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Sample records for activated carboxyl groups

  1. Ovalbumin with Glycated Carboxyl Groups Shows Membrane-Damaging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ching-Chia; Shi, Yi-Jun; Chen, Ying-Jung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether glycated ovalbumin (OVA) showed novel activity at the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated OVA (Man-OVA) was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-dextro (d)-mannopyranoside. An increase in the number of modified carboxyl groups increased the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA on cell membrane-mimicking vesicles, whereas OVA did not induce membrane permeability in the tested phospholipid vesicles. The glycation of carboxyl groups caused a notable change in the gross conformation of OVA. Moreover, owing to their spatial positions, the Trp residues in Man-OVA were more exposed, unlike those in OVA. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that the Trp residues in Man-OVA were located on the interface binds with the lipid vesicles, and their microenvironment was abundant in positively charged residues. Although OVA and Man-OVA showed a similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-interacting feature of Man-OVA was distinct from that of OVA. Chemical modification studies revealed that Lys and Arg residues, but not Trp residues, played a crucial role in the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA. Taken together, our data suggest that glycation of carboxyl groups causes changes in the structural properties and membrane-interacting features of OVA, generating OVA with membrane-perturbing activities at the lipid-water interface. PMID:28264493

  2. Bovine serum albumin with glycated carboxyl groups shows membrane-perturbing activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shin-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jung; Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study aimed to investigate whether glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed novel activities on the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated BSA (Man-BSA) was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-mannopyranoside. In contrast to BSA, Man-BSA notably induced membrane permeability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM)/cholesterol (Chol) and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Noticeably, Man-BSA induced the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles, but not of EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Although BSA and Man-BSA showed similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-bound conformation of Man-BSA was distinct from that of BSA. Moreover, Man-BSA adopted distinct structure upon binding with the EYPC/EYSM/Chol and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Man-BSA could induce the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles with K562 and MCF-7 cells, while Man-BSA greatly induced the leakage of Chol-depleted K562 and MCF-7 cells. The modified BSA prepared by conjugating carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-glucopyranoside also showed membrane-perturbing activities. Collectively, our data indicate that conjugation of carboxyl groups with monosaccharide generates functional BSA with membrane-perturbing activities on the lipid-water interface.

  3. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  4. The structure-anticoagulant activity relationships of sulfated lacquer polysaccharide: effect of carboxyl group and position of sulfation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhong; Du, Yumin; Huang, Ronghua; Wan, Yunyang; Wen, Yan

    2005-07-01

    Regiospecific oxidation of the primary hydroxyl groups in lacquer polysaccharide (LPL, Mw 6.85 x 10(4)) and its NaIO4 oxidation derivatives (LPLde) to C-6 carboxy groups was achieved with NaOCl in the presence of Tempo and NaBr. Sulfate groups were incorporated into the oxidated polysaccharides using Py.SO3 complex as a reagent. Reactivity of polysaccharide hydroxyl group was C-6 > C-2 > C-4. Sulfate groups were mainly linked to the second hydroxy at C-2 in the products. The results of APTT assay showed after incorporation of carboxyl groups into lacquer polysaccharides, the intrinsic coagulation pathway was promoted, and all sulfated polysaccharides had very weak anticoagulant activity within the scope of studied DS (0.39-1.11). These indicated that carboxyl groups and sulfate groups had the synergistic action. At the same time, the anticoagulant activity increased very slowly with the DS in the second hydroxy. This indicated that 6-O-SO3- in the side chains took an important role in the anticoagulant activity.

  5. An active-site peptide containing the second essential carboxyl group of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides by chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Funane, K; Shiraiwa, M; Hashimoto, K; Ichishima, E; Kobayashi, M

    1993-12-14

    The treatment of Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase with 10 mM 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC) and glycine ethyl ester (GEE) inactivated the enzyme almost completely within 24 min where the modification of one carboxyl group/mol of the enzyme by EDC was attained. Though 30 mM diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEP) also inactivated the enzyme, about 35% of the activity remained during a 36-min incubation. When 10 mol of imidazole residues/mol of the enzyme was modified by DEP, 50% of the activity was still retained. The addition of the substrate sucrose greatly retarded the enzyme inactivation by EDC. However, the addition of dextran slightly protected the inactivation of the glucosyl-transferring activity and accelerated the inactivation of the sucrose-cleaving activity. In the case of DEP, the addition of sucrose or dextran gave no influence on the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, the carboxyl group seemed to play a more important role in the substrate binding and in the catalytic activity of the dextransucrase than the imidazolium group. Differential labeling of Leuconostoc dextransucrase by EDC was conducted in the presence of a sucrose analog, sucrose monocaprate. The fluorescent probe N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (EDAN) was used as the nucleophile instead of GEE. A fluorescent labeled peptide was isolated from a trypsin digest of the EDC-EDAN modified enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the isolated peptide was Leu-Gln-Glu-Asp-Asn-Ser-Asn-Val-Val-Val-Glu-Ala.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Accessibility and ion exchange stoichiometry of ionized carboxylic groups in the active layer of FT30 reverse osmosis membrane.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito I; Cahill, David G

    2009-07-01

    We have experimentally determined the concentration of Ba2+ that associates with the accessible ionized R-COO- groups in the polyamide active layer of the FT30 reverse osmosis membrane in the pH range 3.42-10.30. Ba2+ concentrations in the active layer ([Ba2+]) were measured using the ion-probing/Rutherford backscattering spectrometry procedure reported in our previous work. We found that at all but the lowest experimental pH 3.42, [Ba2+] was lower than the corresponding total concentrations of R-COO- groups; their difference was consistent with steric and charge effects determining the accessibility and association, respectively, of Ba2+ to R-COO- groups. Accordingly, we propose two descriptors, the accessibility ratio (AR) and the neutralization number (NN), to account for the observed difference. AR, the fraction of R-COO- groups accessible to Ba2+ ions, and NN, the average number of R-COO- groups neutralized per Ba2+ ion, were determined experimentally performing Ag(+)-Ba2+ ion-exchange tests. The resulting AR = 0.40 indicated that on average only 40% of ionizable carboxylic groups were accessible to Ba2+. [Ba2+] values calculated using R-COO- concentrations and the AR and NN concepts were in agreement with experimental [Ba2+] results.

  7. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  8. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activities of diorganotin(IV) complexes with azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand: Crystal structure and topological study of a doubly phenoxide-bridged dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Roy, Subhadip; Devi, N. Manglembi; Singh, Ch. Brajakishor; Singh, Keisham Surjit

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes appended with free carboxylic acids were synthesized by reacting diorganotin(IV) dichlorides [R2SnCl2; R = Me (1), Bu (2) and Ph (3)] with an azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand i.e. 2-{4-hydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl]phenylazo}benzoic acid in presence of triethylamine. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectroscopy. The structure of 1 in solid state has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure of 1 reveals that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c and is a dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups. In the structure of 1, the Sn(IV) atoms are hexacoordinated and have a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which two phenoxy oxygen atoms and the azomethine nitrogen atom of the ligand coordinate to each tin atom. One of the phenoxy oxygen atom bridges the two tin centers resulting in a planar Sn2O2 core. Topological analysis is used for the description of molecular packing in 1. Tin NMR spectroscopy study indicates that the complexes have five coordinate geometry around tin atom in solution state. Since the complexes have free carboxylic acids, these compounds could be further used as potential metallo-ligands for the synthesis of other complexes. The synthesized diorganotin(IV) complexes were also screened for their antimicrobial activities and compound 2 showed effective antimicrobial activities.

  9. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A group of enzymes, mostly hydrolases or certain transferases, utilize one or a few side-chain carboxyl groups of Asp and/or Glu as part of the catalytic machinery at their active sites. This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major types of carboxyl peptidases including aspartic peptidases, glutamic peptidases and serine-carboxyl peptidases. PMID:23759941

  10. The pH-dependence of the Escherichia coli RNase HII-catalysed reaction suggests that an active site carboxylate group participates directly in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bastock, James A; Webb, Michelle; Grasby, Jane A

    2007-04-27

    RNase HII specifically catalyses the hydrolysis of phosphate diester linkages contained within the RNA portion of DNA/RNA hybrids. The catalytic parameters of the enzyme derived from Escherichia coli BL21 have been measured using 5'-fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing embedded ribonucleotides. The products of the reaction and the chemistry of phosphate diester hydrolysis were assigned unequivocally using mass spectrometry. The pH-dependence of the catalytic parameters was measured under conditions of optimal magnesium ion concentration. The logarithm of the turnover number of the enzyme increases steeply with pH until a pH-independent region is reached close to neutrality. The slope of the pH-dependent region is 2, indicating that the catalytically proficient form of RNase HII is di-anionic. The pH-dependence of log 1/K(M) is a sigmoidal curve reaching a maximal value at higher pH, suggesting deprotonation of a residue stabilises substrate binding. Possible mechanisms for the RNase HII-catalysed reaction consistent with the pH-dependent behaviour of the enzyme are discussed. The active sites of RNase H enzymes contain a cluster of four strictly conserved carboxylate groups. Together, the data suggest a requirement for ionisation of an active site carboxylic acid for metal ion binding or correct positioning of metal ion(s) in the enzyme-substrate complex and a role for a second active site carboxylate in general base catalysis.

  11. Structure investigations of group 13 organometallic carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Justyniak, Iwona; Prochowicz, Daniel; Tulewicz, Adam; Bury, Wojciech; Goś, Piotr; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-01-17

    The octet-compliant group 13 organometallics with highly polarized bonds in the metal coordination sphere exhibit a significant tendency to maximize their coordination number through the formation of adducts with a wide range of neutral donor ligands or by self-association to give aggregates containing tetrahedral and higher coordinated aluminium centres, and even in some cases molecular complexes equilibrate with ionic species of different coordination numbers of the metal centre. This work provides a comprehensive overview of the structural chemistry landscape of the group 13 carboxylates. Aside from a more systematic approach to the general structural chemistry of the title compounds, the structure investigations of [R2M(μ-O2CPh)]2-type benzoate complexes (where M = B, Al and Ga) and their Lewis acid-base adducts [(R2M)(μ-O2CPh)(py-Me)] are reported. DFT calculations were also performed to obtain a more in-depth understanding of both the changes in the bonding of group 13 organometallic carboxylate adducts with a pyridine ligand.

  12. Synthesis and bioactivities of Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid derivatives based on the modification of PCA carboxyl group.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhipeng; Niu, Junfan; Liu, Hao; Xu, Zhihong; Li, Junkai; Wu, Qinglai

    2017-03-08

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) as a natural product widely exists in microbial metabolites of Pseudomonads and Streptomycetes and has been registered for the fungicide against rice sheath blight in China. To find higher fungicidal activities compounds and study the effects on fungicidal activities after changing the carboxyl group of PCA, we synthesized a series of PCA derivatives by modifying the carboxyl group of PCA and their structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR and HRMS. Most compounds exhibited significant fungicidal activities in vitro. In particular, compound 6 exhibited inhibition effect against Rhizoctonia solani with EC50 values of 4.35mg/L and compound 3b exhibited effect against Fusarium graminearum with EC50 values of 8.30mg/L, compared to the positive control PCA with its EC50 values of 7.88mg/L (Rhizoctonia solani) and 127.28mg/L (Fusarium graminearum), respectively. The results indicated that the carboxyl group of PCA could be modified to be amide group, acylhydrazine group, ester group, methyl, hydroxymethyl, chloromethyl and ether group etc. And appropriate modifications on carboxyl group of PCA were useful to extend the fungicidal scope.

  13. Rh(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids by using the carboxylic acid as a traceless directing group.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xurong; Sun, Denan; You, Qiulin; Cheng, Yangyang; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-04-03

    Highly selective decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids with various heteroarenes has been developed through Rh(III)-catalyzed two-fold C-H activation, which exhibits a wide substrate scope of both aromatic carboxylic acids and heteroarenes. The use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid as the directing group avoids troublesome extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group.

  14. Improved antifouling properties of polyamide nanofiltration membranes by reducing the density of surface carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yinghui; Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Adout, Atar; Huang, Xia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-12-18

    Carboxyls are inherent functional groups of thin-film composite polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which may play a role in membrane performance and fouling. Their surface presence is attributed to incomplete reaction of acyl chloride monomers during the membrane active layer synthesis by interfacial polymerization. In order to unravel the effect of carboxyl group density on organic fouling, NF membranes were fabricated by reacting piperazine (PIP) with either isophthaloyl chloride (IPC) or the more commonly used trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Fouling experiments were conducted with alginate as a model hydrophilic organic foulant in a solution, simulating the composition of municipal secondary effluent. Improved antifouling properties were observed for the IPC membrane, which exhibited lower flux decline (40%) and significantly greater fouling reversibility or cleaning efficiency (74%) than the TMC membrane (51% flux decline and 40% cleaning efficiency). Surface characterization revealed that there was a substantial difference in the density of surface carboxyl groups between the IPC and TMC membranes, while other surface properties were comparable. The role of carboxyl groups was elucidated by measurements of foulant-surface intermolecular forces by atomic force microscopy, which showed lower adhesion forces and rupture distances for the IPC membrane compared to TMC membranes in the presence of calcium ions in solution. Our results demonstrated that a decrease in surface carboxyl group density of polyamide membranes fabricated with IPC monomers can prevent calcium bridging with alginate and, thus, improve membrane antifouling properties.

  15. Retention of heavy metals by carboxyl functional groups of biochars in small arms range soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effectiveness of biochar for heavy metal stabilization depends upon biochar’s sorptive property and recalcitrance in soil. To understand the role of carboxyl functional groups on heavy metal stabilization, cottonseed hull biochar and flax shive steam activated biochar having low O/C ratio...

  16. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  17. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  18. Gas-phase reactivity of carboxylic acid functional groups with carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; Gilbert, Joshua D; Stutzman, John R; Forrest, William P; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  19. Characterization and diagenesis of strong-acid carboxyl groups in humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, G.K.; Reddy, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    A small fraction of carboxylic acid functional groups in humic substances are exceptionally acidic with pKa values as low as 0.5. A review of acid-group theory eliminated most models and explanations for these exceptionally acidic carboxyl groups. These acidic carboxyl groups in Suwannee River fulvic acid were enriched by a 2-stage fractionation process and the fractions were characterized by elemental, molecular-weight, and titrimetric analyses, and by infrared and 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. An average structural model of the most acidic fraction derived from the characterization data indicated a high density of carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings. Intramolecular H-bonding between adjacent carboxyl groups in these ring structures enhanced stabilization of the carboxylate anion which results in low pKa1 values. The standard, tetrahydrofuran tetracarboxylic acid, was shown to have similar acidity characteristics to the highly acidic fulvic acid fraction. The end products of 3 known diagenetic pathways for the formation of humic substances were shown to result in carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings.

  20. Production of carboxylates from high rate activated sludge through fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, C; Coma, M; Vlaeminck, S E; Rabaey, K

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the key parameters affecting fermentation of high rate activated A-sludge to carboxylates, including pH, temperature, inoculum, sludge composition and iron content. The maximum volatile fatty acids production was 141mgCg(-1) VSSfed, at pH 7. Subsequently the potential for carboxylate and methane production for A-sludge from four different plants at pH 7 and 35°C were compared. Initial BOD of the sludge appeared to be key determining carboxylate yield from A-sludge. Whereas methanogenesis could be correlated linearly to the quantity of ferric used for coagulation, fermentation did not show a dependency on iron presence. This difference may enable a strategy whereby A-stage sludge is separated to achieve fermentation, and iron dosing for phosphate removal is only implemented at the B-stage.

  1. Identification and quantification of aerosol polar oxygenated compounds bearing carboxylic or hydroxyl groups. 1. Method development.

    PubMed

    Jaoui, M; Kleindienst, T E; Lewandowski, M; Edney, E O

    2004-08-15

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multifunctional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) of the multifunctional compound using an alcohol (e.g., methanol, 1-butanol) in the presence of a relatively strong Lewis acid (BF3) as a catalyst. This esterification reaction quickly and quantitatively converts carboxylic acids to their ester forms. The second step is based on silylation of the ester compounds using bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as the derivatizing agent. For compounds bearing ketone groups in addition to carboxylic and hydroxyl groups, a third step was used based on PFBHA derivatization of the carbonyls. Different parameters including temperature, reaction time, and effect due to artifacts were optimized. A GC/MS in EI and in methane-CI mode was used for the analysis of these compounds. The new approach was tested on a number of multifunctional compounds. The interpretation of their EI (70 eV) and CI mass spectra shows that critical information is gained leading to unambiguous identification of unknown compounds. For example, when derivatized only with BF(3)-methanol, their mass spectra comprise primary ions at m/z M.+ + 1, M.+ + 29, and M.+ - 31 for compounds bearing only carboxylic groups and M.+ + 1, M.+ + 29, M.+ - 31, and M+. - 17 for those bearing hydroxyl and carboxylic groups. However, when a second derivatization (BSTFA) was used, compounds bearing hydroxyl and carboxylic groups simultaneously show, in addition to the ions observed before, ions at m/z M.+ + 73, M.+ - 15, M.+ - 59, M.+ - 75, M.+ - 89, and 73. To the best of our knowledge, this technique describes systematically for the first time a method for identifying multifunctional oxygenated compounds containing simultaneously one or more hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups.

  2. Enrichment of Nanodiamond Surfaces with Carboxyl Groups for Doxorubicin Loading and Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Y.; Saputra, F. D.; Wuning, S.; Arnelli; Bhaduri, G.

    2017-02-01

    In their pristine state, nanodiamond crystals produced via detonation techniques containing several functional groups present on the surface including amine, amide, alcohol, carbonyl, and carboxyl. These functional groups facilitate nanodiamond to interact drugs so as to nanodiamond is potential for medical application such as drug delivery. Even though research on t he use of nanodiamond for this application has been conducted widely, research on the effect of enrichment of nanodiamond surface with carboxyl functional groups for drug loading and release has not been explored extensively. Therefore, in this paper, the effect of carboxyl-terminated nanodiamond (ND-COOH) on drug loading and release will be presented. The enrichment of nanodiamond with carboxyl groups was undertaken by treating nanodiamond with sulphuric acid and nitric acid. The results show that the doxorubicin (DOX) loading and release efficiencies of ND pristine are higher than that of ND-COOH.

  3. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyls play an important role in the chemistry of natural organic molecules (NOM) in the environment, and their behavior is dependent on local structural environment within the macromolecule. We studied the structural environments of carboxyl groups in dissolved NOM from the Pine Barrens (New Jersey, USA), and IHSS NOM isolates from soils and river waters using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It is well established that the energies of the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the carboxylate anion (COO -) are sensitive to the structural environment of the carboxyl group. These energies were compiled from previous infrared studies on small organic acids for a wide variety of carboxyl structural environments and compared with the carboxyl spectral features of the NOM samples. We found that the asymmetric stretching peaks for all NOM samples occur within a narrow range centered at 1578 cm -1, suggesting that all NOM samples examined primarily contain very similar carboxyl structures, independent of sample source and isolation techniques employed. The small aliphatic acids containing hydroxyl (e.g., D-lactate, gluconate), ether/ester (methoxyacetate, acetoxyacetate), and carboxylate (malonate) substitutions on the α-carbon, and the aromatic acids salicylate ( ortho-OH) and furancarboxylate ( O-heterocycle), exhibit strong overlap with the NOM range, indicating that similar structures may be common in NOM. The width of the asymmetric peak suggests that the structural heterogeneity among the predominant carboxyl configurations in NOM is small. Changes in peak area with pH at energies distant from the peak at 1578 cm -1, however, may be indicative of a small fraction of other aromatic carboxyls and aliphatic structures lacking α-substitution. This information is important in understanding NOM-metal and mineral-surface complexation, and in building appropriate structural and mechanistic models of humic materials.

  4. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  5. Introduction of aldehyde vs. carboxylic groups to cellulose nanofibers using laccase/TEMPO mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jaušovec, Darja; Vogrinčič, Robert; Kokol, Vanja

    2015-02-13

    The chemo-enzymatic modification of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) using laccase as biocatalysts and TEMPO or 4-Amino-TEMPO as mediators under mild aqueous conditions (pH 5, 30 °C) has been investigated to introduce surface active aldehyde groups. 4-Amino TEMPO turned out to be kinetically 0.5-times (50%) more active mediator, resulting to oxoammonium cation intermediacy generated and its in situ regeneration during the modification of CNFs. Accordingly, beside of around 750 mmol/kg terminally-located aldehydes, originated during CNFs isolation, the reaction resulted to about 140% increase of C6-located aldehydes at optimal conditions, without reducing CNFs crystallinity. While only the C6-aldehydes were wholly transformed into the carboxyls after additional post-treatment using NaOH according to the Cannizzaro reaction, the post-oxidation with air-oxygen in EtOH/water medium or NaClO2 resulted to no- or very small amounts of carboxyls created, respectively, at a simultaneous loss of all C6- and some terminal-aldehydes in the latter due to the formation of highly-resistant hemiacetal covalent linkages with available cellulose hydroxyls. The results indicated a new way of preparing and stabilizing highly reactive C6-aldehydes on cellulose, and their exploitation in the development of new nanocellulose-based materials.

  6. Carboxylic acids as traceless directing groups for the rhodium(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative C-H arylation of thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Huaiqing; Zhang, Min; Su, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    A rhodium(III)-catalyzed carboxylic acid directed decarboxylative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of carboxylic acids with thiophenes has been developed. With a slight adjustment of the reaction conditions based on the nature of the substrates, aryl carboxylic acids with a variety of substituents could serve as suitable coupling partners, and a broad variety of functional groups were tolerated. This method provides straightforward access to biaryl scaffolds with diverse substitution patterns, many of which have conventionally been synthesized through lengthy synthetic sequences. An illustrative example is the one-step gram-scale synthesis of a biologically active 3,5-substituted 2-arylthiophene by way of the current method.

  7. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  8. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  9. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging.

  10. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles

    PubMed Central

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H.; Gray, Harry B.; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-01-01

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50 values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50 values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax = 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 >> 3 > 2 >> 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging. PMID:27044076

  11. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dron, Julien; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF3/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L(-1). Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  12. Mapping of Fab-1:VEGF Interface Using Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecksler, Aaron T.; Kalo, Matt S.; Deperalta, Galahad

    2015-12-01

    A proof-of-concept study was performed to demonstrate that carboxyl group footprinting, a relatively simple, bench-top method, has utility for first-pass analysis to determine epitope regions of therapeutic mAb:antigen complexes. The binding interface of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the Fab portion of a neutralizing antibody (Fab-1) was analyzed using carboxyl group footprinting with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) labeling. Tryptic peptides involved in the binding interface between VEGF and Fab-1 were identified by determining the specific GEE-labeled residues that exhibited a reduction in the rate of labeling after complex formation. A significant reduction in the rate of GEE labeling was observed for E93 in the VEGF tryptic peptide V5, and D28 and E57 in the Fab-1 tryptic peptides HC2 and HC4, respectively. Results from the carboxyl group footprinting were compared with the binding interface identified from a previously characterized crystal structure (PDB: 1BJ1). All of these residues are located at the Fab-1:VEGF interface according to the crystal structure, demonstrating the potential utility of carboxyl group footprinting with GEE labeling for mapping epitopes.

  13. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF AEROSOL POLAR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS BEARING CARBOXYLIC AND/OR HYDROXYL GROUPS. 1. METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multi-functional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) ...

  14. Quantum chemical investigation of the primary thermal pyrolysis reactions of the sodium carboxylate group in a brown coal model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Baisheng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Kefeng; Kang, Lixun

    2014-12-01

    The primary pyrolysis mechanisms of the sodium carboxylate group in sodium benzoate-used as a model compound of brown coal-were studied by performing quantum chemical computations using B3LYP and the CBS method. Various possible reaction pathways involving reactions such as unimolecular and bimolecular decarboxylation and decarbonylation, crosslinking, and radical attack in the brown coal matrix were explored. Without the participation of reactive radicals, unimolecular decarboxylation to release CO2 was calculated to be the most energetically favorable primary reaction pathway at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) level of theory, and was also found to be more energetically favorable than decarboxylation of an carboxylic acid group. When CBS-QBS results were included, crosslinking between the sodium carboxylate group and the carboxylic acid and the decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group (catalyzed by the phenolic hydroxyl group) were found to be possible; this pathway competes with unimolecular decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group. Provided that H and CH3 radicals are present in the brown coal matrix and can access the sodium carboxylate group, accelerated pyrolysis of the sodium carboxylate group becomes feasible, leading to the release of an Na atom or an NaCO2 radical at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) or CBS-QB3 level of theory, respectively.

  15. Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotube enhanced its biocompatibility with L02 cells through decreased activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenbao; Dong, Xia; Song, Liping; Zhang, Hailing; Liu, Lanxia; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian; Leng, Xigang

    2014-03-01

    Modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with carboxyl group is one of the widely used strategies to increase their water dispersibility. Various molecules can be further coupled to the surface of carboxylated CNTs for the desired applications. However, the effect of carboxylation of CNTs on their cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. In this study, the impact of carboxylated multiwalled CNT (MWCNT-COOH) on human normal liver cell line L02 was studied and compared with pristine multiwalled CNT (p-MWCNT). The data accumulated in this study revealed that modification with carboxyl group reduced the toxicity of MWCNT on L02 cells, probably due to the decreased activation of mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway. Both p-MWCNT and MWCNT-COOH, when reaching to certain concentration, induced significant decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to cytoplasm as well as activation of caspase-9, and -3. However, the changes induced by MWCNT-COOH were significantly milder than that by p-MWCNT. Our observation suggests that carboxylated MWCNTs might be safer for in vivo application as compared with p-MWCNT.

  16. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  17. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  18. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  19. Hydrogel with chains functionalized with carboxyl groups as universal 3D platform in DNA biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Agata; Fau, Michal; Karbarz, Marcin; Donten, Mikolaj; Stojek, Zbigniew; Nowicka, Anna M

    2014-04-15

    Application of hydrogel based on N-isopropylacrylamide with carboxyl groups grafted to the chains enabled the immobilization of DNA at an extent exceeding that for flat surfaces by at least one order of magnitude. The probe DNA strands in the 3D platform were fully available for the hybridization process. The examination of the gels containing different amounts of grafted carboxyl groups (1-10%) was done using quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, chronoamperometry and ionic coupled plasma with laser ablation. The optimal carboxyl group content was determined to be 5%. A very good agreement of the data obtained with independent techniques on content of DNA in the gel was obtained. In comparison to the other methods of immobilization of DNA the new platform enabled complete removal of DNA after the measurements and analysis and, therefore, could be used many times. After a 10-fold exchange of the DNA-sensing layer the efficiency of hybridization and analytical signal did not change by more than 5%. The sensor response increased linearly with logarithm of concentration of target DNA in the range 1×10(-13)-1×10(-6) M. The obtained detection limit was circa 8×10(-13) M of target DNA in the sample which is a substantial improvement over the planar sensing layers.

  20. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it

  1. Factors influencing the rate of non-enzymatic activation of carboxylic and amino acids by ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The nonenzymatic formation of adenylate anhydrides of carboxylic and amino acids is discussed as a necessary step in the origin of the genetic code and protein biosynthesis. Results of studies are presented which have shown the rate of activation to depend on the pKa of the carboxyl group, the pH of the medium, temperature, the divalent metal ion catalyst, salt concentration, and the nature of the amino acid. In particular, it was found that of the various amino acids investigated, phenylalanine had the greatest affinity for the adenine derivatives adenosine and ATP. Results thus indicate that selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides were important during prebiotic chemical evolution, and may have played a major role in the origin of protein synthesis and genetic coding.

  2. Snythesis and characterization of the first main group oxo-centered trinuclear carboxylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of the first main group oxo-centered, trinuclear carboxylato-bridged species is reported, namely (Ga3(mu(sub 3)-O) (mu-O2CC6H5)6 (4-Mepy)3) GaCl4 center dot 4-Mepy (compound 1), where 4-Mepy is 4-methylpyridine. Compound 1 is a main group example of a well-established class of complexes, referred to as 'basic carboxylates' of the general formula (M3(mu(sub 3)-O)(mu-O2CR)6L3)(+), previously observed only for transition metals.

  3. Evaluation of the cyclopentane-1,2-dione as a potential bio-isostere of the carboxylic acid functional group.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Gay, Bryant; Huang, Longchuan; Robinson, Katie Herbst; James, Michael J; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Brunden, Kurt R; Smith, Amos B

    2014-09-01

    Cycloalkylpolyones hold promise in drug design as carboxylic acid bio-isosteres. To investigate cyclopentane-1,2-diones as potential surrogates of the carboxylic acid functional group, the acidity, tautomerism, and geometry of hydrogen bonding of representative compounds were evaluated. Prototypic derivatives of the known thromboxane A2 prostanoid (TP) receptor antagonist, 3-(3-(2-((4-chlorophenyl)sulfonamido)-ethyl)phenyl)propanoic acid, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced by the cyclopentane-1,2-dione unit, were synthesized and evaluated as TP receptor antagonists. Cyclopentane-1,2-dione derivative 9 was found to be a potent TP receptor antagonist with an IC50 value comparable to that of the parent carboxylic acid. These results indicate that the cyclopentane-1,2-dione may be a potentially useful carboxylic acid bio-isostere.

  4. "S" shaped organotin(IV) carboxylates based on amide carboxylic acids: Syntheses, crystal structures and antitumor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Li, Yan; Dong, Yuan; Li, Wenliang; Xu, Kun; Shi, Nianqiu; Liu, Xin; Xie, Jingyi; Liu, Peigen

    2017-02-01

    Three organotin carboxylates based on amide carboxylic acids: (Ph3Sn)2(L1) (1) (L1 = 3,3‧-(1,3,5,7-tetraoxo-5,7-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-f]isoindole-2,6(1H,3H)-diyl)dipropionic acid), (Ph3Sn)2(L2)·C7H8 (2) (L2 = 3,3‧-(1,3,6,8-tetraoxo-1,3,6,8-tetrahydrobenzo [lmn][3,8]phenanthroline-2,7-diyl)dipropionic acid), [(Ph3Sn)(CH3CH2O)]2(L3) (3) (L3 = 2,2‧-(1,3,5,7-tetraoxo-5,7-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-f]isoindole-2,6(1H,3H)-diyl) dibenzoic acid) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 13C, 119Sn NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography diffraction analyses. Complexes 1-3 are di-nuclear triphenlytin carboxylates owning "S" shaped monomer structures. Ligands in 1-3 adopt unidentate coordination. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds and Sn···O interactions help complexes 1-3 build their supramolecular structures which are discussed in detail. The preliminary antitumor activities of 1-3 against HepG2 cell lines have also been studied.

  5. Shielding membrane surface carboxyl groups by covalent-binding graphene oxide to improve anti-fouling property and the simultaneous promotion of flux.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Long; Xia, Xue; Tao, Yu; Yun, Hui; Hou, Ya-Nan; Zhao, Chang-Wei; Luo, Qin; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an excellent material for membrane surface modification. However, little is known about how and to what extent surface functional groups change after GO modification influence membrane anti-fouling properties. Carboxyl is an inherent functional group on polyamide or other similar membranes. Multivalent cations in wastewater secondary effluent can bridge with carboxyls on membrane surfaces and organic foulants, resulting in serious membrane fouling. In this study, carboxyls of a polydopamine (pDA)/1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride (TMC) active layer are shielded by covalently-bound GO. The process is mediated by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). For GO containing low quantities of carboxyls, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential analyzer test results reveal that the carboxyl density decreased by 52.3% compare to the pDA/TMC membrane after GO modification. Fouling experiments shows that the flux only slightly declines in the GO functionalized membrane (19.0%), compared with the pDA/TMC membrane (36.0%) after fouling. In addition, during GO modification process the pDA/TMC active layer also become harder and thinner with the aid of EDC/NHS. So the pure water permeability increases from 56.3 ± 18.2 to 103.7 ± 12.0 LMH/MPa. Our results provide new insights for membrane modification work in water treatment and other related fields.

  6. 17O NMR and density functional theory study of the dynamics of the carboxylate groups in DOTA complexes of lanthanides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Florian; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Helm, Lothar; Peters, Joop A; Djanashvili, Kristina

    2012-01-02

    The rotation of the carboxylate groups in DOTA (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate) complexes of several lanthanide ions and Sc(3+) was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and with variable temperature (17)O NMR studies at 4.7-18.8 T. The data obtained show that the rotation is much slower than the other dynamic processes taking place in these complexes. The exchange between the bound and unbound carboxylate oxygen atoms for the largest Ln(3+) ions (La(3+)→Sm(3+)) follows a pathway via a transition state in which both oxygens of the carboxylate group are bound to the Ln(3+) ion, whereas for the smaller metal ions (Tm(3+), Lu(3+), Sc(3+)) the transition state has a fully decoordinated carboxylate group. The activation free energies show a steady increase from about 75 to 125-135 kJ·mol(-1) going from La(3+) to Lu(3+). This computed trend is consistent with the results of the (17)O NMR measurements. Fast exchange between bound and unbound carboxylate oxygen atoms was observed for the diamagnetic La-DOTA, whereas for Pr-, Sm-, Lu-, and Sc-DOTA the exchange was slow on the NMR time scale. The trends in the linewidths for the various metal ions as a function of the temperature agree with trends in the rates as predicted by the DFT calculations.

  7. Theoretical insights on the interaction of uranium with amidoxime and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wu, Qun-Yan; Luo, Qiong; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xiang-Ke; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-09-15

    Recovery of uranium from seawater is extremely challenging but important for the persistent development of nuclear energy, and thus exploring the coordination structures and bonding nature of uranyl complexes becomes essential for designing highly efficient uranium adsorbents. In this work, the interactions of uranium and a series of adsorbents with various well-known functional groups including amidoximate (AO(-)), carboxyl (Ac(-)), glutarimidedioximate (HA(-)), and bifunctional AO(-)/Ac(-), HA(-)/Ac(-) on different alkyl chains (R'═CH3, R″═C13H26) were systematically studied by quantum chemical calculations. For all the uranyl complexes, the monodentate and η(2) coordination are the main binding modes for the AO(-) groups, while Ac(-) groups act as monodentate and bidentate ligands. Amidoximes can also form cyclic imide dioximes (H2A), which coordinate to UO2(2+) as tridentate ligands. Kinetic analysis of the model displacement reaction confirms the rate-determining step in the extraction process, that is, the complexing of uranyl by amidoxime group coupled with the dissociation of the carbonate group from the uranyl tricarbonate complex [UO2(CO3)3](4-). Complexing species with AO(-) groups show higher binding energies than the analogues with Ac(-) groups. However, the obtained uranyl complexes with Ac(-) seem to be more favorable according to reactions with [UO2(CO3)3](4-) as reactant, which may be due to the higher stability of HAO compared to HAc. This is also the reason that species with mixed functional group AO(-)/Ac(-) are more stable than those with monoligand. Thus, as reported in the literature, the adsorbability of uranium can be improved by the synergistic effects of amidoxime and carboxyl groups.

