60)) nanocomposites under visible light irradiation. The results reveal that incorporating TiO(2) with carbon materials can extend the adsorption edge of all the TiO(2)-carbon nanocomposites to the visible light region. For TiO(2)-GR, TiO(2)-CNT, and TiO(2)-C(60) nanocomposites, the photocatalytic activities of the composites with optimum ratios, TiO(2)-0.1% GR, TiO(2)-0.5% CNT, and TiO(2)-1.0% C(60), are very close to each other along with the irradiation time. Furthermore, the underlying reaction mechanism for the photocatalytic selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde over TiO(2)-carbon nanocomposites has been explored using different radical scavenger techniques, suggesting that TiO(2)-carbon photocatalysts follow the analogous oxidation mechanism toward selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The addition of different carbon materials has no significant influence on the crystal phase, particle size, and the morphology of TiO(2). Therefore, it can be concluded, at least for nanocomposites of TiO(2)-carbon (GR, CNT, and C(60)) obtained by the present approach, that there is no much difference in essence on affecting the photocatalytic performance of semiconductor TiO(2) among these three different carbon allotropes, GR, CNT, and C(60). Our findings point to the importance of a comparative study of semiconductor-carbon

  11. Direct optical carbon dioxide sensing based on a polymeric film doped with a selective molecular tweezer-type ionophore.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaojiang; Pawlak, Marcin; Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Bakker, Eric

    2012-04-03

    A novel optical method for the determination of CO(2) concentration in aqueous and gaseous samples of plasticized PVC film is presented. The detection principle makes use of a direct molecular recognition of the carbonate ion by a molecular tweezer-type ionophore, which has previously been demonstrated to exhibit excellent carbonate selectivity. The carbonate ion is extracted together with hydrogen ions into a polymeric film that contains the anion exchanger tridodecylmethylammonium chloride, a lipophilic, electrically charged, and highly basic pH indicator, which is used for the readout in absorbance mode, in addition to the lipophilic carbonate ionophore. According to known bulk optode principles, such an optical sensor responds to the product of the carbonate ion activity and the square of hydrogen ion activity. This quantity is thermodynamically linked to the activity of carbon dioxide. This allows one to realize a direct carbon dioxide sensor that does not make use of the traditional Severinghaus sensing principle of measuring a pH change upon CO(2) equilibration across a membrane. A selectivity analysis shows that common ions such as chloride are sufficiently suppressed for direct PCO(2) measurements in freshwater samples at pH 8. Chloride interference, however, is too severe for direct seawater measurements at the same pH. This may be overcome by placing a gas-permeable membrane over the optode sensing film. This is conceptually confirmed by establishing that the sensor is equally useful for gas-phase PCO(2) measurements. As expected, humid air samples are required for proper sensor functioning, as dry CO(2) gas will not cause any signal change. The sensor showed acceptable response times and good reproducibility under both conditions.

  12. Decolorization/Deodorization of Zein via Activated Carbons and Molecular Sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of commercial activated carbons generated from different media and selective microporous zeolites with different pore sizes were used in a batch system to sequester the low molecular weight odor and color contaminants in commercial zein products. Because the adsorbents can also adsorb prot...

  13. Sink effect in activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, J.; Labady, M.; Severino, F.; Yunes, S.

    1997-03-01

    A synergistic effect has been proposed in previous papers, attempting to explain the higher activity of activated carbon-supported hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts with respect to conventional alumina-supported catalysts, reported earlier. However, activated carbon characteristics can be strongly affected by the raw material and the method of activation. Thus, previous work using Ni-Mo catalysts supported on two different activated carbons (one prepared by {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} and the other by {open_quotes}chemical{close_quotes} activation) showed different optimal Ni concentrations for higher HDS activity, such difference being attributed to the predominance of Topsoe`s Type I {open_quotes}NiMoS{close_quotes} phase in one carbon and the predominance of Type II in the other. Due to the lack of proper characterization of the activated carbon supported catalysts of the previous work, this paper presents further data suggesting that microporosity provided by the activated carbon may be the responsible for the above referred synergism. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Adsorption of methylene blue and Congo red from aqueous solution by activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Szlachta, M; Wójtowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the adsorption removal of dyes by powdered activated carbon (PAC, Norit) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Chinese Academy of Science) from an aqueous solution. Methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) were selected as model compounds. The adsorbents tested have a high surface area (PAC 835 m(2)/g, MWCNTs 358 m(2)/g) and a well-developed porous structure which enabled the effective treatment of dye-contaminated waters and wastewaters. To evaluate the capacity of PAC and MWCNTs to adsorb dyes, a series of batch adsorption experiments was performed. Both adsorbents exhibited a high adsorptive capacity for MB and CR, and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with the maximum adsorption capacity up to 400 mg/g for MB and 500 mg/g for CR. The separation factor, RL, revealed the favorable nature of the adsorption process under experimental conditions. The kinetics of adsorption was studied at various initial dye concentrations and solution temperatures. The pseudo-second-order model was used for determining the adsorption kinetics of MB and CR. The data obtained show that adsorption of both dyes was rapid in the initial stage and followed by slower processing to reach the plateau. The uptake of dyes increased with contact time, irrespective of their initial concentration and solution temperature. However, changes in the solution temperature did not significantly influence dye removal.

  15. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  16. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  17. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  18. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  19. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  20. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-05

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  1. Physicochemical and porosity characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon polluted with biological activated carbon process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lihua; Liu, Wenjun; Jiang, Renfu; Wang, Zhansheng

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of thermally regenerated activated carbon (AC) polluted with biological activated carbon (BAC) process were investigated. The results showed that the true micropore and sub-micropore volume, pH value, bulk density, and hardness of regenerated AC decreased compared to the virgin AC, but the total pore volume increased. XPS analysis displayed that the ash contents of Al, Si, and Ca in the regenerated AC respectively increased by 3.83%, 2.62% and 1.8%. FTIR spectrum showed that the surface functional groups of virgin and regenerated AC did not change significantly. Pore size distributions indicated that the AC regeneration process resulted in the decrease of micropore and macropore (D>10 μm) volume and the increase of mesopore and macropore (0.1 μm

  2. Estimates of live-tree carbon stores in the Pacific Northwest are sensitive to model selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Estimates of live-tree carbon stores are influenced by numerous uncertainties. One of them is model-selection uncertainty: one has to choose among multiple empirical equations and conversion factors that can be plausibly justified as locally applicable to calculate the carbon store from inventory measurements such as tree height and diameter at breast height (DBH). Here we quantify the model-selection uncertainty for the five most numerous tree species in six counties of northwest Oregon, USA. Results The results of our study demonstrate that model-selection error may introduce 20 to 40% uncertainty into a live-tree carbon estimate, possibly making this form of error the largest source of uncertainty in estimation of live-tree carbon stores. The effect of model selection could be even greater if models are applied beyond the height and DBH ranges for which they were developed. Conclusions Model-selection uncertainty is potentially large enough that it could limit the ability to track forest carbon with the precision and accuracy required by carbon accounting protocols. Without local validation based on detailed measurements of usually destructively sampled trees, it is very difficult to choose the best model when there are several available. Our analysis suggests that considering tree form in equation selection may better match trees to existing equations and that substantial gaps exist, in terms of both species and diameter ranges, that are ripe for new model-building effort. PMID:21477353

  3. Preparation of activated carbons from agricultural residues for pesticide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Ourania A; Zabaniotou, Anastasia A; Stavropoulos, George G; Islam, Md Azharul; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2010-09-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) can be used not only for liquid but also for vapour phase applications, such as water treatment, deodorisation, gas purification and air treatment. In the present study, activated carbons produced from agricultural residues (olive kernel, corn cobs, rapeseed stalks and soya stalks) via physical steam activation were tested for the removal of Bromopropylate (BP) from water. For the characterization of the activated carbons ICP, SEM, FTIR and XRD analyses were performed. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms were investigated for all biomass activated carbons in aqueous solutions. Experimental data of BP adsorption have fitted best to the pseudo 2nd-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. The study resulted that corn cobs showed better adsorption capacity than the other biomass ACs. Comparison among ACs from biomass and commercial ones (F400 and Norit GL50) revealed that the first can be equally effective for the removal of BP from water with the latter.

  4. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  5. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  6. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  7. Activated carbon testing for the 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.N.

    1997-01-17

    This report documents pilot and laboratory scale testing of activated carbon for use in the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility peroxide decomposer columns. Recommendations are made concerning column operating conditions and hardware design, the optimum type of carbon for use in the plant, and possible further studies.

  8. Lignin-based microporous materials as selective adsorbents for carbon dioxide separation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing Bo; Weber, Jens

    2014-12-01

    Suitable solid adsorbents are demanded for carbon capture and storage (CCS) processes. In this work, a novel microporous polymer is developed by hypercrosslinking of organosolv lignin, which is a renewable resource. Reaction with formaldehyde dimethyl acetal (FDA) via Friedel-Crafts reaction gives microporous networks, with moderate capacity of carbon dioxide but excellent selectivity towards CO2 /N2 mixture as predicted on the basis of ideal adsorption-solution theory (IAST). Pyrolysis of pure organosolv lignin results in microporous carbon powders, while pyrolysis of hypercrosslinked organosolv lignin yields shape-persistent materials with increased CO2 capacity while maintaining very good selectivity.

  9. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  10. Effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes with psychosine on complement activation and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rybak-Smith, Malgorzata J; Tripisciano, Carla; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Lamprecht, Constanze; Sim, Robert B

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess interesting physicochemical properties which make them potentially usable in medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, for example, may carry and deliver anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin. Magnetic nanoparticles, like iron filled MWCNT, can be used in hyperthermia therapy. However, their hydrophobic character is a major difficulty, as preparation of stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes in biological buffers is an essential step towards biomedical applications. Recently, a novel treatment using the glycolipid, Galactosyl-beta1-sphingosine (psychosine), was employed to make stable suspensions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes in biological buffers. In this paper, the interactions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes with a part of the human immune system, complement, is presented. To investigate if human serum complement proteins can interact with psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, complement consumption (depletion) assays were conducted. Moreover, direct protein binding studies, to analyze the interaction of plasma proteins with the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, using affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques, were applied. The psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes activate human complement via the classical pathway. Interestingly, as the hydrophilic part of the glycolipid may bind to ficolins, the lectin pathway could also be involved. Binding of human plasma proteins is very selective as only very few proteins adsorb to the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotube surface, when placed in contact with human plasma. Bovine serum albumin-coated carbon nanotubes were used as a standard to find the differences in complement activation and protein adsorption patterns, caused by various non-covalent coatings of carbon nanotubes.

  11. Heterogeneous and homogeneous catalytic ozonation of benzothiazole promoted by activated carbon: kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Héctor; Zaror, Claudio A

    2006-11-01

    Ozone oxidation combined with activated carbon adsorption (O(3)/AC) has recently started to be developed as a single process for water and wastewater treatment. While a number of aspects of aqueous ozone decomposition are well understood, the importance and relationship between aqueous ozone decomposition and organic contaminant degradation in the presence of activated carbon is still not clear. This study focuses on determining the contribution of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions to organic contaminants removal in O(3)/AC system. Benzothiazole (BT) was selected as a target organic pollutant due to its environmental concern. A reactor system based on a differential circular flow reactor composed by a 19 cm(3) activated carbon fixed bed column and 1 dm(3) storage tank was used. Ozone was produced from pure and dry oxygen using an Ozocav ozone generator rated at 5 g O(3)h(-1). Experimental results show that BT removal rate was proportional to activated carbon dosage. Activated carbon surface contribution to BT oxidation reactions with ozone, increased with pH in absence of radical scavengers. The radical reaction contribution within the pH range 2-11 accounted for 67-83% for BT removal in O(3)/AC simultaneous treatment. Results suggest that at pH higher than the pH of the point of zero charge of the activated carbon dissociated acid groups such as carboxylic acid anhydrides and carboxylic acids present on activated carbon surface could be responsible for the observed increase in the ozone decomposition reaction rate. A simplified mechanism and a kinetic scheme representing the contribution of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions on BT ozonation in the presence of activated carbon is proposed.

  12. Enhanced preconcentration of selected chlorofluorocarbons on multiwalled carbon nanotubes with polar functionalities.

    PubMed

    Saridara, Chutarat; Hussain, Chaudhery Mustansar; Ragunath, Smruti; Mitra, Somenath

    2015-02-01

    Chromatographic monitoring of chlorofluorocarbons in air requires the preconcentration of these highly volatile species. In this paper, we present functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes as effective sorbents for a microtrap designed for chlorofluorocarbons preconcentration. Among the commercial carbons and carbon nanotubes studied, functionalization via carboxylation and propyl amine was most effective for dichlorofluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), which were selected as representative chlorofluorocarbons. The results show that carbon nanotubes functionalized with a polar groups led to as much as a 300% increase in breakthrough volume and the desorption bandwidth was reduced by 2.5 times.

  13. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals to microporous activated carbon treated with potassium hydroxide, carbon dioxide, and steam.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Yang, Liuyan; Wan, Yuqiu; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of sulfapyridine, tetracycline, and tylosin to a commercial microporous activated carbon (AC) and its potassium hydroxide (KOH)-, CO-, and steam-treated counterparts (prepared by heating at 850°C) was studied to explore efficient adsorbents for the removal of selected pharmaceuticals from water. Phenol and nitrobenzene were included as additional adsorbates, and nonporous graphite was included as a model adsorbent. The activation treatments markedly increased the specific surface area and enlarged the pore sizes of the mesopores of AC (with the strongest effects shown on the KOH-treated AC). Adsorption of large-size tetracycline and tylosin was greatly enhanced, especially for the KOH-treated AC (more than one order of magnitude), probably due to the alleviated size-exclusion effect. However, the treatments had little effect on adsorption of low-size phenol and nitrobenzene due to the predominance of micropore-filling effect in adsorption and the nearly unaffected content of small micropores causative to such effect. These hypothesized mechanisms on pore-size dependent adsorption were further tested by comparing surface area-normalized adsorption data and adsorbent pore size distributions with and without the presence of adsorbed antibiotics. The findings indicate that efficient adsorption of bulky pharmaceuticals to AC can be achieved by enlarging the adsorbent pore size through suitable activation treatments.

  14. Quality of selected coal seams from Indiana: Implications for carbonization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.; Mastalerz, Maria; Padgett, P.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical properties of two high-volatile bituminous coals, the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation and the Lower Block Coal Member of the Brazil Formation from southern Indiana, were compared to understand the differences in their coking behavior. It was determined that of the two, the Lower Block has better characteristics for coking. Observed factors that contribute to the differences in the coking behavior of the coals include carbon content, organic sulfur content, and oxygen/carbon (O/C) ratios. The Lower Block coal has greater carbon content than the Danville coal, leading to a lower O/C ratio, which is more favorable for coking. Organic sulfur content is higher in the Lower Block coal, and a strong correlation was found between organic sulfur and plasticity. The majority of the data for both seams plot in the Type III zone on a van Krevelen diagram, and several samples from the Lower Block coal plot into the Type II zone, suggesting a perhydrous character for those samples. This divergence in properties between the Lower Block and Danville coals may account for the superior coking behavior of the Lower Block coal. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Granular bamboo-derived activated carbon for high CO(2) adsorption: the dominant role of narrow micropores.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haoran; Deng, Shubo; Hu, Bingyin; Chen, Zhenhe; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective biomass-derived activated carbons with a high CO(2) adsorption capacity are attractive for carbon capture. Bamboo was found to be a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation through KOH activation. The bamboo size in the range of 10-200 mesh had little effect on CO(2) adsorption, whereas the KOH/C mass ratio and activation temperature had a significant impact on CO(2) adsorption. The bamboo-derived activated carbon had a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for CO(2) , and also the adsorption process was highly reversible. The adsorbed amount of CO(2) on the granular activated carbon was up to 7.0 mmol g(-1) at 273 K and 1 bar, which was higher than almost all carbon materials. The pore characteristics of activated carbons responsible for high CO(2) adsorption were fully investigated. Based on the analysis of narrow micropore size distribution of several activated carbons prepared under different conditions, a more accurate micropore range contributing to CO(2) adsorption was proposed. The volume of micropores in the range of 0.33-0.82 nm had a good linear relationship with CO(2) adsorption at 273 K and 1 bar, and the narrow micropores of about 0.55 nm produced the major contribution, which could be used to evaluate CO(2) adsorption on activated carbons.

  16. Quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guannan; Guo, Mingxin

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a source material for generating activated carbon is a value-added and environmentally beneficial approach to recycling organic waste. In this study, the overall quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon was systematically evaluated based on its various physical and chemical properties. Granular activated carbon generated from pelletized poultry litter following a typical steam-activation procedure possessed numerous micropores in the matrix. The product exhibited a mean particle diameter of 2.59 mm, an apparent density of 0.45 g cm(-3), a ball-pan hardness of 91.0, an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1), and a BET surface area of 403 m(2) g(-1). It contained high ash, nitrogen, phosphorus contents and the trace elements Cu, Zn, and As. Most of the nutrients and toxic elements were solidified and solution-unextractable. In general, poultry litter-based activated carbon demonstrated overall quality comparable to that of low-grade commercial activated carbon derived from coconut shell and bituminous coal. It is promising to use poultry litter as a feedstock to manufacture activated carbon for wastewater treatment.

  17. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  19. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  20. [Influence of biological activated carbon dosage on landfill leachate treatment].

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan-Rui; Guo, Yan; Wu, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC) dosage on COD removal in landfill leachate treatment were compared. The COD removal efficiency of reactors with 0, 100 and 300 g activated carbon dosage per litre activated sludge was 12.9%, 19.6% and 27.7%, respectively. The results indicated that BAC improved the refractory organic matter removal efficiency and there was a positive correlation between COD removal efficiency and BAC dosage. The output of carbon dioxide after 8h of aeration in reactors was 109, 193 and 306 mg corresponding to the activated carbon dosages mentioned above, which indicated the amount of biodegradation and BAC dosage also had a positive correlation. The combination of adsorption and bioregeneration of BAC resulted in the positive correlation betweem organic matter removal efficiency and BAC dosage, and bioregeneration was the root cause for the microbial decomposition of refractory organics.

  1. Long-term Carbon Loss and Recovery Following Selective Logging in Amazon Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Asner, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Amazon deforestation contributes significantly to global carbon (C) emissions. In comparison, the contribution from selective logging to atmospheric CO2 emissions, and its impact on regional C dynamics, is highly uncertain. Using a new geographically-based modeling approach in combination with high resolution remote sensing data from 1999-2002, we estimate C losses due to selective logging in a ~2,664,960 sq. km region of the Brazilian Amazon were 0.04 - 0.05 Pg C/yr . In sum, selective logging was responsible for 15-19% higher carbon losses than reported from deforestation (clear-cutting) alone. Our simulations indicated that forest carbon losses via selective logging last two to three decades following harvest, and that the original living biomass takes up to a century to recover, if the forests are not subsequently cleared. High-intensity harvests, which are widespread over the basin, are the major contributors to carbon losses following logging, in addition to obvious impacts on the ecological function of the forests. While avoided deforestation is central to crediting rainforest nations for reduced carbon emissions, the extent and intensity of selective logging are also critical to determining carbon losses in the context of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD).