  8. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  9. Incorporating Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles into Calcite Crystals: Do Anionic Carboxylate Groups Alone Ensure Efficient Occlusion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New spherical diblock copolymer nanoparticles were synthesized via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) at 70 °C and 20% w/w solids using either poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) or poly(proline methacrylate) as the steric stabilizer block. Both of these stabilizers contain carboxylic acid groups, but poly(proline methacrylate) is anionic above pH 9.2, whereas poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) has zwitterionic character at this pH. When calcite crystals are grown at an initial pH of 9.5 in the presence of these two types of nanoparticles, it is found that the anionic poly(proline methacrylate)-stabilized particles are occluded uniformly throughout the crystals (up to 6.8% by mass, 14.0% by volume). In contrast, the zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)-stabilized particles show no signs of occlusion into calcite crystals grown under identical conditions. The presence of carboxylic acid groups alone therefore does not guarantee efficient occlusion: overall anionic character is an additional prerequisite. PMID:27042383

  10. Utilization of carboxylic functional groups generated during purification of carbon nanotube fiber for its strength improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Yong-O.; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Teawon; Park, Junbeom; Lee, Jaegeun; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising method to produce carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber is directly spinning CNT fiber from CNT aerogel. Despite the advantage of this method in terms of productivity, the CNTs thus produced include impurities such as amorphous carbon and residual catalysts. To remove these unwanted materials, the CNT fiber is usually subjected to acid treatment. At the same time, however, the acid treatment damages the CNT wall, creating functional groups on it. In this work, specific tensile strength of CNT fibers was increased by introducing cross-links between the individual CNTs using carboxylic functional groups which were inevitably generated during the acid treatment of CNT fibers. The esterification of the carboxylic acid with 1,5-pentanediol as a linker resulted in cross-links in between the CNTs, thereby increasing the specific strength of the CNT fiber from 0.43 to 1.12 N/tex and Young's modulus from 30.70 to 47.57 N/tex. Supporting weak shear interactions of untreated CNT fiber by adding covalent bonding through the cross-linking reaction led to the improvement of mechanical properties of the CNT fiber. Elimination of impurities and narrowed interspacing between CNT bundles caused by acid treatment was also confirmed, which additionally contributed to enhancing the mechanical properties of CNT fiber.

  11. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  12. Preparation of carboxyl group-modified palladium nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their conjugation with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongying; Zhen, Shuang; He, Nongyue

    2012-05-01

    The use of nanomaterials in biomolecular labeling and their corresponding detection has been attracting much attention, recently. There are currently very few studies on palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) due to their lack of appropriate surface functionalities for conjugation with DNA. In this paper, we thus firstly present an approach to prepare carboxyl group-modified Pd NPs (with an average size of 6 nm) by the use of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as a stabilizer in the aqueous solution. The effect of the various reducing reaction conditions on the morphology of the Pd NPs was investigated. The particles were further characterized by TEM, UV-vis, FT-IR and XPS techniques. DNA was finally covalently conjugated to the surface of the Pd NPs through the activation of the carboxyl group, which was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence analysis. The resulting Pd NPs-DNA conjugates show high single base pair mismatch discrimination capabilities. This work therefore sets a good foundation for further applications of Pd NPs in bio-analytical research.

  13. Bimane: A Visible Light Induced Fluorescent Photoremovable Protecting Group for the Single and Dual Release of Carboxylic and Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Amrita; Venkatesh, Yarra; Behara, Krishna Kalyani; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2017-03-10

    A series of ester conjugates of carboxylic and amino acids were synthesized based on bimane fluorescent photoremovable protecting group (FPRPG). The photorelease of single and dual (same as well as different) carboxylic and amino acids is demonstrated from a single bimane molecule on irradiation with visible light (λ ≥ 410 nm). The detailed mechanistic study of photorelease revealed that the release of two caged acids is simultaneous but in a stepwise pathway.

  14. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  15. Novel 5-substituted benzyloxy-2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids as calcium activated chloride channel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Namkung, Wan; Verkman, A. S.; Sharma, Pawan K.

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) channels are recently discovered membrane proteins that functions as a calcium activated chloride channel (CaCC). CaCCs are major regulators of various physiological processes, such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, smooth muscle contraction and oocyte fertilization. Thirty novel 5-substituted benzyloxy-2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids (B01–B30) were synthesized and evaluated for their TMEM16A inhibitory activity by using short circuit current measurements in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells expressing human TMEM16A. IC50 values were calculated using YFP fluorescence plate reader assay. Final compounds, having free carboxylic group displayed significant inhibition. Eight of the novel compounds B02, B13, B21, B23, B25, B27, B28, B29 exhibit excellent CaCCs inhibition with IC50 value <6 μM, with compound B25 exhibiting the lowest IC50 value of 2.8 ± 1.3 μM. None of the tested ester analogs of final benzofuran derivatives displayed TMEM16A/CaCCs inhibition. PMID:22739085

  16. Binding of suprofen to human serum albumin. Role of the suprofen carboxyl group.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Lin, C C; Yamasaki, K; Miyoshi, T; Imai, T; Yamasaki, M; Otagiri, M

    1993-03-09

    The binding of suprofen (SP), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug of the arylpropionic acid class, and its methyl ester derivative (SPM) to human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by dialysis and spectroscopic techniques. In spite of the remarkable differences in the physicochemical properties of SP and SPM, the binding of each molecule to HSA was quantitatively very similar. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that the interaction of SP with HSA may be caused by electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces, whereas the interactions with SPM may be explained by hydrophobic and van der Waals forces. Similarities in the difference UV absorption spectra between ligand-detergent micelle and -HSA systems indicate that the SP and SPM molecules are inserted into a hydrophobic crevice on HSA. The same studies suggest that the carboxyl group of SP interacts with a cationic sub-site which is closely associated with the SP binding site. Proton relaxation rate measurements indicate that the thiophen ring and propanoate portion of the SP molecule is the major binding site for HSA. The locations of SP and SPM binding sites were identified by using fluorescence probes which bind to a known site on HSA. The displacement data implied that SP primarily binds to Site II, while the high affinity site of SPM as well as low affinity site of SP are at the warfarin binding site in the Site I area. From binding data with chemically modified HSA derivatives, it is likely that highly reactive tyrosine (Tyr) and lysine (Lys) residues, which may be Tyr-411 and Lys-195, are specifically involved in SP binding. In contrast, these two residues are clearly separated from the SPM binding site. The binding of SP and SPM is independent of conformational changes on HSA that accompany N-B transition. There is evidence that the carboxyl group may play a crucial role in the high affinity binding processes of SP to HSA.

  17. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes induce an inflammatory response in human primary monocytes through oxidative stress and NF-κB activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shefang; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yifang; Jiao, Fei; Lin, Cuilin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2011-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and living systems has become imperative owing to the growing nanomedicine applications and the mounting societal concerns on nanosafety. The addition of different chemical groups leads to a significant change in the properties of CNTs, and the resulting functionalized CNTs are generating great interest in many biological applications, such as biosensors and transporters. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) (with a diameter of 1-2 nm and mean length of 500 nm) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of carboxylated SWCNTs in human primary monocytes. The results demonstrated that carboxylated SWCNTs were cytotoxic, triggering apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human primary monocytes. Flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis indicated that internalized carboxylated SWCNTs were mainly accumulated in the cytoplasm. Exposure of human primary monocytes to carboxylated SWCNTs led to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in human primary monocytes. Pretreatment of human primary monocytes with antioxidants or NF-κB-specific inhibitor before exposure to carboxylated SWCNTs significantly abolished carboxylated SWCNTs-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression. These results provide novel insights into the carboxylated SWCNTs-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory responses in vitro.

  18. Characterizing and predicting carboxylic acid reductase activity for diversifying bioaldehyde production.

    PubMed

    Moura, Matthew; Pertusi, Dante; Lenzini, Stephen; Bhan, Namita; Broadbelt, Linda J; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-05-01

    Chemicals with aldehyde moieties are useful in the synthesis of polymerization reagents, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, flavors, and fragrances because of their high reactivity. However, chemical synthesis of aldehydes from carboxylic acids has unfavorable thermodynamics and limited specificity. Enzymatically catalyzed reductive bioaldehyde synthesis is an attractive route that overcomes unfavorable thermodynamics by ATP hydrolysis in ambient, aqueous conditions. Carboxylic acid reductases (Cars) are particularly attractive, as only one enzyme is required. We sought to increase the knowledge base of permitted substrates for four Cars. Additionally, the Lys2 enzyme family was found to be mechanistically the same as Cars and two isozymes were also tested. Our results show that Cars prefer molecules where the carboxylic acid is the only polar/charged group. Using this data and other published data, we develop a support vector classifier (SVC) for predicting Car reactivity and make predictions on all carboxylic acid metabolites in iAF1260 and Model SEED.

  19. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues.

  20. Activation of carbon dioxide: Nickel-catalyzed electrochemical carboxylation of diynes

    SciTech Connect

    Derien, S.; Clinet, J.C.; Dunach, E.; Perichon, J. Institut de Chimie Moleculaire d'Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud, Cedex )

    1993-04-23

    The simultaneous activation of carbon dioxide and diyness by electrogenerated LNi(O) complexes (L = bpy, pentamethyldiethylenetriamine: PMDTA) enables the selective incorporation of one molecule of CO[sub 2] into the unsaturated systems and the preparative-scale electrosyntheses of carboxylic acids. A series of nonconjugated diynes afforded selectively linear or cyclic adducts depending on the ligand. Diynes bearing both a terminal and an internal triple bond gave exclusive CO[sub 2] incorporation into the terminal alkynyl group, regioselectively at the 2-position. The electrocarboxylation of 1,3-diynes with the Ni-PMDTA catalytic system yielded, regio- and stereoselectively, (E)-2-vinylidene-3-yne carboxylic acids in one step. The electrosyntheses were carried out in single-compartment cells fitted with a consumable magnesium anode, and utilized a catalytic amount of an air-stable Ni(II) complex as the catalyst precursor. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed that both carbon dioxide and the diynes are able to coordinate to LNi(O)-generated species in DMF. 39 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Novel vitamin D receptor ligands having a carboxyl group as an anchor to arginine 274 in the ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Toshie; Tsuji, Genichiro; Tanaka, Chika; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin D3 is metabolized into the hormonally active form, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1), via 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) which is the most abundant circulating metabolite. Introduction of the 1alpha-hydroxyl group into 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) to produce 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) increases the VDR binding affinity by approximately 1000-fold. The X-ray crystal structure of human VDR in complex with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) shows that, together with Ser-237, the 1alpha-hydroxyl group of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) makes hydrogen bonds with Arg-274, single mutation of which results in impaired ligand recognition. In 2002, lithocholic acid, which possesses a carboxyl group at position C24, was demonstrated to be a weak VDR ligand. We speculated that the carboxylic acid of lithocholic acid could be recognized by Arg-274 in the ligand-binding domain of VDR. In view of the significance of Arg-274 to direct the 1alpha-hydroxyl group, as well as the results with lithocholic acid and its derivatives, we designed the C2 modified analogues of 25-hydroxylvitamin D3 (2) having a carboxyl group, instead of the 1-hydroxyl group, for better electrostatic interaction to the guanidinium side-chain of arginine.

  2. [The distribution of free and esterified carboxyl groups within the pectin molecule after the action of pectin esterase from Aspergillus niger and oranges].

    PubMed

    Kohn, R; Dongowski, G; Bock, W

    1985-01-01

    By reaction of pectin esterase (PE) from Aspergillus niger and oranges as well as lye, with 95% esterified citrus and apple pectin we prepared series of preparations with degrees of esterification between 35 and 77%. In these partial deesterified pectins the form of distribution of the free and esterified carboxyl groups has been determined from the activity coefficient gamma Ca2+ of the calcium counterions in the solutions of the corresponding calcium pectinates, from the electrostatic free enthalpy delta (Gel/N)KCa of the ion exchange Ca2+----2K+ in these systems as well as from the relative activity of the polygalacturonase reacting with sodium pectinate. The PE from A niger hydrolyzes the esterified carboxyl groups more or less randomly, in a manner similar to the effect of lye on pectin. On the other hand PE from oranges brings about block-like groupings of free carboxyl groups in the pectin molecule. The study revealed different reaction mechanisms of the pectin deesterification by pectin esterases from Aspergillus species and higher plants.

  3. Enumeration of carboxyl groups carried on individual components of humic systems using deuteromethylation and Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zherebker, Alexander; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Kharybin, Oleg; Konstantinov, Andrey I; Zaitsev, Kirill V; Nikolaev, Eugene; Perminova, Irina V

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report a novel approach to enumeration of carboxylic groups carried by individual molecules of humic substances using selective chemical modification and isotopic labeling (deuteromethylation) and high-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR MS). Esterification was conducted with a use of thionyl chloride-deuteromethanol reagent under mild conditions to avoid transesterification. The deuteromethylated products were subjected to solid phase extraction using PPL Bond Elute cartridges prior to FTICR MS analysis. An amount of carboxyl groups in the individual molecular component was estimated from the length of identified deuteromethylation series. The method allowed for discerning between compounds with close elemental compositions possessing different protolytic properties. We found that different carboxylic moieties occupy distinct regions in molecular space of humic substances (HS) projected onto Van Krevelen diagram. These locations do not depend on the source of the humic material and can be assigned to carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (5 to 6 COOH), hydrolyzable tannins (3-4 COOH), lignins (1 to 2 COOH), condensed tannins and lignans (0 to 1 COOH), and carbohydrates (0 COOH). At the same time, the alignment pattern of these carboxylated species along the structural evolution lines in Van Krevelen diagrams was characteristic to the specific transformation processes undergone by the humic materials in the different environments. The obtained data enable mapping of molecular ensemble of HS with regards to their specific acidic compartments and might be used for directed fractionation of HS. Graphical abstract Selective isotopic labeling followed by FTICR MS enables discerning between humic molecules with close elemental compositions carrying different numbers of carboxylic groups.

  4. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-04

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  5. Evidence for a reactive gamma-carboxyl group (Glu-418) at the herbicide glyphosate binding site of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Q K

    1988-08-25

    Incubation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, a target for the nonselective herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide in the presence of glycine ethyl ester resulted in a time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. The inactivation followed pseudo-first order kinetics, with a second order rate constant of 2.2 M-1 min-1 at pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C. The inactivation is prevented by preincubation of the enzyme with a combination of the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate plus glyphosate, but not by shikimate 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate, or glyphosate alone. Increasing the concentration of glyphosate during preincubation resulted in decreasing the rate of inactivation of the enzyme. Complete inactivation of the enzyme required the modification of 4 carboxyl groups per molecule of the enzyme. However, statistical analysis of the residual activity and the extent of modification showed that among the 4 modifiable carboxyl groups, only 1 is critical for activity. Tryptic mapping of the enzyme modified in the absence of shikimate 3-phosphate and glyphosate by reverse phase chromatography resulted in the isolation of a [14C]glycine ethyl ester-containing peptide that was absent in the enzyme modified in the presence of shikimate 3-phosphate and glyphosate. By amino acid sequencing of this labeled peptide, the modified critical carboxyl group was identified as Glu-418. The above results suggest that Glu-418 is the most accessible reactive carboxyl group under these conditions and is located at or close to the glyphosate binding site.

  6. Optimal activation of carboxyl-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles bioconjugated with antibody using orthogonal array design.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoqang; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong; Tang, Meng; Liu, Hui

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to bioconjugate anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibody on the surface of carboxyl-SPIO nanoparticles and to optimize the activated conditions of bioconjugation. Anti-EMMPRIN monoclonal antibody bioconjugated carboxyl-SPIO nanoparticles were performed through a coupling strategy of EDC and sulfo-NHS. The procedure was comprised of two steps by activation of carboxyl-SPIO nanoparticles and conjugation with monoclonal antibody. The optimal activated parameters of bioconjugation were evaluated by single factor design and orthogonal array design. SDS-PAGE analysis and Bradford assay was used for testing and verifying the efficiency of activated conditions obtained from orthogonal array. The results show that pH value, temperature and reaction time were important factors that influence bioconjugated efficiency. The activated parameters with pH value 6.2, temperature 25 degrees C and reaction time 30 min were obviously optimal for activation of carboxyl-SPIO nanoparticles and conjugation with monoclonal EMMPEIN antibody. This coupling strategy for anti-EMMPRIN mAb bioconjugated on SPIO nanoparticles was efficient, and may be further applied in the fields of medical or biological practices.

  7. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  8. Carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes: Preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weiming; Gao, Feng; Gu, Hongchen

    2005-05-01

    Carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes were prepared by miniemulsion polymerization using 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanopentanoic acid) (ACPA) as initiator, which provided carboxyl end groups on the latex surface directly. The colloidal stability and the magnetic properties showed that these resulting carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes were applicable in biomedical separation, which was performed by covalent coupling of activated antibody.

  9. Active site inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase. The development and pharmacophore of 2-thienyl-5,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Ian; Avolio, Salvatore; Colarusso, Stefania; Gennari, Nadia; Narjes, Frank; Pacini, Barbara; Ponzi, Simona; Harper, Steven

    2004-10-18

    5,6-Dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxylic acids are a promising series of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase inhibitors that bind at the active site of the enzyme. Here we report a simple 2-thienyl substituted analogue that shows 10-fold improved activity over the original lead, and which allowed us to further delineate the key elements of the pharmacophore of this class of inhibitor. This work led to the identification of a trifluoromethyl acylsulfonamide group as a viable replacement for the C4 carboxylic acid in this series.

  10. (±)Alkyl 3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylates: conformational preferences of the alkoxycarbonyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Pérez, M. S.; Cosme, A.; Gálvez, E.; Morreale, A.

    2003-07-01

    Molecular mechanics, ab initio (RHF) and density functional (DFT/B3LYP) methods are applied to investigate the conformational preferences of the methoxycarbonyl group of the (±)methyl 3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylate. 1H and 13C chemical shifts are also calculated by the GIAO/DFT approach and compared with experimental values. Both theoretical and experimental data account for almost eclipsed conformations with different degrees of distortion from the ideal geometry. It is found that calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level are relatively more reliable to explain the behaviour of the alkoxycarbonyl moiety of 2-hydroxyesters derived from the (±)3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylic acid.

  11. "Fifty Shades" of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties.

    PubMed

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-05-17

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed.

  12. Synthesis and antifungal activity of the derivatives of novel pyrazole carboxamide and isoxazolol pyrazole carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jialong; Zhou, Yuanming

    2015-03-09

    A series of pyrazole carboxamide and isoxazolol pyrazole carboxylate derivatives were designed and synthesized in this study. The structures of the compounds were elucidated based on spectral data (infrared, proton nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy). Then, all of the compounds were bioassayed in vitro against four types of phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria porri, Marssonina coronaria, Cercospora petroselini and Rhizoctonia solani) using the mycelium growth inhibition method. The results showed that some of the synthesized pyrazole carboxamides displayed notable antifungal activity. The isoxazole pyrazole carboxylate 7ai exhibited significant antifungal activity against R. solani, with an EC50 value of 0.37 μg/mL. Nonetheless, this value was lower than that of the commercial fungicide, carbendazol.

  13. New coumarin carboxylates having trifluoromethyl, diethylamino and morpholino terminal groups: Synthesis and mesomorphic characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, Hosapalya Thimmaiah; Harishkumar, Hosanagara Narayana; Palakshamurthy, Bandrehalli Siddagangappa

    2017-03-01

    New set of trifluromethyl, diethylamino and morpholino derived coumarin compounds were prepared by reacting various coumarin 3-carboxylic acids with various phenyl esters with peripheral alkyl, ester and polar cyano moieties in the presence of EDC.HCl/DMAP as esterification agent. The chemical structures of new coumarin derivatives were confirmed by standard spectroscopic techniques and mesomorphic behaviours were established by polarised optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Trifluoromethane and morpholino derivatives show SmA/Nematic phase, while diethylamino derivatives did not show liquid crystalline property.

  14. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  15. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  16. Evolution of strategies to prepare synthetic mimics of carboxylate-bridged diiron protein active sites.

    PubMed

    Do, Loi H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2011-12-01

    We present a comprehensive review of research conducted in our laboratory in pursuit of the long-term goal of reproducing the structures and reactivity of carboxylate-bridged diiron centers used in biology to activate dioxygen for the conversion of hydrocarbons to alcohols and related products. This article describes the evolution of strategies devised to achieve these goals and illustrates the challenges in getting there. Particular emphasis is placed on controlling the geometry and coordination environment of the diiron core, preventing formation of polynuclear iron clusters, maintaining the structural integrity of model complexes during reactions with dioxygen, and tuning the ligand framework to stabilize desired oxygenated diiron species. Studies of the various model systems have improved our understanding of the electronic and physical characteristics of carboxylate-bridged diiron units and their reactivity toward molecular oxygen and organic moieties. The principles and lessons that have emerged from these investigations will guide future efforts to develop more sophisticated diiron protein model complexes.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, Semiempirical and Biological Activities of Organotin(IV) Carboxylates with 4-Piperidinecarboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Saroj K.; Qanungo, Kushal; Shahid, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Organotin (IV) carboxylates with the general formulae R2Sn(Cl)L [R = Me (1), n-Bu (2), Ph (3)] and R3SnL [R = Me (4), Ph (5)] have been synthesized by the reaction of 4-piperidinecarboxylic acid (HL) with KOH and R2SnCl2 (R = Me, n-Bu, Ph)/R3SnCl (R = Me, Ph) in methanol under stirring conditions. The metal ligand binding site, structure, and stability of complexes have been verified by FT-IR, (1H, 13C) NMR, EI-MS technique, and semiempirical study. The FT-IR data indicate the bidentate chelating mode of the carboxylate ligand which is also confirmed by semiempirical study. In solution state, five and four coordinated geometry around tin was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. The EI-MS data agreed well with the molecular structure of the complexes. Thermodynamic parameters and molecular descriptors were calculated by using semiempirical PM3 method. HOMO-LUMO calculations show that chlorodiorganotin complexes are more susceptible to nucleophilic attack as compared to triorganotin complexes. Computed negative heat of formation indicates that complexes 1–4 are thermodynamically stable. The organotin(IV) carboxylates displayed powerful antimicrobial activities against various strains of bacteria and fungi and their minimal inhibitory concentration were also evaluated. The complexes exhibited comparatively higher hemolytic activity as compared to free ligand. PMID:25548551

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of novel dental monomer with branched carboxyl acid group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Berrie, Cynthia L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the water miscibility and increase the mechanical properties of dentin adhesives, a new glycerol-based monomer with vinyl and carboxylic acid, 4-((1,3-bis(-methacryloyloxy)propan-2-yl)oxy)-2-methylene-4-oxobutanoic acid (BMPMOB), was synthesized and characterized. Dentin adhesive formulations containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (BisGMA), and BMPMOB were characterized with regard to real-time photopolymerization behavior, water sorption, dynamic mechanical analysis, and microscale three-dimensional internal morphologies and compared with HEMA/BisGMA controls. The experimental adhesive copolymers showed higher glass transition temperature and rubbery moduli, as well as improved water miscibility compared to the controls. The enhanced properties of the adhesive copolymers indicated that BMPMOB is a promising comonomer for dental restorative materials. PMID:24596134

  19. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc oxide/carboxylated graphene oxide nanocomposites: Preparation and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Xin; Cai, He; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Tong; Jia, Lingling; Wang, Jian; Wan, Qianbing; Pei, Xibo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare nanocomposites of carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) sheets decorated with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) and investigate their advantages in the field of bone tissue engineering. First, ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites were synthesized by facile reactions, including the carboxylation of graphene oxide (GO) and the nucleation of ZnO on GO-COOH sheets. The synthesized ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectra, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The biocompatibility, osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites were further investigated. In the nanocomposites, ZnO nanoparticles with a size of approximately 12nm were uniformly decorated on GO-COOH sheets. Compared with GO-COOH and the control group, ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites significantly enhanced ALP activity, osteocalcin production and extracellular matrix mineralization as well as up-regulated osteogenic-related genes (ALP, OCN, and Runx2) in MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Moreover, ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites had an antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans. These results indicated that ZnO/GO-COOH nanocomposites exhibited both osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect and had great potential for designing new biomaterials in the field of bone tissue engineering.

  20. Preparation of carboxylated Ag nanoparticles as a coating material for medical devices and control of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Furuzono, Tsutomu; Iwamoto, Takashi; Azuma, Yoshinao; Okada, Masahiro; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2013-12-01

    Carboxyl group-donated silver (Ag) nanoparticles for coating on medical devices were prepared by a two-phase reduction system in situ. AgNO3 was the Ag ion source, tetraoctylammonium bromide [N(C8H17)4Br] the phase-transfer agent, sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH4) the reducing agent and 10-carboxy-1-decanthiol (C11H22O2S, CDT) the capping agent. The characterizations of the Ag nanoparticles were conducted by diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and transmission electron microscope. With CDT capped on Ag nanoparticles, we found that the band around 3,100 cm(-1) was attributed to COO-H stretching vibration, two adsorptions at 2,928 and 2,856 cm(-1) to C-H symmetric/anti-symmetric stretching vibration, and at 1,718 cm(-1) to C=O stretching vibration in the FT-IR spectra. The organic components of the carboxylated Ag nanoparticles were 5.8-25.9 wt%, determined by TG/DTA. The particle sizes of the carboxylated Ag nanoparticles were well controlled by the addition of the capping agent, CDT, into the reaction system. The antimicrobial activity of the Ag nanoparticles covered with different contents of CDT against E. coli was evaluated. Smaller-size Ag nanoparticles showed higher antibacterial activity, which depended on a surface area that attached easily to a microorganism cell membrane.

  1. Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiantong; Cui, Hongzhi; Qin, Qinghua; Tang, Waiching; Zhou, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method to improve the strength of cement paste was developed through a synergy of carbon nanotubes decorated with carboxyl group and carbonation reactions. The experimental results showed that the carboxyl group (–COOH) of decorated carbon nanotubes and the surfactant can control the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal of carbonation products in hydrated cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals showed great morphological differences from those observed in the conventional carbonation of cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals can serve as fiber-like reinforcements to reinforce the cement paste. By the synergy of the carbon nanotubes and carbonation reactions, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement paste were significantly improved and increased by 14% and 55%, respectively, when compared to those of plain cement paste. PMID:28335281

  2. Enzymatic grafting of carboxyl groups on to chitosan--to confer on chitosan the property of a cationic dye adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chao, An-Chong; Shyu, Shin-Shing; Lin, Yu-Chuang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2004-01-01

    Chitosan (CTS) is a good adsorbent for dyes but lacks the ability to adsorb cationic dyes. In this study, chitosan was modified to possess the ability to adsorb cationic dyes from water. Four kinds of phenol derivatives: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (BA), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid (PA), hydrocaffeic acid (CA) were used individually as substrates of tyrosinase to graft onto chitosan. FTIR analysis provided supporting evidence of phenol derivatives being grafted. The grafting amounts of these phenol derivatives onto chitosan were examined by the adsorption of an anionic dye (amaranth) and reached a plateau value. The final contents of carboxyl groups in chitosan (mmol carboxyl groups per kg chitosan) were measured as 46.36 for BA, 70.32 for DBA, 106.44 for PA, and 113.15 for CA. These modified chitosans were used in experiments on uptake of the cationic dyes crystal violet (CV) and bismarck brown Y (BB) by a batch adsorption technique at pH 7 for CV and at pH 9 for BB and 30 degrees C. Langmuir type adsorption was found, and the maximum adsorption capacities for both dyes were increased with the following order CTS-CA>CTS-PA>CTS-DBA>CTS-BA.

  3. The mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological properties and its analysis by in situ FT-IR under an electric field.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Park, Yong Sung; Woo, Je Wan; Choi, Ung Su

    2013-10-21

    Herein, the mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological (ER) properties has been presented with the chitosan and alginic acid dispersed suspensions. Chitosan (for the amine group) and alginic acid (for the carboxyl group) are used to investigate the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups on ER properties with the control of their mixing ratio in the silicone oil. The surface-chemical structure of the mixture of the chitosan and alginic acid particles in the silicone oil is demonstrated by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy at various electric fields for the first time. This study focuses on whether the mixture of chemical groups in the ER fluid can promote ER properties or not, and in situ FT-IR analysis of the interface between ER particles in the silicone oil at various DC electric fields. The ER fluids exhibited the increase of the yield stress values with the increase of the counter group addition up to the weight ratio of 50 : 50 (chitosan : alginic acid). A noteworthy result is that the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups resulting in enhanced ER properties is clearly proved. In the in situ FT-IR study, the complex form of amine and carboxyl groups of particles in the ER fluid was confirmed under the electric field.

  4. Surface modification of silicone tubes by functional carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide groups followed by collagen immobilization improves endothelial cell stability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mottaghy, Khosrow; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz

    2015-03-02

    Surface modification by functional groups promotes endothelialization in biohybrid artificial lungs, but whether it affects endothelial cell stability under fluid shear stress, and the release of anti-thrombotic factors, e.g. nitric oxide (NO), is unknown. We aimed to test whether surface-modified silicone tubes containing different functional groups, but similar wettability, improve collagen immobilization, endothelialization, cell stability and cell-mediated NO-release. Peroxide, carboxyl, and amine-groups increased collagen immobilization (41-76%). Only amine-groups increased ultimate tensile strength (2-fold). Peroxide and amine enhanced (1.5-2.5 fold), but carboxyl-groups decreased (2.9-fold) endothelial cell number after 6 d. After collagen immobilization, cell numbers were enhanced by all group-modifications (2.8-3.8 fold). Cells were stable under 1 h-fluid shear stress on amine, but not carboxyl or peroxide-group-modified silicone (>50% cell detachment), while cells were also stable on carboxyl-group-modified silicone with immobilized collagen. NO-release was increased by peroxide and amine (1.1-1.7 fold), but decreased by carboxyl-group-modification (9.8-fold), while it increased by all group-modifications after collagen immobilization (1.8-2.8 fold). Only the amine-group-modification changed silicone stiffness and transparency. In conclusion, silicone-surface modification of blood-contacting parts of artificial lungs with carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide-groups followed by collagen immobilization allows the formation of a stable functional endothelial cell layer. Amine-group-modification seems undesirable since it affected silicone's physical properties.

  5. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Melinte, Violeta; Aldea, Horia; Pelin, Irina M; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1-F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and (1)H ((13)C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm(-3) (F1) and 40.52 μg mm(-3) (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82-49.14 μg mm(-3) (F1-F3-HAP) and 34.58-45.56 μg mm(-3), respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth.

  6. Bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides as potent, selective, and functionally active CCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cyrille F; Bazin, Marc; Philippe, Laurence; Zhang, Jiansu; Tylaska, Laurie; Miret, Juan; Bauer, Paul H

    2007-09-01

    A cell-based assay for the chemokine G-protein-coupled receptor CCR4 was developed, and used to screen a small-molecule compound collection in a multiplex format. A series of bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides amenable to parallel chemistry were derived that were potent and selective antagonists of CCR4. One prototype compound was shown to be active in a functional model of chemotaxis, making it a useful chemical tool to explore the role of CCR4 in asthma, allergy, diabetes, and cancer.

  7. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site.

  8. Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Identify Key Interactions in the HER2-HER3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Interface* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy S.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Sept, David; Bose, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase is a driver oncogene in many human cancers, including breast and gastric cancer. Under physiologic levels of expression, HER2 heterodimerizes with other members of the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB family, and the HER2-HER3 dimer forms one of the most potent oncogenic receptor pairs. Previous structural biology studies have individually crystallized the kinase domains of HER2 and HER3, but the HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimer structure has yet to be solved. Using a reconstituted membrane system to form HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimers and carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry, we observed that HER2 and HER3 kinase domains preferentially form asymmetric heterodimers with HER3 and HER2 monomers occupying the donor and acceptor kinase positions, respectively. Conformational changes in the HER2 activation loop, as measured by changes in carboxyl group labeling, required both dimerization and nucleotide binding but did not require activation loop phosphorylation at Tyr-877. Molecular dynamics simulations on HER2-HER3 kinase dimers identify specific inter- and intramolecular interactions and were in good agreement with MS measurements. Specifically, several intermolecular ionic interactions between HER2 Lys-716-HER3 Glu-909, HER2 Glu-717-HER3 Lys-907, and HER2 Asp-871-HER3 Arg-948 were identified by molecular dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of the cancer-associated mutations HER2 D769H/D769Y, HER3 E909G, and HER3 R948K (also numbered HER3 E928G and R967K) on kinase activity in the context of this new structural model. This study provides valuable insights into the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB kinase structure and interactions, which can guide the design of future therapies. PMID:23843458

  9. Phosphorescent biscyclometallated iridium(III) ethylenediamine complexes functionalised with polar ester or carboxylate groups as bioimaging and visualisation reagents.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tommy Siu-Ming; Leung, Kam-Keung; Louie, Man-Wai; Liu, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Shuk Han; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2015-03-21

    We report the synthesis, characterisation and photophysical properties of new phosphorescent biscyclometallated iridium(III) ethylenediamine (en) complexes functionalised with polar ester or carboxylate groups [Ir(N^C)2(en)](n)(X) (n = +1, X = Cl(-), HN^C = methyl 4-(2-pyridyl)benzoate Hppy-COOMe (1a), methyl 2-phenyl-4-quinolinecarboxylate Hpq-COOMe (2a); n = -1, X = Li(+), HN^C = 4-(2-pyridyl)benzoate Hppy-COO(-) (1b), 2-phenyl-4-quinolinecarboxylate Hpq-COO(-) (2b)). In aqueous solutions, the carboxylate complexes 1b and 2b displayed emission quenching (ca. 7 and 74 fold, respectively) and lifetime shortening upon protonation, and their pKa values were determined to be 5.13 and 3.46, respectively. The pq complexes 2a and 2b exhibited hypsochromic shifts in their emission maxima and a significant increase in emission intensity (ca. 84 and 15 fold, respectively) upon nonspecific binding to the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) results revealed that the ester complexes 1a and 2a were efficiently internalised by the human cervix epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cells through energy-requiring pathways and subsequently localised in endosomes and mitochondria, respectively. They showed good biocompatibility in the dark, but became significantly cytotoxic upon photoirradiation due to the generation of singlet oxygen. In contrast, in aqueous solutions of physiological pH, the carboxylate complexes 1b and 2b existed as the anionic form and hardly entered cells due to limited membrane permeability, as evidenced by the intense emission surrounding the plasma membrane of the cells. They showed negligible cytotoxicity and the cell viability remained over 95% for an incubation period of 24 hours. In view of the low cytotoxicity and strongly emissive nature of the hydrophilic ppy-COO(-) complex 1b in an aqueous medium, the potential application of the complex as a visualisation

  10. Group Activities for Math Enthusiasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdener, J.; Milnikel, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present three group activities designed for math students: a balloon-twisting workshop, a group proof of the irrationality of p, and a game of Math Bingo. These activities have been particularly successful in building enthusiasm for mathematics and camaraderie among math faculty and students at Kenyon College.

  11. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  12. Revised molecular basis of the promiscuous carboxylic acid perhydrolase activity in serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2012-06-25

    Several serine hydrolases catalyze a promiscuous reaction: perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to form peroxycarboxylic acids. The working hypothesis is that perhydrolases are more selective than esterases for hydrogen peroxide over water. In this study, we tested this hypothesis, and focused on L29P-PFE (Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase), which catalyzes perhydrolysis of acetic acid 43-fold faster than wild-type PFE. This hypothesis predicts that L29P-PFE should be approximately 43-fold more selective for hydrogen peroxide than wild-type PFE, but experiments show that L29P-PFE is less selective. The ratio of hydrolysis to perhydrolysis of methyl acetate at different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide fit a kinetic model for nucleophile selectivity. L29P-PFE (β(0)=170  M(-1)) is approximately half as selective for hydrogen peroxide over water than wild-type PFE (β(0)=330  M(-1)), which contradicts the working hypothesis. An alternative hypothesis is that carboxylic acid perhydrolases increase perhydrolysis by forming the acyl-enzyme intermediate faster. Consistent with this hypothesis, the rate of acetyl-enzyme formation, measured by (18)O-water exchange into acetic acid, was 25-fold faster with L29P-PFE than with wild-type PFE, which is similar to the 43-fold faster perhydrolysis with L29P-PFE. Molecular modeling of the first tetrahedral intermediate (T(d)1) suggests that a closer carbonyl group found in perhydrolases accepts a hydrogen bond from the leaving group water. This revised understanding can help design more efficient enzymes for perhydrolysis and shows how subtle changes can create new, unnatural functions in enzymes.