  2. Alkoxide activation of aminoboranes towards selective amination.

    PubMed

    Solé, Cristina; Fernández, Elena

    2013-10-18

    Piece of the (inter)action: The interaction of alkoxides with the sp(2) Bpin (pin=pinacol) moiety in aminoboranes forms the in situ Lewis acid-base adduct [RO(-) →B(OR)2 N(R')2 ] which enables the amino moiety to react as a strong nucleophile with several electrophiles, thus providing amino alcohols, β-enamino esters, and β-hydroxy amides in a direct and remarkably selective way.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  4. Adsorption of dichlorodifluoromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, and chloropentafluoroethane on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Berlier, K.; Frere, M.; Bougard, J.

    1995-09-01

    The CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are used as working refrigerant fluids. Recent concerns of the effects of CFCs on the ozone layer requires the development of efficient recovery methods. One technique is to adsorb the fluids onto a porous medium such as silica gel or activated carbon. Isotherms and enthalpies of adsorption curves of dichlorodifluoromethane (R12), chlorodifluoromethane (R22), and chloropentafluoroethane (R115) on three different activated carbons have been obtained at 303 K and at pressures to 602 kPa.

  5. Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in Yemen. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in Yemen provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active

  6. A perspective on tritium versus carbon-14: ensuring optimal label selection in pharmaceutical research and development.

    PubMed

    Krauser, Joel A

    2013-01-01

    Tritium ((3) H) and carbon-14 ((14) C) labels applied in pharmaceutical research and development each offer their own distinctive advantages and disadvantages coupled with benefits and risks. The advantages of (3) H have a higher specific activity, shorter half-life that allows more manageable waste remediation, lower material costs, and often more direct synthetic routes. The advantages of (14) C offer certain analytical benefits and less potential for label loss. Although (3) H labels offer several advantages, they might be overlooked as a viable option because of the concerns about its drawbacks. A main drawback often challenged is metabolic liability. These drawbacks, in some cases, might be overstated leading to underutilization of a perfectly viable option. As a consequence, label selection may automatically default to (14) C, which is a more conservative approach. To challenge this '(14) C-by-default' approach, pharmaceutical agents with strategically selected (3) H-labeling positions based on non-labeled metabolism data have been successfully implemented and evaluated for (3) H loss. From in-house results, the long term success of projects clearly would benefit from a thorough, objective, and balanced assessment regarding label selection ((3) H or (14) C). This assessment should be based on available project information and scientific knowledge. Important considerations are project applicability (preclinical and clinical phases), synthetic feasibility, costs, and timelines.

  7. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  8. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  9. Antibacterial activity of selected Malaysian honey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity of honey is mainly dependent on a combination of its peroxide activity and non-peroxide components. This study aims to investigate antibacterial activity of five varieties of Malaysian honey (three monofloral; acacia, gelam and pineapple, and two polyfloral; kelulut and tualang) against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) were performed for semi-quantitative evaluation. Agar well diffusion assay was used to investigate peroxide and non-peroxide activities of honey. Results The results showed that gelam honey possessed lowest MIC value against S. aureus with 5% (w/v) MIC and MBC of 6.25% (w/v). Highest MIC values were shown by pineapple honey against E. coli and P. aeruginosa as well as acacia honey against E. coli with 25% (w/v) MIC and 50% (w/v) MBC values. Agar inhibition assay showed kelulut honey to possess highest total antibacterial activity against S. aureus with 26.49 equivalent phenol concentrations (EPC) and non-peroxide activity of 25.74 EPC. Lowest antibacterial activity was observed in acacia honey against E. coli with total activity of 7.85 EPC and non-peroxide activity of 7.59 EPC. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the total antibacterial activities and non-peroxide activities of Malaysian honey. The intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC of E. coli (r = -0.8559) was high while that between MIC and EPC of P. aeruginosa was observed to be moderate (r = -0.6469). S. aureus recorded a smaller correlation towards the opposite direction (r = 0.5045). In contrast, B.cereus showed a very low intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC (r = -0.1482). Conclusions Malaysian honey, namely gelam, kelulut and tualang, have high antibacterial potency derived from total and non-peroxide activities, which implies that both peroxide and other

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  11. Waste polyvinylchloride derived pitch as a precursor to develop carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, W M; Yoon, S H; Mochida, I; Yang, J H

    2007-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) was successfully recycled through the solvent extraction from waste pipe with an extraction yield of ca. 86%. The extracted PVC was pyrolyzed by a two-stage process (260 and 410 degrees C) to obtain free-chlorine PVC based pitch through an effective removal of chlorine from PVC during the heat-treatment. As-prepared pitch (softening point: 220 degrees C) was spun, stabilized, carbonized into carbon fibers (CFs), and further activated into activated carbon fibers (ACFs) in a flow of CO2. As-prepared CFs show comparable mechanical properties to commercial CFs, whose maximum tensile strength and modulus are 862 MPa and 62 GPa, respectively. The resultant ACFs exhibit a high surface area of 1200 m2/g, narrow pore size distribution and a low oxygen content of 3%. The study provides an effective insight to recycle PVC from waste PVC and develop a carbon precursor for high performance carbon materials such as CFs and ACFs.

  12. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption.

  13. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  14. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  15. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for the Analysis of Activated Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    impregnation procedures . It is believed that Sutcliffe-Speakman is currently using coconut - shell as the carbon precursor (instead of the New Zealand coal...microstructure facilitate the adsorption process whereby all the undesirable materials are retained. For military deployment, the activated carbon is...AD-A245 899 H.P ’ l N dI dUenm / DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY (DSC) FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by S.H.C. a and L.E. Cameron DTIC x

  16. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  17. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  18. Antiprotease activity of selected Slovak medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jedinak, A; Valachova, M; Maliar, T; Sturdik, E

    2010-02-01

    Fifty-six methanol extracts obtained from the barks, flowers, leaves and stems of 30 Slovak trees, bushes and herbs used in the traditional medicine of the Small Carpathians, Slovakia, have been screened for antiprotease (trypsin, thrombin and urokinase) activity using chromogenic bioassay. In this study, 14 extracts showed the strong inhibition activity to protease trypsin with IC50 values below 10 microg/mL. The highest inhibition activities were observed for methanol extracts of Acer platanoides IC50 = 1.8 microg/mL, Rhus typhina IC50 = 1.2 microg/mL and Tamarix gallica IC50 = 1.7 microg/mL. However, the results of extracts tested on thrombin were generally different from those observed for trypsin. The most marked inhibition activity to thrombin were estimated for extracts of Castanea sativa IC50 = 73.2 microg/mL, Larix decidua IC50 = 96.9 microg/mL and Rhus typhina IC50 = 20.5 microg/mL. In addition, Acer platanoides and Rhus typhina were the only extracts which showed inhibition activity to urokinase with IC50 = 171.1 microg/mL and IC50 = 38.3 microg/mL, respectively. In addition, Rhus typhina showed the broadest spectrum of inhibition activity to all tested serine proteases and seems to be a prospective new source of natural products as inhibitors of serine proteases.

  19. Effects of CO 2 activation on porous structures of coconut shell-based activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shenghui; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Kunbin; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shimin; Xia, Hongying

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, textural characterization of an activated carbon derived from carbonized coconut shell char obtained at carbonization temperature of 600 °C for 2 h by CO 2 activation was investigated. The effects of activation temperature, activation time and flow rate of CO 2 on the BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield of activated carbons prepared were evaluated systematically. The results showed that: (i) enhancing activation temperature was favorable to the formation of pores, widening of pores and an increase in mesopores; (ii) increasing activation time was favorable to the formation of micropores and mesopores, and longer activation time would result in collapsing of pores; (iii) increasing flow rate of CO 2 was favorable to the reactions of all active sites and formation of pores, further increasing flow rate of CO 2 would lead carbon to burn out and was unfavorable to the formation of pores. The degree of surface roughness of activated carbon prepared was measured by the fractal dimension which was calculated by FHH (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill) theory. The fractal dimensions of activated carbons prepared were greater than 2.6, indicating the activated carbon samples prepared had very irregular structures, and agreed well with those of average micropore size.

  20. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area.

  1. Activity of selected phytochemicals against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Astelbauer, Florian; Gruber, Maria; Brem, Brigitte; Greger, Harald; Obwaller, Andreas; Wernsdorfer, Gunther; Congpuong, Kanungnit; Wernsdorfer, Walther H; Walochnik, Julia

    2012-08-01

    According to the WHO, in 2008, there were 247 million reported cases of malaria and nearly one million deaths from the disease. Parasite resistance against first-line drugs, including artemisinin and mefloquine, is increasing. In this study the plant-derived compounds aglafolin, rocaglamid, kokusaginine, arborine, arborinine and tuberostemonine were investigated for their anti-plasmodial activity in vitro. Fresh Plasmodium falciparum isolates were taken from patients in the area of Mae Sot, north-western Thailand in 2008 and the inhibition of schizont maturation was determined for the respective compounds. With inhibitory concentrations effecting 50%, 90% and 99% inhibition (IC(50), IC(90) and IC(99)) of 60.95 nM, 854.41 nM and 7351.49 nM, respectively, rocaglamid was the most active of the substances, closely followed by aglafoline with 53.49 nM, 864.55 nM and 8354.20 nM. The activity was significantly below that of artemisinin, but moderately higher than that of quinine. Arborine, arborinine, tuberostemonine and kokusaginine showed only marginal activity against P. falciparum characterized by IC(50) and IC(99) values higher than 350 nM and 180 μM, respectively, and regressions with relatively shallow slopes S>14.38. Analogues of rocaglamid and aglafoline merit further exploration of their anti-plasmodial activity.

  2. Electroadsorption of Arsenic from natural water in granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beralus, Jean-Mackson; Ruiz Rosas, Ramiro; Cazorla-Amoros, Diego; Morallon, Emilia

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption and electroadsorption of arsenic from a natural water has been studied in a filter-press electrochemical cell using a commercial granular activated carbon as adsorbent and Pt/Ti and graphite as electrodes. A significant reduction of the arsenic concentration is achieved when current is imposed between the electrodes, especially when the activated carbon was located in the vicinity of the anode. This enhancement can be explained in terms of the presence of electrostatic interactions between the polarized carbon surface and the arsenic ions, and changes in the distribution of most stable species of arsenic in solution due to As(III) to As(V) oxidation. In summary, electrochemical adsorption on a filter press cell can be used for enhancement the arsenic remediation with activated carbon in the treatment of a real groundwater.

  3. Selected Technology Lab Activities Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    These materials supplement state guides for junior high or middle school technology education programs. The materials show instructors how to implement 81 hours of new technology-related activities into existing programs. Introductory materials include a rationale, philosophy, and goals for technology education. Areas of instruction are as…

  4. [Quickly enrichment of carbon in wastewater by activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bo; Zhao, Fang; Wen, Xiang-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Pilot tests were carried out to investigate the absorption characteristics of the carbon source in urban wastewater by activated sludge and to analyze the carbon release from the carbon absorbed activated sludge in the settling process. The results indicated that carbon in wastewater could be quickly enriched by activated sludge. The absorption process of indissolvable organic matter could be finished as shortly as less than 10 min, while the absorption process of the dissolved organic matter was relatively slow and should consume up about 30 min. Moreover, carbon release was observed in the settling process of enriched sludge. In the period of 30-100 min, the release amount of total COD (TCOD) was 11.44 mg x g(-1), while in the period of 60-150 min, the release amount of dissolved COD (SCOD) was 6.24 mg x g(-1). Furthermore, based on the results of the bench-scale tests, a pilot-scale plant was built to investigate the absorption of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by activated sludge and the settleability of enriched sludge. The results indicated that under continuously operation mode, 60% of COD, 75% of TP and 10% of TN in the wastewater could be removed by the absorption of activated sludge, and the enriched sludge with SVI of 34.2 mL x g(-1) presented good settleability. Carbon enrichment by activated sludge could not only reclaim the carbon source in wastewater, but also reduce the loading of organic matter and give low C/N for the following nitrification unit and improving the nitrification efficiency.

  5. Composite electrodes of activated carbon derived from cassava peel and carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taer, E.; Iwantono, Yulita, M.; Taslim, R.; Subagio, A.; Salomo, Deraman, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a composite electrode was prepared from a mixture of activated carbon derived from precarbonization of cassava peel (CP) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The activated carbon was produced by pyrolysis process using ZnCl2 as an activation agent. A N2 adsorption-desorption analysis for the sample indicated that the BET surface area of the activated carbon was 1336 m2 g-1. Difference percentage of CNTs of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% with 5% of PVDF binder were added into CP based activated carbon in order to fabricate the composite electrodes. The morphology and structure of the composite electrodes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The SEM image observed that the distribution of CNTs was homogeneous between carbon particles and the XRD pattern shown the amorphous structure of the sample. The electrodes were fabricated for supercapacitor cells with 316L stainless steel as current collector and 1 M sulfuric acid as electrolyte. An electrochemical characterization was performed by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method using a Solatron 1286 instrument and the addition of CNTs revealed to improve the resistant and capacitive properties of supercapacitor cell.

  6. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  7. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A J; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E

    2012-07-27

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  8. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  9. The Impact of Selective Logging on the Regional Carbon Budget at the Tapajos National Forest: a Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Asner, G. P.; Keller, M.; Knapp, D.

    2005-12-01

    Selective logging has been identified as an important form of land use in the Brazilian Amazon region based on studies in Large-scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment (LBA) Phase II (Nepstad et al., 1999; Asner et al., 2004). The ground and canopy damage caused by selective logging could have significant ecological, biogeochemical and micrometeorological consequences. Logging creates canopy gaps that affect photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) interception, latent and sensible heat fluxes, water stress and plant productivity. Also, it creates an increased amount of coarse woody debris (CWD), dead leaves and roots, which enlarge the carbon pools for respiration and fire. Furthermore, the biogeochemical processes in the tropical forest including the nutrient cycles and wildlife would also be altered. Unfortunately, previous studies on impacts of selective logging in that region are generally limited in space and/or time. In this study, a high-resolution (30 m by 30 m) version of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model is applied to quantify the impact of selective logging on the regional carbon budget at the Tapajos National Forest. A unique aspect of this study is to take advantage of recent progress in characterizing explicitly the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest canopy gaps and CWD generation based upon field and remote sensing measurements (Asner et al., 2005; Keller et al., 2004). An undisturbed forest scenario and a logging scenario will be considered. The undisturbed forest scenario corresponds to the condition prior to logging and will serve as a baseline simulation for comparison. By assimilating satellite-derived vegetation indices, gap fractions, and CWD estimates before and after logging, we expect to simulate the spatial changes of carbon storage and carbon release caused by logging over time. Measurements from the km 83 flux tower located at the Tapajos National Forest will be used to constrain the model. This study constitutes our

  10. Granular Activated Carbon Performance Capability and Availability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    5-11 Notes: 1. As total nitrobodies 2. Combined with RDX 3. Includes dissolved air flotation, sand filter, and GAC 4. Can be achieved with moderate...RDX-HMX Water and Air Research Inc Feoruary 1976 Facility Newoort Army Aunition Plant 0-27 ater Quality Assessment for the Proposed RDX-HMX Water and... Air Research Inc February 1976 Facility, McAlester Naval munition Depot. Vol I 0-28 luorovin Granular Carbon Treatment FMC Corp/EPA 1792-6D" N 07 71

  11. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  12. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Tsouris, Costas; McFarlane, Joanna

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  13. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of selected herbal extracts.

    PubMed

    Gowthamarajan, K; Kulkarni, T Giriraj; Mahadevan, N; Santhi, K; Suresh, B

    2002-01-01

    METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF OLEORESINS OF ARAUCARIA BIDWILLI HOOK: and aerial parts of Cytisus scoparius Linn. Were screened for antimicrobial activity against two bacterial strains-Bacillus subtilis (Gram Positive) and Escherichia coli (Gem negative), and two fungal strains - Candida albicans and crytococcus neoformans by two-fold serial dilution technique. The results showed that all the microorganisms used were sensitive to the extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for A. bidwilli were found to be 31.25 μg/ml for Bacillus subtilis and 500 μg/ml for all other organisms used in the study. In case of C. Scoparius, the MIC values were 250 μg/ml for B. Subtilis and 500 μg/ml for allthe other strains used. However, in comparison the ampicillin (MIC: 62.5 μg/ml), and Amphotericin-B (MIC: 125 μg/ml ), the activities of both the extracts were less except A. bidwilli against B.Subtilis.

  15. FENTON-DRIVEN REGENERATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON: A TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fenton-driven mechanism for regenerating spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves the combined, synergistic use of two reliable and well established treatment technologies - adsorption onto activated carbon and Fenton oxidation. During carbon adsorption treatment, enviro...

  16. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  17. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  18. Microporous polystyrene particles for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Kaliva, Maria; Armatas, Gerasimos S; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2012-02-07

    This study presents the synthesis of microporous polystyrene particles and the potential use of these materials in CO(2) capture for biogas purification. Highly cross-linked polystyrene particles are synthesized by the emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in water. The cross-link density of the polymer is varied by altering the St/DVB molar ratio. The size and the morphology of the particles are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Following supercritical point drying with carbon dioxide or lyophilization from benzene, the polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a significant surface area and permanent microporosity. The dried particles comprising 35 mol % St and 65 mol % DVB possess the largest surface area, ∼205 m(2)/g measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and ∼185 m(2)/g measured by the Dubinin-Radushkevich method, and a total pore volume of 1.10 cm(3)/g. Low pressure measurements suggest that the microporous polystyrene particles exhibit a good separation performance of CO(2) over CH(4), with separation factors in the range of ∼7-13 (268 K, CO(2)/CH(4) = 5/95 gas mixture), which renders them attractive candidates for use in gas separation processes.

  19. Oxidation of activated carbon: application to vinegar decolorization.

    PubMed

    López, Francisco; Medina, Francisco; Prodanov, Marin; Güell, Carme

    2003-01-15

    This article reports studies on the feasibility of increasing the decoloring capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) by using oxidation with air at 350 degrees C to modify its surface activity and porosity. The GAC, obtained from olive stones, had a maximum decolorization capacity of 92% for doses of 20 g/l, while the maximum decolorization capacity of the modified granular activated carbon (MGAC) was about 96% at a dose of 10 g/l. The increase in decoloring capacity is thought to be due to an increase in mesopore area (from 129 to 340 m2/g) in the MGAC. The maximum decoloring values and the doses needed to attain them are very close to values obtained in previous studies using coconut shell powder-activated carbon (94 and 98% for red and white vinegar for a dose of 10 g/l, respectively).

  20. The recovery of chlorofluorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbon replacements by surface modified activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Naohito; Tanada, Seiki; Nakamura, Takeo; Abe, Ikuo

    1995-06-15

    The adsorption properties of chlorofluorocarbon CFC113 and CFC replacements (HCFC225cb and 5FP) on activated carbon treated with 6 N nitric acid or hydrogen gas were investigated on the basis of their physicochemical adsorption isotherm and Dubinin-Rudshkevich plot to elucidate the difference between untreated activated carbon (U-AC) and surface modified activated carbon (NT-AC and HT-AC) during interaction with CFCs and CFC replacements. No correlation between the physicochemical properties of the activated carbon surface and the polarity of CFCs or CFC replacements was observed. The adsorption isotherms of CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP on U-AC, NT-AC, and HT-AC have different branch points, that is, selective adsorption (HT-AC) and nonselective adsorption (NT-AC). NT-AC is well suited for the recovery of a mixture of CFCs and CFC replacements, while HT-AC is good for a sample of CFC replacements. Studying the adsorption rate is useful for increasing the recovery efficiency. Therefore, the rate of adsorption of CFCs and CFC replacements onto surface modified activated carbon was investigated. The Sameshima equation fits the adsorption isotherms. The initial rate constants k for CFC113, HCFC225cb, and 5FP onto U-AC, HT-AC, and HT-AC, respectively, were the largest. HT-AC could be adapted for the recover of HCFC225cb and 5FP.

  1. Selective growth of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures inside carbon nanotube membranes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid nanostructured arrays based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) and palladium or titanium dioxide materials have been synthesized using self-supported and silicon-supported anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as nanoporous template. It is well demonstrated that carbon nanotubes can be grown using these membranes and hydrocarbon precursors that decompose at temperatures closer to 600°C without the use of a metal catalyst. In this process, carbonic fragments condensate to form stacked graphitic sheets, which adopt the shape of the pores, yielding from these moulds' multi-walled carbon nanotubes. After this process, the ends of the tubes remain open and accessible to other substances, whereas the outer walls are protected by the alumina. Taking advantage of this fact, we have performed the synthesis of palladium and titanium dioxide nanostructures selectively inside carbon nanotubes using these CNT-AAO membranes as nanoreactors. PMID:22731888

  2. Testing Iodized Activated Carbon Filters with Non-Radio Active Methyl Iodide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-30

    and 4314, 4315, and 4316 are labora- to y impregnations using KI, KIO 3, hexamethylenetetramine and a pH 10 phosphate buffer (11). The agreement...14, Columbia Activated Carbon 207A 8 x 16, Sutcliffe, Speakman Co. Ltd. BPL 8 x 20, Activated Carbon Division, Calgon Corp. KITEG II Nuclear Consulting Services, Inc. TEDA triethylenediamine HMTA hexamethylenetetramine 52

  3. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey.

  4. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  5. A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-23

    A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

  6. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube-sheathed carbon fibers as pristine microelectrodes for selective monitoring of ascorbate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ling; Yu, Ping; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Meining; Zhu, Lin; Dai, Liming; Mao, Lanqun

    2014-04-15

    Using as-synthesized vertically aligned carbon nanotube-sheathed carbon fibers (VACNT-CFs) as microelectrodes without any postsynthesis functionalization, we have developed in this study a new method for in vivo monitoring of ascorbate with high selectivity and reproducibility. The VACNT-CFs are formed via pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) on the carbon fiber support. After electrochemical pretreatment in 1.0 M NaOH solution, the pristine VACNT-CF microelectrodes exhibit typical microelectrode behavior with fast electron transfer kinetics for electrochemical oxidation of ascorbate and are useful for selective ascorbate monitoring even with other electroactive species (e.g., dopamine, uric acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine) coexisting in rat brain. Pristine VACNT-CFs are further demonstrated to be a reliable and stable microelectrode for in vivo recording of the dynamic increase of ascorbate evoked by intracerebral infusion of glutamate. Use of a pristine VACNT-CF microelectrode can effectively avoid any manual electrode modification and is free from person-to-person and/or electrode-to-electrode deviations intrinsically associated with conventional CF electrode fabrication, which often involves electrode surface modification with randomly distributed CNTs or other pretreatments, and hence allows easy fabrication of highly selective, reproducible, and stable microelectrodes even by nonelectrochemists. Thus, this study offers a new and reliable platform for in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals (e.g., ascorbate) to largely facilitate future studies on the neurochemical processes involved in various physiological events.

  7. Trivalent chromium removal from wastewater using low cost activated carbon derived from agricultural waste material and activated carbon fabric cloth.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Singh, Kunwar P; Singh, Vinod K

    2006-07-31

    An efficient adsorption process is developed for the decontamination of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A low cost activated carbon (ATFAC) was prepared from coconut shell fibers (an agricultural waste), characterized and utilized for Cr(III) removal from water/wastewater. A commercially available activated carbon fabric cloth (ACF) was also studied for comparative evaluation. All the equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted at different temperatures, particle size, pHs, and adsorbent doses in batch mode. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied. The Langmuir model best fit the equilibrium isotherm data. The maximum adsorption capacities of ATFAC and ACF at 25 degrees C are 12.2 and 39.56 mg/g, respectively. Cr(III) adsorption increased with an increase in temperature (10 degrees C: ATFAC--10.97 mg/g, ACF--36.05 mg/g; 40 degrees C: ATFAC--16.10 mg/g, ACF--40.29 mg/g). The kinetic studies were conducted to delineate the effect of temperature, initial adsorbate concentration, particle size of the adsorbent, and solid to liquid ratio. The adsorption of Cr(III) follows the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics. From kinetic studies various rate and thermodynamic parameters such as effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy and entropy of activation were evaluated. The sorption capacity of activated carbon (ATFAC) and activated carbon fabric cloth is comparable to many other adsorbents/carbons/biosorbents utilized for the removal of trivalent chromium from water/wastewater.

  8. Estimation of the carbon footprint of the Galician fishing activity (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Diego; Vázquez-Rowe, Ian; Hospido, Almudena; Moreira, María Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    2010-10-15

    The food production system as a whole is recognized as one of the major contributors to environmental impacts. Accordingly, food production, processing, transport and consumption account for a relevant portion of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with any country. In this context, there is an increasing market demand for climate-relevant information regarding the global warming impact of consumer food products throughout the supply chains. This article deals with the assessment of the carbon footprint of seafood products as a key subgroup in the food sector. Galicia (NW Spain) was selected as a case study. The analysis is based on a representative set of species within the Galician fishing sector, including species obtained from coastal fishing (e.g. horse mackerel, Atlantic mackerel, European pilchard and blue whiting), offshore fishing (e.g. European hake, megrim and anglerfish), deep-sea fishing (skipjack and yellowfin tuna), extensive aquaculture (mussels) and intensive aquaculture (turbot). The carbon footprints associated with the production-related activities of each selected species were quantified following a business-to-business approach on the basis of 1year of fishing activity. These individual carbon footprints were used to calculate the carbon footprint for each of the different Galician fisheries and culture activities. Finally, the lump sum of the carbon footprints for coastal, offshore and deep-sea fishing and extensive and intensive aquaculture brought about the carbon footprint of the Galician fishing activity (i.e., capture and culture). A benchmark for quantifying and communicating emission reductions was then provided, and opportunities to reduce the GHG emissions associated with the Galician fishing activity could be prioritized.

  9. Tailoring the surface chemistry of activated carbon cloth by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Tabti, Zakaria; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Quijada, César; Cazorla-Amorós, Diego; Morallón, Emilia

    2014-07-23

    This paper presents a systematic study of the effect of the electrochemical treatment (galvanostatic electrolysis in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the surface chemistry and porous texture of commercial activated carbon cloth. The same treatments have been conducted over a granular activated carbon in order to clarify the effect of morphology. The influence of different electrochemical variables, such as the electrode polarity (anodic or cathodic), the applied current (between 0.2 and 1.0 A) and the type of electrolyte (HNO3 and NaCl) have also been analyzed. The anodic treatment of both activated carbons causes an increase in the amount of surface oxygen groups, whereas the cathodic treatment does not produce any relevant modification of the surface chemistry. The HNO3 electrolyte produced a lower generation of oxygen groups than the NaCl one, but differences in the achieved distribution of surface groups can be benefitial to selectively tune the surface chemistry. The porous texture seems to be unaltered after the electro-oxidation treatment. The validity of this method to introduce surface oxygen groups with a pseudocapacitive behavior has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry. As a conclusion, the electrochemical treatment can be easily implemented to selectively and quantitatively modify the surface chemistry of activated carbons with different shapes and morphologies.

  10. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) onto benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Liu, Chunxia; Feng, Miao; Chen, Zhen; Li, Shuqiong; Tian, Gan; Wang, Li; Huang, Jingbo; Li, Shoujian

    2010-04-15

    A new solid phase extractant selective for uranium(VI) based on benzoylthiourea anchored to activated carbon was developed via hydroxylation, amidation and reaction with benzoyl isothiocyanate in sequence. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total element analysis proved that benzoylthiourea had been successfully grafted to the surface of the activated carbon, with a loading capacity of 1.2 mmol benzoylthiourea per gram of activated carbon. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) sorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature, have been investigated. Results have been analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm; the former was more suitable to describe the sorption process. The maximum sorption capacity (82 mg/g) for uranium(VI) was obtained at experimental conditions. The rate constant for the uranium sorption by the as-synthesized extractant was 0.441 min(-1) from the first order rate equation. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(0)=-46.2 kJ/mol; DeltaS(0)=-98.0 J/mol K; DeltaG(0)=-17.5 kJ/mol) showed the adsorption of an exothermic process and spontaneous nature, respectively. Additional studies indicated that the benzoylthiourea-anchored activated carbon (BT-AC) selectively sorbed uranyl ions in the presence of competing ions, Na(+), Co(2+), Sr(2+), Cs(+) and La(3+).

  11. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration.

  12. Silica dust exposures during selected construction activities.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah; Majar, Maria; Camp, Janice; Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study characterized exposure for dust-producing construction tasks. Eight common construction tasks were evaluated for quartz and respirable dust exposure by collecting 113 personal task period samples for cleanup; demolition with handheld tools; concrete cutting; concrete mixing; tuck-point grinding; surface grinding; sacking and patching concrete; and concrete floor sanding using both time-integrating filter samples and direct-reading respirable dust monitors. The geometric mean quartz concentration was 0.10 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation [GSD]=4.88) for all run time samples, with 71% exceeding the threshold limit value. Activities with the highest exposures were surface grinding, tuck-point grinding, and concrete demolition (GM[GSD] of 0.63[4.12], 0.22[1.94], and 0.10[2.60], respectively). Factors recorded each minute were task, tool, work area, respiratory protection and controls used, estimated cross draft, and whether anyone nearby was making dust. Factors important to exposure included tool used, work area configuration, controls employed, cross draft, and in some cases nearby dust. More protective respirators were employed as quartz concentration increased, although respiratory protection was found to be inadequate for 42% of exposures. Controls were employed for only 12% of samples. Exposures were reduced with three controls: box fan for surface grinding and floor sanding, and vacuum/shroud for surface grinding, with reductions of 57, 50, and 71%, respectively. Exposures were higher for sweeping compound, box fan for cleanup, ducted fan dilution, and wetted substrate. Construction masons and laborers are frequently overexposed to silica. The usual protection method, respirators, was not always adequate, and engineering control use was infrequent and often ineffective.

  13. Synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Y.Q.; Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyen, M.; Kimber, G.

    1994-12-31

    The production and application of low-cost, general purpose carbon fibers and activated fibers are emerging technologies with exciting potential, although at present their cost is too high to find widespread use. Production and R and D have been limited and to data, only a small range of precursors has been studied: petroleum pitches, coal extracts and coal tar pitches. Both processing costs and the properties of the fiber products are dependent on the nature of the starting material. Commercial precursors have been limited to the pitches produced from high temperature pyrolysis or cracking processes and are similar in composition and molecular structure. Suitable coal-based precursors can be produced with a wide range of composition, and at moderate cost, by methods such as low temperature carbonization, solvent extraction, hydropyrolysis and mild coal liquefaction. It is of interest to investigate the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from precursors of different origins to elucidate the influence of precursor materials on fiber formation and processing, and their structure and properties. It is also of practical importance to understand the relationships between the type of starting materials (for example, coals) and the processing methods, and the properties of fiber precursors that can be produced from them. In the present study, the authors describe the synthesis of carbon fibers and activated carbon fibers from the products of the first stage of coal liquefaction.

  14. Adsorption of aromatic organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets: comparison with carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Wang, Qiliang; Zhou, Yang; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-15

    Adsorption of two synthetic organic compounds (SOCs; phenanthrene and biphenyl) by two pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and one graphene oxide (GO) was examined and compared with those of a coal base activated carbon (HD4000), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), and a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) in distilled and deionized water and in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphenes exhibited comparable or better adsorption capacities than carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and granular activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of NOM. The presence of NOM reduced the SOC uptake of all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the SOC adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs and activated carbons. Furthermore, the SOC with its flexible molecular structure was less impacted from NOM preloading than the SOC with planar and rigid molecular structure. The results indicated that graphenes can serve as alternative adsorbents for removing SOCs from water. However, they will also, if released to environment, adsorb organic contaminants influencing their fate and impact in the environment.

  15. High surface area activated carbon prepared from cassava peel by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Sudaryanto, Y; Hartono, S B; Irawaty, W; Hindarso, H; Ismadji, S

    2006-03-01

    Cassava is one of the most important commodities in Indonesia, an agricultural country. Cassava is one of the primary foods in our country and usually used for traditional food, cake, etc. Cassava peel is an agricultural waste from the food and starch processing industries. In this study, this solid waste was used as the precursor for activated carbon preparation. The preparation process consisted of potassium hydroxide impregnation at different impregnation ratio followed by carbonization at 450-750 degrees C for 1-3 h. The results revealed that activation time gives no significant effect on the pore structure of activated carbon produced, however, the pore characteristic of carbon changes significantly with impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature. The maximum surface area and pore volume were obtained at impregnation ratio 5:2 and carbonization temperature 750 degrees C.

  16. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    Hydrogen sulphide is an environmentally hazardous gas which is present in many gas streams associated with oil and gas industry. Oxidation of H 2S to sulphur in air produces no bulky or waste material and requires no further purification. Activated carbon is known as a catalyst for this reaction. In this research, a coal-based precursor (luscar char) and a biomass-based precursor (biochar) were used for production of activated carbons by two common methods of activation: physical and chemical activation in which steam and potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively, were used. Experiments were designed by the statistical central composite design method. Two models were developed for the BET surface area and reaction yield of each activation process. These models showed the effects of operating conditions, such as activation temperature, mass ratio of activating agent to precursor, activation time, and nitrogen flowrate on the BET surface area and reaction yield for each activation method for each precursor. The optimum operating conditions were calculated using these models to produce activated carbons with relatively large BET surface area (> 500 m2/g) and high reaction yield (> 50 wt %). The BET surface area and reaction yield for activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions showed maximum 7 and 7.4% difference, respectively, comparing to the values predicted by models. The activated carbons produced at optimum operating conditions were used as the base catalysts for the direct oxidation of 1 mol % hydrogen sulphide in nitrogen to sulphur at the temperature range of 160-205°C and pressure of 700 kPa. Originally activated carbons showed a good potential for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by their selectivity for sulphur product and low amount of sulphur dioxide production. To improve the performance of steam-activated carbons, the catalysts were modified by acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption. This method increased the break-through times for

  17. The environmental applications of activated carbon/zeolite composite materials.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-02-17

    Over the past couple of years, the resurgence of placing an effective and sustainable amendment to combat against the auxiliary industrial entities, remains a highly contested agenda from a global point. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a steadily growing interest in the research field. Recently, the adoption of zeolite composite, a prestigious advanced catalyst which formulates the enhancement of adsorption rate and hydrogen storage capability, has fore fronted to be a new growing branch in the scientific community. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of activated carbon/zeolite composite technology, its fundamental background studies, and environmental implications. Moreover, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbon/zeolite composite represents a potentially viable and powerful tool, leading to the plausible improvement of environmental preservation.

  18. Detoxification of pesticide waste via activated carbon adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2010-03-15

    Concern about environmental protection has increased over the years from a global viewpoint. To date, the percolation of pesticide waste into the groundwater tables and aquifer systems remains an aesthetic issue towards the public health and food chain interference. With the renaissance of activated carbon, there has been a consistent growing interest in this research field. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of pesticide agrochemical practice, its fundamental characteristics, background studies and environmental implications. Moreover, the key advance of activated carbon adsorption, its major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of activated carbon adsorption represents a plausible and powerful circumstance, leading to the superior improvement of environmental preservation.

  19. Gamma irradiation: a method to produce an abiotic control for biological activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stoquart, C; Vázquez-Rodríguez, G A; Servais, P; Barbeau, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the feasibility of using gamma irradiation to inhibit the microbial activity of biological powder activated carbon (PAC) without impacting its adsorptive properties. First of all, the range of dose of gamma rays required to produce abiotic PAC was selected on the basis of heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) inactivation and methylene blue (MB) adsorption kinetics. Doses inferior to 10 kGy were not sufficient to inhibit the culture of heterotrophic bacteria. On the other hand, doses superior to 15 kGy were demonstrated to affect the adsorption rate of MB. Consequently, a dose comprised between 10 and 15 kGy was selected for further investigation. In order to validate the adequacy of the range of dose (i.e. 10-15 kGy), adsorption characteristics were tested by monitoring the removal kinetics of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC). No significant differences were observed between irradiated and non-irradiated biological PAC for the adsorption of RDOC. Irradiated, non-irradiated and virgin PAC were also evaluated in terms of abundance of viable (using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight method) bacteria and in terms of heterotrophic biomass activity. The results of the BacLight method demonstrated that attachment of the biofilm on the PAC was not impacted by the irradiation and heterotrophic activity measurements demonstrated that the latter could be radically reduced in the range of dose selected. In conclusion, when using a proper dose, the gamma irradiation of colonized activated carbon drastically reduced the heterotrophic activity on activated carbon without significantly impacting its adsorptive behaviour.

  20. Adsorption characteristics of acetone, chloroform and acetonitrile on sludge-derived adsorbent, commercial granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Huang, Guan-Yinag; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption characteristics of chloroform, acetone, and acetonitrile on commercial activated carbon (C1), two types of activated carbon fibers (F1 and F2), and sludge adsorbent (S1) was investigated. The chloroform influent concentration ranged from 90 to 7800 ppm and the acetone concentration from 80 to 6900 ppm; the sequence of the adsorption capacity of chloroform and acetone on adsorbents was F2>F1 approximately C1 approximately S1. The adsorption capacity of acetonitrile ranged from 4 to 100 mg/g, corresponding to the influent range from 43 to 2700 ppm for C1, S1, and F1. The acetonitrile adsorption capacity of F2 was approximately 20% higher than that of the other adsorbents at temperatures<30 degrees C. The Freundlich equation fit the data better than the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equations. The adsorption rate of carbon fibers is higher than that of the other adsorbents due to their smaller fiber diameter and higher surface area. The micropore diffusion coefficient of VOC on activated carbon and sludge adsorbent was approximately 10(-4) cm2 s(-1). The diffusion coefficient of VOC on carbon fibers ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-7) cm2 s(-1). The small carbon fiber pore size corresponds to a smaller diffusion coefficient.

  1. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  2. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  3. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Activate Limulus Amebocyte Lysate Coagulation by Interface Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Nie, Xin; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Haiyan

    2017-03-15

    Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay is worldwide requested in the assessment of endotoxin contamination for biomaterials. As carbon nanotubes are one major nanomaterial with multiple potentials in biomedical application, here we investigate whether oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNT) interferes the assessment by LAL assays. We showed that the endotoxin free O-MWCNT dispersing in aqueous solutions could activate both the gel-clotting and the end-point chromogenic LAL assay by converting coagulogen into coagulin through interfacial interactions between O-MWCNT and enzymes in the assays. In conclusion, the O-MWCNT could induce false positive results by activating the enzyme cascade of LAL.