  13. THz and mid-IR spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs: methyl and carboxylic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; McGuire, B A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in astrochemistry concerns the synthesis and survival of complex organic molecules (COMs) throughout the process of star and planet formation. While it is generally accepted that most complex molecules and prebiotic species form in the solid phase on icy grain particles, a complete understanding of the formation pathways is still largely lacking. To take full advantage of the enormous number of available THz observations (e.g., Herschel Space Observatory, SOFIA, and ALMA), laboratory analogs must be studied systematically. Here, we present the THz (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) spectra of astrophysically-relevant species that share the same functional groups, including formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and acetone ((CH3)2CO), compared to more abundant interstellar molecules such as water (H2O), methanol (CH3OH), and carbon monoxide (CO). A suite of pure and mixed binary ices are discussed. The effects on the spectra due to the composition and the structure of the ice at different temperatures are shown. Our results demonstrate that THz spectra are sensitive to reversible and irreversible transformations within the ice caused by thermal processing, suggesting that THz spectra can be used to study the composition, structure, and thermal history of interstellar ices. Moreover, the THz spectrum of an individual species depends on the functional group(s) within that molecule. Thus, future THz studies of different functional groups will help in characterizing the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  14. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of novel mefloquine-isoxazole carboxylic esters as prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jialin; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Yuehong; Wan, Baojie; Pak, Dennis; He, Rong; Franzblau, Scott G

    2010-02-01

    5-(2,8-Bis(trifluoromethyl)quinolin-4-yloxymethyl)isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (compound 3) was reported to have excellent antituberculosis activity against both replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.9 microM and 12.2 microM, respectively. In this study, the antituberculosis activity of compound 3 was further investigated. Its activity appeared to be very specific for organisms of the M. tuberculosis complex and it effected significant reductions of bacterial numbers in infected macrophages with an EC(90) of 4.1 microM. More importantly, the increased in vitro antituberculosis activity of the corresponding acid (compound 4) at pH 6.0 suggested that it may be active in vivo in an acidic environment produced as a consequence of inflammation in the lungs of TB patients. The fact that various ester bioisosteres of compound 3 lost anti-TB activity further suggested that the ester compound 3 may function as a prodrug. The detailed structure-activity relationships (SARs) from this study should facilitate our ultimate goal of improving the anti-TB potency of this isoxazole ester series.

  15. A simple colorimetric chemosensor bearing a carboxylic acid group with high selectivity for CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Ye Won; Lee, Dongkuk; Kim, Cheal

    2014-11-01

    A new simple ‘naked eye' chemosensor 1 (sodium (E)-2-((2-(3-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)hydrazono)methyl)benzoate) has been synthesized for detection of CN- in a mixture of DMF/H2O (9:1). The sensor 1 comprises of a naphthoic hydrazide as efficient hydrogen bonding donor group and a benzoic acid as the moiety with the water solubility. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward cyanide ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to yellow for CN- over other anions. Therefore, receptor 1 could be useful for cyanide detection in aqueous environment, displaying a high distinguishable selectivity from hydrogen bonded anions and being clearly visible to the naked eye.

  16. A layered mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate with exposed carboxylic and phosphonic groups: X-ray powder structure and proton conductivity properties.

    PubMed

    Donnadio, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Costantino, Ferdinando; Taddei, Marco; Casciola, Mario; da Silva Lisboa, Fábio; Vivani, Riccardo

    2014-12-15

    A novel mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate based on glyphosine, of formula Zr2(PO4)H5(L)2·H2O [L = (O3PCH2)2NCH2COO], was synthesized in mild conditions. The compound has a layered structure that was solved ab initio from laboratory PXRD data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group with the following cell parameters: a = 29.925(3), b = 8.4225(5), c = 9.0985(4) Å, and β = 98.474(6)°. Phosphate groups are placed inside the sheets and connect the zirconium atoms in a tetradentate fashion, while uncoordinated carboxylate and P-OH phosphonate groups are exposed on the layer surface. Due to the presence of these acidic groups, the compound showed remarkable proton conductivity properties, which were studied in a wide range of temperature and relative humidity (RH). The conductivity is strongly dependent on RH and reaches 1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 140 °C and 95% RH. At this RH, the activation energy of conduction is 0.15 eV in the temperature range 80-140 °C. The similarities of this structure with related structures already reported in the literature were also discussed.

  17. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  18. Bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex a new apoptotic agent through Flk-1 down regulation, caspase-3 activation and oligonucleosomes DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Azab, Hassan A; Hussein, Belal H M; El-Azab, Mona F; Gomaa, Mohamed; El-Falouji, Abdullah I

    2013-01-01

    New bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex was synthesized and characterized. In vivo anti-angiogenic activities of bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells are described. The newly synthesized complex resulted in inhibition of proliferation of EAC cells and ascites formation. The anti-tumor effect was found to be through anti-angiogenic activity as evident by the reduction of microvessel density in EAC solid tumors. The anti-angiogenic effect is mediated through down-regulation of VEGF receptor type-2 (Flk-1). The complex was also found to significantly increase the level of caspase-3 in laboratory animals compared to the acridine ligand and to the control group. This was also consistent with the DNA fragmentation detected by capillary electrophoresis that proved the apoptotic effect of the new complex. Our complex exhibited anti-angiogenic and apoptotic activity in vivo, a thing that makes it a potential effective chemotherapeutic agent. The interaction of calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) with bis(acridine-9-carboxylate)-nitro-europium(III) dihydrate complex has been investigated using fluorescence technique. A competitive experiment of the europium(III)-acridine complex with ethidium bromide (EB) to bind DNA revealed that interaction between the europium(III)-acridine and DNA was via intercalation. The interaction of the synthesized complex with tyrosine kinases was also studied using molecular docking simulation to further substantiate its mode of action.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Shi Hyung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA), one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA-) induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF-) κB and activator protein- (AP-) 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1), p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Shi Hyung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA), one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA-) induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF-) κB and activator protein- (AP-) 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1), p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs. PMID:27057092

  1. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Activity Limits Ethylene Biosynthesis in Rumex palustris during Submergence

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Wim H.; Hulzink, Raymond; Mariani, Celestina; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Submergence strongly stimulates petiole elongation in Rumex palustris, and ethylene accumulation initiates and maintains this response in submerged tissues. cDNAs from R. palustris corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene (RP-ACO1) were isolated from elongating petioles and used to study the expression of the corresponding gene. An increase in RP-ACO1 messenger was observed in the petioles and lamina of elongating leaves 2 h after the start of submergence. ACC oxidase enzyme activity was measured in homogenates of R. palustris shoots, and a relevant increase was observed within 12 h under water with a maximum after 24 h. We have shown previously that the ethylene production rate of submerged shoots does not increase significantly during the first 24 h of submergence (L.A.C.J. Voesenek, M. Banga, R.H. Thier, C.M. Mudde, F.M. Harren, G.W.M. Barendse, C.W.P.M. Blom [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 783–791), suggesting that under these conditions ACC oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo. We found evidence that this inhibition is caused by a reduction of oxygen levels. We hypothesize that an increased ACC oxidase enzyme concentration counterbalances the reduced enzyme activity caused by low oxygen concentration during submergence, thus sustaining ethylene production under these conditions. Therefore, ethylene biosynthesis seems to be limited at the level of ACC oxidase activity rather than by ACC synthase in R. palustris during submergence. PMID:10482674

  2. Effect of Carboxylic Functional Group Functionalized on Carbon Nanotubes Surface on the Removal of Lead from Water

    PubMed Central

    Atieh, Muataz Ali; Bakather, Omer Yehya; Al-Tawbini, Bassam; Bukhari, Alaadin A.; Abuilaiwi, Faraj Ahmad; Fettouhi, Mohamed B.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of the removal of lead from water by using carboxylic functional group (COOH) functionalized on the surface of carbon nanotubes was investigated. Four independent variables including pH, CNTs dosage, contact time, and agitation speed were carried out to determine the influence of these parameters on the adsorption capacity of the lead from water. The morphology of the synthesized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to measure the diameter and the length of the CNTs. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes were varied from 20 to 40 nm with average diameter at 24 nm and 10 micrometer in length. Results of the study showed that 100% of lead was removed by using COOH-MCNTs at pH 7, 150 rpm, and 2 hours. These high removal efficiencies were likely attributed to the strong affinity of lead to the physical and chemical properties of the CNTs. The adsorption isotherms plots were well fitted with experimental data. PMID:21350599

  3. Comparison of silatrane, phosphonic acid, and carboxylic acid functional groups for attachment of porphyrin sensitizers to TiO2 in photoelectrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Bradley J; Llansola Portolés, Manuel J; Liddell, Paul A; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2013-10-21

    A tetra-arylporphyrin dye was functionalized with three different anchoring groups used to attach molecules to metal oxide surfaces. The physical, photophysical and electrochemical properties of the derivatized porphyrins were studied, and the dyes were then linked to mesoporous TiO2. The anchoring groups were β-vinyl groups bearing either a carboxylate, a phosphonate or a siloxy moiety. The siloxy linkages were made by treatment of the metal oxide with a silatrane derivative of the porphyrin. The surface binding and lability of the anchored molecules were studied, and dye performance was compared in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to study charge recombination processes. At comparable surface concentration, the porphyrin showed comparable performance in the DSSC, regardless of the linker. However, the total surface coverage achievable with the carboxylate was about twice that obtainable with the other two linkers, and this led to higher current densities for the carboxylate DSSC. On the other hand, the carboxylate-linked dyes were readily leached from the metal oxide surface under alkaline conditions. The phosphonates were considerably less labile, and the siloxy-linked porphyrins were most resistant to leaching from the surface. The use of silatrane proved to be a practical and convenient way to introduce the siloxy linkages, which can confer greatly increased stability on dye-sensitized electrodes with photoelectrochemical performance comparable to that of the other linkers.

  4. Carboxylate-Assisted C(sp3)–H Activation in Olefin Metathesis-Relevant Ruthenium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of C–H activation at metathesis-relevant ruthenium(II) benzylidene complexes was studied both experimentally and computationally. Synthesis of a ruthenium dicarboxylate at a low temperature allowed for direct observation of the C–H activation step, independent of the initial anionic ligand-exchange reactions. A first-order reaction supports an intramolecular concerted metalation–deprotonation mechanism with ΔG⧧298K = 22.2 ± 0.1 kcal·mol–1 for the parent N-adamantyl-N′-mesityl complex. An experimentally determined ΔS⧧ = −5.2 ± 2.6 eu supports a highly ordered transition state for carboxylate-assisted C(sp3)–H activation. Experimental results, including measurement of a large primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 8.1 ± 1.7), agree closely with a computed six-membered carboxylate-assisted C–H activation mechanism where the deprotonating carboxylate adopts a pseudo-apical geometry, displacing the aryl ether chelate. The rate of cyclometalation was found to be influenced by both the electronics of the assisting carboxylate and the ruthenium ligand environment. PMID:24731019

  5. Polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid coatings with controllable concentration of surface carboxyl groups: A novel approach in fabrication of polymeric platforms for potential bio-diagnostic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-05-01

    The generally accepted strategy in development of bio-diagnostic devices is to immobilize proteins on polymeric surfaces as a part of detection process for diseases and viruses through antibody/antigen coupling. In that perspective, polymer surface properties such as concentration of functional groups must be closely controlled in order to preserve the protein activity. In order to improve the surface characteristics of transparent polymethacrylate plastics that are used for diagnostic devices, we have developed an effective fabrication procedure of polymethylmetacrylate-co-metacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) coatings with controlled number of surface carboxyl groups. The polymers were processed effectively with the spin-coating technique and the detailed control over surface properties is here by demonstrated through the variation of a single synthesis reaction parameter. The chemical structure of synthesized and processed co-polymers has been investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). The surface morphology of polymer coatings have been analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We demonstrate that the surface morphology and the concentration of surface -COOH groups (determined with UV-vis surface titration) on the processed PMMA-co-MAA coatings can be precisely controlled by variation of initial molar ratio of reactants in the free-radical polymerization reaction. The wettability of developed polymer surfaces also varies with macromolecular structure.

  6. A Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Mutant Causes Chronic Pancreatitis by Forming Intracellular Aggregates That Activate Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xunjun; Jones, Gabrielle; Sevilla, Wednesday A; Stolz, Donna B; Magee, Kelsey E; Haughney, Margaret; Mukherjee, Amitava; Wang, Yan; Lowe, Mark E

    2016-10-28

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) frequently have genetic risk factors for disease. Many of the identified genes have been connected to trypsinogen activation or trypsin inactivation. The description of CP in patients with mutations in the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) domain of carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) presents an opportunity to study the pathogenesis of CP independently of trypsin pathways. We tested the hypothesis that a deletion and frameshift mutation (C563fsX673) in the CEL VNTR causes CP through proteotoxic gain-of-function activation of maladaptive cell signaling pathways including cell death pathways. HEK293 or AR42J cells were transfected with constructs expressing CEL with 14 repeats in the VNTR (CEL14R) or C563fsX673 CEL (CEL maturity onset diabetes of youth with a deletion mutation in the VNTR (MODY)). In both cell types, CEL MODY formed intracellular aggregates. Secretion of CEL MODY was decreased compared with that of CEL14R. Expression of CEL MODY increased endoplasmic reticulum stress, activated the unfolded protein response, and caused cell death by apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that disorders of protein homeostasis can lead to CP and suggest that novel therapies to decrease the intracellular accumulation of misfolded protein may be successful in some patients with CP.

  7. Carboxyl-Terminal Truncations Alter the Activity of the Human α-Galactosidase A

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, Abass; Stokes, Erin; Calhoun, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inborn error of glycolipid metabolism caused by deficiency of the human lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (αGal), leading to strokes, myocardial infarctions, and terminal renal failure, often leading to death in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The enzyme is responsible for the hydrolysis of terminal α-galactoside linkages in various glycolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been approved for the treatment of Fabry disease, but adverse reactions, including immune reactions, make it desirable to generate improved methods for ERT. One approach to circumvent these adverse reactions is the development of derivatives of the enzyme with more activity per mg. It was previously reported that carboxyl-terminal deletions of 2 to 10 amino acids led to increased activity of about 2 to 6-fold. However, this data was qualitative or semi-quantitative and relied on comparison of the amounts of mRNA present in Northern blots with αGal enzyme activity using a transient expression system in COS-1 cells. Here we follow up on this report by constructing and purifying mutant enzymes with deletions of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 C-terminal amino acids (Δ2, Δ4, Δ6, Δ8, Δ10) for unambiguous quantitative enzyme assays. The results reported here show that the kcat/Km approximately doubles with deletions of 2, 4, 6 and 10 amino acids (0.8 to 1.7-fold effect) while a deletion of 8 amino acids decreases the kcat/Km (7.2-fold effect). These results indicate that the mutated enzymes with increased activity constructed here would be expected to have a greater therapeutic effect on a per mg basis, and could therefore reduce the likelihood of adverse infusion related reactions in Fabry patients receiving ERT treatment. These results also illustrate the principle that in vitro mutagenesis can be used to generate αGal derivatives with improved enzyme activity. PMID:25719393

  8. Identification and characterization of barley mutants lacking glycine decarboxylase and carboxyl esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lewis, K.; Lea, P. )

    1990-05-01

    A barley mutant has been isolated, from a selection of fifty air-sensitive seed-lines, using a standard gel stain technique which lacks carboxyl esterase activity, but has normal levels of carbonic anhydrase. In addition, two barley mutants lacking the ability to convert glycine to serine in the mitochondria, have been characterized. Both plants accumulate glycine in air and are unable to metabolize ({sup 14}C)glycine in the short-term. When ({sup 14}C)glycine was supplied over 2h LaPr 85/55 metabolized 90%, whereas the second mutant (LaPr 87/30) metabolized 10%. Results indicate that the mutation in LaPr 85/55 is almost certainly in the glycine transporter into the mitochondrion. The mutation in LaPr 87/30 has been shown, using western blotting, to be in both the P and H proteins, two of four proteins which comprise glycine decarboxylase (P, H, T and L).

  9. STIM1 carboxyl-terminus activates native SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo N; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Joo Young; Yuan, Joseph P; Han, Linhuang; Muallem, Shmuel; Worley, Paul F

    2006-09-01

    Receptor-evoked Ca2+ signalling involves Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Ca2+ influx is essential for many cellular functions, from secretion to transcription, and is mediated by Ca2+-release activated Ca2+ (I(crac)) channels and store-operated calcium entry (SOC) channels. Although the molecular identity and regulation of I(crac) and SOC channels have not been precisely determined, notable recent findings are the identification of STIM1, which has been indicated to regulate SOC and I(crac) channels by functioning as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor, and ORAI1 (ref. 7) or CRACM1 (ref. 8)--both of which may function as I(crac) channels or as an I(crac) subunit. How STIM1 activates the Ca2+ influx channels and whether STIM1 contributes to the channel pore remains unknown. Here, we identify the structural features that are essential for STIM1-dependent activation of SOC and I(crac) channels, and demonstrate that they are identical to those involved in the binding and activation of TRPC1. Notably, the cytosolic carboxyl terminus of STIM1 is sufficient to activate SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels even when native STIM1 is depleted by small interfering RNA. Activity of STIM1 requires an ERM domain, which mediates the selective binding of STIM1 to TRPC1, 2 and 4, but not to TRPC3, 6 or 7, and a cationic lysine-rich region, which is essential for gating of TRPC1. Deletion of either region in the constitutively active STIM1(D76A) yields dominant-negative mutants that block native SOC channels, expressed TRPC1 in HEK293 cells and I(crac) in Jurkat cells. These observations implicate STIM1 as a key regulator of activity rather than a channel component, and reveal similar regulation of SOC, I(crac) and TRPC channel activation by STIM1.

  10. An integrative technique based on synergistic coremoval and sequential recovery of copper and tetracycline with dual-functional chelating resin: roles of amine and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Xu, Chao; Chen, Tai-Peng; Li, Ai-Min

    2013-11-27

    A novel chelating resin (R-AC) bearing dual-functional groups (amino and carboxyl groups) was self-synthesized and it showed superior properties on synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and tetracycline (TC) to commercial resins (amine, carboxyl, and hydrophobic types), which was deeply investigated by equilibrium and kinetic tests in binary, preloading, and saline systems. The adsorption of TC on R-AC was markedly enhanced when coexisted with Cu(II), up to 13 times of that in sole system, whereas Cu(II) uptake seldom decreased in the copresence of TC. Decomplexing-bridging, which included [Cu-TC] decomplexing and [R-Cu] bridging for TC, was demonstrated as the leading mechanism for the synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and TC. Carboxyl groups of R-AC played a dominant role in decomplexing of [Cu-TC] complex and releasing free TC. Cu(II) coordinated with amine groups of R-AC was further proved to participate in bridging interaction with free TC, and the bridging stoichiometric ratio ([NH-Cu]: TC) possibly was 2:1. About 96.9% of TC and 99.3% of Cu could be sequentially recovered with dilute NaOH followed by HCl. Considering stable application for five cycles in simulated and practical wastewater, R-AC shows great potential in green and simple coremoval of antibiotic and heavy metal ions.

  11. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  12. Amino acid ester prodrugs conjugated to the α-carboxylic acid group do not display affinity for the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1).

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Kärkkäinen, Jussi; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Gynther, Mikko

    2015-01-23

    L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1) is an intriguing target for carrier-mediated transport of drugs as it is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier and also in various types of cancer. Several studies have proposed that in order for compounds to act as LAT1 substrates they should possess both negatively charged α-carboxyl and positively charged α-amino groups. However, in some reports, such as in two recent publications describing an isoleucine-quinidine ester prodrug (1), compounds having no free α-carboxyl group have been reported to exhibit high affinity for LAT1 in vitro. In the present study, 1 was synthesized and its affinity for LAT1 was evaluated both with an in situ rat brain perfusion technique and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 in vitro. 1 showed no affinity for LAT1 in either model nor did it show any affinity for LAT2 in an in vitro study. Our results confirm the earlier reported requirements for LAT1 substrates. Thus drugs or prodrugs with substituted α-carboxyl group cannot bind to LAT with high affinity.

  13. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced during dark fermentation of food waste by adsorption on Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Ahasa; Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-10-01

    Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon were tested as promising candidates for carboxylic acid recovery by adsorption. Dark fermentation was performed without pH control and without addition of external inoculum at 37°C in batch mode. Lactic, acetic and butyric acids, were obtained, after 7days of fermentation. The maximum acid removal, 74%, from the Amberlite IRA-67 and 63% from activated carbon was obtained from clarified fermentation broth using 200gadsorbent/Lbroth at pH 3.3. The pH has significant effect and pH below the carboxylic acids pKa showed to be beneficial for both the adsorbents. The un-controlled pH fermentation creates acidic environment, aiding in adsorption by eliminating use of chemicals for efficient removal. This study proposes simple and easy valorization of waste to valuable chemicals.

  14. New transition metal ion complexes with benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid hydrazides with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Galal, Shadia A; Hegab, Khaled H; Kassab, Ahmed S; Rodriguez, Mireya L; Kerwin, Sean M; el-Khamry, Abdel-Mo'men A; el-Diwani, Hoda I

    2009-04-01

    Metal complexes of 2-methyl-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid hydrazide (4a; L(1)) and its Schiff base 2-methyl-N-(propan-2-ylidene)-1H-benzimidazole-5-carbohydrazide (5a; L(2)) with transition metal ions e.g., copper, silver, nickel, iron and manganese were prepared. The complexes formed were 1:1 or 1:2 M:L complexes and have the structural formulae [Cu(L(1))Cl(H(2)O)]Cl x 3 H(2)O (6), [Ag(L(1))NO(3)(H(2)O)] (7), [Ni(L(1))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (8), [Fe(L(1))Cl(3)(H(2)O)] x 3 H(2)O (9) and [Mn(L(1))(2)Cl(H(2)O)]Cl x 3 H(2)O (10) for ligand L(1), and [Cu(L(2))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (11), [Ag(L(2))(2)]NO(3) x H(2)O (12), [Ni(L(2))(2)Cl(2)] x 5 H(2)O (13), [Fe(L(2))(2)Cl(2)]Cl x 2 H(2)O (14) and [Mn(L(2))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (15) for ligand L(2). The antitumor activity of the synthesized compounds has been studied. The silver complex 7 was found to display cytotoxicity (IC(50)=2 microM) against both human lung cancer cell line A549 and human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

  15. “Fifty Shades” of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties

    PubMed Central

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d’Ischia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed. PMID:27196900

  16. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Mohamed, Afaf O.; Hawwam, Maha A.; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  17. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Mohamed, Afaf O; Hawwam, Maha A; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-05

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  18. Activities of the WASVSO Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Michael A.; van Poucker, Joseph F.; Greene, Stephen M.

    2001-04-01

    This poster outlines the goals, activities, and achievements of the Warren Astronomical Society Variable Star Observers (WASVSO), a special-interest sub-group of the Warren Astronomical Society in Michigan. The WASVSO holds monthly meetings to discuss variable star behavior, terminology, current events, observing techniques, Internet resources, software, and of course, the weather. Ongoing projects include monitoring cataclysmic variables, active galactic nuclei, and stars that need more observations from the AAVSO "News Flashes" and "Alert Notices". We are also actively involved in "spreading the word" about AAVSO and variable star observing through presentations at star parties and a speaker exchange program with other astronomy clubs throughout the Midwest and Canada. The WASVSO also maintains an impressive website featuring member areas, upcoming events, articles on variable stars and observing techniques, charts for obscure cataclsmic variables, utilities for observing, and links to variable star organizations and observers throughout the world. Members of the WASVSO contributed 94% of all variable star observations submitted to the AAVSO from Michigan in the fiscal year 2000-2001, and our enthusiasm has catapulted Michigan from 20th place to 11th in overall numbers of US observations submitted to AAVSO in one year.

  19. Lead detoxification activities and ADMET hepatotoxicities of a class of novel 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Hou, Baoguang; Peng, Li; Zheng, Meiqing; Wu, Jianhui; Peng, Shiqi

    2011-03-15

    By linking the mercapto groups with isopropyl and introducing L-amino acid into the 5-carboxyl of DMSA a class of novel 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2- dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids were prepared. Their in vivo activities were evaluated on lead loaded mice at the dose of 0.4 mmol/kg. The results showed that the lead levels of the livers, kidneys, femurs and brains in particular could be efficiently decreased by 0.4 mmol/kg of 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids. The benefit of 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids to the detoxification of the brain lead was attributed to their transmembrane ability. Compared with the lead detoxification efficacy, they did not affect the essential metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ca of the treated mice. Silico molecular modeling predicted that 5-(1-carbonyl-L-amino-acid)-2,2-dimethyl-[1,3]dithiolane-4-carboxylic acids had no hepatotoxicity.

  20. Synthesis, structure and inhibitory activity of a stereoisomer of oseltamivir carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Andrea; Dell'Amico, Luca; Battistini, Lucia; Curti, Claudio; Rivara, Silvia; Pala, Daniele; Kerry, Philip S; Pelosi, Giorgio; Casiraghi, Giovanni; Rassu, Gloria; Zanardi, Franca

    2014-03-14

    A stereodivergent plan is presented leading to all eight stereoisomers of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC). Key chemical manoeuvers are (1) a three-component vinylogous Mukaiyama-Mannich reaction, which sets the whole carbon skeleton and heteroatom substituents, and (2) an intramolecular, silylative Mukaiyama aldol reaction, which creates the targeted carbocycle. The viability of the plan was demonstrated by the first total synthesis of 4-epi-oseltamivir carboxylate (6), accessed in 15 steps from glyceraldehyde, o-anisidine and pyrrole siloxydiene precursors. Compound 6 inhibits influenza A virus strains H1N1 and H3N2 at the μM level, about 150 000-fold less than the OC reference, testifying that the stereodisposition of the C4 acetamido function is key for enzyme recognition. Guided by in-depth structural evaluation including NMR solution studies, molecular mechanics simulations, docking analyses and X-ray crystallography, rationalization of the biological verdict was established.

  1. Variation in optoelectronic properties of azo dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor interfaces with different adsorption anchors: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl and pyridyl groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M; Dai, Chencheng

    2014-05-28

    The optoelectronic properties of four azo dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces are systematically studied as a function of a changing dye anchoring group: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl, and pyridyl. The variation in optoelectronic properties of the free dyes and those in dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied both experimentally and computationally, in the context of prospective dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DSSC device performance testing reveal a strong dependence on the nature of the anchor of the optoelectronic properties of these dyes, both in solution and as dye/TiO2 nanocomposites. First-principles calculations on both an isolated dye/TiO2 cluster model (using localized basis sets) and each dye modeled onto the surface of a 2D periodic TiO2 nanostructure (using plane wave basis sets) are presented. Detailed examination of these experimental and computational results, in terms of light harvesting, electron conversion and photovoltaic device performance characteristics, indicates that carboxylate is the best anchoring group, and hydroxyl is the worst, whereas sulfonate and pyridyl groups exhibit competing potential. Different sensitization solvents are found to affect critically the extent of dye adsorption achieved in the dye-sensitization of the TiO2 semiconductor, especially where the anchor is a pyridyl group.

  2. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ13C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed “light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)”, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light–dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  3. Intramolecular hydrogen bond between 4-oxo and 3-carboxylic groups in quinolones and their analogs. Crystal structures of 7-methyl- and 6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxocinnoline-3-carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Główka, Marek L.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Olczak, Andrzej; Bojarska, Joanna; Szczesio, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Krystyna

    2003-09-01

    Crystal structures of two cinnoline analogs of quinolones and statistics on quinolones molecular forms observed in the crystal state have been determined. It has been shown that common quinolones may be divided into two main types, depending on presence of proton acceptor, usually aliphatic amine group, capable of protonation under mild conditions. Quinolones lacking amine group or having one(s) bound to an aromatic system exist at physiological pH mainly in a free acid form, in which acidic hydrogen atom is locked into an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The phenomenon enhances permeability of quinolones through lipophilic cell membranes but decreases the concentration of carboxylate form capable of specific binding with bacterial DNA. Molecular (neutral) form was observed exclusively in the crystalline state for these quinolones. The dominant forms seem different for quinolones having amine substituents with unconjugated lone pair electrons at N atom. Even in the crystalline state, they may exist also in a zwitterionic form, which was found to dominate in secondary amines crystallised at neutral pH. Our limited data suggest that position and order of amine group may play important role in controlling quinolones absorption, transport and concentration and thus their biological profile.

  4. Concomitant Carboxylate and Oxalate Formation From the Activation of CO2 by a Thorium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Formanuik, Alasdair; Ortu, Fabrizio; Inman, Christopher J.; Kerridge, Andrew; Castro, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Improving our comprehension of diverse CO2 activation pathways is of vital importance for the widespread future utilization of this abundant greenhouse gas. CO2 activation by uranium(III) complexes is now relatively well understood, with oxo/carbonate formation predominating as CO2 is readily reduced to CO, but isolated thorium(III) CO2 activation is unprecedented. We show that the thorium(III) complex, [Th(Cp′′)3] (1, Cp′′={C5H3(SiMe3)2‐1,3}), reacts with CO2 to give the mixed oxalate‐carboxylate thorium(IV) complex [{Th(Cp′′)2[κ2‐O2C{C5H3‐3,3′‐(SiMe3)2}]}2(μ‐κ2:κ2‐C2O4)] (3). The concomitant formation of oxalate and carboxylate is unique for CO2 activation, as in previous examples either reduction or insertion is favored to yield a single product. Therefore, thorium(III) CO2 activation can differ from better understood uranium(III) chemistry. PMID:27714966

  5. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  6. Nafion-assisted cross-linking of sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxylic acid groups and their composite membranes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidan; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui

    In this study, a new type of cross-linked composite membrane is prepared and considered for its potential applications in direct methanol fuel cell. Nafion and sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxylic acid groups (SPAEK-C) are blended and subsequently cross-linked by a Friedel-Craft reaction using the carboxylic acid groups in the SPAEK-C to achieve lower methanol permeability. The perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acid groups of Nafion act as a benign solid catalyst, which assist the cross-linking of SPAEK-C. The physical and chemical characterizations of the cross-linked composite membranes are performed by varying the contents of SPAEK-C. The c-Nafion-15% membrane exhibits appropriate water uptake (10.49-25.22%), low methanol permeability (2.57 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1), and high proton conductivity (0.179 S cm -1 at 80 °C). DSC and FTIR analyze suggest the cross-linking reaction. These results show that the self-cross-linking of SPAEK-C in the Nafion membrane can effectively reduce methanol permeability while maintaining high proton conductivity.

  7. Development of an activity-directed selection system enabled significant improvement of the carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Liu, Guoxia; Zhang, Junli; Li, Yin

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic CO(2) fixation is the ultimate source of organic carbon on earth and thus is essential for crop production and carbon sequestration. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the first step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. However, the extreme low carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco makes it the most attractive target for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Extensive studies have focused on re-engineering a more efficient enzyme, but the effort has been impeded by the limited understanding of its structure-function relationships and the lack of an efficient selection system towards its activity. To address the unsuccessful molecular engineering of Rubisco, we developed an Escherichia coli-based activity-directed selection system which links the growth of host cell solely to the Rubisco activity therein. A Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Rubisco mutant with E49V and D82G substitutions in the small subunit was selected from a total of 15,000 mutants by one round of evolution. This mutant showed an 85% increase in specific carboxylation activity and a 45% improvement in catalytic efficiency towards CO(2). The small-subunit E49V mutation was speculated to influence holoenzyme catalysis through interaction with the large-subunit Q225. This interaction is conserved among various Rubisco from higher plants and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knowledge of these might provide clues for engineering Rubisco from higher plants, with the potential of increasing the crop yield.

  8. Preparation of Optically Active cis-Cyclopropane Carboxylates: Cyclopropanation of α-Silyl Stryenes with Aryldiazoacetates and Desilylation of the Resulting Silyl Cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhao, Yu-Ming; Gu, Peiming

    2016-09-02

    Optically active cis-cyclopropane carboxylates are prepared via the Rh2(S-PTAD)4-catalyzed cyclopropanation of α-silyl styrenes with aryl diazoacetates followed by desilylation of the resulting silyl cyclopropane carboxylates. The conjugation of the aryl ring with C═C bond and π stacking are proposed for the stereoselectivity of cyclopropanation, and configuration inversion is observed with the desilylation process.

  9. An NHC-catalyzed in situ activation strategy to β-functionalize saturated carboxylic acid: an enantioselective formal [3+2] annulation for spirocyclic oxindolo-γ-butyrolactones.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanwei; Yu, Chenxia; Li, Tuanjie; Tu, Shujiang; Yao, Changsheng

    2015-03-27

    An in situ NHC-catalyzed activation strategy to β-functionalize saturated carboxylic acid was developed. This asymmetric formal [3+2] annulation could deliver spirocyclic oxindolo-γ-butyrolactones from saturated carboxylic acid and isatin in good yields with high to excellent enantioselectivities. The easy availability of the starting materials, direct installation of functional units at unreactive carbon atom and the convergent assembly make this protocol attractive in the field of organic synthesis.

  10. A novel carboxyl-terminal protease derived from Paenibacillus lautus CHN26 exhibiting high activities at multiple sites of substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carboxyl-terminal protease (CtpA) plays essential functions in posttranslational protein processing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. To date, only a few bacterial ctpA genes have been characterized. Here we cloned and characterized a novel CtpA. The encoding gene, ctpAp (ctpA of Paenibacillus lautus), was derived from P. lautus CHN26, a Gram-positive bacterium isolated by functional screening. Recombinant protein was obtained from protein over-expression in Escherichia coli and the biochemical properties of the enzyme were investigated. Results Screening of environmental sediment samples with a skim milk-containing medium led to the isolation of a P. lautus CHN26 strain that exhibited a high proteolytic activity. A gene encoding a carboxyl-terminal protease (ctpAp) was cloned from the isolate and characterized. The deduced mature protein contains 466 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 51.94 kDa, displaying 29-38% amino acid sequence identity to characterized bacterial CtpA enzymes. CtpAp contains an unusual catalytic dyad (Ser309-Lys334) and a PDZ substrate-binding motif, characteristic for carboxyl-terminal proteases. CtpAp was expressed as a recombinant protein and characterized. The purified enzyme showed an endopeptidase activity, which effectively cleaved α S1- and β- casein substrates at carboxyl-terminus as well as at multiple internal sites. Furthermore, CtpAp exhibited a high activity at room temperature and strong tolerance to conventional protease inhibitors, demonstrating that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase. Conclusions Our work on CtpA represents the first investigation of a member of Family II CtpA enzymes. The gene was derived from a newly isolated P. lautus CHN26 strain exhibiting a high protease activity in the skim milk assay. We have demonstrated that CtpAp is a novel endopeptidase with distinct cleavage specificities, showing a strong potential in biotechnology and industry applications. PMID:24161150

  11. Synthesis, characterization, theoretical study and biological activities of oxovanadium (IV) complexes with 2-thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Mudassir; Ali, Saqib; Shahzadi, Saira; Sharma, Saroj K; Qanungo, Kushal

    2014-07-05

    Oxovanadium (IV) complexes (1)-(3) have been synthesized by treating 2-thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide with VOSO4⋅xH2O and VCl3(THF)3 in different M/L ratios. These complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, FT-IR and mass spectrometry. The FT-IR data predicts the bidentate nature of the ligand which is also confirmed by semi-empirical study. Mass spectrometric data shows that molecular ion peak is only observed for 2-thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide. The ESP map and thermodynamic parameters shows the presence of partial charge on atoms and stability of synthesized oxovanadium complexes, respectively. DNA binding study of complexes (1)-(3) was carried out by UV-vis and cyclic voltammetric methods which suggests the intercalative binding mode of the complexes with DNA. Cytotoxicity was checked by brine shrimp lethality assay and complex (1) showed greater cytotoxicity towards Artemia salina as compared to free ligand. Immuno-modulatory activity data shows that hydrazide ligand was more active as compared to oxovanadium complexes and standard drug. Complex (2) shows significant urease inhibition activity. The ligand and synthesized complexes were found inactive against all tested bacterial and fungal strains.