  5. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  6. Particle properties in granular activated carbon filter during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Leilei

    2010-01-01

    The elemental composition and bacteria attached in particles were investigated during granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. The experimental results showed that trapped influent particles could form new, larger particles on GAC surface. The sloughing of individuals off GAC surface caused an increase in effluent particles in the size range from 5 to 25 tm. The selectivity for element removal in GAC filters caused an increasing proportion of metallic elements in the effluent particles. The distribution of molar ratio indicated a complicated composition for large particles, involving organic and inorganic substances. The organic proportion accounted for 40% of total carbon attached to the particles. Compared with dissolved carbon, there was potential for the formation of trihalomethanes by organic carbon attached to particles, especially for those with size larger than 10 im. The pure carbon energy spectrum was found only in the GAC effluent and the size distribution of carbon fines was mainly above 10 microm. The larger carbon fines provided more space for bacterial colonization and stronger protection for attached bacteria against disinfection. The residual attached bacteria after chorine disinfection was increased to 10(2)-l0(3) CFU/mL within 24 hours at 25 degrees C.

  7. Removing lead in drinking water with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.M.; Kuennen, R.W. )

    1994-02-01

    A point-of-use (POU) granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed adsorber (FBA) was evaluated for reduction of soluble and insoluble lead from drinking water. Some of the factors which affect lead removal by GAC were evaluated, such as carbon type, solution pH, and a limited amount of work on competitive interactions. The design criteria for lead reduction by a POU device are also addressed. Minicolumns were used to evaluate the capacity of carbon for lead under a variety of conditions. The importance of surface chemistry of the carbon and the relationship with the pH of the water for lead reduction was demonstrated. Results indicate that a properly designed POU-GAC-FBA can reduce lead in drinking water to below the EPA action level of 15 ppb while being tested under a variety of conditions as specified under the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) International Standard 53 test protocol. 37 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Carbon-based supercapacitors produced by activation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanwu; Murali, Shanthi; Stoller, Meryl D; Ganesh, K J; Cai, Weiwei; Ferreira, Paulo J; Pirkle, Adam; Wallace, Robert M; Cychosz, Katie A; Thommes, Matthias; Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-06-24

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp(2)-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  9. Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  10. Carbon-Based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Su, D.; Murali, S.; Stoller, M.D.; Ganesh, K.J.; Cai, W.; Ferreira, P.J.; Pirkle, A.; Wallace, R.M.; Cychosz, K.A., Thommes, M.; Stach, E.A.; Ruoff, R.S.

    2011-06-24

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  11. Transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Bobacka, Johan; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-01-15

    Porous carbon materials and carbon nanotubes were recently used as solid contacts in ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and the signal transduction mechanism of these carbon-based materials is therefore of great interest. In this work the ion-to-electron transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes is studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are deposited on glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes by repetitive spraying, resulting in SWCNT layers with thicknesses of 10, 35, and 50 mum. The impedance spectra of these GC/SWCNT electrodes in contact with aqueous electrolyte solution show a very small resistance and a large bulk capacitance that is related to a large effective double layer at the SWCNT/electrolyte interface. Interestingly, the impedance response of GC/SWCNT is very similar to that of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film electrodes studied earlier under the same experimental conditions. The same equivalent circuit is valid for both types of materials. The reason is that both materials can be described schematically as an asymmetric capacitor where one side is formed by electronic charge (electrons/holes) in the SWCNT wall or along the conjugated polymer chain of PEDOT and the other side is formed by ions (anions/cations) in the solution (or in the ion-selective membrane when used as a solid contact in ISE).

  12. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  13. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  14. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus.

  16. Cobalt-catalysed site-selective intra- and intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuesong; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Hao; Li, Guigen; Ge, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-catalysed sp2 C–H bond functionalization has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of the low cost of cobalt complexes and interesting modes of action in the process. In comparison, much less efforts have been devoted to the sp3 carbons. Here we report the cobalt-catalysed site-selective dehydrogenative cyclization of aliphatic amides via a C–H bond functionalization process on unactivated sp3 carbons with the assistance of a bidentate directing group. This method provides a straightforward synthesis of monocyclic and spiro β- or γ-lactams with good to excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. In addition, a new procedure has been developed to selectively remove the directing group, which enables the synthesis of free β- or γ-lactam compounds. Furthermore, the first cobalt-catalysed intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons is also realized. PMID:25753366

  17. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  18. Carbon nanotube diameter selection by pretreatment of metal catalysts on surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H [Houston, TX; Xu, Ya-Qiong [Houston, TX; Shan, Hongwei [Houston, TX; Nicholas, Nolan Walker [South Charleston, WV; Kim, Myung Jong [Houston, TX; Schmidt, Howard K [Cypress, TX; Kittrell, W Carter [Houston, TX

    2012-02-28

    A new and useful nanotube growth substrate conditioning processes is herein disclosed that allows the growth of vertical arrays of carbon nanotubes where the average diameter of the nanotubes can be selected and/or controlled as compared to the prior art.

  19. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF ANHYDRIDES TO LACTONES UNDER SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective Hydrogenation of Anhydrides to Lactones Under Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    Endalkachew Sahle-Demessie Unnikrishnan R Pillai
    U.S. EPA , 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45268 Phone: 513-569-7739
    Fax: 513-569-7677
    Abstract:
    Hydrogenat...

  20. Preparation of Paper Containing Activated Carbon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    development of charcoal paper. RESUME On a obtenu du papier contenant du charbon actif en dispersant du charbon r~duit en poudre et en versant des agents de...sa capaciti d’adsorption et de ritention du charbon . Ce papier pourrait servir d𔄀crans dans une salle de contr~le de contamination pour le balayage...contenant du charbon . "l-ii:: . ---:.-o * *** * *. .. t C Cd. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 S 2 INTRODUCTION . Activated

  1. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  2. Defect/Edge-Selective Functionalization of Carbon Materials by "Direct" Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Min; Tan, Loon-Seng; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2017-02-21

    Popularly utilized oxidation media, via nitric acid/sulfuric acid mixtures, are too corrosive and oxidizing to preserve structural integrity of highly ordered graphitic materials (carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene). Here, for the most commonly used oxidation method, the important advantages of defect/edge-selective functionalization of carbon materials (CNTs/graphene/graphite) in a polyphosphoric acid (PPA)/phosphorous pentoxide (P2 O5 ) medium are elucidated. The optimized PPA/P2 O5 medium is a mild acid that is not only less corrosive than popularly utilized oxidation media, but also has a strong capability to drive Friedel-Crafts acylation by covalently modifying carbon materials. With a broader spectrum of functional groups accessible, the PPA/P2 O5 -driven Friedel-Crafts acylation offers more options for tailoring the properties and processing of carbon materials.

  3. Selective breakdown of metallic pathways in double-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Allen L; Sun, Yong; Powell, Lyndsey; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, YuHuang

    2015-01-07

    Covalently functionalized, semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit remarkable properties and can outperform their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts. In order to harness their potential for electronic applications, metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes must be separated from the semiconductors. However, the inner wall is inaccessible to current separation techniques which rely on the surface properties. Here, the first approach to address this challenge through electrical breakdown of metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes, both inner and outer walls, within networks of mixed electronic types is described. The intact semiconductors demonstrate a ∼62% retention of the ON-state conductance in thin film transistors in response to covalent functionalization. The selective elimination of the metallic pathways improves the ON/OFF ratio, by more than 360 times, to as high as 40 700, while simultaneously retaining high ON-state conductance.

  4. Nitrogen-Containing Carbon Nanotube Synthesized from Polymelem and Activated Carbon Derived from Polymer Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Nan

    Polymelem possesses a polymeric structure of heptazine (C6N 7) rings connected by amine bridges and our study has demonstrated that it is a promising precursor for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon materials. Nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (NCNT) was produced by pyrolyzing polymelem as a dual source of carbon and nitrogen with Raney nickel in a high pressure stainless steel cell. Activated carbon was produced from poly(ether ether ketone)/poly(ether imide) (PEEK/PEI blend) and incorporated with polymelem to enhance the hydrogen adsorption. Polymelem was successfully synthesized by pyrolyzing melamine at 450--650 °C and its structure was elucidated by 13C solid state NMR, FTIR, and XRD. The molecular weight determined by a novel LDI MS equipped with a LIFT mode illuminated that polymelem has both linear and cyclic connectivity with a degree of polymerization of 2--5 depending on the synthesis temperature. The decomposition products of polymelem were determined to be cyanoamide, dicyanoamide, and tricyanoamine. Tricyanoamine is the smallest carbon nitride molecule and has been experimentally confirmed for the first time in this study. When polymelem was decomposed in the presence of Raney nickel, homogenous NCNT with nitrogen content of ˜ 4--19 atom% was produced. A mechanism based on a detail analysis of the TEM images at different growth stages proposed that the NCNT propagated via a tip-growth mechanism originating at the nano-domains within the Raney nickel, and was accompanied with the aggregation of the nickel catalysts. Such NCNT exhibited a cup-stack wall structure paired with a compartmental feature. The nitrogen content, tube diameter and wall thickness greatly depended on synthesis conditions. The activated carbon derived from PEEK/PEI blend demonstrated a surface area up to ˜3000 m2/g, and average pore size of < 20 A. Such activated carbon exhibited a hydrogen storage capacity of up to 6.47 wt% at 40 bar, 77 K. The activated carbon has

  5. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  6. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  7. Selective Early Retirement of Officers on an Active Duty List and the Reserve Active Status List and Selective Early Removal of Officers from the Reserve Active Status List,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    States Code, to update policies for the selective early retirement of commissioned officers and warrant officers from the Active Duty List, selective...early removal of commissioned officers from the Reserve Active Status List, and selective early retirement of officers in the Naval Reserve, serving in

  8. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  9. Highly selective dopamine electrochemical sensor based on electrochemically pretreated graphite and nafion composite modified screen printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shuhao; Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we report a highly selective dopamine electrochemical sensor based on electrochemically pretreated graphite/nafion composite modified screen printed carbon (SPC) electrode. Electrochemically activated graphite/nafion composite was prepared by using a simple electrochemical method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) used to characterize the surface morphology of the fabricated composite electrode. The SEM result clearly indicates that the graphitic basal planes were totally disturbed and leads to the formation of graphite nanosheets. The composite modified electrode showed an enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of DA when compared with either electrochemical pretreated graphite or nafion SPC electrodes. The fabricated composite electrode exhibits a good electrocatalytic oxidation toward DA in the linear response range from 0.5 to 70 μM with the detection limit of 0.023 μM. The proposed sensor also exhibits very good selectivity and stability, with the appreciable sensitivity. In addition, the proposed sensor showed satisfactory recovery results toward the commercial pharmaceutical DA samples.

  10. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; O'neil, J R; Adami, L H; Gleason, J D; Hardcastle, K

    1970-01-30

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a deltaD from-580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a deltaD of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO(2) is 290 to 418 ppm with delta (13)C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and delta(18)O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO(2) carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, delta(13)C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H(2)O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon(delta(13)C = -17.6 per mil). The (18)O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100 degrees to 1300 degrees C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  11. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from cotton nonowoven fabric. For the ACF acoustical application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glass fiber ...

  12. Activated carbon injection - a mercury control success story

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Almost 100 full-scale activated carbon injection (ACI) systems have been ordered by US electric utilities. These systems have the potential to remove over 90% of the mercury in flue, at a cost below $10,000 per pound of mercury removal. Field trials of ACI systems arm outlined. 1 fig.

  13. Decolorization / deodorization of zein via activated carbons and molecular sieves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective is to evaluate a series of granular media consisting of activated carbons and molecular sieves in a batch process for the purpose of clarifying and removal of color and odor components from yellow zein dispersed in an aqueous alcohol medium. The major contributors of yellow zein is du...

  14. Overview of EPA activities and research related to black carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this international presentation is to give an overview of EPA activities related to black carbon (BC). This overview includes some summary information on how EPA defines BC, current knowledge on United States emissions and forecasted emission reductions, and ongoin...

  15. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from demineralized tyre char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Prasad, Guddu R.; Joshi, Parth.; Zala, Ranjitsingh S.; Gokhale, Siddharth S.; Manocha, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon is the most adsorbing material for industrial waste water treatment. For wider applications, the main consideration is to manufacture activated carbon from low cost precursors, which are easily available and cost effective. One such source is scrap tyres. Recently much effort has been devoted to the thermal degradation of tyres into gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and solid char residue, all of which have the potential to be processed into valuable products. As for solid residue, char can be used either as low-grade reinforcing filler or as activated carbon. The product recovered by a typical pyrolysis of tyres are usually, 33-38 wt% pyrolytic char, 38-55 wt% oil and 10-30 wt% solid fractions. In the present work activated carbon was prepared from pyrolyzed tyre char (PC). Demineralization involves the dissolution of metal into acids i.e. HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4 and in base i.e. NaOH. Different concentration of acid and base were used. Sodium hydroxide showed maximum amount of metal oxide removal. Further the concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied from 1N to 6N. As the concentration of acid are increased demineralization increases. 6N Sodium hydroxide is found to be more effective demineralising agent of tyre char.

  16. Solid-contact pH-selective electrode using multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gastón A; Gugsa, Derese; Macho, Santiago; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are shown to be efficient transducers of the ionic-to-electronic current. This enables the development of a new solid-contact pH-selective electrode that is based on the deposition of a 35-microm thick layer of MWCNT between the acrylic ion-selective membrane and the glassy carbon rod used as the electrical conductor. The ion-selective membrane was prepared by incorporating tridodecylamine as the ionophore, potassium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate as the lipophilic additive in a polymerized methylmethacrylate and an n-butyl acrylate matrix. The potentiometric response shows Nernstian behaviour and a linear dynamic range between 2.89 and 9.90 pH values. The response time for this electrode was less than 10 s throughout the whole working range. The electrode shows a high selectivity towards interfering ions. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronopotentiometry techniques were used to characterise the electrochemical behaviour and the stability of the carbon-nanotube-based ion-selective electrodes.

  17. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  18. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  19. Activated carbon coated palygorskite as adsorbent by activation and its adsorption for methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Cheng, Liping; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Yingzhao; Wu, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    An activation process for developing the surface and porous structure of palygorskite/carbon (PG/C) nanocomposite using ZnCl2 as activating agent was investigated. The obtained activated PG/C was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis (BET) techniques. The effects of activation conditions were examined, including activation temperature and impregnation ratio. With increased temperature and impregnation ratio, the collapse of the palygorskite crystal structure was found to accelerate and the carbon coated on the surface underwent further carbonization. XRD and SEM data confirmed that the palygorskite structure was destroyed and the carbon structure was developed during activation. The presence of the characteristic absorption peaks of CC and C-H vibrations in the FTIR spectra suggested the occurrence of aromatization. The BET surface area improved by more than 11-fold (1201 m2/g for activated PG/C vs. 106 m2/g for PG/C) after activation, and the material appeared to be mainly microporous. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue onto the activated PG/C reached 351 mg/g. The activated PG/C demonstrated better compressive strength than activated carbon without palygorskite clay.

  20. Evaluation of the genetic activity of industrially produced carbon black.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, C J; LeBlanc, J V; Thomas, W C; Haworth, S R; Kirby, P E; Thilagar, A; Bowman, J T; Brusick, D J

    1981-06-01

    Commercially produced oil furnace carbon black (Chemical Abstract Service Registry No. 1333-86-4) has been evaluated by five different assay for genetic activity. These were the Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test, sister chromatid exchange test in CHO cells, mouse lymphoma test, cell transformation assay in C3H/10T1/2 cells, and assay for genetic effects in Drosophila melanogaster. Limited cellular toxicity was exhibited but no significant genetic activity was noted.

  1. Neural adhesion, growth, and activity on carbon nanotubes and carbonized nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franca, Eric William

    This dissertation focuses on how the physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbonized nanofibers (CNFs) affect the physiological and electrophysiological properties of neurons and neural networks and how this may affect the efficacy of these nanomaterials as microelectrode materials. In general, the pursuit of increasing electrode sensitivity while maintaining low noise levels is addressed by investigating and utilizing novel electrode materials. Carbon nanomaterials have a native conductivity and nano-scale roughness that should decrease microelectrode noise levels and impedance by virtue of a substantially increased surface area. In addition to the beneficial microelectrode properties, these carbon nanomaterials could increase the integration of the electrode to the neural tissue. The work here is an investigation of how selected CNT and CNF materials affect the viability, outgrowth, and adhesion of cortical neurons in vitro and how the physical and chemical properties of each substrate correlates to these measurements. The intent is that properties detailed in vitro can be assumed to extrapolate to performance in vivo assuming the same materials are utilized for invasive, implanted microelectrodes. Carbon nanotubes were deposited by a layer-by-layer (LBL) method with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). Carbon nanofiber substrates were prepared in conjunction with collaborators via electrospinning a photosensitive polymer (SU-8), photopatterning, and pyrolyzing the depositions. In addition to these substrates, control samples were prepared in the form of PEI-treated glass coverslips, carbonized thin films, SU-8 thin films, and SU-8 nanofibers. The primary variable between all of these substrates is the roughness or topography of each deposition (ranging from 0.26 nm to 160 nm average roughness). Physical and chemical characteristics of the depositions are presented in addition to the electrical characteristics which make them attractive as

  2. Bioindication potential of carbonic anhydrase activity in anemones and corals.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, A L; Guzmán, H M

    2001-09-01

    Activity levels of carbonic anhydrase (CA) were assessed in anemones Condylactis gigantea and Stichodactyla helianthus with laboratory exposures to copper, nickel, lead, and vanadium, and also in animals collected from polluted vs pristine field sites. CA activity was found to be decreased with increase in metal concentration and also in animals collected from the polluted field site. Preliminary assessments to adapt the CA assay for use in the widespread coral Montastraea cavernosa show decreased CA activity in specimens from the polluted field site and provide an avenue for future research aimed at more thoroughly describing coral CA activity for potential application in bioindication.

  3. Bimodal activated carbons derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels prepared at different dilution ratios have been activated with phosphoric acid at 450 °C and compared with their carbonaceous counterparts obtained by pyrolysis at 900 °C. Whereas the latter were, as expected, highly mesoporous carbons, the former cryogels had very different pore textures. Highly diluted cryogels allowed preparation of microporous materials with high surface areas, but activation of initially dense cryogels led to almost non-porous carbons, with much lower surface areas than those obtained by pyrolysis. The optimal acid concentration for activation, corresponding to stoichiometry between molecules of acid and hydroxyl groups, was 2 M l−1, and the acid–cryogel contact time also had an optimal value. Such optimization allowed us to achieve surface areas and micropore volumes among the highest ever obtained by activation with H3PO4, close to 2200 m2 g−1 and 0.7 cm3 g−1, respectively. Activation of diluted cryogels with a lower acid concentration of 1.2 M l−1 led to authentic bimodal activated carbons, having a surface area as high as 1780 m2 g−1 and 0.6 cm3 g−1 of microporous volume easily accessible through a widely developed macroporosity. PMID:27877405

  4. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  5. Effect of the concentration of inherent mineral elements on the adsorption capacity of coconut shell-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Afrane, G; Achaw, Osei-Wusu

    2008-09-01

    Coconut shells of West Africa Tall, a local variety of the coconut species Cocos nucifera L., were taken from five different geographical locations in Ghana and examined for the presence and concentration levels of some selected mineral elements using atomic absorption spectrometer. Activated carbons were subsequently made from the shells by the physical method. The iodine adsorption characteristics of the activated carbons measured showed a definite relationship to the concentration levels of potassium and other mineral elements in the precursor shell. Samples with lower total minerals content recorded higher iodine numbers. It was observed that the origin of the shells was related to the concentration levels of the analyzed mineral elements in the shells, which in turn affected the adsorption capacity of the activated carbons. The results of this study have important implications for the sourcing of coconuts whose shells are used in the manufacture of activated carbons.

  6. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    PubMed

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-03

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions.

  7. Surface Alteration of Activated Carbon for Detoxification of Copper (ii) from Industrial Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutto, Sadaf; Khan, M. Nasiruddin

    2013-04-01

    The low-cost modified activated carbons were prepared from Thar and Lakhra (Pakistan) coals by activation with sulfuric acid and further modified with citric, tartaric and acetic acids for the selective adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The original carbon obtained from activated Thar and Lakhra coals at pH 3.0 displayed significant adsorption capacity for lead and insignificant capacity values (0.880 and 0.830 mgṡg-1) for copper. However, after modification with citric, tartaric and acetic acid the copper adsorption capacities enhanced in the range of 5.56-21.85 and 6.05-44.61 times, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherms were used to elucidate the observed sorption phenomena. The isotherm equilibrium data was well fitted by the Langmuir and sufficiently fitted to the Freundlich models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) inferred that the investigated adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Based on the results, it was concluded that the surface alteration with citric and tartaric acid, Thar and Lakhra activated carbons had significant potential for selective removal of copper(II) from industrial wastewater.

  8. 75 FR 48644 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Import Export Corp.; China National Nuclear General Company Ningxia Activated Carbon Factory; Da Neng Zheng Da Activated Carbon Co., Ltd.; Datong Carbon Corporation; Datong Changtai Activated Carbon Co....; DaTong Tri- Star & Power Carbon Plant; Datong Weidu Activated Carbon Co., Ltd.; Datong...

  9. A Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Catalyst for Electrochemical CO2 Conversion to CO with High Selectivity and Current Density.

    PubMed

    Jhong, Huei-Ru Molly; Tornow, Claire E; Smid, Bretislav; Gewirth, Andrew A; Lyth, Stephen M; Kenis, Paul J A

    2017-03-22

    We report characterization of a non-precious metal-free catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO; namely, a pyrolyzed carbon nitride and multiwall carbon nanotube composite. This catalyst exhibits a high selectivity for production of CO over H2 (approximately 98 % CO and 2 % H2 ), as well as high activity in an electrochemical flow cell. The CO partial current density at intermediate cathode potentials (V=-1.46 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is up to 3.5× higher than state-of-the-art Ag nanoparticle-based catalysts, and the maximum current density is 90 mA cm(-2) . The mass activity and energy efficiency (up to 48 %) were also higher than the Ag nanoparticle reference. Moving away from precious metal catalysts without sacrificing activity or selectivity may significantly enhance the prospects of electrochemical CO2 reduction as an approach to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions or as a method for load-leveling in relation to the use of intermittent renewable energy sources.

  10. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.˚ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  11. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications. PMID:27488268

  12. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-04

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  13. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  14. Adsorption of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans on activated carbon from hexane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu-Jian; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ni, Ming-Jiang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2016-02-01

    Activated carbon is widely used to abate dioxins and dioxin-like compounds from flue gas. Comparing commercial samples regarding their potential to adsorb dioxins may proceed by using test columns, yet it takes many measurements to characterise the retention and breakthrough of dioxins. In this study, commercial activated carbon samples are evaluated during tests to remove trace amounts of dioxins dissolved in n-hexane. The solution was prepared from fly ash collected from a municipal solid waste incinerator. The key variables selected were the concentration of dioxins in n-hexane and the dosage of activated carbon. Both polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) showed very high removal efficiencies (94.7%-98.0% for PCDDs and 99.7%-99.8% for PCDFs). The presence of a large excess of n-hexane solvent had little effect on the removal efficiency of PCDD/Fs. The adsorbed PCDD/Fs showed a linear correlation (R(2) > 0.98) with the initial concentrations. Comparative analysis of adsorption isotherms showed that a linear Henry isotherm fitted better the experimental data (R(2) = 0.99 both for PCDDs and PCDFs) than the more usual Freundlich isotherm (R(2) = 0.88 for PCDDs and 0.77 for PCDFs). Finally, the results of fingerprint analysis indicated that dioxin fingerprint (weight proportion of different congeners) on activated carbon after adsorption did not change from that in hexane.

  15. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  16. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2011-01-15

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  17. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  18. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa.

    PubMed

    Couth, R; Trois, C

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  19. Structural characteristics of modified activated carbons and adsorption of explosives.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, W; Gun'ko, V M; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Leboda, R

    2003-10-15

    Several series of activated carbons prepared by catalytic and noncatalytic gasification and subsequent deposition of pyrocarbon by pyrolysis of methylene chloride or n-amyl alcohol were studied by FTIR, chromatography, and adsorption methods using nitrogen and probe organics (explosives). The relationships between the textural characteristics of carbon samples and the recovery rates (eta) of explosives on solid-phase extraction (SPE) using different solvents for their elution after adsorption were analyzed using experimental and quantum chemical calculation results. The eta values for nitrate esters, cyclic nitroamines, and nitroaromatics only partially correlate with different adsorbent parameters (characterizing microporosity, mesoporosity, pore size distributions, etc.), polarity of eluting solvents, or characteristics of probe molecules, since there are many factors strongly affecting the recovery rates. Some of the synthesized carbons provide higher eta values than those for such commercial adsorbents as Hypercarb and Envicarb.

  20. Catalytic Activation of Nitrogen Dioxide for Selective Synthesis of Nitroorganics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0035 Catalytic activation of nitrogen dioxide for selective synthesis SETH BROWN UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME DU LAC Final Report 01...8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 12-01-2015 Final 15 Aug 2011 - 14 Aug 2014 Catalytic activation of nitrogen dioxide for selective synthesis...reductive elimination of the nitroarene has not. Nitrogen dioxide can be used as a source of the nitro group in reactions with arylboronic acids or their

  1. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  2. Investigation kinetics mechanisms of adsorption malachite green onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Onal, Y; Akmil-Başar, C; Sarici-Ozdemir, C

    2007-07-19

    Lignite was used to prepare activated carbon (T3K618) by chemical activation with KOH. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by t-plot based on N2 adsorption isotherm. BET surface area of activated carbon is determined as 1000 m2/g. Adsorption capacity of malachite green (MG) onto T3K618 activated carbon was investigated in a batch system by considering the effects of various parameters like initial concentration (100, 150 and 200 mg/L) and temperature (25, 40 and 50 degrees C). The adsorption process was relatively fast and equilibrium was reached after about 20 min for 100, 150 mg/L at all adsorption temperature. Equilibrium time for 200 mg/L was determined as 20 min and 40 min at 298, 313 and 323 K, respectively. Simple mass and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate controlling steps such as external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion. Pseudo second-order model was found to explain the kinetics of MG adsorption most effectively. It was found that both mass transfer and pore diffusion are important in determining the adsorption rates. The intraparticle diffusion rate constant, external mass transfer coefficient, film and pore diffusion coefficient at various temperatures were evaluated. The activation energy (Ea) was determined as 48.56, 63.16, 67.93 kJ/mol for 100, 150, 200 mg/L, respectively. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium studies at different temperatures. Langmiur isotherm shows better fit than Freundlich isotherm in the temperature range studied. The thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaS and DeltaH degrees were calculated. The thermodynamics of dyes-T3K618 system indicates endothermic process.

  3. Selective determination of sucrose based on electropolymerized molecularly imprinted polymer modified multiwall carbon nanotubes/glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Ensafi, Ali A; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2013-08-01

    A novel and selective electrochemical sensor was successfully developed for the determination of sucrose by integrating electropolymerization of molecularly imprinted polymer with multiwall carbon nanotubes. The sensor was prepared by electropolymerizing of o-phenylenediamine in the presence of template, sucrose, on a multiwall carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode. The sensor preparation conditions including sucrose concentration, the number of CV cycles in the electropolymerization step, pH of incubation solution, extraction time of template from the imprinted film and the incubation time were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). A mixture of acetonitrile/acetic acid was used to remove the template. Hexacyanoferrate(II) was used as a probe to characterize the sensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Capturing of sucrose by the modified electrode causes decreasing the response of the electrode to hexacyanoferrate(II). Calibration curve was obtained in the sucrose concentration range of 0.01-10.0 mmol L(-1) with a limit of detection 3 μmol L(-1). This sensor provides an efficient way for eliminating interferences from compounds with similar structures to sucrose. The sensor was successfully used to determine sucrose in sugar beet juices with satisfactory results.

  4. Transnitrosylation directs TRPA1 selectivity in N-nitrosamine activators.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Daisuke; Kabasawa, Yoji; Ebert, Maximilian; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Otani, Yuko; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Mori, Yasuo; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-01-01

    S-Nitrosylation, the addition of a nitrosyl group to cysteine thiols, regulates various protein functions to mediate nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectivity in protein S-nitrosylation signaling pathways is conferred through transnitrosylation, a transfer of the NO group, between proteins via interaction. We previously demonstrated that sensitivity to activation by synthetic NO-releasing agents via S-nitrosylation is a common feature of members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. However, strategies to confer subtype selectivity to nitrosylating agents targeted to TRP channels are yet to be developed. Here, we show selective activation of TRPA1 channels by novel NO donors derived from the ABBH (7-azabenzobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane) N-nitrosamines, which exhibit transnitrosylation reactivity to thiols without releasing NO. The NNO-ABBH1 (N-nitroso-2-exo,3-exo-ditrifluoromethyl-7-azabenzobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane) elicits S-nitrosylation of TRPA1 proteins, and dose-dependently induces robust Ca(2+) influx via both recombinant and native TRPA1 channels, but not via other NO-activated TRP channels. TRPA1 activation by NNO-ABBH1 is suppressed by specific cysteine mutations but not by NO scavenging, suggesting that cysteine transnitrosylation underlies the activation of TRPA1 by NNO-ABBH1. This is supported by the correlation of N-NO bond reactivity and TRPA1-activating potency in a congeneric series of ABBH N-nitrosamines. Interestingly, nonelectrophilic derivatives of ABBH also activate TRPA1 selectively, but less potently, compared with NNO-ABBH1. Thus, ABBH N-nitrosamines confer subtype selectivity on S-nitrosylation in TRP channels through synergetic effects of two chemical processes: cysteine transnitrosylation and molecular recognition of the nonelectrophilic moiety.

  5. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Rubel, Glenn O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Ball, Thomas M.

    2011-04-01

    The impregnated active carbon used in air purification systems degrades over time due to exposure to contamination and mechanical effects (packing, settling, flow channeling, etc.). A novel approach is proposed to detect contamination in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). ECIS is currently being used to evaluate active carbon filtration material; however, it cannot differentiate the impedance changes due to chemical contamination from those due to mechanical changes. EMIS can detect impedance changes due to mechanical changes. For the research work presented in this paper, Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) was used for the EMIS method. Some remarkable new phenomena were unveiled in the detection of carbon filter status. 1. PWAS EMIS can detect the presence of contaminants, such as water and kerosene in the carbon bed 2. PWAS EMIS can monitor changes in mechanical pressure that may be associated with carbon bed packing, settling and flow channeling 3. EMIS and ECIS measurements are consistent with each other and complimentary A tentative simplified impedance model was created to simulate the PWAS-carbon bed system under increasing pressure. Similar impedance change pattern was observed when comparing the simulation results with experimental data.

  6. Preparation of activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell by air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, M.S.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, three-step process for the production of high-quality activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell charcoals is described. In this process the charcoal is (1) heated to a high temperature (carbonized), (2) oxidized in air following a stepwise heating program from low (ca. 450 K) to high (ca. 660 K) temperatures (oxygenated), and (3) heated again in an inert environment to a high temperature (activated). By use of this procedure, activated carbons with surface areas greater than 1,000 m{sub 2}/g are manufactured with an overall yield of 15% (based on the dry shell feed). Removal of carbon mass by the development of mesopores and macropores is largely responsible for increases in the surface area of the carbons above 600 m{sub 2}/g. Thus, the surface area per gram of activated carbon can be represented by an inverse function of the yield for burnoffs between 15 and 60%. These findings are supported by mass-transfer calculations and pore-size distribution measurements. A kinetic model for gasification of carbon by oxygen, which provides for an Eley-Rideal type reaction of a surface oxide with oxygen in air, fits the measured gasification rates reasonably well over the temperature range of 550--660 K.

  7. Highly sensitive and selective determination of methylergometrine maleate using carbon nanofibers/silver nanoparticles composite modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalambate, Pramod K; Rawool, Chaitali R; Karna, Shashi P; Srivastava, Ashwini K

    2016-12-01

    A highly sensitive and selective voltammetric method for determination of Methylergometrine maleate (MM) in pharmaceutical formulations, urine and blood serum samples has been developed based on enhanced electrochemical response of MM at carbon nanofibers and silver nanoparticles modified carbon paste electrode (CNF-AgNP-CPE). The electrode material was characterized by various techniques viz., X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The electrocatalytic response of MM at CNF-AgNP-CPE was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimized conditions, the proposed sensor exhibits excellent electrochemical response towards MM. The DPV study shows greatly enhanced electrochemical signal for MM at CNF-AgNP-CPE lending high sensitivity to the proposed sensor for MM detection. The peak (Ip) current for MM is found to be rectilinear in the range 4.0×10(-8)-2.0×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 7.1×10(-9)M using DPV. The feasibility of the proposed sensor in analytical applications was investigated by conducting experiments on commercial pharmaceutical formulations, human urine and blood serum samples, which yielded satisfactory recoveries of MM. The proposed electrochemical sensor offers high sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and practical utility. We recommend it as an authentic and productive electrochemical sensor for successful determination of MM.

  8. Neuronal activity biases axon selection for myelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Jacob H.; Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Schwindt, Rani; Scott, Ethan K.; Appel, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    An essential feature of vertebrate neural development is ensheathment of axons with myelin, an insulating membrane formed by oligodendrocytes. Not all axons are myelinated, but mechanisms directing myelination of specific axons are unknown. Using zebrafish we show that activity-dependent secretion stabilizes myelin sheath formation on select axons. When VAMP2-dependent exocytosis is silenced in single axons, oligodendrocytes preferentially ensheath neighboring axons. Nascent sheaths formed on silenced axons are shorter in length, but when activity of neighboring axons is also suppressed, inhibition of sheath growth is relieved. Using in vivo time-lapse microscopy, we show that only 25% of oligodendrocyte processes that initiate axon wrapping are stabilized during normal development, and that initiation does not require activity. Instead, oligodendrocyte processes wrapping silenced axons are retracted more frequently. We propose that axon selection for myelination results from excessive and indiscriminate initiation of wrapping followed by refinement that is biased by activity-dependent secretion from axons. PMID:25849987

  9. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy covers various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.

  10. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages. Combining self-templaing process and in situ activation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; ...

    2015-05-11

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy coversmore » various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, andFanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.« less

  11. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of the carbonate mineral huanghoite - And in comparison with selected rare earth carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Belotti, Fernanda Maria

    2013-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the rare earth based mineral huanghoite with possible formula given as BaCe(CO3)2F and compared with the Raman spectra of a series of selected natural halogenated carbonates from different origins including bastnasite, parisite and northupite. The Raman spectrum of huanghoite displays three bands are at 1072, 1084 and 1091 cm-1 attributed to the CO32- symmetric stretching vibration. The observation of three symmetric stretching vibrations is very unusual. The position of CO32- symmetric stretching vibration varies with mineral composition. Infrared spectroscopy of huanghoite show bands at 1319, 1382, 1422 and 1470 cm-1. No Raman bands of huanghoite were observed in these positions. Raman spectra of bastnasite, parisite and northupite show a single band at 1433, 1420 and 1554 cm-1 assigned to the ν3 (CO3)2- antisymmetric stretching mode. The observation of additional Raman bands for the ν3 modes for some halogenated carbonates is significant in that it shows distortion of the carbonate anion in the mineral structure. Four Raman bands for huanghoite are observed at 687, 704, 718 and 730 cm-1and assigned to the (CO3)2- ν2 bending modes. Raman bands are observed for huanghoite at around 627 cm-1 and are assigned to the (CO3)2- ν4 bending modes. Raman bands are observed for the carbonate ν4 in phase bending modes at 722 cm-1 for bastnasite, 736 and 684 cm-1 for parisite, 714 cm-1 for northupite. Raman bands for huanghoite observed at 3259, 3484 and 3589 cm-1 are attributed to water stretching bands. Multiple bands are observed in the OH stretching region for bastnasite and parisite indicating the presence of water and OH units in their mineral structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables new information on the structure of huanghoite to be assessed.

  12. Synthesis and Antioxidant Activity of Hydroxytyrosol Alkyl-Carbonate Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Pastor, Ignacio; Fernandez-Hernandez, Antonia; Rivas, Francisco; Martinez, Antonio; Garcia-Granados, Andres; Parra, Andres

    2016-07-22

    Three procedures have been investigated for the isolation of tyrosol (1) and hydroxytyrosol (2) from a phenolic extract obtained from the solid residue of olive milling. These three methods, which facilitated the recovery of these phenols, were chemical or enzymatic acetylation, benzylation, and carbomethoxylation, and subsequent carbonylation or acetonation reactions. Several new lipophilic alkyl-carbonate derivatives of hydroxytyrosol have been synthesized, coupling the primary hydroxy group of this phenol, through a carbonate linker, using alcohols with different chain lengths. The antioxidant properties of these lipophilic derivatives have been evaluated by different methods and compared with free hydroxytyrosol (2) and also with the well-known antioxidants BHT and α-tocopherol. Three methods were used for the determination of this antioxidant activity: FRAP and ABTS assays, to test the antioxidant power in hydrophilic media, and the Rancimat test, to evaluate the antioxidant capacity in a lipophilic matrix. These new alkyl-carbonate derivatives of hydroxytyrosol enhanced the antioxidant activity of this natural phenol, with their antioxidant properties also being higher than those of the commercial antioxidants BHT and α-tocopherol. There was no clear influence of the side-chain length on the antioxidant properties of the alkyl-carbonate derivatives of 2, although the best results were achieved mainly by the compounds with a longer chain on the primary hydroxy group of this natural phenolic substance.

  13. Production of charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    With its wide range of properties, charcoal finds many commercial applications for domestic cooking, refining of metals (steel, copper, bronze, nickel, aluminum and electro-manganese), production of chemicals (carbon disulfide, calcium carbide, silicon carbide, sodium cyanide, carbon black, fireworks, gaseous chemicals, absorbents, soil conditioners and pharmaceuticals), as well as production of activated carbon and synthesis gas. In 1991, the world production of charcoal was 22.8 million cubic meters (3.8 million metric tons) as shown in Table 1. Brazil is the world`s largest charcoal producer --- 5.9 million cubic meters or one million metric tons was produced in 1991, most of which is used in steel and iron industry. African countries produced 45% of the world total amount of charcoal, where 86% of the wood-based energy is for domestic use, most of which is inefficiently used. Charcoal is produced commercially in kilns with a 25% to 30% yield by mass on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Until recently, the highest yield of good quality charcoal reported in the literature was 38%. In this paper, and ASME code rated experimental system is presented for producing charcoal and activated carbon from biomass.