  12. Tyrosine residues at the carboxyl terminus of Vav1 play an important role in regulation of its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Pe'er, Liron; Farago, Marganit; Machida, Kazuya; Mayer, Bruce J; Katzav, Shulamit

    2010-07-23

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Vav1 is an essential signal transducer protein in the hematopoietic system, where it is expressed physiologically. It is also involved in several human malignancies. Tyrosine phosphorylation at the Vav1 amino terminus plays a central role in regulating its activity; however, the role of carboxyl terminal tyrosine residues is unknown. We found that mutation of either Tyr-826 (Y826F) or Tyr-841 (Y841F) to phenylalanine led to loss of Vav1 GEF activity. When these Vav1 mutants were ectopically expressed in pancreatic cancer cells lacking Vav1, they failed to induce growth in agar, indicating loss of transforming potential. Furthermore, although Y841F had no effect on Vav1-stimulated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, Y826F doubled NFAT activity when compared with Vav1, suggesting that Tyr-826 mediates an autoinhibitory effect on NFAT activity. SH2 profiling revealed that Shc, Csk, Abl, and Sap associate with Tyr-826, whereas SH2-B, Src, Brk, GTPase-activating protein, and phospholipase C-gamma associate with Tyr-841. Although the mutations in the Tyr-826 and Tyr-841 did not affect the binding of the carboxyl SH3 of Vav1 to other proteins, binding to several of the proteins identified by the SH2 profiling was lost. Of interest is Csk, which associates with wild-type Vav1 and Y841F, yet it fails to associate with Y826F, suggesting that loss of binding between Y826F and Csk might relieve an autoinhibitory effect, leading to increased NFAT. Our data indicate that GEF activity is critical for the function of Vav1 as a transforming protein but not for NFAT stimulation. The association of Vav1 with other proteins, detected by SH2 profiling, might affect other Vav1-dependent activities, such as NFAT stimulation.

  13. Synthesis and antitumor activity of novel dibutyltin carboxylates of aminoglucosyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Ren, Su-Mei; Sibiril, Yann; Parent Massin, Dominique; Jiang, Tao

    2009-06-01

    In this study, di-n-butyltin(IV) oxide was reacted with the amino glucose analog, cis-4-[N-(1',3',4',6'-tetra-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-glucopyranosyl)imido]-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid (1a) and o-[N-(1',3',4',6'-tetra-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-glucopyranosyl) carbamoyl] benzoic acid (2a) to give the complexes bis-{cis-4-[N-(1',3',4',6'-tetra-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-glucopyranosyl)imido-4-oxo-2-butenoic acid]-di-n-butyltin} carboxylate (1) and bis-{o-[N-(1',3',4',6'-tetra-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-glucopyranosyl) carbamoyl-benzoic acid]-di-n-butyltin}carboxylate (2). These two compounds were then characterized by IR, NMR and MS. In vitro tests showed that both compounds have high cytotoxicity in four tumor cell lines (P388, HL-60, A549 and BEL-7402). Clonogenic assays demonstrated that both compounds 1 and 2 have hematopoietic cell toxicity at 10(-6) M.

  14. Teaching Interpersonal Skills through Group Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Linda G.; Lewis, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Indicates the importance of interpersonal skills in the workplace and suggests that the business curricula offers many opportunities for incorporation of group activities. Offers steps for planning student group activities. (JOW)

  15. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  16. Mechanistic implications of the active species involved in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by iron complexes of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Stefania; Marques-Gallego, Patricia; Browne, Wesley R; Hage, Ronald; Bouwman, Elisabeth; Feringa, Ben L; Reedijk, Jan

    2008-04-21

    The reactivity towards H(2)O(2) of the complexes [Fe(pca)(2)(py)(2)].py (1) and Na(2){[Fe(pca(3))](2)O}.2H(2)O.CH(3)CN (2) (where pca(-) is pyrazine-2-carboxylate) and their catalytic activity in the oxidation of hydrocarbons is reported. Addition of H(2)O(2) to 1 results in the formation of a dinuclear Fe(III)-(mu-O)-Fe(III) species characterized spectroscopically and by cyclic voltammetry. By contrast, treatment of 2 with H(2)O(2) results in the formation of mononuclear iron(II) complexes, [Fe(pca)(2)(solvent)(2)]. The experimental results indicate that the catalytic activity of the starting complexes 1 and 2 is strongly dependent on the species formed in solution.

  17. The effect of the P1 side chain on the binding of optimized carboxylate and activated carbonyl inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Stephen H; LaPlante, Steven R; Llinàs-Brunet, Montse; Hucke, Oliver

    2010-07-01

    Peptidyl inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease hold much promise as direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C infection. The optimization of N-terminal cleavage products, found to exhibit activity (product inhibition) against the enzyme, has led to potent tripeptide inhibitors that bear free C-terminal carboxylate groups. An analogous activated carbonyl compound (pentafluoroethyl ketone) bearing a P1 norvaline (Nva) was found to possess comparable activity against hepatitis C virus protease. However, an analogue bearing an aminocyclopropylcarboxylic acid (Acca) P1 residue exhibited very poor activity. (19)F-NMR studies indicate that the propensity of the Acca-derived activated carbonyl to form hemiketals is only slightly reduced compared with that of a P1 Nva equivalent. These results, as well as molecular modeling studies, argue against steric hindrance of the nucleophilic attack of Ser-139 accounting for the poor mechanism-based inhibition by the former. We hypothesize that the conformational properties of the respective C-termini in the context of an adaptable active site account for the divergent P1 structure-activity relationships.

  18. Simultaneous determination of interfacial molarities of amide bonds, carboxylate groups, and water by chemical trapping in micelles of amphiphiles containing peptide bond models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Romsted, Laurence S; Zhuang, Lanzhen; de Jong, Sander

    2013-01-15

    Chemical trapping is a powerful approach for obtaining experimental estimates of interfacial molarities of weakly basic nucleophiles in the interfacial regions of amphiphile aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical probe 4-hexadecyl-2,6-dimethylbenzenediazonium ion (16-ArN(2)(+)) reacts competitively with interfacial water, with the amide carbonyl followed by cleavage of the headgroups from the tail at the amide oxygen, and with the terminal carboxylate groups in micelles of two N-acyl amino-acid amphiphiles, sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SLS) and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SLG), simple peptide bond model amphiphiles. Interfacial molarities (in moles per liter of interfacial volume) of these three groups were obtained from product yields, assuming that selectivity toward a particular nucleophile compared to water is the same in an aqueous reference solution and in the interfacial region. Interfacial carboxylate group molarities are ~1.5 M in both SLS and SLG micelles, but the concentration of the amide carbonyl for SLS micelles is ~4.6-5 times less (ca. 0.7 M) than that of SLG micelles (~3 M). The proton on the secondary N of SLG helps solubilize the amide bond in the aqueous region, but the methyl on the tertiary N of SLS helps solubilize the amide bond in the micellar core, reducing its reaction with 16-ArN(2)(+). Application of chemical trapping to proteins in membrane mimetic interfaces should provide insight into the topology of the protein within the interface because trapping of the amide carbonyl and cleavage at the C-N bond occurs only within the interface, and fragment characterization marks those peptide bonds located within the interface.

  19. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    , suggesting that the carboxyl terminus of PA28 is required for binding to the proteasome. These results indicate the importance of the carboxyl terminus of PA28 for proteasome activation.

  20. High-level expression of active recombinant ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase of Drosophila melanogaster in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng-liang; Xu, Xiao-xia; Yu, Xiao-qiang; Ren, Shun-xiang

    2009-06-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are implicated in the proteolytic processing of polymeric ubiquitin. The high specificity for the recognition site makes UCHs useful enzymes for in vitro cleavage of ubiquitin fusion proteins. In this work, an active C-terminal His-tagged UCH from Drosophila melanogaster (DmUCH) was produced as a secretory form in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The production of recombinant DmUCH by Mut(s) strain was much higher than that by Mut(+) strain, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis. When expression was induced at pH 6.0 in a BMMY/methanol medium, the concentration of recombinant DmUCH reached 210 mg l(-1). With the (His)(6)-tag, the recombinant DmUCH was easily purified by Ni-NTA chromatography and 18 mg pure active DmUCH were obtained from 100ml culture broth supernatant. Ubiquitin-magainin fusion protein was efficiently cleaved by DmUCH, yielding recombinant magainin with high antimicrobial activity. After removing the contaminants by Ni-NTA chromatography, recombinant magainin was purified to homogeneity easily by reversed-phase HPLC. Analysis of the recombinant magainin by ESI-MS showed that the molecular weight of the purified recombinant magainin was 2465 Da, which perfectly matches the mass calculated from the amino acid sequence. The result of mass spectrometry confirmed that the purified His-tagged DmUCH can recognize the ubiquitin-magainin fusion protein and cleave it at the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin precisely. Our results showed that P. pastoris is a robust system to express the secreted form of DmUCH.

  1. Chemically-related Groups of Active Ingredients

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many pesticide active ingredients affect pests in similar ways, and we re-evaluate them together as a group. Groups include carbamate insecticides, neonicotinoids, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethrins, and pyrethroids.

  2. Organotin(IV) carboxylates of (E)-3-(2-nitrophenyl) propenoic acid: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, crystal structure and antitumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunling; Liu, Shuangshuang; Du, Dafeng; Zhu, Dongsheng; Xu, Lin

    2011-09-01

    Two organotin(IV) carboxylates of (E)-3-(2-nitrophenyl) propenoic acid (HL), [Ph 3SnL] n ( 1) and {[Bu 2SnL] 2O} 2 ( 2), have been synthesized. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR ( 1H, 13C) spectroscopy. In addition, the molecular structures of 1 and 2 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Complex 1 consisted of a 1D chain polymer and was interconnected by C sbnd H⋯π stacking to aggregate in 2D framework. Complex 2 contained a dimeric tetraorganodistannoxane of ladder arrangement and was linked by C sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form a 1D chain. Their antitumor activities were also investigated.

  3. A guided inquiry experiment for the measurement of activation energies in the biophysical chemistry laboratory: Decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Kelly M; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Mettee, Howard D; Smiley, Jeffrey A

    2005-03-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate biophysical chemistry is described, in which the acid concentration and temperature dependences of the decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate are measured using a continuous ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. Data collection and analysis are structured using principles of guided inquiry. Data leading to the calculation of multiple rate constants at varying temperatures and acid concentrations can be collected within one laboratory period, using inexpensive reagents and standard instrumentation. These experiments permit determination of activation energies that are lower at high acid concentration, indicative of a subtle change in the reaction mechanism with decreasing pH. The reaction is readily observable by students as they collect UV spectrophotometry data, and the decarboxylation reaction is related to biologically relevant enzymatic reactions.

  4. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate.

  5. Synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon fiber for improved electro-activated polymeric shape-memory nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Min Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery.

  6. Activities of carboxylating enzymes in the CAM species Opuntia ficus-indica grown under current and elevated CO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Israel, A A; Nobel, P S

    1994-06-01

    Responses of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were determined along with net CO2 uptake rates for the Crassulacean acid metabolism species Opuntia ficus-indica growing in open-top chambers. During the spring 13 months after planting, total daily net CO2 uptake of basal and first-order daughter cladodes was 28% higher at 720 than at 360 μl CO2 l(-1). The enhancement, caused mainly by higher CO2 assimilation during the early part of the night, was also observed during late summer (5 months after planting) and the following winter. The activities of Rubisco and PEPCase measured in vitro were both lower at the elevated CO2 concentration, particularly under the more favorable growth conditions in the spring and late summer. Enzyme activity in second-order daughter cladodes increased with cladode age, becoming maximal at 6 to 10 days. The effect ofelevated CO2 on Rubisco and PEPCase activity declined with decreasing irradiance, especially for Rubisco. Throughout the 13-month observation period, O. ficus-indica thus showed increased CO2 uptake when the atmospheric CO2 concentration was doubled despite lower activities of both carboxylating enzymes.

  7. Mechanism of the Iron(II)-Catalyzed Hydrosilylation of Ketones: Activation of Iron Carboxylate Precatalysts and Reaction Pathways of the Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bleith, Tim; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-04-13

    A detailed mechanistic study of the catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones with the highly active and enantioselective iron(II) boxmi complexes as catalysts (up to >99% ee) was carried out to elucidate the pathways for precatalyst activation and the mechanism for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. Carboxylate precatalysts were found to be activated by reduction of the carboxylate ligand to the corresponding alkoxide followed by entering the catalytic cycle for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. An Eyring-type analysis of the temperature dependence of the enantiomeric ratio established a linear relationship of ln(S/R) and T(-1), indicating a single selectivity-determining step over the whole temperature range from -40 to +65 °C (ΔΔG(‡)sel, 233 K = 9 ± 1 kJ/mol). The rate law as well as activation parameters for the rate-determining step were derived and complemented by a Hammett analysis, radical clock experiments, kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements (kH/kD = 3.0 ± 0.2), the isolation of the catalytically active alkoxide intermediate, and DFT-modeling of the whole reaction sequence. The proposed reaction mechanism is characterized by a rate-determining σ-bond metathesis of an alkoxide complex with the silane, subsequent coordination of the ketone to the iron hydride complex, and insertion of the ketone into the Fe-H bond to regenerate the alkoxide complex.

  8. Cobalt(II)-catalyzed 1,4-addition of organoboronic acids to activated alkenes: an application to highly cis-stereoselective synthesis of aminoindane carboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hsien; Mannathan, Subramaniyan; Lin, Pao-Shun; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2012-11-19

    It all adds up: The 1,4-addition of organoboronic acids to activated alkenes catalyzed by [Co(dppe)Cl(2)] is described. A [3+2]-annulation reaction of ortho-iminoarylboronic acids with acrylates to give various aminoindane carboxylic acid derivatives with cis-stereoselectivity is also demonstrated (see scheme; dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane).

  9. N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Catalyzed [4 + 2] Cyclization of Saturated Carboxylic Acid with o-Quinone Methides through in Situ Activation: Enantioselective Synthesis of Dihydrocoumarins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Pan, Jian; Dong, Jingjiao; Yu, Chenxia; Li, Tuanjie; Wang, Xiang-Shan; Shen, Shide; Yao, Changsheng

    2017-02-03

    An N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed formal [4 + 2] synthesis of dihydrocoumarins was realized from saturated carboxylic acids and o-quinone methides via an in situ activation strategy. This protocol results in excellent diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity and good yields and uses readily available and inexpensive starting materials.

  10. Transesterification of PHA to Oligomers Covalently Bonded with (Bio)Active Compounds Containing Either Carboxyl or Hydroxyl Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Adamus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents the synthesis and structural characterisation of novel biodegradable polymeric controlled-release systems of pesticides with potentially higher resistance to weather conditions in comparison to conventional forms of pesticides. Two methods for the preparation of pesticide-oligomer conjugates using the transesterification reaction were developed. The first method of obtaining conjugates, which consist of bioactive compounds with the carboxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) oligomers, is "one-pot" transesterification. In the second method, conjugates of bioactive compounds with hydroxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates oligomers were obtained in two-step method, through cyclic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) oligomers. The obtained pesticide-PHA conjugates were comprehensively characterised using GPC, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. The structural characterisation of the obtained products at the molecular level with the aid of mass spectrometry confirmed that both of the synthetic strategies employed led to the formation of conjugates in which selected pesticides were covalently bonded to PHA oligomers via a hydrolysable ester bond. PMID:25781908

  11. Effect of Nd3+ ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hong, Fa-shui; Wu, Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang, Xue-guang; Hong, Cheng-jiao; Wu, Cheng; Gao, Feng-qing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Tao; Xie, Ya-ning; Xu, Jian-hua; Li, Zhong-rui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd(3+) treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd(3+)-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89A, respectively.

  12. An iridium-mediated C-H activation/CO2-carboxylation reaction of 1,1-bisdiphenylphosphinomethane.

    PubMed

    Langer, Jens; Fabra, María José; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Görls, Helmar; Oro, Luis A; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2010-09-07

    The reaction of 1,1-bisdiphenylphosphinomethane (dppm, 4 eq.) with [IrCl(coe)(2)](2) results in a solvent dependent equilibrium from which the complexes [IrCl(dppm)(dppm-H)(H)] (1) and [Ir(dppm)(2)]Cl (2) were isolated. When 2 is dissolved in methanol, [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)][OCH(3)] (4) is formed as dominant species in solution. The C-H activation reaction which leads to 1 and 4 can be suppressed by adding an additional dppm ligand per iridium center resulting in the formation of [Ir(dppm)(3)]Cl (5). If the reaction of dppm with [IrX(coe)(2)](2) (X = Cl, I) is performed under an atmosphere of CO(2) the complexes [IrX(dppm)(H){(Ph(2)P)(2)C-COOH}] (6: X = Cl; 7: X = I) are formed by a CH activation/CO(2) carboxylation sequence. The reaction of 6 with NH(4)PF yields [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)]PF(6).(10). Additionally the lithium compounds [Li(dme)(2)(dppm-H)] (3) and [Li(dme){(Ph(2)P)(2)CHCOO}](2) (8) were prepared for comparison. The molecular structures of the compounds 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 and of the related iridium complex [IrCl(dppm)(2)(H)]I (11) are reported.

  13. Small Group Activities for Introductory Business Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundrake, George

    1999-01-01

    Describes numerous small-group activities for the following areas of basic business education: consumer credit, marketing, business organization, entrepreneurship, insurance, risk management, economics, personal finance, business careers, global markets, and government regulation. (SK)

  14. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, trichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate, 2,2′-dichloropropionate and 3-chloropropionate were inhibitors of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Dichloroacetate was also shown to inhibit rat heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. The inhibition was mainly non-competitive with respect to ATP. The concentration required for 50% inhibition was approx. 100μm for the three chloroacetates, difluoroacetate and 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate. Dichloroacetamide was not inhibitory. 2. Dichloroacetate had no significant effect on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase when this was maximally activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. 3. Dichloroacetate did not increase the catalytic activity of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Dichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate increased the proportion of the active (dephosphorylated) form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria with 2-oxoglutarate and malate as respiratory substrates. Similar effects of dichloroacetate were shown with kidney and fat-cell mitochondria. Glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and dichloroacetamide were inactive. 5. Dichloroacetate increased the proportion of active pyruvate dehydrogenase in the perfused rat heart, isolated rat diaphragm and rat epididymal fat-pads. Difluoroacetate and dichloroacetamide were also active in the perfused heart, but glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and trichloroacetate were inactive. 6. Injection of dichloroacetate into rats starved overnight led within 60 min to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in extracts from heart, psoas muscle, adipose tissue, kidney and liver. The blood concentration of lactate fell within 15 min to reach a minimum after 60 min. The blood concentration of glucose fell after 90 min and reached a minimum after 120 min. There was no significant change in plasma glycerol concentration. 7. In epididymal fatpads

  15. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  16. Adsorption of Cu(II) to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Importance of the carboxyl group for Cu mobility in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2012-09-01

    :bacteria mass ratio of the composite. EXAFS shows that Cu adsorbs to ferrihydrite as an inner-sphere, (CuO4Hn)n - 6 bidentate edge-sharing complex; and to ferrihydrite composites as an inner-sphere, (CuO5Hn)n - 8 monodentate complex with carboxyl surface functional groups present on the bacterial fraction plus the bidentate edge-sharing complex on the ferrihydrite fraction. Our new results combined with previous work on Cu sorption to bacteria, humic substances and iron (hydr)oxides coated with humics, demonstrate the universal importance of the carboxyl moiety for Cu sorption and mobility in natural environments. Taken together these results show that Cu-carboxyl binding is the predominant mechanism by which Cu interacts with abiotic and biotic organic matter, and provides a ubiquitous control on Cu fate and mobility in natural waters, soils and sediments. Our results indicate that in environments where a significant proportion of iron (hydr)oxides are intimately intermixed with an organic fraction, we must consider Cu sequestration by these composites in addition to pure mineral phases.

  17. Increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity enhances Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene delivery into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Nonaka, Satoko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a useful tool for the genetic modification in plants, although its efficiency is low for several plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has three major steps in laboratory-controlled experiments: the delivery of T-DNA into plant cells, the selection of transformed plant cells, and the regeneration of whole plants from the selected cells. Each of these steps must be optimized to improve the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. It has been reported that increasing the number of cells transformed by T-DNA delivery can improve the frequency of stable transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that a reduction in ethylene production by plant cells during cocultivation with A. tumefaciens-expressing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase resulted in increased T-DNA delivery into the plant cells. In this study, to further improve T-DNA delivery by A. tumefaciens, we modified the expression cassette of the ACC deaminase gene using vir gene promoter sequences. The ACC deaminase gene driven by the virD1 promoter was expressed at a higher level, resulting in a higher ACC deaminase activity in this A. tumefaciens strain than in the strain with the lac promoter used in a previous study. The newly developed A. tumefaciens strain improves the delivery of T-DNA into Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Erianthus ravennae plants and thus may be a powerful tool for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering of plants.

  18. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  19. Nanoparticles made of multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol containing periodic side-chain carboxyl groups for oral delivery of cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Ankola, D. D.; Battisti, A.; Solaro, R.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of new carboxylated multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol (EL14) for nanoparticle (NP) formation and their ability to deliver high molecular weight hydrophobic drug—cyclosporine A (CsA). CsA-loaded EL14 NPs were compared with traditional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, both prepared by emulsion–diffusion–evaporation process. On the one hand, the increase in drug payload from 10 to 30 per cent for EL14 NPs showed no difference in particle size, however the entrapment efficiency tends to decrease from 50 to 43 per cent; on the other hand, the more hydrophobic PLGA showed an increasing trend in entrapment efficiency from 20 to 62 per cent with increasing particle size. Over 90 per cent of CsA was released in vitro from both the nanoparticulates; however, the release was much slower in the case of more hydrophobic PLGA. On in vivo evaluation in rats, the NPs made of EL14 showed a higher Cmax, a faster Tmax and enhanced tissue levels to that of PLGA that are crucial for CsA's activity and toxicity; however, the overall bioavailability of the nanoparticulates was similar and higher than Neoral. Together these data demonstrate the feasibility of NPs made of low molecular weight, hydrophilic polymer EL14 for efficient delivery of CsA. PMID:20504806

  20. Carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres in drug design.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M; Smith, Amos B

    2013-03-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug-target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design.

  1. Inhibition of potato polyphenol oxidase by anions and activity in various carboxylate buffers (pH 4.8) at constant ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B D; Thickman, K R; Markworth, C J; Wilcox, D E; Kull, F J

    2001-01-01

    The activity of potato polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase) toward DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (K(M) 5.39 mM) was studied using a variety of carboxylate buffers at a common pH and ionic strength. Enzyme activity, greatest in citrate and least in oxalate, correlated with increasing carboxyl concentration and molecular mass. The lower activity in oxalate was attributed to more effective chelation of a copper(II) form of the enzyme by the oxalate dianion. Sodium halide salts inhibited the enzyme. Although there was little difference in inhibition between sodium and potassium salts, the degree and type of inhibition was anion dependent; K(is), values for NaCl and KCl, (competitive inhibitors) were 1.82 and 1.62 mM, whereas Na(2) SO(4) and K(2) SO(4) (mixed inhibitors) had K(is) and K(ii) values in the 250 to 450 mM range.

  2. Nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite anchored with multi-carboxyl functional groups as an adsorbent for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) from nuclear industry wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Deepa, J R; Christa, J

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent, poly(itaconic acid/methacrylic acid)-grafted-nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite [P(IA/MAA)-g-NC/NB] with multi carboxyl functional groups for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) [Co(II)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM and potentiometric titrations before and after adsorption of Co(II) ions. FTIR spectra revealed that Co(II) adsorption on to the polymer may be due to the involvement of COOH groups. The surface morphological changes were observed by the SEM images. The pH was optimized as 6.0. An adsorbent dose of 2.0g/L found to be sufficient for the complete removal of Co(II) from 100mg/L at room temperature. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested to describe kinetic data and adsorption of Co(II) follows pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min. Isotherm studies were conducted and data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models and best fit was Sips model. Thermodynamic study confirmed endothermic and physical nature of adsorption of the Co(II) onto the adsorbent. Desorption experiments were done with 0.1MHCl proved that without significant loss in performance adsorbent could be reused for six cycles. The practical efficacy and effectiveness of the adsorbent were tested using nuclear industrial wastewater. A double stage batch adsorption system was designed from the adsorption isotherm data of Co(II) by constructing operating lines.

  3. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase activity results in dependency on pyruvate carboxylation for cellular anabolism.

    PubMed

    Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte; Hollinshead, Kate E R; Ludwig, Christian; Menara, Mélanie; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Parker, Seth J; Janin, Maxime; Martinelli, Cosimo; Ottolenghi, Chris; Metallo, Christian; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith; Tennant, Daniel A

    2015-11-02

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway responsible for supplying reducing potential for oxidative phosphorylation and anabolic substrates for cell growth, repair and proliferation. As such it thought to be essential for cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis. However, since the initial report of an inactivating mutation in the TCA cycle enzyme complex, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in paraganglioma (PGL), it has become clear that some cells and tissues are not only able to survive with a truncated TCA cycle, but that they are also able of supporting proliferative phenotype observed in tumours. Here, we show that loss of SDH activity leads to changes in the metabolism of non-essential amino acids. In particular, we demonstrate that pyruvate carboxylase is essential to re-supply the depleted pool of aspartate in SDH-deficient cells. Our results demonstrate that the loss of SDH reduces the metabolic plasticity of cells, suggesting vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.

  4. Copper- and copper–N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed C─H activating carboxylation of terminal alkynes with CO2 at ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dingyi; Zhang, Yugen

    2010-01-01

    The use of carbon dioxide as a renewable and environmentally friendly source of carbon in organic synthesis is a highly attractive approach, but its real world applications remain a great challenge. The major obstacles for commercialization of most current protocols are their low catalytic performances, harsh reaction conditions, and limited substrate scope. It is important to develop new reactions and new protocols for CO2 transformations at mild conditions and in cost-efficient ways. Herein, a copper-catalyzed and copper–N-heterocyclic carbene-cocatalyzed transformation of CO2 to carboxylic acids via C─H bond activation of terminal alkynes with or without base additives is reported. Various propiolic acids were synthesized in good to excellent yields under ambient conditions without consumption of any organometallic or organic reagent additives. This system has a wide scope of substrates and functional group tolerances and provides a powerful tool for the synthesis of highly functionalized propiolic acids. This catalytic system is a simple and economically viable protocol with great potential in practical applications. PMID:21059950

  5. Multiple effects of anthracene-9-carboxylic acid on the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Cherian, O Lijo; Menini, Anna; Boccaccio, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (CaCCs) play important roles in many physiological processes. Recent studies have shown that TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 constitute CaCCs in several cell types. Here we have investigated for the first time the extracellular effects of the Cl(-) channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A9C) and of its non-charged analogue anthracene-9-methanol (A9M) on TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. A9C caused a voltage-dependent block of outward currents and inhibited a larger fraction of the current as depolarization increased, whereas the non-charged A9M produced a small, not voltage dependent block of outward currents. A similar voltage-dependent block by A9C was measured both when TMEM16B was activated by 1.5 and 13μM Ca(2+). However, in the presence of 1.5μM Ca(2+) (but not in 13μM Ca(2+)), A9C also induced a strong potentiation of tail currents measured at -100mV after depolarizing voltages, as well as a prolongation of the deactivation kinetics. On the contrary, A9M did not produce potentiation of tail currents, showing that the negative charge is required for potentiation. Our results provide the first evidence that A9C has multiple effects on TMEM16B and that the negative charge of A9C is necessary both for voltage-dependent block and for potentiation. Future studies are required to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these complex effects of A9C on TMEM16B. Understanding these mechanisms will contribute to the elucidation of the structure and functional properties of TMEM16B channels.

  6. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  7. Self-assembly of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu Solder in Thermoplastic Resin Containing Carboxyl Group and its Interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Naoya; Takano, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    The self-assembly of solder powder on pads is attractive as a novel interconnection method between chips and substrates. However, the solder used in this method is limited to Sn-58Bi and Sn-52In. In contrast, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu has been relatively less studied despite its wide use as a lead-free solder in assembling semiconductor packages. Hence, here, polymeric materials incorporating Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder powder were investigated for the self-assembly of the solder on pads at temperatures up to 260°C in a lead-free reflow process. The self-assembly of the solder was observed with an optical microscope through transparent glass chips placed on substrates covered with the polymeric materials incorporating the solder powder. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed to confirm the behaviors of the reaction of the resins and the melting of the solder. When epoxy resin with a fluxing additive was used as a matrix, self-assembly of the solder was prevented by the cross-linking reaction. Conversely, when thermoplastic resin containing carboxyl groups was used as a matrix, the self-assembly of solder was successfully achieved in the absence of fluxing additives. The shear strength of interconnection using reflowfilm with lamination was sufficient and significantly increased during the reflow process. However, the shear strength of the reflowfilm showed cohesive failure, possibly because of the brittle intermetallic compounds (Ag3Sn, Au4Sn) network in bulk was lower than that of conventional solder paste that showed interfacial failure after the reflow process with a rapid cooling rate.

  8. Probing the acidity of carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids, water, and their binary mixtures: activation energy of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2013-02-28

    Acidity functions were used to express the ability of a solvent/solution to donate/accept a proton to a solute. The present work accounts for the acidity determination of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH in the alkylimidazolium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), incorporated with carboxylate anion, water, and in a binary mixture of PIL and water using the Hammett acidity function, H0. A reversal in the acidity trend was observed, when organic acids were transferred from water to PIL. It was emphasized that an increased stabilization offered by PIL cation toward the more basic conjugate anion of organic acid was responsible for this anomalous change in acidity order in PILs, which was absent in water. The greater stabilization of a basic organic anion by PIL cation is discussed in terms of the stable hard–soft acid base (HSAB) pairing. A change in the H0 values of these acids was observed with a change in temperature, and a linear correlation between the ln H0 and 1/T was noted. This relationship points toward the activation energy of proton transfer (E(a,H+)), a barrier provided by the medium during the proton transfer from Brønsted acid to indicator. The H0 function in binary mixtures points to the involvement of pseudosolvent, the behavior of which changes with the nature and concentration of acid. The presence of the maxima/minima in the H0 function is discussed in terms of the synergetic behavior of the pseudosolvent composed of the mixtures of aqueous PILs.

  9. Novel regioselective hydroxylations of pyridine carboxylic acids at position C2 and pyrazine carboxylic acids at position C3.

    PubMed

    Tinschert, A; Tschech, A; Heinzmann, K; Kiener, A

    2000-02-01

    We have previously described the isolation of the new bacterial species, Ralstonia/Burkholderia sp. strain DSM 6920, which grows with 6-methylnicotinate and regioselectively hydroxylates this substrate in the C2 position by the action of 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase to yield 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinate (Tinschert et al. 1997). In the present study we show that this enzymatic activity can be used for the preparation of a series of hydroxylated heterocyclic carboxylic acid derivatives. The following products were obtained from the unhydroxylated educts by biotransformation using resting cells: 2-hydroxynicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-6-chloronicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-5,6-dichloronicotinic acid, 3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methylpyrazine-2-carboxylic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-chloropyrazine-2-carboxylic acid. Thus the respective educts were all regioselectively mono-hydroxylated at the carbon atom between the ring-nitrogen and the ring-carbon atom carrying the carboxyl group. In contrast to its relatively broad biotransformation abilities, the strain shows a limited heterocyclic nutritional spectrum. It could grow only with three of the seven transformed educts: 6-methylnicotinate, 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinate and 5-methylpyrazine-2-carboxylate. 2-Hydroxynicotinate, 2-hydroxy-6-chloronicotinate, 2-hydroxy-5,6-dichloronicotinate, 3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxylate and 3-hydroxy-5-chloropyrazine-2-carboxylate were not degraded by the strain. Therefore, unlike 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase, which has a broad substrate spectrum, the second enzyme of the 6-methylnicotinate pathway seems to have a much more limited substrate range. Among 28 aromatic heterocyclic compounds tested as the sole source of carbon and energy, only pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate was found as a further growth substrate, and this was degraded by a pathway which did not involve 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase. To the best of our knowledge the

  10. Identification of 2-Aminothiazole-4-Carboxylate Derivatives Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and the β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase mtFabH

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay; Anthony, Nahoum G.; Al-Jaidi, Bilal; Alnimr, Amani; Abbott, Grainne; Brown, Alistair K.; Taylor, Rebecca C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Gillespie, Stephen H.; Johnston, Blair F.; Mackay, Simon P.; Coxon, Geoffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease which kills two million people every year and infects approximately over one-third of the world's population. The difficulty in managing tuberculosis is the prolonged treatment duration, the emergence of drug resistance and co-infection with HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis control requires new drugs that act at novel drug targets to help combat resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and reduce treatment duration. Methodology/Principal Findings Our approach was to modify the naturally occurring and synthetically challenging antibiotic thiolactomycin (TLM) to the more tractable 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold to generate compounds that mimic TLM's novel mode of action. We report here the identification of a series of compounds possessing excellent activity against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and, dissociatively, against the β-ketoacyl synthase enzyme mtFabH which is targeted by TLM. Specifically, methyl 2-amino-5-benzylthiazole-4-carboxylate was found to inhibit M. tuberculosis H37Rv with an MIC of 0.06 µg/ml (240 nM), but showed no activity against mtFabH, whereas methyl 2-(2-bromoacetamido)-5-(3-chlorophenyl)thiazole-4-carboxylate inhibited mtFabH with an IC50 of 0.95±0.05 µg/ml (2.43±0.13 µM) but was not active against the whole cell organism. Conclusions/Significance These findings clearly identify the 2-aminothiazole-4-carboxylate scaffold as a promising new template towards the discovery of a new class of anti-tubercular agents. PMID:19440303

  11. Relocation of active site carboxylates in major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP reveals plasticity in proton interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Asha V.; Singh, Himansha; Raturi, Sagar; Neuberger, Arthur; Tong, Zhen; Ding, Ning; Agboh, Kelvin; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of polyspecific membrane transporters is one important mechanism by which cells can obtain resistance to structurally different antibiotics and cytotoxic agents. These transporters reduce intracellular drug concentrations to subtoxic levels by mediating drug efflux across the cell envelope. The major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis catalyses drug efflux in a membrane potential and chemical proton gradient-dependent fashion. To enable the interaction with protons and cationic substrates, LmrP contains catalytic carboxyl residues on the surface of a large interior chamber that is formed by transmembrane helices. These residues co-localise together with polar and aromatic residues, and are predicted to be present in two clusters. To investigate the functional role of the catalytic carboxylates, we generated mutant proteins catalysing membrane potential-independent dye efflux by removing one of the carboxyl residues in Cluster 1. We then relocated this carboxyl residue to six positions on the surface of the interior chamber, and tested for restoration of wildtype energetics. The reinsertion at positions towards Cluster 2 reinstated the membrane potential dependence of dye efflux. Our data uncover a remarkable plasticity in proton interactions in LmrP, which is a consequence of the flexibility in the location of key residues that are responsible for proton/multidrug antiport. PMID:27917857

  12. A Guided Inquiry Experiment for the Measurement of Activation Energies in the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory: Decarboxylation of Pyrrole-2-Carboxylate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Kelly M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Mettee, Howard D.; Smiley, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate biophysical chemistry is described, in which the acid concentration and temperature dependences of the decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate are measured using a continuous ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. Data collection and analysis are structured using principles of guided inquiry. Data…

  13. Griseochelin, a novel carboxylic acid antibiotic from Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Schade, W; Roth, M; Radics, L; Incze, M; Ujszászy, K

    1984-08-01

    Griseochelin, C33H60O7, isolated from an asporogenous strain of Streptomyces griseus represents a novel carboxylic acid antibiotic. The metabolite, which is active against Gram-positive bacteria, forms water-insoluble salts with mono- and divalent cations and binds alkaline-earth metal ions specifically in 2:1 (X2M) stoichiometry. Detailed spectral (IR, MS and NMR) studies provide full characterization of its constitution featuring a carboxylic acid function, a substituted tetrahydropyran ring, an allylic OH group which are accommodated within a tetrahydroxylated-octamethyl-C25 diene backbone.