  14. Optimization of Neutron Activation of Carbon at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, S.; Polsin, D.; Russ, M.; Sangster, T.; LLE Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    To determine the rhoR of ignition scale targets at the NIF, a carbon activation diagnostic is being developed to measure tertiary neutron yield. It has been shown theoretically that the ratio of the tertiary yield to the primary yield is directly related to rhoR and is nearly independent of hot-spot electron temperature. Due to carbon's 20.3 MeV reaction threshold, it is insensitive to 14.7 MeV primary neutrons which are measured by other means and allows for an unambiguous determination of the tertiary to primary ratio. The energy distribution of the 20 to 30 MeV DT neutrons folded with the (n,2n) cross section in this energy region determines the degree in which carbon will be activated. However, the published 12C(n,2n) cross sections in this energy range are bifurcated. To set upper and lower limits on the sensitivity of the activation diagnostic, a finite element calculation was used to determine the limits of the method's usefulness at differing primary yields and solid angles for the NIF chamber. It was further used to verify MCNPX activation calculations. This work was funded in part by the USDOE through LLE.

  15. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, S.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    The kernels of grain such as corn and hard red winter wheat were subjected to a two-stage pyrolytic process to generate relatively high yields of charcoals. The process involved carbonization of the kernels at low temperatures (250-325{degrees}C) followed by complete devolatilization of the resultant charcoals at around 750{degrees}C. The charcoals were subsequently activated physically with CO{sub 2} at 800{degrees}C to yield activated carbons. The total pore volumes and surface areas of the activated carbons were determined at various degree of activation by physisorption methods. The surface areas from the nitrogen BET method ranged from 500 to 1750 m{sup 2}/g, while the total pore volumes obtained from the volumes at saturation were in the interval from 0.3 to 0.7 cm{sup 3}/g. The fractal nature of the pore interfaces as well as the existence of different types of pores were investigated through small-angle x-ray scattering.

  16. Assessment of the bacteriological activity associated with granular activated carbon treatment of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M H; Wolfe, R L; Means, E G

    1990-12-01

    Bacteriological analyses were performed on the effluent from a conventional water treatment pilot plant in which granular activated carbon (GAC) had been used as the final process to assess the impact of GAC on the microbial quality of the water produced. Samples were collected twice weekly for 160 days from the effluents of six GAC columns, each of which used one of four different empty-bed contact times (7.5, 15, 30, and 60 min). The samples were analyzed for heterotrophic plate counts and total coliforms. Effluent samples were also exposed to chloramines and free chlorine for 60 min (pH 8.2, 23 degrees C). Bacterial identifications were performed on the disinfected and nondisinfected effluents. Additional studies were conducted to assess the bacteriological activity associated with released GAC particles. The results indicated that heterotrophic plate counts in the effluents from all columns increased to 10(5) CFU/ml within 5 days and subsequently stabilized at 10(4) CFU/ml. The heterotrophic plate counts did not differ at different empty-bed contact times. Coliforms (identified as Enterobacter spp.) were recovered from the nondisinfected effluent on only two occasions. The disinfection results indicated that 1.5 mg of chloramines per liter inactivated approximately 50% more bacteria than did 1.0 mg of free chlorine per liter after 1 h of contact time. Chloramines and chlorine selected for the development of different bacterial species--Pseudomonas spp. and Flavobacterium spp., respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  18. The14C 'bomb' pulse in selected European stalagmites as a tracer of soil carbon cycling dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzka, D.; McDermott, F.

    2012-04-01

    The decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is temperature dependant, but its response to a future warmer climate remains equivocal. Enhanced rates of decomposition of SOM under increased global temperatures might cause higher CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, and could constitute a strong positive feedback. The magnitude of this feedback however remains poorly understood primarily because of the difficulty in quantifying the temperature sensitivity of stored, recalcitrant carbon that comprises the bulk (>90%) of SOM in most soils. In this study we investigated the effects of climate on soil carbon using the 'bomb' radiocarbon systematics of selected modern European speleothems. The 'bomb' 14C spike was used as a tracer of the accumulation and decomposition of SOM under different climatic settings. New time-series radiocarbon measurements were carried out, and the attenuation of the 'bomb' 14C spike was studied in three stalagmites and in one soda straw stalactite. The results were used to examine the quality of soil organic matter and carbon dynamics on decadal timescales under a range of soil conditions and different climatic regimes. These new data were combined with published results to further examine soil carbon transfer dynamics, and to explore the sensitivity of labile and recalcitrant organic matter decomposition to different climatic conditions. The initial radiocarbon activity from each speleothem was modelled using a three pool soil carbon inverse model (applying a Monte Carlo method) in order to investigate the soil carbon residence time and its turnover above the cave site. Sites that are characterised by high mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) and a high soil carbon storage capacity (e.g. overlain by thick soil cover with dense, well developed vegetation, such as La Garma, N. Spain and Sofular, Turkey) display the highest damping effect, and the oldest mean soil carbon ages (MSCA), with residence times of c. half a millennium. This suggests that

  19. Degradation characteristics of 17beta-estradiol by ozone treatment with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Naohito; Ogata, Fumihiko; Yamaguchi, Isao; Tominaga, Hisato

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates (1) ozone treatment, (2) adsorption treatment using activated carbon treatment, and (3) ozone treatment with activated carbon for their efficacy in removing 17beta-estradiol (E2) present in an aqueous solution. Both ozone and activated carbon treatments for 20 min were effective in removing E2 (initial concentration, 100 mg/L). However, both treatments have been used for two processes, and the disposal time with these treatments is more than that of another treatment. In this study, ozone treatment with activated carbon was investigated with regard to the percentage of E2 removal, pH, and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The physical and chemical characteristics of the activated carbon surface were modified due to the ozone treatment: the surface was oxidized by ozone. The surface of activated carbon exhibited polarity groups and became porous after ozone treatment. The amount of E2 adsorbed onto the ozone-treated activated carbon surface was similar to that adsorbed onto the untreated activated carbon surface. The percentage of E2 removal by ozone treatment with activated carbon was greater than that by ozone treatment alone. Moreover, the rate of E2 removal by ozone treatment with activated carbon was higher than that by ozone or activated carbon treatments alone. Ozone with activated carbon treatment may be used for the removal of E2. However, this ozone treatment for the degradation of E2 may have a greater COD than that in the case of activated carbon treatment alone.

  20. Role of heteroatoms in activated carbon for removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Cheung, W H; Zhang, K

    2006-07-31

    Heteroatoms are elements including sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen which are found on the surface of activated carbons. This study investigated the surface modification arising from heteroatoms bonding to carbon aromatic rings within the activated carbon and their corresponding influence on the chromium adsorption process. Activated carbons were prepared from bagasse by physical. Chromium removal capacities of these activated carbons by adsorption and reduction were determined. Models which related the chromium adsorption and reduction capacities of activated carbons to carbon acidity and heteroatom site concentrations were established using multi-variable linear regression method. It was found the individual heteroatoms contributed separately to the basicity of the carbon which in turn determined the mechanism by which chromium was removed from solution. The surface areas of the carbons were also observed to influence the adsorption and reduction of chromium. These understandings provide the fundamental method of optimising chromium removal through suitable control of carbon surface chemistry and textural properties.

  1. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  2. Activated carbon from flash pyrolysis of eucalyptus residue.

    PubMed

    Grima-Olmedo, C; Ramírez-Gómez, Á; Gómez-Limón, D; Clemente-Jul, C

    2016-09-01

    Forestry waste (eucalyptus sp) was converted into activated carbon by initial flash pyrolysis followed carbonization and CO2 activation. These residues were obtained from a pilot plant in Spain that produces biofuel, the biochar represented 10-15% in weight. It was observed that the highest activation was achieved at a temperature of 800 °C, the specific surface increased with time but, on the contrary, high loss of matter was observed. At 600 °C, although there was an important increase of the specific surface and the volume of micropores, at this temperature it was observed that the activation time was not an influential parameter. Finally, at 400 °C it was observed that the activation process was not very significant. Assessing the average pore diameter it was found that the lowest value corresponded to the activation temperature of 600 °C, which indicated the development of microporosity. When the activation temperature increases up to 800 °C the pore diameter increased developing mesoporosity.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube from coconut shells activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melati, A.; Hidayati, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored in almost every single cancer treatment modality, including drug delivery, lymphatic targeted chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and gene therapy. They are considered as one of the most promising nanomaterial with the capability of both detecting the cancerous cells and delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to the cells. CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties such as high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechanical strength, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Coconut Shell was researched as active carbon source on 500 - 600°C. These activated carbon was synthesized becomes carbon nanotube and have been proposed as a promising tool for detecting the expression of indicative biological molecules at early stage of cancer. Clinically, biomarkers cancer can be detected by CNT Biosensor. We are using pyrolysis methods combined with CVD process or Wet Chemical Process on 600°C. Our team has successfully obtained high purity, and aligned MWCNT (Multi Wall Nanotube) bundles on synthesis CNT based on coconut shells raw materials. CNTs can be used to cross the mammalian cell membrane by endocytosis or other mechanisms. SEM characterization of these materials have 179 nm bundles on phase 83° and their materials compound known by using FTIR characterization.

  4. Synergism of Selective Tumor Vascular Thrombosis and Protease Activated Prodrug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    cells of the hair follicles , and cells of the reproductive and digestive tracts. Chemotherapy can also cause nausea, vomiting, 14 W81XWH-07-1-0389......selected sites promises reduced toxicity and enhanced efficacy. We propose to investigate and validate a bipartite drug delivery-activation system that

  5. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  6. Frequency-selective multilayer electromagnetic bandgap structure combining carbon nanotubes with polymeric or ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danlée, Y.; Huynen, I.; Bailly, C.

    2014-09-01

    We present an electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) multilayer structure, acting as a frequency-selective surface able to absorb in specified narrow frequency bands within the GHz-range. The structure is a lossy EBG using ultra-thin conductive layers to generate a controlled resonance in homogenous high permittivity slabs. The basic structure is composed of carbon nanotubes depositions sandwiched between polycarbonate films, which are stacked in alternation between dielectric slabs. The physical properties (i.e., relative permittivity and thickness) of the dielectric spacers allow creating narrow high-absorption bands at defined frequencies. This multilayer approach offers a smart and versatile solution for tuning the selectivity of EBG performance.

  7. Layer-by-layer assembled carbon nanotubes for selective determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meining; Gong, Kuanping; Zhang, Hongwu; Mao, Lanqun

    2005-01-15

    Multilayer films of shortened multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are homogeneously and stably assembled on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes using layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on electrostatic interaction of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and negatively charged shortened MWNTs. The assembled MWNT multilayer films were studied with respect to the electrocatalytic activity toward ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA) and were further applied for selective determination of DA in the presence of AA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used for characterization of MWNT films indicates that the assembled MWNTs are almost in a form of small bundles or single nanotubes on the electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric results with assembled MWNT electrode indicate that the strategy based on the LBL method for assembling the MWNT multilayer films on substrate well retains the electrochemical catalytic activity of the MWNTs toward AA and DA, offering some advantages particularly attractive for analytical applications, such as the form of MWNTs assembled on the substrate, i.e., small bundles or single tubes, homogeneity and stability of the as-assembled MWNT films. These features make the assembled MWNTs relatively potential for selective and sensitive determination of DA in the presence of AA.

  8. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  9. 75 FR 51754 - Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty... of initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon... Activated Carbon Plant; Datong Forward Activated Carbon Co., Ltd.; Datong Guanghua Activated Carbon Co.,...

  10. Water purification by sulfide-containing activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Oeste, F D; Haas, R; Kaminski, L

    2000-03-01

    We investigated a new kind of activated carbon named gaiasafe-Formstoff as an agent for powerful heavy metal reduction. This activated carbon contains highly dispersed sulfide compounds. Our investigations with lead containing wastewaters showed an outstanding metal sulfide precipitation power of the new agent. The lead reduction rates are independent of wastewater parameters like lead concentration and complexing agent concentration. Contacted as powder or as a fixed bed with wastewater gaiasafe-Formstoff showed the best cleaning capacity in comparison to all other agents tested. Investigations with gaiasafe-Formstoff about its ability to reduce the contents of further heavy metals in wastewater are under way. The gaiasafe-Formstoff reaction products with wastewater represent an energy-rich and raw material-rich resource when fed to metallurgical processes.

  11. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  12. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width.

  13. Activated carbon treatment of municipal solid waste incineration flue gas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Ya; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Zengyi; Jin, Yuqi; Li, Xiaodong; Yan, Jianhua

    2013-02-01

    Activated carbon injection is widely used to control dioxins and mercury emissions. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to its modelling. This paper proposes an expansion of the classical Everaerts-Baeyens model, introducing the expression of fraction of free adsorption sites, f (s), and asserting the significant contribution of fly ash to dioxins removal. Moreover, the model monitors dioxins partitioning between vapour and particulate phase, as well as removal efficiency for each congener separately. The effects of the principal parameters affecting adsorption are analysed according to a semi-analytical, semi-empirical model. These parameters include temperature, contact time during entrained-flow, characteristics (grain-size, pore structure, specific surface area) and dosage of activated carbon, lignite cokes or mineral adsorbent, fly ash characteristics and concentration, and type of incinerator plant.

  14. Monopolar intracochlear pulse trains selectively activate the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Schoenecker, Matthew C; Bonham, Ben H; Stakhovskaya, Olga A; Snyder, Russell L; Leake, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Previous cochlear implant studies using isolated electrical stimulus pulses in animal models have reported that intracochlear monopolar stimulus configurations elicit broad extents of neuronal activation within the central auditory system-much broader than the activation patterns produced by bipolar electrode pairs or acoustic tones. However, psychophysical and speech reception studies that use sustained pulse trains do not show clear performance differences for monopolar versus bipolar configurations. To test whether monopolar intracochlear stimulation can produce selective activation of the inferior colliculus, we measured activation widths along the tonotopic axis of the inferior colliculus for acoustic tones and 1,000-pulse/s electrical pulse trains in guinea pigs and cats. Electrical pulse trains were presented using an array of 6-12 stimulating electrodes distributed longitudinally on a space-filling silicone carrier positioned in the scala tympani of the cochlea. We found that for monopolar, bipolar, and acoustic stimuli, activation widths were significantly narrower for sustained responses than for the transient response to the stimulus onset. Furthermore, monopolar and bipolar stimuli elicited similar activation widths when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Surprisingly, we found that in guinea pigs, monopolar and bipolar stimuli produced narrower sustained activation than 60 dB sound pressure level acoustic tones when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Therefore, we conclude that intracochlear electrical stimulation using monopolar pulse trains can produce activation patterns that are at least as selective as bipolar or acoustic stimulation.

  15. Acetylation of glycerol to biofuel additives over sulfated activated carbon catalyst.

    PubMed

    Khayoon, M S; Hameed, B H

    2011-10-01

    Oxygenated fuel additives can be produced by acetylation of glycerol. A 91% glycerol conversion with a selectivity of 38%, 28% and 34% for mono-, di- and triacetyl glyceride, respectively, was achieved at 120 °C and 3 h of reaction time in the presence of a catalyst derived from activated carbon (AC) treated with sulfuric acid at 85 °C for 4h to introduce acidic functionalities to its surface. The unique catalytic activity of the catalyst, AC-SA5, was attributed to the presence of sulfur containing functional groups on the AC surface, which enhanced the surface interaction between the glycerol molecule and acyl group of the acetic acid. The catalyst was reused in up to four consecutive batch runs and no significant decline of its initial activity was observed. The conversion and selectivity variation during the acetylation is attributed to the reaction time, reaction temperature, catalyst loading and glycerol to acetic acid molar ratio.

  16. Adsorption, desorption and bioregeneration in the treatment of 2-chlorophenol with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Ozgür; Ceçen, Ferhan

    2007-03-22

    This study aims to clarify the effect of activated carbon type on the extent of adsorbability, desorbability, and bioregenerability in the treatment of 2-chlorophenol. Four different activated carbon types; thermally activated and chemically activated powdered carbons (PAC), and their granular countertypes (GAC) with similar physical characteristics were used. Thermally activated carbons adsorbed 2-chlorophenol much better than chemically activated ones. However, adsorption was more reversible in the case of chemically activated ones. The use of powdered and granular activated carbon countertypes resulted in comparable adsorption and desorption characteristics. For each activated carbon type, 2-chlorophenol exhibited higher adsorbability and lower desorbability than phenol. Biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol took place very slowly when it was used as the sole carbon source in acclimated and non-acclimated activated sludges. Bioregeneration occurred only via desorption due to an initial concentration gradient and no further desorption took place due to low biodegradability. Bioregeneration of activated carbon loaded with 2-chlorophenol was not a suitable option when 2-chlorophenol was the only carbon source. It is suggested to remove 2-chlorophenol via adsorption onto activated carbon rather than applying biological treatment. Also in such cases, the use of thermally activated carbons with higher adsorption and lower desorption capacities is recommended rather than chemically activated carbons.

  17. Protein Immobilization on Carbon Nanotubes Via a Two-Step Process of Diimide-Activated Amidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kuiyang; Schadler, Linda S.; Siegel, Richard W.; Zhang, Xinjie; Zhang, Haifeng; Terrones, Mauricio

    2004-11-06

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit interesting electrical, structural and mechanical properties that make them highly promising nanoscale building blocks for the construction of novel functional materials. Many potential applications have been proposed, such as conductive and high-strength composites, field emission displays, fuel cells, sensors, and hydrogen storage media. In addition, biosensors for detecting abnormalities and bio-fuel cells for embedded devices are among the most exciting applications. In order to create the synergy between the biomolecules and nanotubes required to realize these applications, biomolecules, such as proteins and DNAs, must be connected to the carbon nanotubes. This connection can be non-covalent interaction or covalent bonding. There have been several reports on the immobilization of biomolecules on carbon nanotubes, and most of them use non-covalent interaction. The best stability, accessibility and selectivity, however, will be achieved through covalent bonding because of its capability to control the location of the biomolecule, improve stability, accessibility and selectivity and reduce leaching. In the present study, we report the covalent bonding of proteins to nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNx MWNTs) via a two-step process of diimide-activated amidation between the carboxylic acid groups on CNx MWNTs and the amine groups on proteins.

  18. Influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rong, Haiqin; Ryu, Zhenyu; Zheng, Jingtang; Zhang, Yuanli

    2003-05-15

    The influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption behavior of formaldehyde was studied. Heat treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen for rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs) resulted in a significant increase in the adsorption capacities and prolongation of breakthrough time on removing of formaldehyde. The effect of different heat-treatment conditions on the adsorption characteristics was investigated. The porous structure parameters of the samples under study were investigated using nitrogen adsorption at the low temperature 77.4 K. The pore size distributions of the samples under study were calculated by density functional theory. With the aid of these analyses, the relationship between structure and adsorption properties of rayon-based ACFs for removing formaldehyde was revealed. Improvement of their performance in terms of adsorption selectivity and adsorption rate for formaldehyde were achieved by heat post-treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen.

  19. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original.

  20. Adsorption onto fluidized powdered activated carbon flocs-pACF.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Ana Lídia; Schneider, Ivo André H; Rubio, Jorge

    2005-02-01

    This work presents a new adsorption technique where the adsorbent (powdered activated carbon-PAC) is in the form of suspended flocs formed with water-soluble polymer flocculants. Thus, the adsorption of a typical dye, methylene blue (MB), was studied onto polyacrylamide flocs of PAC (PACF) in a fluidized bed reactor. The technique is based on the fact that the adsorption capacity of PAC does not decrease after flocculation because the adsorbed polymer occupies only a few surface sites, in the form of trains, loops, and tails. Moreover, the adsorption was found to proceed through a rapid mass transfer of MB to the adsorbing PAC flocs, in the same extent as onto PAC. Because of the rapid settling characteristics of the aggregates formed, the two phase separations, loaded PAC and solution, become easier. Thus, the technique offers the advantages of conducting simultaneously both adsorption and solid/liquid separation all in one single stage. Results obtained showed that high MB removal values can be attained in a fluidized bed reactor (>90%) and that PACF presents a much higher adsorption capacity (breakthrough points) than granulated activated carbon (GAC) in the same adsorbing bed. It is believed that this technique highly broadens the potential of the use of powdered activated carbon or other similar ultrafine adsorbents.

  1. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  2. 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey selected tabulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the detailed design of the NTACS are described in the ORNL Report [open quotes]Technical Documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File[close quotes]. (1992). ORNL Technical Report No. TM-12188, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. The main purpose of this summary report is to provide selected tables based on the public use file.

  3. Tributyltin sorption to marine sedimentary black carbon and to amended activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Brändli, Rahel C; Breedveld, Gijsbert D; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2009-03-01

    Under marine conditions, tributyltin (TBT) is speciated mainly as an uncharged hydroxyl complex (TBTOH) that is expected to have a similar fate to hydrophobic organic contaminants. Earlier studies indicated that for the later compounds, sorption to black carbon (BC) can be more than two orders of magnitude stronger than sorption to organic carbon, notably at low and environmentally relevant concentrations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sorption strength of spiked TBT to a sediment and its BC isolate. It was observed that carbon-normalized sorption coefficients were in the same range for the sediment total organic carbon (TOC) and for its BC (log K(TOC) 5.05 L/kg(TOC) and log K(BC) 5.09 L/kg(BC), respectively). This indicates that TBT does not sorb as strongly to BC as other hydrophobic organic contaminants. Activated carbon (AC), a strong man-made sorbent, has the potential to be used for in situ remediation of contaminated sediments and soils, in particular for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. In the present study, both granular and powdered AC were found to strongly sorb TBT under marine conditions, with a log sorption coefficient of 6.8 L/kg(carbon). Tributyl- and dibutyltin concentrations in the pore water of a natively contaminated sediment were reduced by more than 70% on addition of 2% of powdered AC, whereas granular AC did not show a similar reduction. The results indicate that powdered AC might be a feasible remediation agent for sediments contaminated by organotins.

  4. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ∼650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption.

  5. In Vitro Selection of pH-Activated DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fong, Faye Yi; Oh, Seung Soo; Hawker, Craig J; Soh, H Tom

    2016-12-05

    We report the first in vitro selection of DNA nanostructures that switch their conformation when triggered by change in pH. Previously, most pH-active nanostructures were designed using known pH-active motifs, such as the i-motif or the triplex structure. In contrast, we performed de novo selections starting from a random library and generated nanostructures that can sequester and release Mipomersen, a clinically approved antisense DNA drug, in response to pH change. We demonstrate extraordinary pH-selectivity, releasing up to 714-fold more Mipomersen at pH 5.2 compared to pH 7.5. Interestingly, none of our nanostructures showed significant sequence similarity to known pH-sensitive motifs, suggesting that they may operate via novel structure-switching mechanisms. We believe our selection scheme is general and could be adopted for generating DNA nanostructures for many applications including drug delivery, sensors and pH-active surfaces.

  6. Selective intermolecular amination of C-H bonds at tertiary carbon centers.

    PubMed

    Roizen, Jennifer L; Zalatan, David N; Du Bois, J

    2013-10-18

    C-H insertion: A method for intermolecular amination of tertiary CH bonds is described that uses limiting amounts of substrate and a convenient phenol-derived nitrogen source. Structure-selectivity and mechanistic studies suggest that steric interaction between the substrate and active oxidant is the principal determinant of product selectivity.

  7. The effects of activation temperature on physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbons derived from biomass wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Bachrun; Hidayat, Arif

    2015-12-01

    This research focused on investigating in the effect of activation temperature on the physico-chemical properties of palm empty fruit bunch (PEFB) based activated carbon prepared by physical activation with carbon dioxide. The activation temperature was studied in the range of 400-800°C by keeping the activation temperature at 800°C for 120 min. It was found that the porous properties of activated carbon decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature. The activated carbons prepared at the highest activation temperature at 800°C and activation time of 120 min gave the activated carbon with the highest of BET surface area and pore volume of 938 m2/g and 0.4502 cm3/g, respectively

  8. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  9. Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Bele, Constantin; Orza, Anamaria Ioana; Lucan, Ciprian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Manaila, Ioana; Iulia, Ferencz; Dana, Iancu; Zaharie, Florin; Osian, Gelu; Vlad, Liviu; Iancu, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes is frequently called “nanophotothermolysis”. We herein present a method of selective nanophotothermolisys of pancreatic cancer (PC) using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with human serum albumin (HSA). With the purpose of testing the therapeutic value of these nanobioconjugates, we have developed an ex-vivo experimental platform. Surgically resected specimens from patients with PC were preserved in a cold medium and kept alive via intra-arterial perfusion. Additionally, the HSA-MWCNTs have been intra-arterially administered in the greater pancreatic artery under ultrasound guidance. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical staining have confirmed the selective accumulation of HSA-MWCNTs inside the human PC tissue. The external laser irradiation of the specimen has significantly produced extensive necrosis of the malign tissue after the intra-arterial administration of HSA-MWCNTs, without any harmful effects on the surrounding healthy parenchyma. We have obtained a selective photothermal ablation of the malign tissue based on the selective internalization of MWCNTs with HSA cargo inside the pancreatic adenocarcinoma after the ex-vivo intra-arterial perfusion. PMID:21720504

  10. Remediation of organochlorine pesticides contaminated lake sediment using activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Shan; Gong, Ji-Lai; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yao, Fu-Bing; Guo, Min; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in sediment were a potential damage for humans and ecosystems. The aim of this work was to determine the effectiveness of carbon materials remedy hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) in sediment. Two different carbon materials including activated carbon (AC) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used in the present research. Sediment treated with 2 wt% AC and MWCNTs after 150 d contact showed 97%, and 75% reduction for HCH, and 93% and 59% decrease for DDTs in aqueous equilibrium concentration, respectively. Similarly, the reduction efficiencies of DDT and HCH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) treated with AC (MWCNTs) were 97% (75%) and 92% (63%), respectively under the identical conditions. Furthermore, for 2 wt% AC (MWCNTs) system, a reduction of XAD beads uptake up to 87% (52%) and 73% (67%) was obtained in HCH and DDT flux to overlying water in quiescent system. Adding MWCNTs to contaminated sediment did not significantly decrease aqueous equilibrium concentration and DDTs and HCH availability in SPMDs compared to AC treatment. A series of results indicated that AC had significantly higher remediation efficiency towards HCH and DDTs in sediment than MWCNTs. Additionally, the removal efficiencies of two organic pollutants improved with increasing material doses and contact times. The greater effectiveness of AC was attributed to its greater specific surface area, which was favorable for binding contaminants. These results highlighted the potential for using AC as in-situ sorbent amendments for sediment remediation.

  11. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from marine macro-algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Aravindhan, R; Raghava Rao, J; Unni Nair, B

    2009-03-15

    Activated carbons prepared from two macro-algal biomass Sargassum longifolium (SL) and Hypnea valentiae (HV) have been examined for the removal of phenol from aqueous solution. The activated carbon has been prepared by zinc chloride activation. Experiments have been carried out at different activating agent/precursor ratio and carbonization temperature, which had significant effect on the pore structure of carbon. Developed activated carbon has been characterized by BET surface area (S(BET)) analysis and iodine number. The carbons, ZSLC-800 and ZHVC-800, showed surface area around 802 and 783 m(2)g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon developed showed substantial capability to adsorb phenol from aqueous solutions. The kinetic data were fitted to the models of pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. Column studies have also been carried out with ZSLC-800 activated carbon.

  12. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasachar, Srivats; Benson, Steven; Crocker, Charlene; Mackenzie, Jill

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  13. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  14. 77 FR 12614 - Activated Carbon From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Activated Carbon From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review AGENCY: United States International... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on activated carbon from China would be likely to lead to..., the Department of Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of activated carbon from...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  16. 78 FR 26748 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary... duty order on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') for the period of... The merchandise subject to the order is certain activated carbon.\\1\\ The products are...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1330 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1330 Section 60.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements § 60.1330 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15275 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 62.15275 Section 62.15275 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... August 30, 1999 Other Monitoring Requirements § 62.15275 How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans...

  5. Enhancement of N-nitrosamine formation on granular-activated carbon from N-methylaniline and nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, A.M.; Gallagher, D.L.; DeRosa, P.M.; Millington, D.S.; DiGiano, F.A.

    1986-10-01

    Sterile aqueous N-methylaniline solutions were allowed to equilibrate at various nitrite, F-400 granular-activated carbon, and pH levels for 1 week. The aqueous and activated carbon phases were extracted and analyzed for nitrosamines relative to an added internal standard. Selected ion monitoring GC/MS, utilizing continuous monitoring of the NO/sup +/ ion (m/z 29.9980) characteristic of nitrosamines, at medium resolution (R = 2500-3000) was applied to quantitatively measure nitrosamines at picograms per microliter concentrations. This method selected for nitrosamine products only and eliminated interferences from non-nitrosamine reaction products. Results indicate that the pressure of granular-activated carbon significantly enhanced the formation of nitrosamine from N-methyl-aniline (F = 145, P< 0.0001). The amount of N-nitrosomethylaniline formed in the presence of activated carbon was 75 times more than that formed in the absence of activated carbon under the same nitrite, pH, and precursor amine conditions. High nitrite concentrations and loss pH values significantly increased the conversion of secondary amine to nitrosamine. 25 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Hydroquinone and Quinone-Grafted Porous Carbons for Highly Selective CO2 Capture from Flue Gases and Natural Gas Upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Krishna, Rajamani; Yang, Jiangfeng; Deng, Shuguang

    2015-08-04

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption isotherms were measured and correlated with the Langmuir model. An ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) selectivity for the CO2/N2 separation of 26.5 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the hydroquinone-grafted carbon, which is 58.7% higher than that of the pristine porous carbon, and a CO2/CH4 selectivity value of 4.6 (298 K, 1 atm) was obtained on the quinone-grafted carbon (OAC-2), which represents a 28.4% improvement over the pristine porous carbon. The highest CO2 adsorption capacity on the oxygen-doped carbon adsorbents is 3.46 mmol g(-1) at 298 K and 1 atm. In addition, transient breakthrough simulations for CO2/CH4/N2 mixture separation were conducted to demonstrate the good separation performance of the oxygen-doped carbons in fixed bed adsorbers. Combining excellent adsorption separation properties and low heats of adsorption, the oxygen-doped carbons developed in this work appear to be very promising for flue gas treatment and natural gas upgrading.

  7. Preparation of high surface area activated carbon from coconut shells using microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunbin; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, C; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Hongying; Duan, Xinhui

    2010-08-01

    The present study attempts to utilize coconut shell to prepare activated carbon using agents such as steam, CO(2) and a mixture of steam-CO(2) with microwave heating. Experimental results show that the BET surface area of activated carbons irrespective of the activation agent resulted in surface area in excess of 2000 m(2)/g. The activation time using microwave heating is very much shorter, while the yield of the activated carbon compares well with the conventional heating methods. The activated carbon prepared using CO(2) activation has the largest BET surface area, however the activation time is approximately 2.5 times higher than the activation using steam or mixture of steam-CO(2). The chemical structure of activated carbons examined using Fourier transformed infra-red spectra (FTIR) did not show any variation in the surface functional groups of the activated carbon prepared using different activation agents.

  8. One-pot carbonization synthesis of europium-doped carbon quantum dots for highly selective detection of tetracycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Liu, Meng; Chen, Bin Bin; Yang, Tong; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xi Dong; Zhi Huang, Cheng

    2017-03-01

    The detection of tetracycline is of great significance because of its damaging effects on human health, such as renal toxicity and hemolytic anemia. Any release of tetracycline into the surrounding environment can produce bacterial drug resistance. We develop a new sensitive and selective detection approach for tetracycline in complex water samples by preparing europium-doped carbon quantum dots (Eu-CQDs) through a simple and rapid carbonization method operating at 200 °C for 5 min. The Eu-CQDs are characterized by blue photoluminescence, excitation-wavelength-dependent emission and excellent stability. Importantly, the fluorescence of the Eu-CQDs can be quenched efficiently by tetracycline, based on the strong inner filter effect mechanism between Eu-CQDs and tetracycline, making the fluorescence intensity ratio (I 0/I) of the Eu-CQDs at 465 nm correlate linearly with the concentration of tetracycline in the range of 0.5–200 μM, with a limit of detection of 0.3 μM. This shows the broad applicability of the Eu-CQDs in pursuing the concepts of simplicity and specificity for analytical purposes.

  9. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-02-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process.We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process

  10. Preparation of functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon by a single-step activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastgheib, Seyed A.; Ren, Jianli; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Chang, Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method to prepare functionalized and metal-impregnated activated carbon from coal is described in this paper. A mixture of ferric chloride and a sub-bituminous coal was used to demonstrate simultaneous coal activation, chlorine functionalization, and iron/iron oxides impregnation in the resulting porous carbon products. The FeCl3 concentration in the mixture, the method to prepare the FeCl3-coal mixture (solid mixing or liquid impregnation), and activation atmosphere and temperature impacted the surface area and porosity development, Cl functionalization, and iron species impregnation and dispersion in the carbon products. Samples activated in nitrogen or a simulated flue gas at 600 or 1000 °C for 1-2 min had surface areas up to ∼800 m2/g, bulk iron contents up to 18 wt%, and surface chlorine contents up to 27 wt%. Potential catalytic and adsorption application of the carbon materials was explored in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol and adsorption of ionic mercury from aqueous solutions. Results indicated that impregnated activated carbons outperformed their non-impregnated counterparts in both the CWAO and adsorption tests.

  11. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Fluorous Membranes Doped with Highly Selective Ionophores for Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li D.; Mandal, Debaprasad; Pozzi, Gianluca; Gladysz, John A.; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Manganese(III) complexes of three fluorophilic salen derivatives were used to prepare ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) with ionophore-doped fluorous sensing membranes. Because of their extremely low polarity and polarizability, fluorous media are not only chemically very inert but also solvate potentially interfering ions poorly, resulting in a much improved discrimination of such ions. Indeed, the new ISEs exhibited selectivities for CO32− that exceed those of previously reported ISEs based on non-fluorous membranes by several orders of magnitude. In particular, the interference from chloride and salicylate was reduced by two and six orders of magnitude, respectively. To achieve this, the selectivities of these ISEs were fine-tuned by addition of non-coordinating hydrophobic ions (i.e., ionic sites) into the sensing membranes. Stability constants of the anion–ionophore complexes were determined from the dependence of the potentiometric selectivities on the charge sign of the ionic sites and the molar ratio of ionic sites and the ionophore. For this purpose, a previously introduced fluorophilic tetraphenylborate and a novel fluorophilic cation with a bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene)ammonium group, (Rf6(CH2)3)3PN+P(Rf6(CH2)3)3, were utilized. The optimum CO32− selectivities were found for sensing membranes composed of anionic sites and ionophore in a 1:4 molar ratio, which results in the formation of 2:1 complexes with CO32− with stability constants up to 4.1 × 1015. As predicted by established theory, the site-to-ionophore ratios that provide optimum potentiometric selectivity depend on the stoichiometries of the complexes of both the primary and the interfering ions. However, the ionophores used in this study give examples of charges and stoichiometries previously neither explicitly predicted by theory nor shown by experiment. The exceptional selectivity of fluorous membranes doped with these carbonate ionophores suggests their use not only for

  12. Performance of activated carbon loaded fibrous filters on simultaneous removal of particulate and gaseous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Agranovski, I E; Moustafa, S; Braddock, R D

    2005-07-01

    Activated carbons are used for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated air carriers. Various arrangements, including fixed and fluidised layers, are employed to meet air quality standards for industrial and domestic applications. Filters are commonly used for the removal of small particles from gas streams. The selective performance of these devices can be high for the removal of either particles or VOCs. However, none of them can be used solely for the simultaneous removal of both contaminants, as their performance for the removal of the alternate group of pollutants is usually very poor. The scope of this project is to combine the above control technologies by loading fibrous filters with activated carbon powder and to investigate the performance of such a single-stage technology on the simultaneous removal of VOCs and particles from the gas stream under controlled laboratory conditions. It was found that the efficiency of the carbon loaded filter was about twice as high as the efficiency of the clean filter with respect to the removal of particles (monodisperse polystyrene latex spheres were used for the measurements) with a corresponding increase of the pressure drop across the filter by around 25-35%. Also, carbon loaded filters were capable of purifying VOC (toluene) concentrated air streams over quite substantial time periods.

  13. A theoretical study on cellular antioxidant activity of selected flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Wu, Jinhong; Zhao, Bo

    The antioxidant capacities of the selected flavonoids quercetin, luteolin and taxifolin have been investigated at density functional level of theory with the aim of verifying the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) values representative of experimental findings. The selected flavonoids were believed to act through the H-atom transfer mechanism. Their potentiality of hydrogen abstraction was evaluated by computing the Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide solution. Results indicate that the order of antioxidant efficacies calculated in this work is in agreement with that reported by experimental results of CAA. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were also performed both in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide to reproduce the electronic UV-vis spectra of the selected flavonoids.

  14. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods.

  15. Enhanced adsorption of quaternary amine using modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Prahas, Devarly; Wang, M J; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined different methodologies to modify activated carbon (AC) for the removal of quaternary amine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), from water. Commercial carbon (WAC) was treated by nitric acid oxidation (NA-WAC), silica impregnation (SM-WAC0.5), and oxygen plasma (P10-WAC), and their characteristics and adsorption capacity were compared. The Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium adsorption data well under different pH. The maximum adsorption capacity of WAC was 27.77 mg/g, while those of NA-WAC, SM-WAC 0.5, and P10-WAC were 37.46, 32.83 and 29.03 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid oxidation was the most effective method for enhancing the adsorption capacity of TMAH. Higher pH was favorable for TMAH adsorption. Desorption study revealed that NA-WAC had no considerable reduction in performance even after five cycles of regeneration by 0.1 N hydrochloric acid. It was proposed that electrostatic interaction was the main mechanism of TMAH adsorption on activated carbon.

  16. Removal of toxic chemicals from water with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Activated carbon was effective in removing fish toxicants and anesthetics from water solutions. Its capacity to adsorb 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), antimycin, NoxfishA? (5% rotenone), Dibrorms, juglone, MSa??222, and benzocaine ranged from 0.1 to 64 mg per gram of carbon. The adsorptive capacity (end point considered as a significant discharge) of activated carbon for removal of TFM was determined at column depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm; temperatures of 7, 12, 17, and 22 C; pH's of 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5; and flow rates of 50, 78, 100, 200, and 940 ml/min. Adsorptive capacity increased when the contact time was increased by reducing the flow rate or increasing the column depth. The adsorptive capacity was not significantly influenced by temperature but was substantially higher at pH 6.5 than at the other pH's tested. A practical and efficient filter for purifying chemically treated water was developed.