  14. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Breakout Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perka, Alan; Walz, Carl; Cobb, Sharon; Hanford, Anthony; Eppler, Dean

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document summarizes the workings of the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) Breakout group in a Martian environment. The group was tasked with: identifying potential contaminants and pathways for AEVA systems with respect to forward and backward contamination; identifying plausible mitigation alternatives and obstacles for pertinent missions; identifying topics that require further research and technology development and discuss development strategies with uncertain Planetary Protection (PP) requirements; Identifying PP requirements that impose the greatest mission/development costs; Identifying PP requirements/topics that require further definition;

  15. 1-Azaniumylcyclobutane-1-carboxylate monohydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, Ray J.; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C5H9NO2H2O, the amino acid is in the usual zwitterionic form involving the carboxylate group. The cyclobutane backbone of the amino acid is disordered over two conformations, with occupancies of 0.882 (7) and0.118 (7). In the crystal, NH O and OH O hydrogen bonds link the zwitterions [with the water molecule involved as both acceptor (with the NH3+) and donor (through a single carboxylate O from two different aminocyclobutane carboxylatemoities)], resulting in a two-dimensional layered structure lying parallel to (100).

  16. Simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production from xylose by Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 in presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Cao, Ming-Yue; Wang, Peng-Tao; Wang, Shi; Yue, Ying-Rong; Yuan, Wen-Duo; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Fei; Song, Xin

    2017-03-10

    Biohydrogen production from the pulp and paper effluent containing rich lignocellulosic material could be achieved by the fermentation process. Xylose, an important hemicellulose hydrolysis product, is used less efficiently as a substrate for biohydrogen production. Moreover, azo dyes are usually added to fabricate anti-counterfeiting paper, which further increases the complexity of wastewater. This study is the first paper to report that xylose could serve as the sole carbon source for a pure culture-Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 to achieve simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production. With 2 g l(-1) of xylose as the substrate, a maximum xylose utilization rate (URXyl) and a hydrogen molar yield (HMY) were obtained as 93.99% and 0.259 mol H2 mol(-1) xylose, respectively. Biohydrogen kinetics and e(-) equiv balance calculations indicated that MR penetrates and intracellularly inhibits on both pentose phosphate pathway and pyruvate fermentation pathway, while MO was independent of the glycolysis and biohydrogen pathway. The data demonstrate that biohydrogen pathways in the presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups were different, but the azo dyes could be completely reduced during the biohydrogen production period whether with the presence of MO or MR. The feasibility of hydrogen production from industrial pulp and paper effluent by the strain was also proved if the xylose is sufficient, and not affected by toxic substances which usually exists in such wastewater except for chlorophenol. This study offers a promising energy-recycling strategy for treating pulp and paper wastewaters, especially for those containing azo dyes.Importance The pulp and paper industry is a major industry in many developing countries and the global market of pulp and paper wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 60% between 2012 and 2020. Such wastewater contains large amount of refractory contaminants, such as lignin, whose reclamation is considered economic

  17. Biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Winkler, Margit

    2014-06-01

    An increasing demand for non-petroleum-based products is envisaged in the near future. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid, succinic acid, fatty acids, and many others are available in abundance from renewable resources and they could serve as economic precursors for bio-based products such as polymers, aldehyde building blocks, and alcohols. However, we are confronted with the problem that carboxylic acid reduction requires a high level of energy for activation due to the carboxylate's thermodynamic stability. Catalytic processes are scarce and often their chemoselectivity is insufficient. This review points at bio-alternatives: currently known enzyme classes and organisms that catalyze the reduction of carboxylic acids are summarized. Two totally distinct biocatalyst lines have evolved to catalyze the same reaction: aldehyde oxidoreductases from anaerobic bacteria and archea, and carboxylate reductases from aerobic sources such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. The majority of these enzymes remain to be identified and isolated from their natural background in order to evaluate their potential as industrial biocatalysts.

  18. Synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity evaluations of novel pyrazole carboxylic and dicarboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mert, Samet; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; İça, Tuba; Çolak, Ferdağ; Altun, Ahmet; Ok, Salim

    2014-05-06

    A series of pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid and pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized, the structures were confirmed by their NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and FT-IR spectra, and elemental analyses. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the compounds against five bacterial and five fungal pathogens were screened using modified agar well diffusion assay. Most of the molecules have inhibitory effects on both standard and clinical Candida albicans strains. However, only the molecules 8, 10, 21, and 22 demonstrate some inhibitory effects on Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida glabrata strains. The structure-antifungal activity relationships of the compounds on the C. albicans strains were investigated by electron-conformational method. The pharmacophores and antipharmacophores responsible for the inhibition and non-inhibition of the C. albicans strains were obtained by electronic and geometrical characteristics of the reactive fragments of the molecules. These fragments along with the associated parameters can be used in designing the future more potent antifungal agents. It has been shown that both the positions of electronegative atoms like F and O in the pyrazole substituents and the amount of the associated charges on such atoms are crucial in regulating the strength of antifungal activity for the C. albicans strain.

  19. Ionization behavior, stoichiometry of association, and accessibility of functional groups in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; González, Mari I; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2010-09-01

    We characterized the fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers of six commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes and found that in contrast to their similar elemental composition, total concentration of functional groups, and degree of polymerization, the ionization behavior and spatial distribution of carboxylic (R-COOH) groups within the active layers can be significantly different. We also studied the steric effects experienced by barium ion (Ba2+) in the active layers by determining the fraction of carboxylate (R-COO-) groups accessible to Ba2+; such fraction, referred to as the accessibility ratio (AR), was found to vary within the range AR=0.40-0.81, and to be generally independent of external solution pH. Additionally, we studied an NF membrane with a sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) active layer, and found that the concentration of sulfonate (R-SO3-) groups in the active layer was 1.67 M, independent of external solution pH and approximately three times higher than the maximum concentration (approximately 0.45+/-0.25 M) of R-COO- groups in PA active layers. The R-SO3- groups were found to be highly accessible to Ba2+ (AR=0.95+/-0.01).

  20. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Imidazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Combining 2D and 3D QSAR Methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh C

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed for correlating the chemical composition of imidazole-5-carboxylic acid analogs and their angiotensin II [Formula: see text] receptor antagonist activity using partial least squares and k-nearest neighbor, respectively. For comparing the three different feature selection methods of 2D-QSAR, k-nearest neighbor models were used in conjunction with simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm and stepwise coupled with partial least square (PLS) showed variation in biological activity. The statistically significant best 2D-QSAR model having good predictive ability with statistical values of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was developed by SA-partial least square with the descriptors like [Formula: see text]count, 5Chain count, SdsCHE-index, and H-acceptor count, showing that increase in the values of these descriptors is beneficial to the activity. The 3D-QSAR studies were performed using the SA-PLS. A leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient [Formula: see text] and predicate activity [Formula: see text] = 0.7226 were obtained. The information rendered by QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of substituted imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives and also aid in designing novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  1. The Different Inhibition Mechanisms of OXA-1 and OXA-24 β-Lactamases Are Determined by the Stability of Active Site Carboxylated Lysine*

    PubMed Central

    Che, Tao; Bethel, Christopher R.; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Bonomo, Robert A.; Carey, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency of class D β-lactamases depends critically on an unusual carboxylated lysine as the general base residue for both the acylation and deacylation steps of the enzyme. Microbiological and biochemical studies on the class D β-lactamases OXA-1 and OXA-24 showed that the two enzymes behave differently when reacting with two 6-methylidene penems (penem 1 and penem 3): the penems are good inhibitors of OXA-1 but act more like substrates for OXA-24. UV difference and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the respective reaction mechanisms are different. The penems form an unusual intermediate, a 1,4-thiazepine derivative in OXA-1, and undergo deacylation followed by the decarboxylation of Lys-70, rendering OXA-1 inactive. This inactivation could not be reversed by the addition of 100 mm NaHCO3. In OXA-24, under mild conditions (enzyme:inhibitor = 1:4), only hydrolyzed products were detected, and the enzyme remained active. However, under harsh conditions (enzyme:inhibitor = 1:2000), OXA-24 was inhibited via decarboxylation of Lys-84; however, the enzyme could be reactivated by the addition of 100 mm NaHCO3. We conclude that OXA-24 not only decarboxylates with difficulty but also recarboxylates with ease; in contrast, OXA-1 decarboxylates easily but recarboxylates with difficulty. Structural analysis of the active site indicates that a crystallographic water molecule may play an important role in carboxylation in OXA-24 (an analogous water molecule is not found in OXA-1), supporting the suggestion that a water molecule in the active site of OXA-24 can lower the energy barrier for carboxylation significantly. PMID:24443569

  2. Synthesis and preliminary mechanistic evaluation of 5-(p-tolyl)-1-(quinolin-2-yl)pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid amides with potent antiproliferative activity on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cankara Pirol, Şeyma; Çalışkan, Burcu; Durmaz, Irem; Atalay, Rengül; Banoglu, Erden

    2014-11-24

    We synthesized a series of novel amide derivatives of 5-(p-tolyl)-1-(quinolin-2-yl)pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid and assessed their antiproliferative activities against three human cancer cell lines (Huh7, human liver; MCF7, breast and HCT116, colon carcinoma cell lines) with the sulforhodamine B assay. Compound 4j with 2-chloro-4-pyridinyl group in the amide part exhibited promising cytotoxic activity against all cell lines with IC50 values of 1.6 μM, 3.3 μM and 1.1 μM for Huh7, MCF7 and HCT116 cells, respectively, and produced dramatic cell cycle arrest at SubG1/G1 phase as an indicator of apoptotic cell death induction. On the basis of their high potency in cellular environment, these straightforward pyrazole-3-carboxamide derivatives may possess potential in the design of more potent compounds for intervention with cancer cell proliferation.

  3. Chlorosulfonation of polystyrene substrates for bioanalytical assays: distribution of activated groups at the surface.

    PubMed

    del Prado, Anselmo; Briz, Nerea; Navarro, Rodrigo; Pérez, Mónica; Gallardo, Alberto; Reinecke, Helmut

    2012-12-07

    In this work the activation of transparent PS substrates by chlorosulfonation is described and their distribution in the subsurface region is analyzed. For this purpose XPS, FTIR-ATR and colorimetry have been used. It is shown that the electrophilic aromatic substitution of polystyrene in pure chlorosulfonic acid is extremely quick with complete surface coverage by chlorosulfonic groups achieved after only a 10 minute reaction time at -10 °C. It is further demonstrated that the reaction is very surface selective and that even after reaction times as long as 3 hours, the modification is limited to a layer with a thickness of less than one micron. The activated PS substrates can be further functionalized in a second step with carboxylic groups. Due to the excellent optical transparency that the samples maintain upon modification, the modified systems were successfully probed for use in ELISA assays.

  4. Are carboxyl groups the most acidic sites in amino acids? Gas-phase acidities, photoelectron spectra, and computations on tyrosine, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and their conjugate bases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhixin; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Kass, Steven R

    2009-01-28

    Deprotonation of tyrosine in the gas phase was found to occur preferentially at the phenolic site, and the conjugate base consists of a 70:30 mixture of phenoxide and carboxylate anions at equilibrium. This result was established by developing a chemical probe for differentiating these two isomers, and the presence of both ions was confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Equilibrium acidity measurements on tyrosine indicated that deltaG(acid)(o) = 332.5 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1) and deltaH(acid)(o) = 340.7 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1). Photoelectron spectra yielded adiabatic electron detachment energies of 2.70 +/- 0.05 and 3.55 +/- 0.10 eV for the phenoxide and carboxylate anions, respectively. The H/D exchange behavior of deprotonated tyrosine was examined using three different alcohols (CF3CH2OD, C6H5CH2OD, and CH3CH2OD), and incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms was observed. Two pathways are proposed to account for these results, and all of the experimental findings are supplemented with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and G3B3 calculations. In addition, it was found that electrospray ionization of tyrosine from a 3:1 (v/v) CH3OH/H2O solution using a commercial source produces a deprotonated [M-H]- anion with the gas-phase equilibrium composition rather than the structure of the ion that exists in aqueous media. Electrospray ionization from acetonitrile, however, leads largely to the liquid-phase (carboxylate) structure. A control molecule, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, was found to behave in a similar manner. Thus, the electrospray conditions that are employed for the analysis of a compound can alter the isomeric composition of the resulting anion.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, Ted V.

    Silicon nanoparticles are of great interest in a great number of fields. Silicon nanoparticles show great promise particularly in the field of bioimaging. Carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles have the ability to covalently bond to biomolecules through the conjugation of the carboxylic acid to an amine functionalized biomolecule. This thesis explores the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles functionalized by both carboxylic acids and alkenes and their carboxylic acid functionality. Also discussed is the characterization of the silicon nanoparticles by the use of x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the nature of the Si-H bond that is observed on the surface of the silicon nanoparticles will be investigated using photoassisted exciton mediated hydrosilation reactions. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from both carboxylic acids and alkenes. However, the lack of solubility of diacids is a significant barrier to carboxylic acid functionalization by a mixture of monoacids and diacids. A synthesis route to overcome this obstacle is to synthesize silicon nanoparticles with terminal vinyl group. This terminal vinyl group is distal to the surface of the silicon nanoparticle. The conversion of the vinyl group to a carboxylic acid is accomplished by oxidative cleavage using ozonolysis. The carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles were then successfully conjugated to amine functionalized DNA strand through an n-hydroxy succinimide ester activation step, which promotes the formation of the amide bond. Conjugation was characterized by TEM and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The PAGE results show that the silicon nanoparticle conjugates move slower through the polyacrylamide gel, resulting in a significant separation from the nonconjugated DNA. The silicon nanoparticles were then characterized by the use of x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (Xanes) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the bonding and chemical

  6. [Studies on quinolone antibacterials. I. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of 7-(2-aminoethoxy)-, 7-(2-aminoethylthio)-, and 7-(2-aminoethylamino)-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo qui noline -3-carboxylic acids and their derivatives].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, N; Yasuda, S; Katoh, H; Itoh, Y

    1990-04-01

    7-(2-Aminoethoxy)-, 7-(2-aminoethylthio)-, and 7-(2-aminoethylamino)-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoq uin oline-3- carboxylic acids and their derivatives (11a--f, h, j, k, 12a--f, and 13a--f) were synthesized and their antibacterial activities were tested. Among them, compounds (13a, d) having a primary amino group at the terminal position of alkoxy and alkylthio groups were found to have excellent in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity comparable to those of ciprofloxacin (5). Structure-activity relationship of these compounds was also stated.

  7. Biological activity of novel N-substituted amides of endo-3-(3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2-carboxylic acid and N-substituted amides of 1-(5-methylthio-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)cyclohexane-2-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pachuta-Stec, Anna; Kosikowska, Urszula; Chodkowska, Anna; Pitucha, Monika; Malm, Anna; Jagiełło-Wójtowicz, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    N-Substituted amides of endo-3-(3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2-carboxylic acid and 1-(5-methylthio-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)cyclohexane-2-carboxylic acid were prepared by the condensation reaction of endo-S-methyl-N1-(bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarbonyl)isothiosemicarbazide and S-methyl-N1-(cyclohexane-2,3-dicarbonyl)isothiosemicarbazide with primary amines. The synthesized compounds were screened for their microbiological and pharmacological activities.

  8. In vitro anti-influenza A activity of interferon (IFN)-λ1 combined with IFN-β or oseltamivir carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Ilyushina, Natalia A; Donnelly, Raymond P

    2014-11-01

    Influenza viruses, which can cross species barriers and adapt to new hosts, pose a constant potential threat to human health. The influenza pandemic of 2009 highlighted the rapidity with which an influenza virus can spread worldwide. Currently available antivirals have a number of limitations against influenza, and novel antiviral strategies, including novel drugs and drug combinations, are urgently needed. Here, we evaluated the in vitro effects of interferon (IFN)-β, IFN-λ1, oseltamivir carboxylate (a neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor), and combinations of these agents against two seasonal (i.e., H1N1 and H3N2) influenza A viruses. We observed that A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2) isolates were equally sensitive to the antiviral activity of IFN-β and oseltamivir carboxylate in A549 and Calu-3 cells. In contrast, IFN-λ1 exhibited substantially lower protective potential against the H1N1 strain (64-1030-fold ↓, P<0.05), and was ineffective against H3N2 virus in both cell lines. Three dimensional analysis of drug-drug interactions revealed that IFN-λ1 interacted with IFN-β and oseltamivir carboxylate in an additive or synergistic manner, respectively, to inhibit influenza A virus replication in human airway epithelial cells. Overall, the present study demonstrated that anti-influenza agents with different mechanisms of action (e.g., a NA inhibitor combined with IFN-λ1) exerted a significantly greater (P<0.05) synergistic effect compared to co-treatment with drugs that target the same signaling pathway (i.e., IFN-β plus IFN-λ1) in vitro. Our findings provide support for the combined use of interferon plus oseltamivir as a potential means for treating influenza infections.

  9. Dual role of the carboxyl-terminal region of pig liver L-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: mitochondrial-targeting signal and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kumiko; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hirabayashi-Takahashi, Kanako; Saito, Kuniaki; Haga, Seiich; Uemura, Tomihiko; Izumi, Susumu

    2010-12-01

    l-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin monooxygenase that catalyses the hydroxylation of l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and is localized as an oligomer in the mitochondrial outer membrane. In the human brain, KMO may play an important role in the formation of two neurotoxins, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, both of which provoke severe neurodegenerative diseases. In mosquitos, it plays a role in the formation both of eye pigment and of an exflagellation-inducing factor (xanthurenic acid). Here, we present evidence that the C-terminal region of pig liver KMO plays a dual role. First, it is required for the enzymatic activity. Second, it functions as a mitochondrial targeting signal as seen in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) or outer membrane cytochrome b(5). The first role was shown by the comparison of the enzymatic activity of two mutants (C-terminally FLAG-tagged KMO and carboxyl-terminal truncation form, KMOΔC50) with that of the wild-type enzyme expressed in COS-7 cells. The second role was demonstrated with fluorescence microscopy by the comparison of the intracellular localization of the wild-type, three carboxyl-terminal truncated forms (ΔC20, ΔC30 and ΔC50), C-terminally FLAG-tagged wild-type and a mutant KMO, where two arginine residues, Arg461-Arg462, were replaced with Ser residues.

  10. Brønsted analysis reveals Lys218 as the carboxylase active site base that deprotonates vitamin K hydroquinone to initiate vitamin K-dependent protein carboxylation.

    PubMed

    Rishavy, Mark A; Hallgren, Kevin W; Yakubenko, Anna V; Shtofman, Rebecca L; Runge, Kurt W; Berkner, Kathleen L

    2006-11-07

    The vitamin K-dependent (VKD) carboxylase converts Glu's to carboxylated Glu's in VKD proteins to render them functional in a broad range of physiologies. The carboxylase uses vitamin K hydroquinone (KH(2)) epoxidation to drive Glu carboxylation, and one of its critical roles is to provide a catalytic base that deprotonates KH(2) to allow epoxidation. A long-standing model invoked Cys as the catalytic base but was ruled out by activity retention in a mutant where every Cys is substituted by Ala. Inhibitor analysis of the cysteine-less mutant suggested that the base is an activated amine [Rishavy et al. (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 13732-13737], and in the present study, we used an evolutionary approach to identify candidate amines, which revealed His160, His287, His381, and Lys218. When mutational analysis was performed using an expression system lacking endogenous carboxylase, the His to Ala mutants all showed full epoxidase activity but K218A activity was not detectable. The addition of exogenous amines restored K218A activity while having little effect on wild type carboxylase, and pH studies indicated that rescue was dependent upon the basic form of the amine. Importantly, Brønsted analysis that measured the effect of amines with different pK(a) values showed that K218A activity rescue depended upon the basicity of the amine. The combined results provide strong evidence that Lys218 is the essential base that deprotonates KH(2) to initiate the reaction. The identification of this base is an important advance in defining the carboxylase active site and has implications regarding carboxylase membrane topology and the feedback mechanism by which the Glu substrate regulates KH(2) oxygenation.

  11. Synthesis and biological relationships of 3',6-substituted 2-phenyl-4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ya-Yun; Huang, Li-Jiau; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xiao, Zhiyan; Bastow, Kenneth F; Yamori, Takao; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2005-01-03

    As part of a continuing search for potential anticancer drug candidates in the 2-phenyl-4-quinolone series, 3',6-substituted 2-phenyl-4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives and their salts were synthesized and evaluated. Preliminary screening showed that carboxylic acid analogs containing a m-fluoro substituted 2-phenyl group displayed the highest in vitro anticancer activity. Activity decreased significantly if a chlorine or methoxy group replaced the fluorine atom. 3'-Fluoro-6-methoxy-2-phenyl-4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid (68) had the highest in vitro cytotoxic activity among all tested carboxylic acid derivatives and their salts. The mechanism of action may be similar, but not identical, to that of tubulin binding drugs, such as navelbine and taxol. Compound 68 merits further investigation as a novel hydrophilic antimitotic agent.

  12. Mechanism Studies of Ir-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao-Lin; Yang, Shuang; Su, Xun-Cheng; Wu, Hui-Ling; Yang, Liang-Liang; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-01-11

    The Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins is widely used for production of value-added bulk and fine chemicals. The iridium catalysts with chiral spiro phosphine-oxazoline ligands developed in our group show high activity and high enantioselectivity in the hydrogenation of olefins bearing a coordinative carboxyl group, such as α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids, β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids, and γ,δ-unsaturated carboxylic acids. Here we conducted detailed mechanistic studies on these Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions by using (E)-2-methyl-3-phenylacrylic acid as a model substrate. We isolated and characterized several key intermediates having Ir-H bonds under the real hydrogenation conditions. Particularly, an Ir(III) migratory insertion intermediate was first isolated in an asymmetric hydrogenation reaction promoted by chiral Ir catalysts. That this intermediate cannot undergo reductive elimination in the absence of hydrogen strongly supports the involvement of an Ir(III)/Ir(V) cycle in the hydrogenation. On the basis of the structure of the Ir(III) intermediate, variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations, we elucidated the mechanistic details of the Ir-catalyzed hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids and explained the enantioselectivity of the reactions. These findings experimentally and computationally elucidate the mechanism of Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins with a strong coordinative carboxyl group and will likely inspire further catalyst design.

  13. Structure-antifungal activity relationships of polyene antibiotics of the amphotericin B group.

    PubMed

    Tevyashova, Anna N; Olsufyeva, Evgenia N; Solovieva, Svetlana E; Printsevskaya, Svetlana S; Reznikova, Marina I; Trenin, Aleksei S; Galatenko, Olga A; Treshalin, Ivan D; Pereverzeva, Eleonora R; Mirchink, Elena P; Isakova, Elena B; Zotchev, Sergey B; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive comparative analysis of the structure-antifungal activity relationships for the series of biosynthetically engineered nystatin analogues and their novel semisynthetic derivatives, as well as amphotericin B (AMB) and its semisynthetic derivatives, was performed. The data obtained revealed the significant influence of the structure of the C-7 to C-10 polyol region on the antifungal activity of these polyene antibiotics. Comparison of positions of hydroxyl groups in the antibiotics and in vitro antifungal activity data showed that the most active are the compounds in which hydroxyl groups are in positions C-8 and C-9 or positions C-7 and C-10. Antibiotics with OH groups at both C-7 and C-9 had the lowest activity. The replacement of the C-16 carboxyl with methyl group did not significantly affect the in vitro antifungal activity of antibiotics without modifications at the amino group of mycosamine. In contrast, the activity of the N-modified derivatives was modulated both by the presence of CH3 or COOH group in the position C-16 and by the structure of the modifying substituent. The most active compounds were tested in vivo to determine the maximum tolerated doses and antifungal activity on the model of candidosis sepsis in leukopenic mice (cyclophosphamide-induced). Study of our library of semisynthetic polyene antibiotics led to the discovery of compounds, namely, N-(L-lysyl)-BSG005 (compound 3n) and, especially, L-glutamate of 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl amide of S44HP (compound 2j), with high antifungal activity that were comparable in in vitro and in vivo tests to AMB and that have better toxicological properties.

  14. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  15. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  16. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGES

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  17. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  18. Group Work vs. Whole Class Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanveer, Asma

    2008-01-01

    Group work has only been recently introduced in the education system of Pakistan but many primary teachers, especially in the public schools, are still not aware of how different kinds of strategies that is group work and whole class teaching facilitate learning among students. This paper aims to provide an overview of teaching strategies to…

  19. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ruth; Dutta, Saikat; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR-TEM, and NH3 temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  20. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim; Dutta, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  1. Tetranuclear iron(III) complexes of an octadentate pyridine-carboxylate ligand and their catalytic activity in alkane oxidation by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Gutkina, Elena A; Trukhan, Vladimir M; Pierpont, Cortlandt G; Mkoyan, Shaen; Strelets, Vladimir V; Nordlander, Ebbe; Shteinman, Albert A

    2006-01-21

    Reaction of the octadentate ligand 2,6-bis{3-[N,N-di(2-pyridylmethyl)amino]propoxy}benzoic acid (LH) with Fe(ClO4)3 leads to the formation of the tetranuclear complexes [Fe4(mu-O)2(LH)2(ClCH2-CO2)4](ClO4)4 (1), [{Fe2(mu-O)L(R-CO2)}2](ClO4)4 (2 R = C6H5-, 3 R = CH3-, 4, R = ClCH2-). The crystal structures of complexes 1 and 2 reveal that they consist of two Fe(III)2(mu-O)(mu-RCO2)2 cores that are linked via the two LH/L ligands to give a "dimer of dimers" structure. Complex assumes a helical shape, with protonated carboxylic acid moieties of the two ligands forming a hydrogen-bonded pair at the center of the cation. In complexes 2, 3 and 4, central carboxylates of the two ligands bridge the iron ions in each of the two Fe2O units, with an interdimer iron-iron separation of approximately 10 A and an intradimer separation of approximately 3.1 A. The second carboxylate bridge within the Fe2O units is defined by exogenous benzoate (2), acetate (3) or chloroacetate (4) ligands. The aqua complex [{Fe2(mu-O)L(H2O)2}2](ClO4)6 (5) is proposed to have a similar structure, but with the exogenous bridging carboxylates replaced by two terminal water ligands. These complexes exhibit electronic and Mössbauer spectral features that are similar to those of (mu-oxo)diiron(III) proteins as well as other related (mu-oxo)bis(mu-carboxylato)diiron(III) complexes. This similarity shows that these properties are not significantly affected by the nature of the bridging exogenous carboxylate, and that the octadentate framework ligand is essential in stabilizing the "dimer of dimers" structure. This structural feature remains in highly diluted solution (10(-5) M) as evidenced by electrospray ionization mass-spectroscopy (ES MS). Cyclic voltammetric studies of complexes 2 and 5 showed two irreversible two-electron reductions, indicating that the two Fe2O units of the tetranuclear complexes behave as distinct redox entities. Complexes 2, 3 and, especially, the aqua complex 5 are active alkane

  2. Novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives as Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: synthesis, activity, and X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Arasappan, Ashok; Njoroge, F. George; Parekh, Tejal N.; Yang, Xiaozheng; Pichardo, John; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Prongay, Andrew; Yao, Nanhua; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis and HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitory activity of some novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives are reported. Inhibitors derived from this new P2 core exhibited activity in the low {micro}M range. X-ray structure of an inhibitor, 15c bound to the protease is presented.

  3. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which demonstrates standing waves in air generated by a loudspeaker driven by an audio oscillator. The waves are detected by cool spots on a glowing nichrome wire contained in an inexpensive piece of equipment. Also describes activities involving analysis of kinematics through data taking and graphing. (JM)

  4. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Glenn; Insley, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Explains two activities: (1) a "rotator demonstration" (a turntable, pendulum, chalk, and other materials), which can be used in many activities to demonstrate rotational concepts; and (2) an "Eskimo yo-yo," consisting of two balls (plus long strings and a glass tube) which rotate in opposite directions to show centripetal force. (JN)

  5. [Identification of catalytically active groups of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germ lipase].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, O S; Popova, T N; Kapranchikov, V S; Motina, E A

    2008-01-01

    The active site of wheat germ lipase was studied by the Dixon method and chemical modification. The profile of curve logV = f(pH), pK and ionization heat values, lipase photoinactivation, and lipase inactivation with diethylpyrocarbonate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide led us to assume that the active site of the enzyme comprises the carboxylic group of aspartic or glutamic acid and the imidazole group of histidine. Apparently, the OH-group of serine plays a key role in catalysis: as a result of incubation for 1 h in the presence of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, the enzyme activity decreased by more than 70%. It is shown that ethylenediamine tetraacetate is a noncompetitive inhibitor of lipase. Wheat germs are very healthful because they are rich in vitamins, essential amino acids, and proteins. For this reason, wheat germs are widely used in food, medical, and feed mill industries [1-3]. However, their use is limited by instability during storage, which is largely determined by the effect of hydrolytic and redox enzymes. Representative enzymes of this group are lipase (glycerol ester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3), which hydrolyzes triglycerides of higher fatty acids, and lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.13), which oxidizes polyunsaturated higher fatty acids.

  6. Exploring Group Activity Therapy with Ethnically Diverse Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.; Maldonado, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    Group activity therapy has been promoted as an effective means of providing growth opportunities for adolescents through the use of structured, developmentally appropriate activities in a group setting. This article qualitatively explores outcomes of 12 sessions of group activity therapy with ethnically diverse adolescents in a school setting. The…

  7. Group Learning as Relational Economic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Eisuke; Atencio, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss group learning in line with economic perspectives of embeddedness and integration emanating from the work of Karl Polanyi. Polanyi's work defines economy as a necessary interaction among human beings for survival; the economy is considered inextricably linked from broader society and social relations rather…

  8. Doing Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Materials needed and procedures for conducting two activities are provided. The first investigates drops of a liquid which float on water in a watchglass resting on top of a loudspeaker. The second investigates electromagnetic phenomena. (JN)

  9. Active microwave users working group program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bare, J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Childs, L. F.; Dellwig, L. F.; Heighway, J. E.; Joosten, R.; Lewis, A. J.; Linlor, W.; Lundien, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed programmatic and technical development plan for active microwave technology was examined in each of four user activities: (1) vegetation; (2) water resources and geologic applications, and (4) oceanographic applications. Major application areas were identified, and the impact of each application area in terms of social and economic gains were evaluated. The present state of knowledge of the applicability of active microwave remote sensing to each application area was summarized and its role relative to other remote sensing devices was examined. The analysis and data acquisition techniques needed to resolve the effects of interference factors were reviewed to establish an operational capability in each application area. Flow charts of accomplished and required activities in each application area that lead to operational capability were structured.

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer and antileishmanial activities as well interaction with Salmon sperm DNA of newly synthesized carboxylic acid derivative, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; McKee, Vickie; Ullah, Hameed

    2015-03-05

    This paper stresses on the synthesis, characterization of novel carboxylic acid derivative and its application in pharmaceutics. Carboxylic acid derivatives have a growing importance in medicine, particularly in oncology. A novel carboxylic acid, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, NMR ((1)H, and (13)C), mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray structural analysis. The structure of the title compound, C11H12N2O6, shows the molecules dimerised by short intramolecular OH⋯O hydrogen bonds. The compound was screened for in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer, and antileishmanial activities as well as interaction with SS-DNA. The compound was also checked for in vitro anticancer activity against BHK-21, H-157 and HCEC cell lines, and showed significant anticancer activity. The compound was almost non-toxic towards human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) and did not show more than 7.4% antiproliferative activity when used at the 2.0μg/mL end concentration. It was also tested for antileishmanial activity against the promastigote form of leishmania major and obtained attractive result. DNA interaction study exposes that the binding mode of the compound with SS-DNA is an intercalative as it results in hypochromism along with minor red shift. A new and efficient strategy to identify pharmacophores sites in carboxylic acid derivative for antibacterial/antifungal activity using Petra, Osiris and Molinspiration (POM) analyses was also carried out.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer and antileishmanial activities as well interaction with Salmon sperm DNA of newly synthesized carboxylic acid derivative, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; McKee, Vickie; Ullah, Hameed

    2015-03-01

    This paper stresses on the synthesis, characterization of novel carboxylic acid derivative and its application in pharmaceutics. Carboxylic acid derivatives have a growing importance in medicine, particularly in oncology. A novel carboxylic acid, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, NMR (1H, and 13C), mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray structural analysis. The structure of the title compound, C11H12N2O6, shows the molecules dimerised by short intramolecular Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The compound was screened for in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer, and antileishmanial activities as well as interaction with SS-DNA. The compound was also checked for in vitro anticancer activity against BHK-21, H-157 and HCEC cell lines, and showed significant anticancer activity. The compound was almost non-toxic towards human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) and did not show more than 7.4% antiproliferative activity when used at the 2.0 μg/mL end concentration. It was also tested for antileishmanial activity against the promastigote form of leishmania major and obtained attractive result. DNA interaction study exposes that the binding mode of the compound with SS-DNA is an intercalative as it results in hypochromism along with minor red shift. A new and efficient strategy to identify pharmacophores sites in carboxylic acid derivative for antibacterial/antifungal activity using Petra, Osiris and Molinspiration (POM) analyses was also carried out.