  17. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  18. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents.

  19. Selective removal of nitrate ion using a novel composite carbon electrode in capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2012-11-15

    We fabricated nitrate-selective composite carbon electrodes (NSCCEs) for use in capacitive deionization to remove nitrate ions selectively from a solution containing a mixture of anions. The NSCCE was fabricated by coating the surface of a carbon electrode with the anion exchange resin, BHP55, after grinding the resin into fine powder. BHP55 is known to be selective for nitrate ions. We performed desalination experiments on a solution containing 5.0 mM NaCl and 2.0 mM NaNO(3) using the NSCCE system constructed with the fabricated electrode. The selective removal of nitrate in the NSCCE system was compared to a membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) system constructed with ion exchange membranes and carbon electrodes. The total quantity of chloride and nitrate ions adsorbed onto the unit area of the electrode in the MCDI system was 25 mmol/m(2) at a cell potential of 1.0 V. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 8.3 mmol/m(2), accounting for 33% of the total. In contrast, the total anion adsorption in the NSCCE system was 34 mmol/m(2), 36% greater than the total anion adsorption of the MCDI system. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 19 mmol/m(2), 2.3-times greater than the adsorption in the MCDI system. These results showed that the ions were initially adsorbed by an electrostatic force, and the ion exchange reactions then occurred between the resin powder in the coated layer and the solution containing mixed anions.

  20. Environmental carbonate chemistry selects for phenotype of recently isolated strains of Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Hermoso, Michaël; Lee, Renee B. Y.; Rae, Benjamin D.; Heureux, Ana M. C.; Balestreri, Cecilia; Chakravarti, Leela; Schroeder, Declan C.; Brownlee, Colin

    2016-05-01

    Coccolithophorid algae, particularly Emiliania huxleyi, are prolific biomineralisers that, under many conditions, dominate communities of marine eukaryotic plankton. Their ability to photosynthesise and form calcified scales (coccoliths) has placed them in a unique position in the global carbon cycle. Contrasting reports have been made with regards to the response of E. huxleyi to ocean acidification. Therefore, there is a pressing need to further determine the fate of this key organism in a rising CO2 world. In this paper, we investigate the phenotype of newly isolated, genetically diverse, strains of E. huxleyi from UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme (UKOA) cruises around the British Isles, the Arctic, and the Southern Ocean. We find a continuum of diversity amongst the physiological and photosynthetic parameters of different strains of E. huxleyi morphotype A under uniform, ambient conditions imposed in the laboratory. This physiology is best explained by adaptation to carbonate chemistry in the former habitat rather than being prescribed by genetic fingerprints such as the coccolithophore morphology motif (CMM). To a first order, the photosynthetic capacity of each strain is a function of both aqueous CO2 availability, and calcification rate, suggestive of a link between carbon concentrating ability and calcification. The calcification rate of each strain is related linearly to the natural environmental [CO32-] at the site of isolation, but a few exceptional strains display low calcification rates at the highest [CO32-] when calcification is limited by low CO2 availability and/or a lack of a carbon concentrating mechanism. We present O2-electrode measurements alongside coccolith oxygen isotopic composition and the uronic acid content (UAC) of the coccolith associated polysaccharide (CAP), that act as indirect tools to show the differing carbon concentrating ability of the strains. The environmental selection revealed amongst our recently isolated strain

  1. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor molasses by activation with sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Legrouri, K; Khouya, E; Ezzine, M; Hannache, H; Denoyel, R; Pallier, R; Naslain, R

    2005-02-14

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulphuric acid, followed by carbonisation at varying conditions (temperature and gas coverage) in order to optimize preparation parameters. The influence of activation conditions was investigated by determination of adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined while the micropore volume was determined by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and reveal the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activated carbons properties in this study were found for activation of the mixture (molasses/sulphuric acid) in steam at 750 degrees C. The samples obtained in this condition were highly microporous, with high surface area (> or =1200 m2/g) and the maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine were 435 and 1430 mg/g, respectively.

  2. Selective solid-phase extraction of uranium by salicylideneimine-functionalized hydrothermal carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Ma, Lijian; Cao, Kecheng; Geng, Junxia; Liu, Jun; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Li, Shoujian

    2012-08-30

    A new salicylideneimine-functionalized hydrothermal-carbon-based solid-phase extractant was developed for the purpose of separating uranium selectively for sustainability of uranium resources. The resulting adsorption material was obtained via hydrothermal carbonization, calcination at mild temperature (573.15K), amination, and grafting with salicylaldehyde in sequence. Both Fourier transform infrared spectra and elemental analysis proved the successful grafting of salicylideneimine onto hydrothermal carbon matrix. Adsorption behaviors of the extractant on uranium(VI) were investigated by varying pH values of solution, adsorbent amounts, contact times, initial metal concentrations, temperatures, and ionic strengths. An optimum adsorption capacity of 1.10 mmol g(-1) (261 mg g(-1)) for uranium(VI) was obtained at pH 4.3. The present adsorption process obeyed pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH=+8.81 kJ mol(-1), ΔS=+110 J K(-1)mol(-1), ΔG=-23.0 kJ mol(-1)) indicated the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Results from batch adsorption test in simulated nuclear industrial effluent, containing Cs(+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), and Gd(3+), showed the adsorbent could separate uranium(VI) from those competitive ions with high selectivity. The adsorbent might be promising for use in certain key steps in any future sustainable nuclear fuel cycle.

  3. Ordered mesoporous carbon/Nafion as a versatile and selective solid-phase microextraction coating.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jingbin; Zhao, Cuiying; Chen, Jingjing; Subhan, Fazle; Luo, Liwen; Yu, Jianfeng; Cui, Bingwen; Xing, Wei; Chen, Xi; Yan, Zifeng

    2014-10-24

    In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with large surface area (1019m(2)g(-1)), uniform mesoporous structure (pore size distribution centering at 4.2nm) and large pore volume (1.46cm(3)g(-1)) was synthesized using 2D hexagonally mesoporous silica MSU-H as the hard template and sucrose as the carbon precursor. The as-synthesized OMC was immobilized onto a stainless steel wire using Nafion as a binder to prepare an OMC/Nafion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coating. The extraction characteristics of the OMC/Nafion coating were extensively investigated using a wide range of analytes including non-polar (light petroleum and benzene homologues) and polar compounds (amines and phenols). The OMC/Nafion coating exhibited much better extraction efficiency towards all selected analytes than that of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion coating with similar length and thickness, which is ascribed to its high surface area, well-ordered mesoporous structure and large pore volume. When the OMC/Nafion coating was used to extract a mixture containing various kinds of analytes, it possessed excellent extraction selectivity towards aromatic non-polar compounds. In addition, the feasibility of the OMC/Nafion coating for application in electrochemically enhanced SPME was demonstrated using protonated amines as model analytes.

  4. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  5. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Abundances of Selected Stars in the Hertzsprung Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanture, Andrew D.; Wallerstein, George

    1999-01-01

    The iron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances for several stars whose characteristics place them in the Hertzsprung gap have been derived from high-resolution spectra. These stars were selected based on the fact that previous studies have shown them to have peculiar carbon, nitrogen, or lithium abundances considering their position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. When combined with the lithium abundances derived by Wallerstein and coworkers, the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances indicate that the sample of stars can generally be broken into two categories-lower luminosity dwarfs or subgiants that are unmixed and higher luminosity mixed giants. Among the sample are two stars, HR 7606 and HR 8626, which previously have been identified by Bidelman as ``low-velocity CH stars.'' These stars show metallicities of [Fe/H]~-0.5 and solar abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The strength of the CH band in these stars is probably an artifact of a mild metal deficiency and the absence of substantial mixing of CN processed materials to the surface of the star rather than an unusual nucleosynthetic history.

  6. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  7. Selected advanced aerodynamic and active control concepts development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented of results obtained during analysis, design and test activities on six selected technical tasks directed at exploratory improvement of fuel efficiency for new and derivative transports. The work included investigations into the potential offered by natural laminar flow, improved surface coatings and advanced high lift concepts. Similar investigations covering optimum low-energy flight path control, integrated application of active controls and evaluation of primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance are also summarized. Recommendations are included for future work needed to exploit potential advancements.

  8. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  9. Antioxidant activity of various extracts of selected gourd vegetables.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Baljeet S; Yadav, Roshanlal; Yadav, Ritika B; Garg, Munish

    2016-04-01

    Study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative activity of methanolic (ME), ethanolic (EE) and butanolic extracts (BE) of selected gourd vegetables. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different assays namely ferric thiocyanate test (FTC), thiobarbituric acid test (TBA), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and DPPH free radicals scavenging test. A densitometric HPTLC analysis was performed for the analysis of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Different extracts of the selected gourd vegetables revealed different antioxidant activity. Different extracts of Lagenaria siceraria, Momordica charantia and Luffa cylindrica revealed significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of total phenols, flavonids, tannins and carotenoids content and also the antioxidant activity in comparison to remaining vegetable extracts. Correlation studies indicated that FRAP test best described the antioxidant activity of phenols, flavonoids and carotenoids (r = 0.854, 0.692 and 0.915 respectively). HPTLC profiles revealed the presence of maximum number of phenolic acids and flavonoids in L. siceraria and M. charantia.

  10. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  11. Simultaneous activation/sulfurization method for production of sulfurized activated carbons: characterization and Hg(II) adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Shamsijazeyi, Hadi; Kaghazchi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    As an inexpensive method for modification of activated carbons (ACs), sulfurization has attracted significant attention. However, the resulting sulfurized activated carbons (SACs) often are less porous than the original ACs. In this work, we propose a new method for concurrent sulfurization/activation that can lead to preparation of SACs with more porosity than the corresponding non-sulfurized ACs. By using scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and iodine number experiments, the porous structure of the SACs has been compared with that of non-sulfurized ACs. The specific surface areas of SACs are higher than the corresponding ACs, regardless of the type of activation agents used. For instance, the specific surface area of SAC and AC activated with phosphoric acid is 1,637 and 1,338 m(2)/g, respectively. Additionally, sulfur contents and surface charges (pHpzc) of the SACs and non-sulfurized ACs are compared. In fact, the SACs have higher sulfur contents and more acidic surfaces. Furthermore, the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of SACs has been compared with the corresponding non-sulfurized ACs. The Hg(II) adsorption isotherms on a selected SAC is measured at different pH values and temperatures. Hg(II) adsorptions as high as 293 mg/g are observed by using SACs prepared by the method proposed in this study.

  12. Carbon sink activity and GHG budget of managed European grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja; Herfurth, Damien; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Fluxnet Grassland Pi's, European

    2013-04-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion (89%) of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Recent demonstrations of carbon sink activities of European ecosystemes, however, often questioned the existence of C storing grasslands, as though a net sink of C was observed, uncertainty surrounding this estimate was larger than the sink itself (Janssens et al., 2003, Schulze et al., 2009. Then again, some of these estimates were based on a small number of measurements, and on models. Not surprising, there is still, a paucity of studies demonstrating the existence of grassland systems, where C sequestration would exceed (in CO2 equivalents) methane emissions from the enteric fermentation of ruminants and nitrous oxide emissions from managed soils. Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component of the carbon sink activity in grasslands is thus the impact of changes in management practices or effects of past and recent management, such as intensification as well as climate (and -variation). We analysed data (i.e. flux, ecological, management and soil organic carbon) from a network of European grassland flux observation sites (36). These sites covered different types and intensities of management, and offered the opportunity to understand grassland carbon cycling and trade-offs between C sinks and CH4 and N2O emissions. For some sites, the assessment of carbon sink activities were compared using two methods; repeated soil inventory and determination of the ecosystem C budget by continuous measurement of CO2 exchange in combination with quantification of other C imports and exports (net C storage, NCS). In general grassland, were a potential sink of C with 60±12 g C /m2.yr (median; min -456; max 645). Grazed sites had a higher NCS compared to cut sites (median 99 vs 67 g C /m2.yr), while permanent grassland sites tended to have a lower NCS compared to temporary sown grasslands (median 64 vs

  13. Selective dermal rejuvenation using intradermal injection of carbon dioxide and hyaluronic acid for facial wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sae Hoon; Burm, Jin Sik; Kim, Youn Wha

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed selective dermal rejuvenation using sequential intradermal injections of carbon dioxide and hyaluronic acid as a treatment of facial wrinkles. An injection device was designed. After topical anesthesia, 0.1-mL carbon dioxide was gently injected intradermally so as to spread diffusely. A volume of 0.01- to 0.02-mL diluted hyaluronic acid was sequentially injected until the skin rose slightly. Overlapping injections were performed at 3 to 5 mm intervals. This process was repeated until the wrinkles were smoothened. This study included 36 cases of facial wrinkles in 34 patients. The follow-up period was 3 to 11 months. Temporary adverse effects were injection-site pain, mild edema, and redness. Most cases showed obvious improvement in skin thickness, elasticity, and smoothening. Complications included irregularities and hyperpigmentation in 3 cases, and 91% were highly satisfied with the antiwrinkle treatment. This method was a safe, economical, and clinically effective antiwrinkle treatment.

  14. Activated Sludge. Selected Instructional Activities and References. Instructional Resources Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Clinton L.; Walasek, James B.

    This monograph contains a variety of selected materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education and instruction. Part I presents a brief discussion of the activated sludge process in wastewater treatment operations. Part II, Instructional Units, contains selected portions of existing programs which may be utilized in…

  15. Soil Microbial Activity Provides Insight to Carbon Cycling in Shrub Ecotones of Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, E.; Kashi, N. N.; Chen, J.; Hobbie, E. A.; Schwan, M. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Shrubs are expanding in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to rising atmospheric temperatures. Microbial activity increases as growing temperatures cause permafrost warming and subsequent thaw, leading to a greater resource of soil nutrients enabling shrub growth. Increased carbon inputs from shrubs is predicted to result in faster carbon turnover by microbial decomposition. Further understanding of microbial activity underneath shrubs could uncover how microbes and soil processes interact to promote shrub expansion and carbon cycling. To address how higher soil carbon input from shrubs influences decomposition, soil samples were taken across a heath, shrub, and forest ecotone gradient at two sites near Abikso, Sweden. Samples were analyzed for soluble carbon and nitrogen, microbial abundance, and microbial activity of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase to reflect organic matter decomposition and availability of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphate respectively. Chitinase activity positively correlated with shrub cover, suggesting microbial demands for nitrogen increase with higher shrub cover. Glucosidase activity negatively correlated with shrub cover and soluble carbon, suggesting decreased microbial demand for carbon as shrub cover and carbon stores increase. Lower glucosidase activity in areas with high carbon input from shrubs implies that microbes are decomposing carbon less readily than carbon is being put into the soil. Increasing soil carbon stores in shrub covered areas can lead to shrubs becoming a net carbon sink and a negative feedback to changing climate.

  16. Investigating effectiveness of activated carbons of natural sources on various supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon can be produced from natural sources, such as pistachio and acorn shells, which can be an inexpensive and sustainable sources of natural wastes for the energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors. The carbonaceous materials used in this study were carbonized at the temperatures of 700°C and 900°C after the stabilization process at 240°C for two hours. These shells showed approximately 60% carbon yield. Carbonized nutshells were chemically activated using1wt% potassium hydroxide (KOH). Activated carbon powders with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) were used to construct carbon electrodes. A 1M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as electrolytes. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the characterization of the supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to inspect the surface texture of the activated carbons. Activated pistachio shells carbonized at 700°C showed more porous surface texture than those carbonized at 900°C. Effects of the carbonization temperatures were studied for their electrochemical characteristics. The shells carbonized at 700°C showed better electrochemical characteristics compared to those carbonized at 900°C. The test results provided about 27,083 μF/g specific capacitance at a scan rate of 10mV/s. This study showed promising results for using these activated carbons produced from the natural wastes for supercapacitor applications.

  17. Tellurium-nanowire-coated glassy carbon electrodes for selective and sensitive detection of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-05-15

    Tellurium-nanowire-coated glassy carbon electrodes (TNGCEs) have been fabricated and employed for selective and sensitive detection of dopamine (DA). TNGCEs were prepared by direct deposition of tellurium nanowires, 600 ± 150 nm in length and 16 ± 3 nm in diameter, onto glassy carbon electrodes, which were further coated with Nafion to improve their selectivity and stability. Compared to the GCE, the TNGCE is more electroactive (by approximately 1.9-fold) for DA, and its selectivity toward DA over ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) is also greater. By applying differential pulse voltammetry, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, the TNGCE provides a limit of detection of 1 nM for DA in the presence of 0.5mM AA and UA. Linearity (R(2)=0.9955) of the oxidation current at 0.19 V against the concentration of DA is found over the range 5 nM-1 μM. TNGCEs have been applied to determine the concentration of dopamine to be 0.59 ± 0.07 μM in PC12 cells.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; George Alexander

    2004-11-15

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates, and the overall reaction being exothermic. However, the primary drawback to mineral carbonation is the reaction kinetics. To accelerate the reaction, aqueous carbonation processes are preferred, where the minerals are firstly dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface controlled. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, the serpentine can be ground to very fine particle size (<37 {micro}m), but this is a very energy intensive process. Alternatively, magnesium could be chemically extracted in aqueous solution. Phase I showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve the magnesium from the serpentine minerals (particle size {approx}100 {micro}m), and furthermore, the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 650 psig) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >1850 psig and <37 {micro}m particle size. Phase I also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature leaving amorphous SiO{sub 2} with surface areas {approx} 330m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of Phase 2 of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process developed in Phase I in order to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. During the current reporting period, Task 1 ''Mineral activation'' was initiated and focused on a parametric study to optimize the operation conditions for the mineral activation, where serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted, as following the results from Phase 1. Several experimental factors were outlined as having a potential influence on the mineral activation. This study has focused to date on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle

  19. From an equilibrium based MOF adsorbent to a kinetic selective carbon molecular sieve for paraffin/iso-paraffin separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiyan; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Zhang, Yiming; Bhatt, Prashant M; He, Hongming; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Perman, Jason A; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-11-24

    We unveil a unique kinetic driven separation material for selectively removing linear paraffins from iso-paraffins via a molecular sieving mechanism. Subsequent carbonization and thermal treatment of CD-MOF-2, the cyclodextrin metal-organic framework, afforded a carbon molecular sieve with a uniform and reduced pore size of ca. 5.0 Å, and it exhibited highly selective kinetic separation of n-butane and n-pentane from iso-butane and iso-pentane, respectively.

  20. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically selected and X-ray-detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In nine systems, the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3″ diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of two. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGNs selected from the SDSS galaxy catalog with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0.″6 (0.8 kpc) to 17.″4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2.″7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGNs in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess the kinematics of AGN photoionized gas in galaxy mergers. We find that spectroscopic offset AGN selection may be up to {89}-16+7% incomplete due to small projected velocity offsets. We also find that the magnitude of the velocity offsets are generally larger than expected if our spatial selection introduces a bias toward face-on orbits, suggesting the presence of complex kinematics in the emission line gas of AGNs in galaxy mergers.