  12. The microbial metabolism of thiophen-2-carboxylate

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Roger E.

    1973-01-01

    1. An organism was isolated by enrichment culture that was capable of using thiophen-2-carboxylate as sole source of carbon, energy and sulphur for growth. 2. Analysis of the cellular protein after growth of the organism on thiophen-2-[14C]carboxylate showed that only glutamate, proline and arginine were labelled. All the radioactivity in the glutamate was confined to C-1. 3. In the presence of 2.1 mm-arsenite, suspensions of the organism converted thiophen-2-[14C]carboxylate into 14C-labelled 2-oxoglutarate which had the same specific radioactivity as the starting material. 4. Cell-free extracts of the organism catalysed the release of 14CO2 from thiophen-2-[14C]carboxylate. This activity was largely dependent on the presence of ATP and CoA and was stimulated by NAD+ and Mg2+. Inclusion of hydroxylamine resulted in the appearance of thiophen-2-carbohydroxamic acid, indicating that the ATP and CoA were involved in the formation of the CoA ester of thiophen-2-carboxylate. 5. High-speed centrifuging of cell-free extracts resulted in supernatants with decreased thiophen-2-carboxylate-degrading activity. Activity was restored by the addition of the high-speed pellet or by Methylene Blue. 6. The metabolism of the CoA ester of thiophen-2-carboxylate by cell-free extracts could be linked to the anaerobic reduction of Methylene Blue. 7. The sulphur atom of the thiophen nucleus was converted into sulphate by growing cultures and resting suspensions of the organism. 8. A degradative pathway is proposed involving the hydroxylation (at C-5) of the CoA ester of thiophen-2-carboxylate followed by further metabolism to 2-oxoglutarate and sulphate. PMID:16742794

  13. Breaking the Carboxyl Rule

    PubMed Central

    Balashov, Sergei P.; Petrovskaya, Lada E.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lukashev, Evgeniy P.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Sychev, Sergey V.; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A.; Rubin, Andrei B.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2013-01-01

    A lysine instead of the usual carboxyl group is in place of the internal proton donor to the retinal Schiff base in the light-driven proton pump of Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR). The involvement of this lysine in proton transfer is indicated by the finding that its substitution with alanine or other residues slows reprotonation of the Schiff base (decay of the M intermediate) by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In these mutants, the rate constant of the M decay linearly decreases with a decrease in proton concentration, as expected if reprotonation is limited by the uptake of a proton from the bulk. In wild type ESR, M decay is biphasic, and the rate constants are nearly pH-independent between pH 6 and 9. Proton uptake occurs after M formation but before M decay, which is especially evident in D2O and at high pH. Proton uptake is biphasic; the amplitude of the fast phase decreases with a pKa of 8.5 ± 0.3, which reflects the pKa of the donor during proton uptake. Similarly, the fraction of the faster component of M decay decreases and the slower one increases, with a pKa of 8.1 ± 0.2. The data therefore suggest that the reprotonation of the Schiff base in ESR is preceded by transient protonation of an initially unprotonated donor, which is probably the ϵ-amino group of Lys-96 or a water molecule in its vicinity, and it facilitates proton delivery from the bulk to the reaction center of the protein. PMID:23696649

  14. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity in which two pulleys are connected by a wire loop; when the bottom pulley is dipped into hot water, the pulleys rotate. Also suggests that students design/build a machine to propel a bean; the machine must use materials including one bean, two plastic straws, and two rubber bands. (JN)

  15. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations/activities that involve forces: (1) a canoe-like boat made from copper window screen; (2) magnetic forces with a paper clip and ceramic magnetic; and (3) an "icemobile" machine that cuts ice cubes without an obvious source of energy. (DH)

  16. Individual and group dynamics in purchasing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Guo, Jin-Li; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is in constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behavior of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchase orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plots. It’s found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and then lead to an exponential factor for group dynamics. To better describe the mechanism generating the heterogeneity of the purchase order assignment process from the objective company to all its vendors, a model driven by product life cycle is introduced, and then the analytical distribution and the simulation result are obtained, which are in good agreement with the empirical data.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structures, molecular docking, and in vitro biological activities evaluation of transition metal complexes with 4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) piperazine-1-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Jian; Chen, Ya-Na; Xu, Chun-Na; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Cao, Qi-Yue; Qian, Shao-Song; Qin, Jie; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Three novel mononuclear complexes, [MⅡ(L)2·2H2O], (M = Cu, Ni or Cd; HL = 4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperazine-1-carboxylic acid)were synthesized and structurally determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Molecular docking study preliminarily revealed that complex 1 had potential urease inhibitory activity. In accordance with the result of calculation, in vitro tests of the inhibitory activities of complexes 1-3 against jack bean urease showed complex 1 (IC50 = 8.17 ± 0.91 μM) had better inhibitory activities than the positive reference acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) (IC50 = 26.99 ± 1.43 μM), while complexes 2 and 3 showed no inhibitory activities., kinetics study was carried out to explore the mechanism of the inhibiting of the enzyme, and the result indicated that complex 1 was a competitive inhibitor of urease. Albumin binding experiment and in vitro toxicity evaluation of complex 1 were implemented to explore its Pharmacological properties.

  18. The antifungal activity of sulfonylated/carboxylated derivatives of dibenzo-1,4-dioxine-2-acetyloxime may be due to inhibition of lanosterol-14alpha-demethylase.

    PubMed

    Mastrolorenzo, A; Scozzafava, A; Supuran, C T

    2000-01-01

    Aryl/alkyl-sulfonyl-, aryl/alkylcarboxyl- and aryl(sulfonyl)carbamyl/thiocarbamyl-derivatives of dibenzo-1,4-dioxine-2-acetyloxime were prepared by reaction of the title compound with sulfonyl halides, sulfonic acid anhydrides, acyl chlorides/carboxylic acids, arylsulfonyl isocyanates, aryl/acyl isocyanates or isothiocyanates. Several of the newly synthesized compounds showed effective in vitro antifungal activity against Aspergillus and Candida spp., some of them showing activities comparable to ketoconazole (with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range of 1.2-4 microg/mL) against the two Aspergillus strains, but possessing a lower activity as compared to ketoconazole against C. albicans. Of the three investigated strains, best activity was detected against A. flavus. The mechanism of action of these compounds probably involves inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis by interaction with lanosterol-14-alpha-demethylase (CYP51A1), since reduced amounts of ergosterol were found by means of HPLC, in cultures of the sensitive strain A. flavus treated with some of these inhibitors. Thus, the compounds reported here might possess a similar mechanism of action at molecular level with that of the widely used azole antifungals.

  19. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  20. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  1. Gibberellic acid, synthetic auxins, and ethylene differentially modulate alpha-L-Arabinofuranosidase activities in antisense 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase tomato pericarp discs.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, Gabriel O; Greve, L Carl; Prody, Gerry A; Labavitch, John M

    2002-07-01

    Alpha-L-Arabinofuranosidases (alpha-Afs) are plant enzymes capable of releasing terminal arabinofuranosyl residues from cell wall matrix polymers, as well as from different glycoconjugates. Three different alpha-Af isoforms were distinguished by size exclusion chromatography of protein extracts from control tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) and an ethylene synthesis-suppressed (ESS) line expressing an antisense 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic synthase transgene. alpha-Af I and II are active throughout fruit ontogeny. alpha-Af I is the first Zn-dependent cell wall enzyme isolated from tomato pericarp tissues, thus suggesting the involvement of zinc in fruit cell wall metabolism. This isoform is inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, but remains stable in the presence of NaCl and sucrose. alpha-Af II activity accounts for over 80% of the total alpha-Af activity in 10-d-old fruit, but activity drops during ripening. In contrast, alpha-Af III is ethylene dependent and specifically active during ripening. alpha-Af I released monosaccharide arabinose from KOH-soluble polysaccharides from tomato cell walls, whereas alpha-Af II and III acted on Na(2)CO(3)-soluble pectins. Different alpha-Af isoform responses to gibberellic acid, synthetic auxins, and ethylene were followed by using a novel ESS mature-green tomato pericarp disc system. alpha-Af I and II activity increased when gibberellic acid or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was applied, whereas ethylene treatment enhanced only alpha-Af III activity. Results suggest that tomato alpha-Afs are encoded by a gene family under differential hormonal controls, and probably have different in vivo functions. The ESS pericarp explant system allows comprehensive studies involving effects of physiological levels of different growth regulators on gene expression and enzyme activity with negligible wound-induced ethylene production.

  2. Gibberellic Acid, Synthetic Auxins, and Ethylene Differentially Modulate α-l-Arabinofuranosidase Activities in Antisense 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Synthase Tomato Pericarp Discs1

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Gabriel O.; Greve, L. Carl; Prody, Gerry A.; Labavitch, John M.

    2002-01-01

    α-l-Arabinofuranosidases (α-Afs) are plant enzymes capable of releasing terminal arabinofuranosyl residues from cell wall matrix polymers, as well as from different glycoconjugates. Three different α-Af isoforms were distinguished by size exclusion chromatography of protein extracts from control tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) and an ethylene synthesis-suppressed (ESS) line expressing an antisense 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic synthase transgene. α-Af I and II are active throughout fruit ontogeny. α-Af I is the first Zn-dependent cell wall enzyme isolated from tomato pericarp tissues, thus suggesting the involvement of zinc in fruit cell wall metabolism. This isoform is inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, but remains stable in the presence of NaCl and sucrose. α-Af II activity accounts for over 80% of the total α-Af activity in 10-d-old fruit, but activity drops during ripening. In contrast, α-Af III is ethylene dependent and specifically active during ripening. α-Af I released monosaccharide arabinose from KOH-soluble polysaccharides from tomato cell walls, whereas α-Af II and III acted on Na2CO3-soluble pectins. Different α-Af isoform responses to gibberellic acid, synthetic auxins, and ethylene were followed by using a novel ESS mature-green tomato pericarp disc system. α-Af I and II activity increased when gibberellic acid or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was applied, whereas ethylene treatment enhanced only α-Af III activity. Results suggest that tomato α-Afs are encoded by a gene family under differential hormonal controls, and probably have different in vivo functions. The ESS pericarp explant system allows comprehensive studies involving effects of physiological levels of different growth regulators on gene expression and enzyme activity with negligible wound-induced ethylene production. PMID:12114586

  3. Activities of the Boom and Chassis Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dell, Jason Scott; Meeks, Thomas Bayne; Merkel, Kelly; Nelson, Brent; Winchell, Tom

    1992-01-01

    Group One of the NASA Lunar Enabler Project has designed the primary chassis and boom structures for the lunar vehicle. Both components also feature V-clamps that were adapted to interface connections within the structure. The chassis features a front end, rear end section, middle cross-section, and face plate. The rear section contains an extra compartment for the engine, hydraulic pump, fuel bottles, and oil reservoir necessary for the wheel drives. Each section consists of tubular aluminum 6061-T6. The boom features four degrees of freedom system, where the minimum factor of safety of any part is 1.5 (but, normally much higher). It consists of a tapered upper boom, lower boom, and three elbows that complement the articulation joints. Each section of the boom has been constructed from aluminum 6061-T6. There are four joints and eight V-clamps in the boom assembly. The V-clamps feature support rings that prevent axial rotation. They provide easy adaptability and assembly.

  4. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D.; Tang, Dong-Qi; Li, Dong-Sheng; Cui, Taixing

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  5. The Orphan G protein-coupled receptors GPR41 and GPR43 are activated by propionate and other short chain carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew J; Goldsworthy, Susan M; Barnes, Ashley A; Eilert, Michelle M; Tcheang, Lili; Daniels, Dion; Muir, Alison I; Wigglesworth, Mark J; Kinghorn, Ian; Fraser, Neil J; Pike, Nicholas B; Strum, Jay C; Steplewski, Klaudia M; Murdock, Paul R; Holder, Julie C; Marshall, Fiona H; Szekeres, Philip G; Wilson, Shelagh; Ignar, Diane M; Foord, Steve M; Wise, Alan; Dowell, Simon J

    2003-03-28

    GPR41 and GPR43 are related members of a homologous family of orphan G protein-coupled receptors that are tandemly encoded at a single chromosomal locus in both humans and mice. We identified the acetate anion as an agonist of human GPR43 during routine ligand bank screening in yeast. This activity was confirmed after transient transfection of GPR43 into mammalian cells using Ca(2+) mobilization and [(35)S]guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding assays and by coexpression with GIRK G protein-regulated potassium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Other short chain carboxylic acid anions such as formate, propionate, butyrate, and pentanoate also had agonist activity. GPR41 is related to GPR43 (52% similarity; 43% identity) and was activated by similar ligands but with differing specificity for carbon chain length, with pentanoate being the most potent agonist. A third family member, GPR42, is most likely a recent gene duplication of GPR41 and may be a pseudogene. GPR41 was expressed primarily in adipose tissue, whereas the highest levels of GPR43 were found in immune cells. The identity of the cognate physiological ligands for these receptors is not clear, although propionate is known to occur in vivo at high concentrations under certain pathophysiological conditions.

  6. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  7. Group Dynamics and Initiative Activities with Outdoor Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaagstra, Lynn

    This paper focuses on group dynamics and introduces the use of initiative activities as a means of facilitating a more cohesive group experience in outdoor programs. Specific topics addressed and defined include: (1) curative factors of groups (universality, didactic learning, altruism, socialization, peer learning, group cohesiveness); (2) stages…

  8. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, Laura R; Royce, Liam A; Liu, Ping

    2013-09-03

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance.

  9. Mass spectrometric behaviour of carboxylated polyethylene glycols and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena; Zgoła, Agnieszka; Rychłowska, Joanna; Szymański, Andrzej; Łukaszewski, Zenon; Frański, Rafał

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometric behaviour of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGCs and CPEGCs) and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates (OPECs) are discussed. The tendency for ionisation (deprotonation, protonation and cationisation by alkali metal cations) of carboxylated PEGs was compared with that of non-carboxylated correspondents by using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrospray ionisation (ESI). The fragmentation of the PEGCs and CPEGCs is discussed and also compared with their neutral correspondents, PEGs. The B/E mass spectra were recorded, using secondary ion mass spectrometry as a method for generation, for deprotonated and protonated molecules and molecules cationised by alkali metal cations. The fragmentation behaviour of PEGs is found to be different from that of CPEGCs, The presence of carboxylic groups may be confirmed not only by the determination of molecular weights of the ethoxylates studied, but also on the basis of the fragment ions formed. The metastable decomposition of the [OPEC-H](-) ions proceed through the cleavage of the bond between the octylphenol moiety and the ethoxylene chain leading to the octylphenoxy anions. It permits determination of the mass of the hydrophobic moiety of the studied carboxylated alkylphenol ethoxylate. ESI mass spectra recorded in the negative ion mode were found to be more suitable for the determination of the average molecular weight of carboxylated ethoxylates than SI mass spectra.

  10. Activity of a Carboxyl-Terminal Truncated Form of Catechol 2,3-Dioxygenase from Planococcus sp. S5

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23Os, E.C.1.13.12.2) are two domain enzymes that catalyze degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons. The catalytically active C-domain of all known C23Os comprises ferrous ion ligands as well as residues forming active site pocket. The aim of this work was to examine and discuss the effect of nonsense mutation at position 289 on the activity of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Planococcus strain. Although the mutant C23O showed the same optimal temperature for activity as the wild-type protein (35°C), it exhibited activity slightly more tolerant to alkaline pH. Mutant enzyme exhibited also higher affinity to catechol as a substrate. Its Km (66.17 µM) was approximately 30% lower than that of wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, removal of the C-terminal residues resulted in 1.5- to 1.8-fold (P < 0.05) increase in the activity of C23OB61 against 4-methylcatechol and 4-chlorocatechol, respectively, while towards catechol the activity of the protein dropped to about 80% of that of the wild-type enzyme. The results obtained may facilitate the engineering of the C23O for application in the bioremediation of polluted areas. PMID:24693238

  11. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  12. Effect of ploidy levels on the activities of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in Cenchrus species grown under water stress.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amaresh; Dubey, Archana

    2010-01-01

    The effects of ploidy levels on the activities of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS; EC not assigned), superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (POX; EC 1.11.1.7), as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) and proline contents were studied in two months old plants of Cenchrus species. The Cenchrus species represent three ploidy levels: diploid, tetraploid, hexaploid and two life spans: annual and perennial. Plants were subjected to water stress for 2, 4, 6 and 8 d by withholding water under glasshouse conditions. Although the levels of proline increased with the magnitude of water stress, the P5CS activity did not show a corresponding increase in all species. Peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities showed an increase or steady state in the early phase of drought and then declined with the further increase in the magnitude of water stress, indicating differing behaviors of species towards drought tolerance. Under drought, diploid Cenchrus species had a higher POX activity, MDA accumulation and lower proline content than tetraploid species. Lower POX and higher P5CS activities and proline contents, however, were observed in hexaploid and tetraploid species. Taken together, our findings suggest that diploid species have a less efficient antioxidant system to scavenge reactive oxygen species than tetra and hexaploid Cenchrus. This may result in a corresponding variability in growth and persistence under natural grasslands. The study also paves the way for investigations on the molecular events associated with drought in Cenchrus species differing in ploidy and life span.

  13. Isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid of drug candidate VX-787: Effect of charge on antiviral potency and kinase activity of azaindole-based influenza PB2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michael J; Bandarage, Upul K; Bennett, Hamilton; Byrn, Randal R; Davies, Ioana; Gu, Wenxin; Jacobs, Marc; Ledeboer, Mark W; Ledford, Brian; Leeman, Joshua R; Perola, Emanuele; Wang, Tiansheng; Bennani, Youssef; Clark, Michael P; Charifson, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    VX-787 is a first in class, orally bioavailable compound that offers unparalleled potential for the treatment of pandemic and seasonal influenza. As a part of our routine SAR exploration, carboxylic acid isosteres of VX-787 were prepared and tested against influenza A. It was found that the negative charge is important for maintaining potency and selectivity relative to kinase targets. Neutral carboxylic acid replacements generally resulted in compounds that were significantly less potent and less selective relative to the charged species.

  14. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions.

  15. A 1-methyl-4-piperidinyl cytectrene carboxylate labeled by the technetium 99m, a radiotracer for rat brain acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Mejri, Najoua; Barhoumi, Chokri; Trabelsi, Moez; Mekni, Abdelkader; Said, Nadia Malek; Saidi, Mouldi

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative neurological disorder that causes progressive and irreversible loss of connections between brain cells and loss of mental functions. Clinical and postmortem studies show that the biochemical changes in brains of AD patients include decrease in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Our aim was to study AChE activity using piperidinyl ester labelled with technetium-99m. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that labelled piperidinyl ester was a substrate for AChE. The hydrolytic rate of this substrate was measured and the specificity was evaluated using the inhibitor BW284c51. The rhenium analogues of the technetium-labelled substrate were used to determine the affinity constant (K(m)) and the maximum reaction velocity (V(max)) because of the high specific activity of technetium. The high hydrolytic rate and high specificity of the substrate for AChE make it suitable as an in vivo radiotracer for studying AChE activity in the brain.

  16. Supporting "Learning by Design" Activities Using Group Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessakis, Georgios; Tatsis, Konstantinos; Dimitracopoulou, Angelique

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the educational exploitation of group blogging for the implementation of a "learning by design" activity. More specifically, a group of students used a blog as a communication and information management tool in the University course of ICT-enhanced Geometry learning activities. The analysis of the designed…

  17. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  18. Teacher Educators' Design and Implementation of Group Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Hei, Miranda S. A.; Sjoer, Ellen; Admiraal, Wilfried; Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how teacher educators design and implement group learning activities (GLAs). We used the Group Learning Activities Instructional Design (GLAID) framework to analyse their descriptions. The GLAID framework includes eight components: (1) interaction, (2) learning objectives and outcomes, (3) assessment, (4) task…

  19. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  20. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  1. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  2. Five novel lanthanide complexes with 2-chloroquinoline-4-carboxylic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline: Crystal structures, molecular spectra, thermal properties and bacteriostatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Jin, Cheng-Wei; He, Shu-Mei; Ren, Ning; Zhang, Jian-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Five novel lanthanide complexes [Ln2(2-ClQL)6(phen)2(H2O)2]·2H2O (Ln = Pr(1), Sm(2), Eu(3), Ho(4), Er(5)); 2-ClQL: 2-chloroquinoline-4-carboxylate; phen: 1,10-phenanthroline; were synthesized by conventional solution method at room temperature and characterized via elemental analysis, powder x-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectrometry. The results indicate that complexes 1-5 are isostructural, and each Ln3+ ion is eight-coordinated adopting a distorted square antiprismatic molecular geometry. Binuclear complex 1 are stitched together via hydrogen bonding interactions to form 1D chains, and further to form 2D sheets by the π-π interactions. Luminescence investigation reveals that complex 3 displays strong red emission. TG/DTG-FTIR, reveal the thermal decomposition processes and products of title complexes. The bacteriostatic activities of the complexes were evaluated against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. Sequential truncation of the lactose permease over a three-amino acid sequence near the carboxyl terminus leads to progressive loss of activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, E.; Hardy, D.; Pastore, J.C.; Kaback, H.R. )

    1991-04-15

    Previous experiments are consistent with the notion that residues 396-401 (...SVFTLS...) at the carboxyl terminus of the last putative transmembrane helix of the lactose (lac) permease of Escherichia coli are important for protection against proteolytic degradation and suggest that this region of the permease may be necessary for proper folding. Stop codons (TAA) have now been substituted sequentially for amino acid codons 396-401 in the lacY gene, and the termination mutants were expressed from the plasmid pT7-5. With respect to transport, permease truncated at residue 396-or 397 is completely defective, while molecules truncated at residues 398, 399, 400, and 401, respectively, exhibit 15-25%, 30-40%, 40-45%, and 70-100% of wild-type activity. As judged by pulse-chase experiments with ({sup 35}S)methionine, wild-type permease or permease truncated at residue 401 is stable, while permease molecules truncated at position 400, 399, 398, 397, or 396 are degraded at increasingly rapid rates. The findings indicate that either the last turn of putative helix XII or the region immediately distal to helix XII is important for proper folding and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  4. Hydrothermal Mineral-Assisted Organic Transformations of Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. N.; Gould, I.; Williams, L. B.; Hartnett, H. E.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    decarboxylation product formation and activation of additional product pathways including diphenyl alkanes, alkenes, ketones and more. Our investigations involving reactivity of abundant functional groups, including carboxylic acids, reveal the varieties of processes available both on the Earth today and at the dawn of life.

  5. Theoretical study of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane and β-hexachlorocyclohexane isomers interaction with surface groups of activated carbon model.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Durimel, Axelle; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises

    2014-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed in drinking water purification without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanism of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) onto it. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) is an organochlorinated contaminant present in water and soils of banana crops production zones of the Caribbean. The most relevant isomers of HCH are γ-HCH and β-HCH, both with great environmental persistence. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on HCH adsorption is done in order to help to understand the process and may lead to improve the AC selection process. A simplified AC model consisting of naphthalene with a functional group was used to assess the influence of SGs over the adsorption process. The Multiple Minima Hypersurface (MMH) methodology was employed to study γ-HCH and β-HCH interactions with different AC SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) under different hydration and pH conditions. The results obtained showed that association of HCH with SGs preferentially occurs between the axial protons of HCH and SG's oxygen atom, and the most favorable interactions occurring with charged SGs. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance HCH adsorption onto AC under neutral pH conditions. Finally, this work presents an inexpensive computer aided methodology for preselecting activated carbon SGs content for the removal of a given compound.

  6. Student expectations in a group learning activity on harmonic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczynski, Adam; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Students in a sophomore-level mechanics course participated in a new group learning activity that was intended to support model-building and finding coherence between multiple representations in the context of an underdamped harmonic system. Not all of the student groups framed the activity in the same way, and many attempted tasks that existed outside of the prompts of the activity. For one group, this meant that instead of providing a rich verbal description, they framed the activity as finding a mathematical expression.

  7. Reusable sensor based on high magnetization carboxyl-modified graphene oxide with intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity for hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Shi-Lian; Tsai, Rung-Ywan

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new strategy to improve the enzyme stability, construction and sensitivity of a multifunctional sensor. An exfoliated graphene oxide sheet with carboxyl-long-chains (GO-CLC) was prepared in one step from primitive graphite via Friedel-Crafts acylation. Magnetic nanoparticles, glucose oxidase (GOD) and poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline] (SPAnH) were then incorporated to form an electrochemical film (SPAnH-HMGO-CLC-GOD) for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and glucose. The GO and Fe(3)O(4) have intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity and the activity will be enhanced by the combination of SPAnH coating and induces an amplification of electrochemical reduction current. This response can be used as a glucose sensor by tracing the released H(2)O(2) after enzymatic reaction of bound GOD. Our sensor was linear within the range from 0.01 mM to 1mM H(2)O(2) and 0.1mM to 1.4mM glucose, with high sensitivities of 4340.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 1074.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were 5.4% for H(2)O(2) detection and 5.8% for glucose detection. The true detecting range was 0.4-40 mM for H(2)O(2) and 4-56 mM for glucose, which multiplied by 40-fold of dilution. This sensor based on the catalysis of organic SPAnH and the enzymatic activity of GOD can be used for both H(2)O(2) and glucose sensing in potential clinical, environmental and industrial applications.

  8. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  9. Reducing mechanical activation-induced amorphisation of salbutamol sulphate by co-processing with selected carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Vincent; Amharar, Youness; Gallagher, Kieran H; Corcoran, Sarah; Tajber, Lidia; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2013-11-18

    The unintentional generation of amorphous character in crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is an adverse consequence of mechanical activation during dosage form manufacture. In this study, we assess and compare the ability of low glass transition temperature (Tg) dicarboxylic acids to mitigate amorphisation of a model API, salbutamol sulphate (SS), on both co-milling and co-mixing. SS processed alone, as well as co-milled and co-mixed composites of the API with glutaric acid (GA), adipic acid (AA) and pimelic acid (PA) were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic vapour sorption (DVS). Milling and dry mixing of SS both resulted in pXRD amorphous materials. No amorphous content of SS was detected by DVS on co-milling with 50% (w/w) GA, while amorphisation was more than halved, relative to the API milled alone, on co-milling with 50% (w/w) AA and PA, respectively. Co-mixing with each excipient also resulted in a decrease in API amorphicity, although the extent of reduction was considerably less compared to the co-milling experiments. The solubility (Solexcipient) of each excipient in amorphous SS was determined by thermal methods. No further reduction in API amorphisation was achieved on co-mixing with 50% (w/w) excipient, compared to concentrations corresponding to the solubility of each excipient in the amorphous API (SolGA=36%, SolAA=21%, SolPA=22%). PXRD confirmed gradual dissolution over time of GA in amorphous SS on co-mixing. In contrast to co-mixing, co-milling SS at excipient weight fractions above their respective solubilities in the amorphous drug resulted in further reductions in API amorphisation. This is thought to be due to the generation of a molecular dispersion of amorphous API, supersaturated with excipient, thereby leading to a more pronounced composite Tg lowering effect. The results indicate that co-processing with low Tg excipients is an effective strategy at

  10. Evaluation of a diverse set of potential P1 carboxylic acid bioisosteres in hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Robert; Gossas, Thomas; Sabnis, Yogesh A; Daoud, Hanna; Kerblom, Eva; Danielson, U Helena; Sandström, Anja

    2007-06-15

    There is an urgent need for more efficient therapies for people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV NS3 protease inhibitors have shown proof-of-concept in clinical trials, which make the virally encoded NS3 protease an attractive drug target. Product-based NS3 protease inhibitors comprising a P1 C-terminal carboxylic acid have shown to be effective and we were interested in finding alternatives to this crucial carboxylic acid group. Thus, a series of diverse P1 functional groups with different acidity and with possibilities to form a similar, or an even more powerful, hydrogen bond network as compared to the carboxylic acid were synthesized and incorporated into potential inhibitors of the NS3 protease. Biochemical evaluation of the inhibitors was performed in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Several non-acidic C-terminal groups, such as amides and hydrazides, were evaluated but failed to produce inhibitors more potent than the corresponding carboxylic acid inhibitor. The tetrazole moiety, although of similar acidity to a carboxylic acid, provided an inhibitor with mediocre potencies in both assays. However, the acyl cyanamide and the acyl sulfinamide groups rendered compounds with low nanomolar inhibitory potencies and were more potent than the corresponding carboxylic acid inhibitor in the enzymatic assay. Additionally, results from a pH-study suggest that the P(1) C-terminal of the inhibitors comprising a carboxylic acid, an acyl sulfonamide or an acyl cyanamide group binds in a similar mode in the active site of the NS3 protease.

  11. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-08-28

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)](+)) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru-H](+), which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources.

  12. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)]+) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru–H]+, which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  13. XtalFluor-E, an efficient coupling reagent for amidation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Orliac, Aurélie; Gomez Pardo, Domingo; Bombrun, Agnès; Cossy, Janine

    2013-02-15

    Amides were produced from carboxylic acids and amines by using XtalFluor-E as an activator. Even poorly reactive carboxylic acids can be transformed to amides. In addition, optically active amines and/or carboxylic acids were not epimerized/racemized during the process.

  14. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  15. Activity Group Therapy for Emotionally Disturbed Pre-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plenk, Agnes M.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the comprehensive services offered emotionally disturbed preschool children by a voluntary social agency (the Childrens Center in Salt Lake City, Utah), focusing on activity group therapy, the major therapeutic tool used there. (Author/DLS)

  16. Poly[triaquabis-(μ(2)-3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ato)dilithium(I)].

    PubMed

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-02-20

    In the title compound, [Li(2)(C(6)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(3)](n), the coordination number for both independent Li(+) cations is five. One of the Li(+) ions has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol-ecules, and an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand. The other Li(+) ion also has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol-ecule and two 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions involving the water mol-ecules and carboxyl-ate O atoms.

  17. Congener-specific numbering systems for the environmentally relevant C4 through C8 perfluorinated homologue groups of alkyl sulfonates, carboxylates, telomer alcohols, olefins, and acids, and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya; Friesen, Ken J

    2008-10-01

    We introduce a congener-specific numbering system for the C4 through C8 perfluorinated homologue groups of alkyl sulfonates, carboxylates, telomer alcohols, olefins, and acids, and their derivatives. Increasing length of the carbon chain beyond C3 leads to a corresponding rapid increase in the number of potential isomers (C4 = 4, C5 = 8, C6 = 17, C7 = 39, and C8 = 89 congeners). There is a need for clear and unambiguous chemical shorthand to ensure accuracy and consistency in the future perfluorinated alkyl substance (PFA) literature, and to correct previous misconceptions that may have restricted research efforts into developing full-congener PFA analysis. If adopted by the research community, introduction of a numbering system at this relatively early stage of investigations into the congener-specific analysis, environmental behavior, and toxicology of PFAs would not require an arduous and difficult reassignment of historical structures and naming conventions presented in the prior art. Many PFA congeners are chiral, necessitating a consideration of their enantiospecific environmental behavior and toxicology.

  18. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  19. Effects of Collaborative Activities on Group Identity in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyungsung; Seo, Sumin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of collaborative activities on group identity in a virtual world such as "Second Life." To achieve this purpose, this study adopted events that promoted participants' interactions using tools inherent in "Second Life." The interactive tools given to the control group in this…

  20. Blood group isoantibody stimulation in man by feeding blood group-active bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Georg F.; Horton, Richard E.

    1969-01-01

    It was investigated whether or not the human blood group isoantibodies A and B could be induced by immunogenic stimuli via natural routes with a kind of antigenic substance to which all humans are commonly exposed, or if the appearance of these antibodies is independent of antigenic stimuli as has long been believed. Escherichia coli O86, which possess high human blood group B and faint A activity in vitro, were fed to healthy humans and those with intestinal disorders. 80% of the sick individuals of blood group O and A responded with a significant rise of anti-B antibodies which was frequently de novo in infants; significant increase of anti-A isoantibodies among blood group O individuals was less frequent. Over one-third of the healthy individuals also had a significant isoantibody increase. Intestinal lesions favor isoantibody stimulation by intestinal bacteria; this view was supported by the study of control infants. Persons of blood group A responded more frequently with anti-B and anti-E. coli O86 antibody production than those of blood group O. Isoantibody increase was accompanied with antibody rise against E. coli O86. Inhalation of E. coli O86 or blood group AH(O)-specific hog mucin also evoked isoantibodies. The induced isoantibodies were specifically inhibited by small amounts of human blood group substances. E. coli O86-induced anti-blood group antibodies in germ-free chickens and preexisting blood group antibodies in ordinary chickens were neutralized by intravenous injection of E. coli O86 lipopolysaccharide. This study demonstrates that human isoantibodies A and B are readily elicited via physiological routes, by blood group-active E. coli, provided the genetically determined apparatus of the host is responsive. Antibodies against a person's own blood group were not formed. Interpretation of these results permits some careful generalizations as to the origin of so-called natural antibodies. PMID:4893685

  1. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  2. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  3. Mobilizing and Activating Group Demands: The American Agriculture Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, William P.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the American agriculture movement begun in 1977 provides insight into group behavior, mobilization, and activation. Leaders who had recruited participants and organized local and state activities were interviewed. Problems of organizing, specifically when protest is involved, are also discussed. (KC)

  4. In Vitro DNA-Binding, Anti-Oxidant and Anticancer Activity of Indole-2-Carboxylic Acid Dinuclear Copper(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangcong; Yan, Maocai; Wang, Qibao; Wang, Huannan; Wang, Zhengyang; Zhao, Jiayi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-01-20

    Indole-2-carboxylic acid copper complex (ICA-Cu) was successfully prepared and characterized through elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR, TG analysis, and molar conductance, and its molecular formula was [Cu₂(C₉H₆O₂N)₄(H₂O)₂]·2H₂O. The binding ability of ICA-Cu to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was examined by fluorescence spectrometry and the viscosity method. The results indicated that, upon the addition of increasing amounts of CT-DNA, the excitation and emission intensity of ICA-Cu decreased obviously and the excitation spectra shifted towards a long wavelength. ICA-Cu could displace ethidium bromide (EB) from the EB-DNA system, making the fluorescence intensity of the EB-DNA system decrease sharply; the quenching constant KSV value was 3.99 × 10⁴ M(-1). The emission intensity of the ICA-Cu-DNA system was nearly constant, along with the addition of Na⁺ in a series of concentrations. The fluorescence of the complex could be protected after the complex interacted with DNA. A viscosity measurement further supported the result that the ICA-Cu complex may interact with DNA in an intercalative binding mode. The antioxidant activities of ICA-Cu were evaluated by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging assay, and a 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay. The ICA-Cu exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on the ABTS radical (94% inhibition at 60 µM), followed by OH and DPPH radicals (the degrees of inhibition being 71% and 56%, respectively). The in vitro cytotoxicity activity of ICA-Cu against two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, was investigated by 3-[4,5-dimethyltiazol2-yl]-2.5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cellular morphological analysis. The results showed that, upon increasing the concentration of ICA-Cu, an increase was observed in growth-inhibitory activity and the inhibition percentage were greater than 90% at 20 µM in both cell

  5. Cloud Forming Potential of Aminium Carboxylate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Hernandez, M. E.; McKeown, M.; Taylor, N.; Collins, D. R.; Lavi, A.; Rudich, Y.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect visibility, air quality, human health, climate, and in particular the aerosol direct and indirect forcings represent the largest uncertainty in climate projections. In this paper, we present laboratory measurements of the hygroscopic growth factors (HGf) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of a series of aminium carboxylate salt aerosols, utilizing a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and a CCN counter. HGf measurements were conducted for size-selected aerosols with diameters ranging from 46 nm to 151 nm and at relative humidity (RH%) values ranging from 10 to 90%. In addition, we have calculated the CCN activation diameters for the aminium carboxylate aerosols and derived the hygroscopicity parameter (k or kappa) values for all species using three methods, i.e., the mixing rule approximation, HGf, and CCN results. Our results show that variations in the ratio of acid to base directly affect the activation diameter, HGf, and (k) values of the aminium carboxylate aerosols. Atmospheric implications of the variations in the chemical composition of aminium carboxylate aerosols on their cloud forming potential will be discussed.

  6. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  7. A role for coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) in a bacterial pathway of aliphatic epoxide carboxylation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Daniel D.; Krum, Jonathan G.; Ensign, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The bacterial metabolism of short-chain aliphatic alkenes occurs via oxidation to epoxyalkanes followed by carboxylation to β-ketoacids. Epoxyalkane carboxylation requires four enzymes (components I–IV), NADPH, NAD+, and a previously unidentified nucleophilic thiol. In the present work, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), a compound previously found only in the methanogenic Archaea where it serves as a methyl group carrier and activator, has been identified as the thiol and central cofactor of aliphatic epoxide carboxylation in the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2. Component I catalyzed the addition of coenzyme M to epoxypropane to form a β-hydroxythioether, 2-(2-hydroxypropylthio)ethanesulfonate. Components III and IV catalyzed the NAD+-dependent stereoselective dehydrogenation of R- and S-enantiomers of 2-(2-hydroxypropylthio)ethanesulfonate to form 2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate. Component II catalyzed the NADPH-dependent cleavage and carboxylation of the β-ketothioether to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M. These findings evince a newfound versatility for coenzyme M as a carrier and activator of alkyl groups longer in chain-length than methane, a function for coenzyme M in a catabolic pathway of hydrocarbon oxidation, and the presence of coenzyme M in the bacterial domain of the phylogenetic tree. These results serve to unify bacterial and Archaeal metabolism further and showcase diverse biological functions for an elegantly simple organic molecule. PMID:10411892

  8. Aqueous infrared carboxylate absorbances: Aliphatic di-acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; McVey, I.F.

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of 18 aliphatic di-carboxylic acids are reported as a function of pH. The spectra show isosbestic points and intensity changes which indicate that Beer's law is obeyed, and peak frequencies lie within previously reported ranges for aqueous carboxylates and pure carboxylic acids. Intensity sharing from the symmetric carboxylate stretch is evident in many cases, so that bands which are nominally due to alkyl groups show increased intensity at higher pH. The asymmetric stretch of the HA- species is linearly related to the microscopic acidity constant of the H2A species, with ??pK 2 intervening atoms). The results suggest that aqueous ATR-FTIR may be able to estimate 'intrinsic' pKa values of carboxylic acids, in addition to providing quantitative estimates of ionization. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Discriminative Latent Models for Recognizing Contextual Group Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Yang; Yang, Weilong; Robinovitch, Stephen N.; Mori, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we go beyond recognizing the actions of individuals and focus on group activities. This is motivated from the observation that human actions are rarely performed in isolation; the contextual information of what other people in the scene are doing provides a useful cue for understanding high-level activities. We propose a novel framework for recognizing group activities which jointly captures the group activity, the individual person actions, and the interactions among them. Two types of contextual information, group-person interaction and person-person interaction, are explored in a latent variable framework. In particular, we propose three different approaches to model the person-person interaction. One approach is to explore the structures of person-person interaction. Differently from most of the previous latent structured models, which assume a predefined structure for the hidden layer, e.g., a tree structure, we treat the structure of the hidden layer as a latent variable and implicitly infer it during learning and inference. The second approach explores person-person interaction in the feature level. We introduce a new feature representation called the action context (AC) descriptor. The AC descriptor encodes information about not only the action of an individual person in the video, but also the behavior of other people nearby. The third approach combines the above two. Our experimental results demonstrate the benefit of using contextual information for disambiguating group activities. PMID:22144516

  10. Discriminative latent models for recognizing contextual group activities.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Yang; Yang, Weilong; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Mori, Greg

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we go beyond recognizing the actions of individuals and focus on group activities. This is motivated from the observation that human actions are rarely performed in isolation; the contextual information of what other people in the scene are doing provides a useful cue for understanding high-level activities. We propose a novel framework for recognizing group activities which jointly captures the group activity, the individual person actions, and the interactions among them. Two types of contextual information, group-person interaction and person-person interaction, are explored in a latent variable framework. In particular, we propose three different approaches to model the person-person interaction. One approach is to explore the structures of person-person interaction. Differently from most of the previous latent structured models, which assume a predefined structure for the hidden layer, e.g., a tree structure, we treat the structure of the hidden layer as a latent variable and implicitly infer it during learning and inference. The second approach explores person-person interaction in the feature level. We introduce a new feature representation called the action context (AC) descriptor. The AC descriptor encodes information about not only the action of an individual person in the video, but also the behavior of other people nearby. The third approach combines the above two. Our experimental results demonstrate the benefit of using contextual information for disambiguating group activities.

  11. A comprehensive classification and nomenclature of carboxyl–carboxyl(ate) supramolecular motifs and related catemers: implications for biomolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Carboxyl and carboxylate groups form important supramolecular motifs (synthons). Besides carboxyl cyclic dimers, carboxyl and carboxylate groups can associate through a single hydrogen bond. Carboxylic groups can further form polymeric-like catemer chains within crystals. To date, no exhaustive classification of these motifs has been established. In this work, 17 association types were identified (13 carboxyl–carboxyl and 4 carboxyl–carboxylate motifs) by taking into account the syn and anti carboxyl conformers, as well as the syn and anti lone pairs of the O atoms. From these data, a simple rule was derived stating that only eight distinct catemer motifs involving repetitive combinations of syn and anti carboxyl groups can be formed. Examples extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all identified dimers and catemers are presented, as well as statistical data related to their occurrence and conformational preferences. The inter-carboxyl(ate) and carboxyl(ate)–water hydrogen-bond properties are described, stressing the occurrence of very short (strong) hydrogen bonds. The precise characterization and classification of these supramolecular motifs should be of interest in crystal engineering, pharmaceutical and also biomolecular sciences, where similar motifs occur in the form of pairs of Asp/Glu amino acids or motifs involving ligands bearing carboxyl(ate) groups. Hence, we present data emphasizing how the analysis of hydrogen-containing small molecules of high resolution can help understand structural aspects of larger and more complex biomolecular systems of lower resolution. PMID:25827369

  12. Carboxylic Acid to Thioamide Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Suchitra; Lightner, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The lactam groups of dipyrrinones avidly engage in amide-amide hydrogen bonding to form dimeric association complexes in nonpolar solvents (in CHCl3, KD ~25,000 M-1 at 22°C). The corresponding thioamides (dipyrrinthiones), prepared from dipyrrinones by reaction with Lawesson’s reagent, also form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers in nonpolar solvents, albeit with much weaker association constants (in CHCl3, KD ~200 M-1 at 22°C). When a carboxylic acid group is tethered to C(9) of the dipyrrinone, as in the hexanoic acid of [6]-semirubin, tight intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic acid group and the lactam moiety (intramolecular Kassoc ≫25,000) is found in CHCl3 with no evidence of dimers. In contrast, the analogous dipyrrinthione, [6]-thiosemirubin, eschews intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined using NMR spectroscopy and vapor pressure osmometry, preferring to form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers of the thioamide-thioamide type. PMID:20049064

  13. Potent antitumor activity of quinolone compounds with an unsaturated aminoazabicyclo group at the C-7 position of the quinolone ring.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, H; Mano, E; Hakoda, N; Yoshinari, T; Nakagawa, S; Okura, A

    1996-04-01

    Relationships between the substituents on the quinolone nucleus of 2 and related compounds and their biological activities were studied. 2, 3 and 1 carrying a (1R, 2R, 6R)-2-amino-8-azabicyclo[4.3.0.]non-3-en-8-yl group at the C-7 position increased the rate of formation of DNA-protein complexes in cells, and inhibited the growth of tumor cells more strongly than the compounds with other substituents. The introduction of a fluorine atom or a methoxy group at the 8-position and an amino group at the 5-position increased the activity still further. The three compounds listed were all effective against P388 leukemia in mice. Subcutaneous injection of 2 at 2 mg/kg strongly suppressed the growth of human MX-1 breast cancer cells in nude mice. 1 has various functional groups that increase the cytotoxic potential of quinolone derivatives: a (1R, 2R, 6R)-2-amino-8-azabicyclo[4.3.0.]non-3-en-8-yl moiety at C-7, a cyclopropyl group at the 1-position, fluorine atoms at the 6- and 8-positions, and an amino group at the 5-position of the quinoline carboxylic acid. These data suggest that this series of compounds provide good models for the further design of potent antitumor quinolones.

  14. On the Mechanism of Pd(0)-Catalyzed, Cu(I) Carboxylate-Mediated Thioorganic-Boronic Acid Desulfitative Coupling. A Non-innocent Role for Carboxylate Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational studies of the mechanism of the Pd-catalyzed, Cu(I)-carboxylate-mediated desulfitative coupling of thioorganics with boronic acids have determined that the requisite Cu(I)-carboxylate plays multiple important roles. The Cu(I)-carboxylate enhances both the transmetalation and the C-C reductive elimination steps: it acts as a reactive transmetalation center and it provides a vital carboxylate ligand. The carboxylate ligand functions not only as an activator for the boronic acid, but it also displaces a phosphine ligand at the palladium center generating a catalytically competent mono-phosphine-palladium intermediate. PMID:20161122

  15. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  16. 9-Anthracene carboxylic acid is more suitable than DIDS for characterization of calcium-activated chloride current during canine ventricular action potential.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Kistamás, Kornél; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Magyar, János

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of ionic currents in shaping the cardiac action potential (AP) has great importance as channel malfunctions can lead to sudden cardiac death by inducing arrhythmias. Therefore, researchers frequently use inhibitors to selectively block a certain ion channel like 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (9-AC) for calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca)). This study aims to explore which blocker is preferable to study ICl(Ca). Whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1, while action potentials were measured using sharp microelectrodes. DIDS- (0.2 mM) and 9-AC-sensitive (0.5 mM) currents were identical in voltage-clamp conditions, regardless of intracellular Ca(2+) buffering. DIDS-sensitive current amplitude was larger with the increase of stimulation rate and correlated well with the rate-induced increase of calcium transients. Both drugs increased action potential duration (APD) to the same extent, but the elevation of the plateau potential was more pronounced with 9-AC at fast stimulation rates. On the contrary, 9-AC did not influence either the AP amplitude or the maximal rate of depolarization (V max), but DIDS caused marked reduction of V max. Both inhibitors reduced the magnitude of phase-1, but, at slow stimulation rates, this effect of DIDS was larger. All of these actions on APs were reversible upon washout of the drugs. Increasing concentrations of 9-AC between 0.1 and 0.5 mM in a cumulative manner gradually reduced phase-1 and increased APD. 9-AC at 1 mM had no additional actions upon perfusion after 0.5 mM. The half-effective concentration of 9-AC was approximately 160 μM with a Hill coefficient of 2. The amplitudes of ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1 were not changed by 0.5 mM 9-AC. These results suggest that DIDS is equally useful to study ICl(Ca) during voltage-clamp but 9-AC is superior in AP measurements for studying the physiological role of

  17. Forestry Activities. A Guide for Youth Group Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Twenty-six activities related to forestry, conservation, and outdoor education comprise the content of this leader's guide. Designed for use with youth groups, ideas and techniques range from forest conservation mobiles, locating forest fires, and Christmas tree uses to litterbug campaigns, watershed experiments, and crossword puzzles. Activities…

  18. Active Classroom Participation in a Group Scribbles Primary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenli; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2011-01-01

    A key stimulus of learning efficacy for students in the classroom is active participation and engagement in the learning process. This study examines the nature of teacher-student and student-student discourse when leveraged by an interactive technology--Group Scribbles (GS) in a Primary 5 Science classroom in Singapore which supports rapid…

  19. Stabilization of calcium- and terbium-carboxylate bonds by NH...O hydrogen bonds in a mononuclear complex: a functional model of the active site of calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Akira; Yamada, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Adachi, Hiroshi; Okamura, Taka-Aki; Nakamura, Akira; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Ueyama, Norikazu; Vyprachticky, Drahomir; Okamoto, Yoshi

    2004-07-12

    Novel benzoic acid ligands with bulky amide groups at the ortho position, 2,6-(MeCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)CO(2)H (1) and 2,6-(t-BuCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)CO(2)H (2), and their tris- and tetrakis(carboxylate) complexes with Ca(II) and Tb(III) ions, (NEt(4))(2)[Ca(II)[O(2)C-2,6-(t-BuCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)](4)] (4), [Tb[O(2)C-2,6-(t-BuNHCO)(2)C(6)H(3)](3)(H(2)O)(3)

  20. The Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid and Ester Groups in the Functionalized Interfacial Region of ’Polyethylene Carboxylic Acid’ (PE-CO2H) and Derivatives: Differentiation of the Functional Groups into Shallow and Deep Subsets Based on a Comparison of Contact Angle and ATR-IR Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    the relationship is less obvious, because the sensitivity of this technique depends on the depth of the group being observed in the interface and on...the nature of this group and the surrounding material. We have postulated that relationships of the type required by eq I hold for contact angle...8217 points are drawn sinaller than their estimated error far clarity. Bottom: The relationship between fe (pH 1 and pH 13) and fIR based on the data in

  1. Evolution and flare activity of a group in July 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, I.

    1983-03-01

    The evolution of a sunspot group with a delta configuration which passed over the solar disk on July 8--21, 1978, is studied on the basis of original materials consisting of photoheliograms, H..cap alpha.. filtergrams, and wide-band photographs obtained in Tashkent. More than 160 H..cap alpha.. flares, including 22 flares of importance 1 and 10 flares of importance 2, were observed in the active region (AR) containing this group according to Solar-Geophysical Data. As a result of a comparison of the evolutionary changes of the group with the flare activity of the AR it was found that the flare activity is connected with the formation of a new sunspot group within an old one, with its maximum falling at the time of formation of the first nuclei, and new nuclei are formed along the zero line of the longitudinal field of the old group; the nodes of the majority of flares are located near new nuclei, symmetrical relative to the zero line; the area of the new nuclei increases impulsively; the total area of the entire group varies, fluctuating about its average value, and flares happen during the slowing and cessation of the increase in area; some nuclei show proper motion at a velocity of approx.0.5 km/sec while others show intermittent motion, like pulsation, directed outside the old group; as a result of the development of new nuclei near old ones the small nuclei break up, while the boundary of the large nucleus is deformed on the side of the new nuclei and bright points shine within it.

  2. Adherence to physical activity guidelines among cancer support group participants.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Lydon, A; Amir, Z

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity is recommended after cancer diagnosis for physical function, quality of life and survival benefits. This study provided preliminary data on the prevalence of physical activity among adult men and women with cancer in the UK. As part of a national survey of cancer support group participation, questionnaires including items on leisure-time physical activity and demographic information were completed by 748 cancer survivors. Overall, 395 (52.8%) participants reported no weekly moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity, 221 (29.5%) reported some activity but below minimum recommendations and 132 (17.6%) were meeting published guidelines. Gender, health status and socio-economic status were independently associated with meeting guidelines. Among participants in good or fair health who were not meeting guidelines, 59.9% thought that they ought to be more physically active. In conclusion, overall levels of physical activity are low among cancer survivors in the UK. However, the majority of insufficiently active participants showed awareness of the need to increase their activity, and may be receptive to interventions for promoting physical activity in this population.

  3. In-Group and Out-Group Membership Mediates Anterior Cingulate Activation to Social Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Austen; Platek, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to examine sensitivity to social exclusion in three conditions: same-race, other-race, and self-resembling faces. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), specifically the dorsal ACC, has been targeted as a key substrate in the physical and social pain matrix and was hypothesized to regulate activation response to various facial conditions. We show that participants demonstrated greatest ACC activation when being excluded by self-resembling and same-race faces, relative to other-race faces. Additionally, participants expressed greater distress and showed increased ACC activation as a result of exclusion in the same-race condition relative to the other-race condition. A positive correlation between implicit racial bias and activation in the amygdala was also evident. Implicit attitude about other-race faces partly explains levels of concern about exclusion by out-group individuals. These findings suggest that individuals are more distressed and their brain (i.e. neural alarm system) responds with greater activation when being excluded by individuals whom they are more likely to share group membership with. PMID:19597546

  4. Trypanosoma brucei prenylated-protein carboxyl methyltransferase prefers farnesylated substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S; Kateete, David P; Lubega, George W; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Yokoyama, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    Carboxyl methylation of the C-terminal prenylated cysteine, which occurs in most farnesylated and geranylgeranylated proteins, is a reversible step and is implicated in the regulation of membrane binding and cellular functions of prenylated proteins such as GTPases. The gene coding for prenylated-protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PPMT) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. The protein of 245 amino acids has 24-28% sequence identity to the orthologues from other species including human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methyltransferase activity was detected in the membrane fraction from Sf9 cells infected with the recombinant baculovirus using N -acetyl- S -farnesylcysteine (AFC) and S -adenosyl[ methyl -(3)H]methionine ([(3)H]AdoMet) as substrates. Recombinant T. brucei PPMT prefers AFC to N -acetyl- S -geranylgeranylcysteine (AGGC) by 10-50-fold based on the V (max)/ K (m) values. Native PPMT activity detected in the membrane fraction from T. brucei procyclics displays similar substrate specificity ( approximately 40-fold preference for AFC over AGGC). In contrast, mouse liver PPMT utilizes both AFC and AGGC as substrates with similar catalytic efficiencies. Several cellular proteins of the T. brucei bloodstream form were shown to be carboxyl methylated in a cell-free system. Incorporation of [(3)H]methyl group from [(3)H]AdoMet into most of the proteins was significantly inhibited by AFC but not AGGC at 20 microM, suggesting that T. brucei PPMT acts on farnesylated proteins in the cell. Cells of the T. brucei bloodstream form show higher sensitivity to AFC and AGGC (EC(50)=70-80 microM) compared with mouse 3T3 cells (EC(50)>150 microM). PMID:12141948

  5. Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-04-04

    Chiral carboxylic acid moieties are widely found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, fragrances, and health supplements. Although they can be synthesized straightforwardly by transition-metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids, because the existing chiral catalysts have various disadvantages, the development of new chiral catalysts with high activity and enantioselectivity is an important, long-standing challenge. Ruthenium complexes with chiral diphosphine ligands and rhodium complexes with chiral monodentate or bidentate phosphorus ligands have been the predominant catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of unsaturated acids. However, the efficiency of these catalysts is highly substrate-dependent, and most of the reported catalysts require a high loading, high hydrogen pressure, or long reaction time for satisfactory results. Our recent studies have revealed that chiral iridium complexes with chiral spiro-phosphine-oxazoline ligands and chiral spiro-phosphine-benzylamine ligands exhibit excellent activity and enantioselectivity in the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids, including α,β-disubstituted acrylic acids, trisubstituted acrylic acids, α-substituted acrylic acids, and heterocyclic α,β-unsaturated acids. On the basis of an understanding of the role of the carboxy group in iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions, we developed a carboxy-group-directed strategy for asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins. Using this strategy, we hydrogenated several challenging olefin substrates, such as β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids, 1,1-diarylethenes, 1,1-dialkylethenes, and 1-alkyl styrenes in high yield and with excellent enantioselectivity. All these iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions feature high turnover numbers (up to 10000) and turnover frequencies (up to 6000 h(-1)), excellent enantioselectivities (greater than 95% ee with few exceptions), low hydrogen pressure (<12 atm

  6. Modulation of Group I Ribozyme Activity by Cationic Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ito, Tatsunobu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cationic porphyrins on the catalytic activities of four group I ribozymes were investigated. A cationic porphyrin possessing four pyridinium moieties (pPyP) inhibited two group IC3 ribozymes (Syn Rz and Azo Rz) and a group IC1 ribozyme (Tet Rz). In the case of a group IA2 ribozyme (Td Rz), however, pPyP served not only as an inhibitor but also as an activator, and the effects of pPyP were dependent on its concentration. To analyze the structural and electronic factors determining the effects of pPyP on group I ribozymes, three cationic porphyrins (pPyNCP, pPyF4P, and TMPyP) were also examined. As interactions between small organic molecules and nucleic acids are attractive and important issues in biochemistry and biotechnology, this study contributes to the development of porphyrin-based molecules that can modulate functions of structured RNA molecules. PMID:25811638

  7. Inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate. The nature of active-site functional groups and comparisons with the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1991-01-01

    The pH-rate profile for inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate supports previous evidence [Knap & Pratt (1989) Proteins Struct. Funct. Genet. 6, 316-323] for the activation of the active-site thiol group by adjacent functional groups. The enhanced reactivity of iodoacetate, with respect to that of iodoacetamide, suggests the influence of a positive charge in the active site. The reactivity of iodoacetate is not affected by dissociation of an active-site functional group of pKa 6.7, which increases the reactivity of neutral reagents, probably because of a compensation phenomenon; it is, however, lost on dissociation of an acid of pKa 8.1. It is concluded that the active cysteine beta-lactamase has four functional groups at the active site, one nucleophilic thiolate of Cys-70, one neutral acid (most probably the carboxy group of Glu-166, from the crystal structures) and two cationic residues (most probably Lys-73 and Lys-234). A comparison of these results with the pH-dependence of reactivity of the native RTEM-2 beta-lactamase suggests that the active form of the latter enzyme is also monocationic, although the nucleophile (Ser-70) is likely to be neutral in this case and the carboxylic acid dissociated. A mechanism of class A beta-lactamase catalysis is discussed where the Glu-166 carboxylate acts as a general base/acid catalyst and Lys-73 is principally required for electrostatic stabilization of the anionic tetrahedral intermediate.

  8. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-01-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25–70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated PMID:24288654

  9. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Bromination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xinqiang; Song, Tao; Wang, Zhentao; Chen, He; Cui, Lei; Li, Chaozhong

    2017-03-13

    The silver-catalyzed Hunsdiecker bromination of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With Ag(Phen)2OTf as the catalyst and dibromoisocyanuric acid as the brominating agent, various aliphatic carboxylic acids underwent decarboxylative bromination to provide the corresponding alkyl bromides under mild conditions. This method not only is efficient and general but also enjoys wide functional group compatibility. An oxidative radical mechanism involving Ag(II) intermediates is proposed.

  10. Crystal structures of ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia R; Low, John Nicolson; Fernandes, Carlos; Gaspar, Alexandra; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of two chromone derivatives, viz. ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate, C19H16O4, (1), and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate C18H13FO4, (2), have been determined: (1) crystallizes with two mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. A comparison of the dihedral angles beween the mean planes of the central chromone core with those of the substituents, an ethyl ester moiety at the 2-position and a para-substituted phenyl ring at the 6-position shows that each mol-ecule differs significantly from the others, even the two independent mol-ecules (a and b) of (1). In all three mol-ecules, the carbonyl groups of the chromone and the carboxyl-ate are trans-related. The supra-molecular structure of (1) involves only weak C-H⋯π inter-actions between H atoms of the substituent phenyl group and the phenyl group, which link mol-ecules into a chain of alternating mol-ecules a and b, and weak π-π stacking inter-actions between the chromone units. The packing in (2) involves C-H⋯O inter-actions, which form a network of two inter-secting ladders involving the carbonyl atom of the carboxyl-ate group as the acceptor for H atoms at the 7-position of the chromone ring and from an ortho-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. The carbonyl atom of the chromone acts as an acceptor from a meta-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. π-π inter-actions stack the mol-ecules by unit translation along the a axis.

  11. Synthesis, structures, electrochemical studies and antioxidant activity of 5-aryl-4-oxo-3,4,5,8-tetrahydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-7-carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, Jairo; Romo, Pablo E.; Ortiz, Alejandro; Isaza, José Hipólito; Insuasty, Braulio; Abonia, Rodrigo; Nogueras, Manuel; Cobo, Justo

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of 5-aryl-4-oxo-3,4,5,8-tetrahydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-7-carboxylic acids 3 from the reaction of 6-aminopyrimidines 1 with arylidene derivatives of pyruvic acid 2 under microwave and ultrasound irradiation is described. The orientation of cyclization process was determined by NMR measurements. The methodology provides advantages such as high yields and friendly to the environment without the use of solvents. The antioxidant properties, DPPH free radical scavenging, ORAC, and anodic potential oxidation of the new pyridopyrimidines were studied.

  12. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  13. Insights on the susceptibility of plant pathogenic fungi to phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its chemical derivatives.

    PubMed

    Puopolo, Gerardo; Masi, Marco; Raio, Aida; Andolfi, Anna; Zoina, Astolfo; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 produced two phenazine compounds as main secondary metabolites. These metabolites were identified as phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and 2-hydroxyphenazine (2-OH P). In this study, the spectrum of the activity of PCA and 2-OH P was evaluated against a group of crop and forestal plant pathogenic fungi by an agar plate bioassay. PCA was active against most of the tested plant pathogens, while 2-OH P slightly inhibited a few fungal species. Furthermore, four semisynthesised derivatives of PCA (phenazine-1-carboxymethyl, phenazine-1-carboxamide, phenazine-1-hydroxymethyl and phenazine-1-acetoxymethyl) were assayed for their antifungal activity against 11 phytopathogenic species. Results showed that the carboxyl group is a structural feature important for the antifungal activity of PCA. Since the activity of phenazine-1-carboxymethyl and phenazine-1-carboxamide, the two more lipophilic and reversible PCA derivatives remained substantially unaltered compared with PCA.

  14. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  15. 4-Carboxypiperidinium 1-carboxycyclobutane-1-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Belandria, Lusbely M; Mora, Asiloé J; Delgado, Gerzon E; Briceño, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The title salt, C(6)H(12)NO(2)(+)·C(6)H(7)O(4)(-) or ISO(+)·CBDC(-), is an ionic ensemble assisted by hydrogen bonds. The amino acid moiety (ISO or piperidine-4-carboxylic acid) has a protonated ring N atom (ISO(+) or 4-carboxypiperidinium), while the semi-protonated acid (CBDC(-) or 1-carboxycyclobutane-1-carboxylate) has the negative charge residing on one carboxylate group, leaving the other as a neutral -COOH group. The -(+)NH(2)- state of protonation allows the formation of a two-dimensional crystal packing consisting of zigzag layers stacked along a separated by van der Waals distances. The layers extend in the bc plane connected by a complex network of N-H···O and O-H···O hydrogen bonds. Wave-like ribbons, constructed from ISO(+) and CBDC(-) units and described by the graph-set symbols C(3)(3)(10) and R(3)(3)(14), run alternately in opposite directions along c. Intercalated between the ribbons are ISO(+) cations linked by hydrogen bonds, forming rings described by the graph-set symbols R(6)(6)(30) and R(4)(2)(18). A detailed analysis of the structures of the individual components and the intricate hydrogen-bond network of the crystal structure is given.

  16. Location of. gamma. -carboxyglutamyl residues in partially carboxylated prothrombin preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Liska, D.J.; Suttie, J.W.

    1988-11-15

    Prothrombin contains 10-..gamma..-carboxylglutamyl (Gla) residues in the N-terminal (fragment 1) domain of the protein. Following anticoagulant administration, a spectrum of undercarboxylated, physiologically less active forms of prothrombin is secreted into bovine or human plasma. The sites of undercarboxylation in these prothrombin species have now been investigated. Plasma containing a mixture of partially carboxylated forms of prothombin was obtained from a dicoumarol-treated bovine, and three pools of partially carboxylated (four, six, or eight Gla) species were purified by adsorption onto barium citrate and barium oxalate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and chromatography. Fragment 1 obtained from these variants was equilibrated with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O and heated in a dry state to decarboxylate Gla and incorporate /sup 3/H into the resulting Glu residues. This peptide was then sequenced by Edman degradation, and the specific radioactivity of PTH-Glu was determined for each potential Gla-containing site. Data obtained from normal prothrombin fragment 1 fit a linear model when the log of specific activity of PTH-Glu was plotted against the cycle number. Analysis of the 80% variant showed a decrease in carboxylation only in the last two Gla residues, while data obtained from the 60% variant indicated a general decrease in carboxylation from the most amino-terminal of the Gla residues. In the 40% Gla variant, all but the most amino-terminal of the Gla residues appeared to be undercarboxylated. These data indicate that the ..gamma..-carboxylation of glutamyl residues in prothrombin does not occur randomly but instead with preferential carboxylation of the most amino-terminal Gla residues. When carboxylation is limited, the impairment of carboxylation is more severe at the more carboxyl-terminal residues.

  17. Synthesis Characterization and Biological Activities of Coordination Compounds of 4-Hydroxy-3-nitro-2H-chromen-2-one and Its Aminoethanoic Acid and Pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic Acid Mixed Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Akinkunmi, Ezekiel; Obuotor, Efere; Olawuni, Idowu; Isabirye, David; Jordaan, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Coordination compounds of 4-hydroxy-3-nitro-2H-chromen-2-one and their mixed ligand complexes with aminoethanoic acid and pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid were synthesized by the reaction of Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts in molar ratio 1 : 2 for the coumarin complexes and 1 : 1 : 1 for the mixed ligand complexes, in basic media. The compounds formed were characterized using infrared, Uv-vis spectrophotometric analyses, mass spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and EDX analyses. It was concluded that 4-hydroxy-3-nitro-2H-chromen-2-one coordinated as a monobasic ligand for all the complexes; it also coordinated via the carbonyl moiety in the case of the Cu(II) mixed ligand complexes. Similarly it was proposed that the amino acids also coordinated in a bidentate fashion via their amino nitrogen and carboxylate oxygen atoms. The synthesized compounds were screened for their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The complexes exhibited marginal antimicrobial activity but good cytotoxic activity. PMID:28270743

  18. Influence of molecular interactions on the stability of hydrogen-bonded dimers of carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Alfred; Plass, Monika; Kresse, Horst; Kolbe, Adelheid; Drabowicz, Jozef; Zurawinski, Remiguisz

    1997-12-01

    Possibilities to change the molecular arrangement of hydrogen bonded dimers of carboxylic acids by offering other acceptor groups are investigated in different species of molecules, namely in amino acid conjugates, in sulfinyl- and phosphinyl-carboxylic acids and in some p- n-alkoxybenzoic acids. As a result it was found that the carboxylic dimers are rather easily broken by lattice forces, by forming other intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds to stronger acceptor groups, and by increasing the temperature.

  19. Filamin-A binds to the carboxyl-terminal tail of the calcium-sensing receptor, an interaction that participates in CaR-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hjälm, G; MacLeod, R J; Kifor, O; Chattopadhyay, N; Brown, E M

    2001-09-14

    The G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) regulates parathyroid hormone secretion and parathyroid cellular proliferation as well as the functions of diverse other cell types. The CaR resides in caveolae-plasma membrane microdomains containing receptors and associated signaling molecules that are thought to serve as cellular "message centers." An additional mechanism for coordinating cellular signaling is the presence of scaffold proteins that bind and organize components of signal transduction cascades. With the use of the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified filamin-A (an actin-cross-linking, putative scaffold protein that binds mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) components activated by the CaR) as an intracellular binding partner of the CaR's carboxyl (COOH)-terminal tail. A direct interaction of the two proteins was confirmed by an in vitro binding assay. Moreover, confocal microscopy combined with two color immunofluorescence showed co-localization of the CaR and filamin-A within parathyroid cells as well as HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the CaR. Deletion mapping localized the sites of interaction between the two proteins to a stretch of 60 amino acid residues within the distal portion of the CaR's COOH-terminal tail and domains 14 and 15 in filamin-A, respectively. Finally, introducing the portion of filamin-A interacting with the CaR into CaR-transfected HEK-293 cells using protein transduction with a His-tagged, Tat-filamin-A fusion protein nearly abolished CaR-mediated activation of ERK1/2 MAPK but had no effect on ERK1/2 activity stimulated by ADP. Therefore, the binding of the CaR's COOH-terminal tail to filamin-A may contribute to its localization in caveolae, link it to the actin-based cytoskeleton, and participate in CaR-mediated activation of MAPK.

  20. Modification of agarose with carboxylation and grafting dopamine for promotion of its cell-adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Su, Yixue; Chu, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Chaoxi; Zhang, Lingmin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xiaoying; Tang, Shunqing

    2013-02-15

    In order to improve bioactivity of agarose, we modified agarose by carboxylation and grafting dopamine. Under alkaline condition, carboxylated agarose was prepared using 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) oxidation system by oxidizing C(6) hydroxyl on D-galactose ring into carboxyl group, and the maximum value of the degree of carboxylation reached 30%. With the increase of the amount of oxidant, the molecular weight of the carboxylated agarose decreased to 4 kDa by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measure. Carboxylated agarose reacted with dopamine through EDC condensation reaction to obtain agarose grafting dopamine (Ag-g-DA), and the grafting rate of dopamine was determined to be 9.3% by UV spectroscopy at 280 nm. The structures of these modified agaroses were determined by FT-IR and (13)C NMR. Both carboxylated agarose and Ag-g-DA showed no cytotoxicity and promoted cell-adhesiveness.

  1. The cooperative effect between active site ionized groups and water desolvation controls the alteration of acid/base catalysis in serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2007-08-13

    What is the driving force that alters the catalytic function of His57 in serine proteases between general base and general acid in each step along the enzymatic reaction? The stable tetrahedral complexes (TC) of chymotrypsin with trifluoromethyl ketone transition state analogue inhibitors are topologically similar to the catalytic transition state. Therefore, they can serve as a good model to study the enzyme catalytic reaction. We used DFT quantum mechanical calculations to analyze the effect of solvation and of polar factors in the active site of chymotrypsin on the pKa of the catalytic histidine in FE (the free enzyme), EI (the noncovalent enzyme inhibitor complex), and TC. We demonstrated that the acid/base alteration is controlled by the charged groups in the active site--the catalytic Asp102 carboxylate and the oxyanion. The effect of these groups on the catalytic His is modulated by water solvation of the active site.

  2. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis.

  3. Enhanced biological activity of carotenoids stabilized by phenyl groups.

    PubMed

    You, Ji Suk; Jeon, Sunhwa; Byun, Youn Jung; Koo, Sangho; Choi, Shin Sik

    2015-06-15

    Carotenoids are lipid soluble food ingredients with multifunction including antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, carotenoids are destructively oxidized upon reaction with radicals resulting in toxic effects on biological systems. Two synthetic carotenoids (BAS and BTS) containing the aromatic phenyl groups with a para-substituent (OMe and Me, respectively) at C-13 and C-13' position were prepared in order to overcome a structural instability of carotenoid. Both BAS and BTS exerted stronger radical scavenging activity than β-carotene in DPPH and ABTS assays. In particular, BTS significantly reduced in vivo ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels and improved body growth and reproduction of Caenorhabditiselegans. BTS has a great potential for the advanced and modified carotenoid material with stability leading to enhanced bioavailability.

  4. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  5. The International Particle Physics Outreach Group (ippog):. Aims and Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, David

    2012-08-01

    The International Particle Physics Outreach Group, IPPOG, is a network of particle physics communication and education experts. IPPOG's principle aim is to maximize the impact of education and outreach efforts related to particle physics through information exchange and the sharing of expertise. IPPOG has initiated several major European and Worldwide activities, such as the "International Particle Physics Masterclasses" where each year thousands of high school students in more than 20 countries come to one of about 120 nearby universities or research centres for a day in order to unravel the mysteries of particle physics. IPPOG has also initiated a global database of education and outreach materials, aimed at supporting other particle physicists and education professionals. The aims and activities of IPPOG will be described, as well as plans to include more countries & laboratories in the network.

  6. 75 FR 51525 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update... of Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group Activities. SUMMARY: The FRA is updating its announcement of RSAC's Working Group activities to reflect its current status. FOR...

  7. Inhibition of NF-{kappa}B1 and NF-{kappa}B2 activation in prostate cancer cells treated with antibody against the carboxyl terminal domain of GRP78: Effect of p53 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, U.K.; Kaczowka, S.; Pizzo, S.V.

    2010-02-19

    Ligation of cancer cell surface GRP78 by activated {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin ({alpha}{sub 2}M{sup *}) triggers pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. Cancer patients who develop autoantibodies to the {alpha}{sub 2}M{sup *} binding site in GRP78 have a poor prognosis since these antibodies are receptor agonists. The NF-{kappa}B family of transcription factors induces expression of genes affecting cell growth and differentiation. NF-{kappa}B1 plays a major regulatory role in controlling innate immunity and inflammation, whereas NF-{kappa}B2 plays a greater role in cancer cell proliferation. Here we report that treatment of prostate cancer cells with antibody directed against the carboxyl terminal domain of GRP78 inhibits {alpha}{sub 2}M{sup *}-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B2 by {approx}50% while exerting a lesser effect of {approx}20% on NF-{kappa}B1 activation. Treatment of these cells nearly abolished {alpha}{sub 2}M{sup *}-induced activation of IKK{alpha} involved in the activation of NF-{kappa}B2. This antibody also suppressed {alpha}{sub 2}M{sup *}-induced phosphorylation of IKK{alpha}, IKK{alpha}/{beta}, I{kappa}B{alpha}, and I{kappa}B{beta} as well as levels of NIK. Antibody treatment of cancer cells elevated pro-apoptotic p21WAF and p27kip while reducing cyclin D1 levels. These studies demonstrate that antibody directed against the carboxyl terminal domain of GRP78 inhibits the pro-proliferative NF-{kappa}B signaling cascade in cancer cells.

  8. Environmental distribution, abundance and activity of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Biddle, J.; Teske, A.

    2011-12-01

    Many marine sedimentary microbes have only been identified by 16S rRNA sequences. Consequently, little is known about the types of metabolism, activity levels, or relative abundance of these groups in marine sediments. We found that one of these uncultured groups, called the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG), dominated clone libraries made from reverse transcribed 16S rRNA, and 454 pyrosequenced 16S rRNA genes, in the White Oak River estuary. Primers suitable for quantitative PCR were developed for MCG and used to show that 16S rRNA DNA copy numbers from MCG account for nearly all the archaeal 16S rRNA genes present. RT-qPCR shows much less MCG rRNA than total archaeal rRNA, but comparisons of different primers for each group suggest bias in the RNA-based work relative to the DNA-based work. There is no evidence of a population shift with depth below the sulfate-methane transition zone, suggesting that the metabolism of MCG may not be tied to sulfur or methane cycles. We classified 2,771 new sequences within the SSU Silva 106 database that, along with the classified sequences in the Silva database was used to make an MCG database of 4,646 sequences that allowed us to increase the named subgroups of MCG from 7 to 19. Percent terrestrial sequences in each subgroup is positively correlated with percent of the marine sequences that are nearshore, suggesting that membership in the different subgroups is not random, but dictated by environmental selective pressures. Given their high phylogenetic diversity, ubiquitous distribution in anoxic environments, and high DNA copy number relative to total archaea, members of MCG are most likely anaerobic heterotrophs who are integral to the post-depositional marine carbon cycle.

  9. Oxoiron(IV) Tetramethylcyclam Complexes with Axial Carboxylate Ligands: Effect of Tethering the Carboxylate on Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Jennifer O; England, Jason; Klein, Johannes E M N; Farquhar, Erik R; Frisch, Jonathan R; Martinho, Marlène; Mandal, Debasish; Münck, Eckard; Shaik, Sason; Que, Lawrence

    2017-03-20

    Oxoiron(IV) species are implicated as reactive intermediates in nonheme monoiron oxygenases, often acting as the agent for hydrogen-atom transfer from substrate. A histidine is the most likely ligand trans to the oxo unit in most enzymes characterized thus far but is replaced by a carboxylate in the case of isopenicillin N synthase. As the effect of a trans carboxylate ligand on the properties of the oxoiron(IV) unit has not been systematically studied, we have synthesized and characterized four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by the tetramethylcyclam (TMC) macrocycle and having a carboxylate ligand trans to the oxo unit. Two complexes have acetate or propionate axial ligands, while the other two have the carboxylate functionality tethered to the macrocyclic ligand framework by one or two methylene units. Interestingly, these four complexes exhibit substrate oxidation rates that differ by more than 100-fold, despite having Ep,c values for the reduction of the Fe═O unit that span a range of only 130 mV. Eyring parameters for 1,4-cyclohexadiene oxidation show that reactivity differences originate from differences in activation enthalpy between complexes with tethered carboxylates and those with untethered carboxylates, in agreement with computational results. As noted previously for the initial subset of four complexes, the logarithms of the oxygen atom transfer rates of 11 complexes of the Fe(IV)(O)TMC(X) series increase linearly with the observed Ep,c values, reflecting the electrophilicity of the Fe═O unit. In contrast, no correlation with Ep,c values is observed for the corresponding hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction rates; instead, the HAT rates increase as the computed triplet-quintet spin state gap narrows, consistent with Shaik's two-state-reactivity model. In fact, the two complexes with untethered carboxylates are among the most reactive HAT agents in this series, demonstrating that the axial ligand can play a key role in tuning the HAT reactivity

  10. Cu(I)-catalyzed (11)C carboxylation of boronic acid esters: a rapid and convenient entry to (11)C-labeled carboxylic acids, esters, and amides.

    PubMed

    Riss, Patrick J; Lu, Shuiyu; Telu, Sanjay; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Pike, Victor W

    2012-03-12

    Rapid and direct: the carboxylation of boronic acid esters with (11)CO(2) provides [(11)C]carboxylic acids as a convenient entry into [(11)C]esters and [(11)C]amides. This conversion of boronates is tolerant to diverse functional groups (e.g., halo, nitro, or carbonyl).

  11. Design, structural and spectroscopic elucidation of new nitroaromatic carboxylic acids and semicarbazones for the in vitro screening of anti-leishmanial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, L. C.; de Lima, G. M.; Pinheiro, C. B.; Rodrigues, B. L.; Donnici, C. L.; Fujiwara, R. T.; Bartholomeu, D. C.; Ferreira, R. A.; Ferreira, S. R.; Mendes, T. A. O.; da Silva, J. G.; Alves, M. R. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis and characterization of four new nitroaromatic compounds, 2-{6-nitrobenzo[1,3]dioxol-5-(methyleneamino)}benzoic acid (1), 2-{[5-(2-nitrophenyl)furan-2-yl]methylene-amino}benzoic acid (2), 2-{(6-nitrobenzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl)methylene}hydrazinecarboxamide (3) and 2-{[5-(2-nitrophenyl)furan-2-yl]methylene}hydrazinecarboxamide (4). Compounds (1)-(4) have been authenticated by infrared and NMR spectroscopy, and the structure of (1), (2) and (4) have been determined by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the in vitro ability of compounds (1)-(4) to inhibit the growth of Leishmania infantum has been evaluated. Comparisons of the redox potential of the compounds and leishmanicidal activity indicate that the presence of the electroactive nitro group is important for the biological activity. The inhibition activity of compound (3) is comparable to that of the reference drug, SbCl3. Considering the important side effects and the low efficiency of SbCl3 in the case of resistance, compound (3) deserves further attention as a promising anti-leishmanicidal drug for veterinary use.

  12. Determination of the enantiomeric excess of chiral carboxylic acids by 31P NMR with phosphorylated derivatizing agents from C2-symmetrical diamines containing the (S)-alpha-phenylethyl group.

    PubMed

    Mastranzo, Virginia M; Quintero, Leticia; de Parrodi, Cecilia Anaya

    2007-06-01

    The use of P(III) and P(V) organophosphorus derivatizing agents prepared from C(2) symmetrical (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamines 1 and 2, as well as (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-4-cyclohexene-1,2-diamines 3 and 4 for the determination of enantiomeric composition of chiral carboxylic acids by (31)P NMR, is described.

  13. Neural activity reveals perceptual grouping in working memory.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Laura R; Roberts, Daniel M; McDonald, Craig G; Peterson, Matthew S

    2017-03-01

    There is extensive evidence that the contralateral delay activity (CDA), a scalp recorded event-related brain potential, provides a reliable index of the number of objects held in visual working memory. Here we present evidence that the CDA not only indexes visual object working memory, but also the number of locations held in spatial working memory. In addition, we demonstrate that the CDA can be predictably modulated by the type of encoding strategy employed. When individual locations were held in working memory, the pattern of CDA modulation mimicked previous findings for visual object working memory. Specifically, CDA amplitude increased monotonically until working memory capacity was reached. However, when participants were instructed to group individual locations to form a constellation, the CDA was prolonged and reached an asymptote at two locations. This result provides neural evidence for the formation of a unitary representation of multiple spatial locations.

  14. Eaton's reagent-mediated domino π-cationic arylations of aromatic carboxylic acids to Iasi-red polymethoxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: products with unprecedented biological activities as tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghinet, Alina; Gautret, Philippe; Hijfte, Nathalie Van; Ledé, Bertrand; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Bîcu, Elena; Darbost, Ulrich; Rigo, Benoît; Daïch, Adam

    2014-08-04

    A rapid domino π-cationic arylation of aromatic carboxylic acids, mediated by Eaton's reagent, has been developed for the synthesis of Iasi-red polymethoxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This route is currently the easiest method to obtain such popular PAH compounds, which bear in addition numerous methoxy groups. The domino process was generalized, the structure of the obtained red products and the mechanism of their formations were elucidated, and some of their photophysical properties were determined. Newly synthesized polymethoxylated-PAHs were tested for their interaction with tubulin polymerization as well as for their cytotoxicity on a panel of NCI-60 human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, one of these rubicene derivatives exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro, including inhibition of leukemia, colon, melanoma, CNS, and ovarian cancer cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range (GI50 < 10 nM).

  15. Photovoltaic Reliability Group activities in USA and Brazil (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Cruz, Leila R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Recently prices of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been reduced considerably and may continue to be reduced making them attractive. If these systems provide electricity over the stipulated warranty period, it would be possible attain socket parity within the next few years. Current photovoltaic module qualifications tests help in minimizing infant mortality but do not guarantee useful lifetime over the warranty period. The PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) is trying to formulate accelerated tests that will be useful towards achieving the ultimate goal of assuring useful lifetime over the warranty period as well as to assure manufacturing quality. Unfortunately, assuring the manufacturing quality may require 24/7 presence. Alternatively, collecting data on the performance of fielded systems would assist in assuring manufacturing quality. Here PV systems installed by home-owners and small businesses can constitute as an important untapped source of data. The volunteer group, PV - Reliable, Safe and Sustainable Quality! (PVRessQ!) is providing valuable service to small PV system owners. Photovoltaic Reliability Group (PVRG) is initiating activities in USA and Brazil to assist home owners and small businesses in monitoring photovoltaic (PV) module performance and enforcing warranty. It will work in collaboration with small PV system owners, consumer protection agencies. Brazil is endowed with excellent solar irradiance making it attractive for installation of PV systems. Participating owners of small PV systems would instruct inverter manufacturers to copy the daily e-mails to PVRG and as necessary, will authorize the PVRG to carry out review of PV systems. The presentation will consist of overall activities of PVRG in USA and Brazil.

  16. An Update on the VAMOS Extremes Working Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Cavalcanti, Iracema

    2011-01-01

    We review here the progress of the Variability of the American MOnsoon Systems (VAMOS) extremes working group since it was formed in February of 2010. The goals of the working group are to 1) develop an atlas of warm-season extremes over the Americas, 2) evaluate existing and planned simulations, and 3) suggest new model runs to address mechanisms and predictability of extremes. Substantial progress has been made in the development of an extremes atlas based on gridded observations and several reanalysis products including Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). The status of the atlas, remaining issues and plans for its expansion to include model data will be discussed. This includes the possibility of adding a companion atlas based on station observations based on the software developed under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Expert Team on Climate Change. Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) activity. We will also review progress on relevant research and plans for the use and validation of the atlas results.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of norfloxacin-transition metal complexes (group 11, IB): Spectroscopic, thermal, kinetic measurements and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation of the new structures of Ag(I), Cu(II) and Au(III) complexes, [Ag 2(Nor) 2](NO 3) 2, [Cu(Nor) 2(H 2O) 2]SO 4·5H 2O and [Au(Nor) 2 (H 2O) 2]Cl 3 (where, Nor = norfloxacin) was done during the reaction of silver(I), copper(II) and gold(III) ions with norfloxacin drug ligand. Elemental analysis of CHN, infrared, electronic, 1H NMR and mass spectra, as well as thermo gravimetric analysis (TG and DTG) and conductivity measurements have been used to characterize the isolated complexes. The powder XRD studies confirm the amorphous nature of the complexes. The norfloxacin ligand is coordinated to Ag(I) and Au(III) ions as a neutral monodentate chelating through the N atom of piperidyl ring, but the copper(II) complex is coordinated through the carbonyl oxygen atom (quinolone group) and the oxygen atom of the carboxylic group. The norfloxacin and their metal complexes have been biologically tested, which resulted in norfloxacin complexes showing moderate activity against the gram positive and gram negative bacteria as well as against fungi.

  18. Improving the antidepressant action and the bioavailability of sertraline by co-crystallization with coumarin 3-carboxylate. Structural determination.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Laino, Carlos H; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Martini, Nancy; Rodríguez, Ailén N; Martínez Medina, Juan J; López Tévez, Libertad L; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-04-05

    To improve the antidepressant action of sertraline a new salt with coumarin-3-carboxylate anion (SerH-CCA) has been synthesized by two different methods and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and structural determinations by X-ray diffraction methods. The new salt is stabilized by strong intermolecular H-bonds involving the protonated amine group of SerH and the deprotonated carboxylate group of CCA. These findings can be correlated with the interpretation of the infrared spectrum. The salt, sertraline (SerHCl) and the sodium salt of coumarin-3-carboxylate (NaCCA) were orally administered male Wistar rats (10 mg/kg, based on sertraline). Rats were evaluated in separate groups by means of the forced swimming (FST). SerH-CCA produced antidepressant effects in a magnitude that exceeded SerHCl individual effects. None of these treatments affected activity levels by the open field OFT tests. We have also determined that the ion pair also improve the binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) of the drug but retain its antimicrobial activity. It is reasonable to conclude that the replacement of chloride anion by a large organic anion in sertraline strengthens the pharmacological action of the native drug, binding to BSA with higher activity and retaining the antimicrobial activity of the antidepressant compound.

  19. Organometallic carboxylate resists for extreme ultraviolet with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, James; Murphy, Michael; Re, Ryan Del; Sortland, Miriam; Hotalen, Jodi; Dousharm, Levi; Fallica, Roberto; Ekinci, Yasin; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel A.; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed organometallic carboxylate compounds [RnM)] capable of acting as negative-tone extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. The most sensitive of these resists contain antimony, three R-groups and two carboxylate groups, and carboxylate groups with polymerizable olefins (e.g., acrylate, methacrylate, or styrenecarboxylate). Evidence suggests that high sensitivity is achieved through the polymerization of olefins in the exposed region. We have performed a systematic sensitivity study of the molecules of the type RnM) where we have studied seven R groups, four main group metals (M), and three polymerizable carboxylate groups (O2CR‧). The sensitivity of these resists was evaluated using Emax or dose to maximum resist thickness after exposure and development. We found that the greatest predictor of sensitivity of the RnSb) resists is their level of polymerizable olefins. We mathematically define the polymerizable olefin loading (POL) as the ratio of the number of olefins versus the number of nonhydrogen atoms. Linear and log plots of Emax versus POL for a variety of molecules of the type R3Sb) lend insight into the behavior of these resists.

  20. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  1. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  2. Photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on donor-acceptor pi-conjugated benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes with a carboxyl group at different positions of the chromophore skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Yousuke; Shimada, Yoshihito; Kagawa, Yusuke; Imae, Ichiro; Harima, Yutaka

    2007-07-07

    Donor-acceptor pi-conjugated benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes 3a, 3b, 8a, and 8b with a carboxyl group at different positions of the chromophore skeleton have been designed and synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence spectra and cyclic voltammograms of the fluorescent dyes agree very well, showing that the position of the carboxyl group has a negligible influence on the photophysical and electrochemical properties of these dyes. When these dyes are used in dye-sensitized solar cells, however, their photovolatic performances are considerably different. The short-circuit photocurrents and energy conversion efficiencies under a simulated solar light increase in the order: 3a (2.12 mA cm(-2), 1.00%) approximately 3b (2.10 mA cm(-2), 1.06%) > 8b (1.50 mA cm(-2), 0.67%) > 8a (0.84 mA cm(-2), 0.34%). Based on semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations (AM1 and INDO/S) together with spectral analyses and their photovolatic performance, the relationships between the observed photovolatic properties and the chemical structures of the benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes are discussed. It is found that strong interaction between a TiO(2) surface and the electron accepting moiety of the dye leads to a high photovoltaic performance.

  3. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Chilson, Oscar P.; Kelly-Chilson, Anne E.; Schneider, Julie D.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultured rhizobia were compared with those of the enzyme in soybean nodule host cytosol. Reductase from host cytosol differed from that in bacteroids in: (a) the effect of pH on enzymic activity, (b) the capacity to catalyze both reduction of pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid and NAD+-dependent proline oxidation, (c) apparent affinities for pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, and (d) sensitivities to inhibition by NADP+ and proline. The K1 for proline inhibition of P5CR in bacteroid cytosol was 1.8 millimolar. The properties of P5CR in B. japonicum and bacteroid cytosol were similar. The specific activities of P5CR in the cytosolic fractions of the nodule host and the bacteroid compartment were also comparable. PMID:16668837

  4. The Use of a Group Blog to Actively Support Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of blogs in higher education, there remains a lack of knowledge and consensus about the use and value of blogging in higher education, particularly when used for long periods. This article investigates the use of a group blog to assist traditional teaching activities and foster collaborative learning through the…

  5. The Fantastic Facilitator: Engaging Activities for Leading Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    This document is designed to help facilitators with the formation and development of effective teams of people who have no previous history as a team and no training in group processes. Part 1 provides a narrative explanation of the stages of group development (investing in membership, forming attachments to subgroups, confronting/debating issues,…

  6. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Sopher, D.W.

    1983-05-09

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100/sup 0/C and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  7. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Sopher, David W.

    1984-01-01

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100.degree. C. and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  8. An Activity Group Experience for Disengaged Elderly Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John Ewing; Bodden, Jack L.

    1978-01-01

    Tested the activity theory (which proposes that elderly persons remain in active contact with their environment) and disengagement theory (which suggests adjustment comes through reduction of activity and social contact). Disengaged elderly were identified. Subjects demonstrated significant improvement over the untreated control subjects. Results…

  9. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  10. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA.

  11. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA. PMID:28289406

  12. Investigation of Carboxylic Acid-Neodymium Conversion Films on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Liu, Zhe; Lin, Lili; Jin, Guo; Wang, Haidou; Xu, Binshi

    2015-01-01

    The new carboxylic acid-neodymium anhydrous conversion films were successfully prepared and applied on the AZ91D magnesium alloy surface by taking absolute ethyl alcohol as solvent and four kinds of soluble carboxylic acid as activators. The corrosion resistance of the coating was measured by potentiodynamic polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution in pH 7.0. The morphology, structure, and constituents of the coating were observed by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersivespectrum, x-ray photoelectron spectrum, and Fourier infrared spectrometer. Results show that corrosion resistance properties of samples coated with four different anhydrous conversion films were improved obviously. The corrosion potential increased, corrosion current density decreased, and polarization resistance increased. Among these four kinds of conversion films the one added with phytic exhibits the best corrosion resistant property. The mechanism of anhydrous-neodymium conversion film formation is also analyzed in this paper. It reveals that the gadolinium conversion coating is mainly composed of stable Nd2O3, MgO, Mg(OH)2, and carboxylate of Nd. And that the sample surface is rich in organic functional groups.

  13. Influence of ethylene-oxy spacer group on the activity of linezolid: synthesis of potent antibacterials possessing a thiocarbonyl group.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, N; Raheem, Mohammed A; Khera, Manoj Kumar; Rajale, Trideep V; Kumar, Magadi Sitaram; Kandepu, Sreenivas; Das, Jagattaran; Rajagopalan, R; Iqbal, Javed; Trehan, Sanjay

    2003-12-01

    The influence of an ethylene-oxy spacer element between the heterocycle and the aromatic ring in linezolid is reported. The introduction of such spacer group generated compounds with inferior antibacterial activity. However, the conversion of the acetamide group present in the linezolid analogues to either thiocarbamate or thioacetamide functionality restored the activity. The synthesis of linezolid analogues possessing the ethylene-oxy spacer group along with SAR studies with different heterocycles and preparation of some thiocarbonyl compounds possessing potent antibacterial property are presented.

  14. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  15. A specific radiochemical assay for pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Small, C; Jones, M E

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies of pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase have been conducted using a spectrophotometric method to monitor substrate-dependent NAD(P)H production. For the assay of the mammalian enzyme, the spectrophotometric assay was found to be unacceptable for kinetic studies as the production of NAD(P)H was nonlinear with time and protein concentration. An assay which measures radiolabeled glutamate production by this enzyme in the presence of NAD+ from radiolabeled pyrroline-5-carboxylate has been developed. Separation of substrate from product is achieved by column chromatography using Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin. The product isolated by this procedure was identified as glutamate. This new assay is linear with time and protein concentration and gives reproducible results. The assay is not influenced by competing enzyme activities, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, in a liver homogenate so that quantitative conversion of pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate is observed.

  16. The molecular structure and catalytic mechanism of a novel carboxyl peptidase from Scytalidium lignicolum

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Masao; Cherney, Maia M.; Oyama, Hiroshi; Oda, Kohei; James, Michael N. G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular structure of the pepstatin-insensitive carboxyl peptidase from Scytalidium lignicolum, formerly known as scytalidopepsin B, was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement phasing methods and refined to an R factor of 0.230 (Rfree = 0.246) at 2.1-Å resolution. In addition to the structure of the unbound peptidase, the structure of a product complex of cleaved angiotensin II bound in the active site of the enzyme was also determined. We propose the name scytalidocarboxyl peptidase B (SCP-B) for this enzyme. On the basis of conserved, catalytic residues identified at the active site, we suggest the name Eqolisin for the enzyme family. The previously uninvestigated SCP-B fold is that of a β-sandwich; each sheet has seven antiparallel strands. A tripeptide product, Ala-Ile-His, bound in the active site of SCP-B has allowed for identification of the catalytic residues and the residues in subsites S1, S2, and S3, which are important for substrate binding. The most likely hydrolytic mechanism involves nucleophilic attack of a general base (Glu-136)-activated water (OH-) on the si-face of the scissile peptide carbonylcarbon atom to form a tetrahedral intermediate. Electrophilic assistance and oxyanion stabilization is provided by the side-chain amide of Gln-53. Protonation of the leaving-group nitrogen is accomplished by the general acid function of the protonated carboxyl group of Glu-136. PMID:14993599

  17. Electrostatic bubbles and supramolecular assistance of photosensitization by carboxylated Ru(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Pierre G; Luyen, Phuong Uyen; Bräckow, Jan

    2003-04-23

    The paper examines the supramolecular effects at play during photosensitization by carboxylated Ru(II) sensitizers, both by experiment and by modeling. Experimentally, twelve Ru(II) complexes of pyrazolylpyridine and polypyridine ligands, including two benchmark complexes and two new species, were assessed as photosensitizers by measurement of the kinetics of methyl viologen cation radical (MV(*)(+)) generation through an oxidative, photoinduced electron transfer (PET) to methyl viologen (MV(2+)) under continuous irradiation in the presence of a sacrificial reductant. All complexes, luminescent or not, produced measurable amounts of MV(*)(+) in CH(3)CN. The assessment protocol was found to be useful with sensitizers of widely varying excited-state lifetimes (tau) as well as being easier and faster than conventional approaches. The seven sensitizers bearing peripheral COOH groups were found to be significantly more active than their non-carboxylated analogues, which is consistent with ionization of the COOH groups and electrostatic promotion of PET. Only the luminescent complexes were active in aqueous solvents, where tau appears to be the dominant effector. The benefits are exemplified by the singly carboxylated [Ru(H1)(bpy)(2)](2+) (H1 is 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-3-(2-pyridyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindazole), a weakly luminescent sensitizer that was less active in aqueous solvents than [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine), but which became the better sensitizer in CH(3)CN. Computationally, electrostatic field and dissociation energy calculations demonstrated that even a single peripheral COO(-) substituent suffices to provide supramolecular assistance: it defines a spheric "bubble" of electrostatically attractive space that is sufficiently large to allow the supramolecular preassociation of MV(2+), which provides an entropic advantage to PET that reduces the importance of tau in organic solvent. Calculations also show that the PET is electrostatically favored over its

  18. Parents' Networking Strategies: Participation of Formal and Informal Parent Groups in School Activities and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined parent groups' involvement in school activities and their participation in decision making. Research questions included the following: (1) What is the nature of parent groups in schools? (2) What activities and issues gain parent groups' attention and participation? (3) How do parent groups communicate concerns about…

  19. Enhanced excitatory synaptic network activity following transient group I metabotropic glutamate activation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y-Z; Rutecki, P A

    2014-09-05

    Prolonged activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) using the agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) produces long-lasting changes in the CA3 region of the hippocampal slice. Changes in CA3 pyramidal neuron excitability that follow DHPG exposure result in abnormal network activity manifest by epileptiform activity that consists of interictal and longer lasting ictal epileptiform discharges. In this study we evaluated changes in synaptic activity of CA3 neurons in rat hippocampal slices that occurred after exposure to DHPG. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from visually identified CA3 neurons in control artificial cerebrospinal fluid at times greater than 1h after DHPG exposure. Compared to control slices, neurons from slices exposed to DHPG showed enhanced amplitude and frequency of spontaneously occurring excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) without a concurrent change in inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) amplitude or frequency. Miniature EPSCs were not affected by DHPG exposure but mIPSCs occurred less frequently and were of reduced amplitude. IPSCs recorded in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor blockade occurred less frequently in neurons that had been exposed to DHPG. Monosynaptic-evoked IPSPs were also reduced in amplitude in neurons that had been exposed to DHPG. Taken together, these findings demonstrated an enhanced network excitability of the CA3 region and failure of compensatory synaptic inhibition. We propose that prolonged activation of group I mGluR that may occur under conditions of pathological glutamate release results in long-lasting changes in CA3 synaptic network activity and epileptiform activity driven by excessive synaptic excitation.

  20. Effect of surface groups on the electrocatalytic behaviour of Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon electrodes in the phosphoric acid fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il; Lee, Seung-Bok

    Effect of surface group on the electrocatalytic behaviour of 10 wt.% Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon (Pt-Fe-Co/C) electrode has been investigated as functions of applied potential and duration in 85% H 3PO 4 solution of 145°C, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with ac-impedance spectroscopy, potentiostatic current transient technique, and potentiodynamic polarization experiment. It was shown from FTIR spectra that surface group formed in this work mainly comprises carboxyl group and that the formation potential of carboxyl group lies between 600 and 700 mV RHE. From increase of charge transfer resistance ( Rct), and decrease of electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction with immersion time, it is suggested that above the formation potential of carboxyl group, further formation of carboxyl group on the carbon support around the catalyst particle reduces active surface area of the catalyst particle with immersion time. On the other hand, below the formation potential, dissolution of carboxyl group previously formed on the carbon support raises active surface area of the catalyst particle. In the present study, relationship between electrocatalytic aspect of the electrode, and the amount of carboxyl group formed on the carbon support around the catalyst particle was well discussed with a schematic illustration. The illustrative representation is underlain by formation on and dissolution from the catalyst particle of carboxyl group which cause the rise and fall in circumferential coverage of carboxyl group, respectively and hence the reduction and elevation in active surface area of the catalyst particle.

  1. Crystal structure of 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Rajam, Ammaiyappan; Muthiah, P T; Butcher, Ray J; Jasinski, Jerry P

    2015-07-01

    In the title salt, C6H10N3O2 (+)·C5H3O2S(-), the 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium cation inter-acts with the carboxyl-ate group of the thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate anion through a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. These motifs are centrosymmetrically paired via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a complementary DDAA array. The separate DDAA arrays are linked by π-π stacking inter-actions between the pyrimidine rings, as well as by a number of weak C-H⋯O and N-H⋯O inter-actions. In the anion, the dihedral angle between the ring plane and the CO2 group is 11.60 (3)°. In the cation, the C atoms of methoxy groups deviate from the ring plane by 0.433 (10) Å.

  2. Chelation-assisted Pd-catalysed ortho-selective oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of aromatic carboxylic acids with arenes and intramolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation: one-pot formation of fluorenones.

    PubMed

    Sun, Denan; Li, Bijin; Lan, Jingbo; Huang, Quan; You, Jingsong

    2016-03-04

    Pd-Catalysed ortho-selective oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of aromatic carboxylic acids with arenes and subsequent intramolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation has been accomplished for the first time through a chelation-assisted C-H activation strategy. Starting from the readily available substrates, a variety of fluorenone derivatives are obtained in one pot. The direct use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid functionalities as directing groups avoids unnecessary steps for installation and removal of an extra directing group.

  3. Potential antifertility agents. 6. Synthesis and biological activities of optical isomers of 4 beta-(p-methozyphenyl)-2 beta-methylcyclohexane-alpha-carboxylic acid and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, R R; Jenks, T A; Luke, G M; Bialy, G

    1974-12-01

    The optical isomers of the title compound were synthesized and the biological potencies of the two enantiomers were compared. There was essentially no difference in their hypocholesterolemic activities, as had been predicted, and little or no difference between their uterotropic potencies. The approximately equal uterotropic activities seen with the enantiomers is explained in terms of stereochemical requirements at the receptor level for an estrogenic response. A working model of an estrogenic receptor is proposed. An accompanying paper provides support for the proposed model.

  4. Regulation of rat liver hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a new class of noncompetitive inhibitors. Effects of dichloroacetate and related carboxylic acids on enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, P W; Harwood, H J; Varnado, C E

    1983-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) markedly reduces circulating cholesterol levels in animals and in patients with combined hyperlipoproteinemia or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanism of its cholesterol-lowering action, we studied the effects of DCA and its hepatic metabolites, glyoxylate and oxalate, on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) obtained from livers of healthy, reverse light-cycled rats. Oral administration of DCA for 4 d decreased HMG CoA reductase activity 46% at a dose of 50 mg/kg per d, and 82% at a dose of 100 mg/kg per d. A 24% decrease in reductase activity was observed as early as 1 h after a single dose of 50 mg/kg DCA. The inhibitory effect of the drug was due to a fall in both expressed enzyme activity and the total number of reductase molecules present. DCA also decreased reductase activity when added to suspensions of isolated hepatocytes. With chronic administration, DCA inhibited 3H2O incorporation into cholesterol by 38% and into triglycerides by 52%. When liver microsomes were incubated with DCA, the pattern of inhibition of reductase activity was noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (inhibition constant [Ki] 11.8 mM) and NADPH (Ki 11.6 mM). Inhibition by glyoxylate was also noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (Ki 1.2 mM) and NADPH (Ki 2.7 mM). Oxalate inhibited enzyme activity only at nonsaturating concentrations of NADPH (Ki 5.6 mM). Monochloroacetate, glycollate, and ethylene glycol, all of which can form glyoxylate, also inhibited reductase activity. Using solubilized and 60-fold purified HMG CoA reductase, we found that the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate was reversible. Furthermore, the inhibition by glyoxylate was an effect exerted on the reductase itself, rather than on its regulatory enzymes, reductase kinase and reductase phosphatase. We conclude that the cholesterol-lowering effect of DCA is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of endogenous cholesterol

  5. Governance - Alignment and Configuration of Business Activities Task Group Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    governance level and the Enterprise Model as a way of ensuring integration at the management and work/execution levels 3. Ensure shared services (i.e...Management Framework o QDR Organizational Model o Secretary of Defense 2006-2008 Priorities o Shared Services Defense Business Board...support for horizontal and vertical organizations • Move “supporting” organizations to shared services model May 2006 "Team Defense" 18 Task Group

  6. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  7. S-Mercuration of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 through Cys152 by methylmercury causes inhibition of its catalytic activity and reduction of monoubiquitin levels in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Takashi; Abiko, Yumi; Katayama, Yuko; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental electrophile that covalently modifies cellular proteins. In this study, we identified proteins that undergo S-mercuration by MeHg. By combining two-dimensional SDS-PAGE, atomic absorption spectrometry and ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS), we revealed that ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a target for S-mercuration in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exposed to MeHg (1 µM, 9 hr). The modification site of UCH-L1 by MeHg was Cys152, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. MeHg was shown to inhibit the catalytic activity of recombinant human UCH-L1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of UCH-L1 indicated that this enzyme plays a critical role in regulating mono-ubiquitin (monoUb) levels in SH-SY5Y cells and exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to MeHg caused a reduction in the level of monoUb in these cells. These observations suggest that UCH-L1 readily undergoes S-mercuration by MeHg through Cys152 and this covalent modification inhibits UCH-L1, leading to the potential disruption of the maintenance of cellular monoUb levels.

  8. Characterization of γ-carboxylated tryptic peptides by collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramström, Margareta; Sandberg, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of glutamic acid (Glu) residues into γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) is a post-translational modification essential for normal protein activity of, for example, proteins involved in the blood coagulation system. These proteins may contain as many as 12 sites for γ-carboxylation within a protein sequence of 45 amino acid residues. In the biopharmaceutical industry, powerful analytical techniques are required for identification and localization of modified sites. We here present comparatively easy and rapid methods for studies of Gla-containing proteins using recent technology. The performances of two mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques, collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), were evaluated with respect to γ-carboxylated peptides, applying on-line LC-ion trap MS. ETD MS has so far not been reported for Gla-containing peptides and the applicability of CID for heavily γ-carboxylated proteins has not been evaluated. The anticoagulant protein, protein C, containing nine Gla-sites, was chosen as a model protein. After tryptic digestion, three peptides containing Gla-residues were detected by MS; a 1.2 kDa fragment containing two Gla-residues, a 4.5 kDa peptide containing seven residues and also the 5.6 kDa tryptic peptides containing all nine Gla-residues. Regarding the shortest peptide, both CID and ETD provided extensive peptide sequencing. For the larger peptides, fragmentation by CID resulted in loss of the 44 Da CO(2)-group, while little additional fragmentation of the peptide chain was observed. In contrast, ETD resulted in comprehensive fragmentation of the peptide backbone. The study demonstrates that the combination of both techniques would be beneficial and complementary for investigation of γ-carboxylated proteins and peptides.

  9. Conformational Changes in Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: A Structure-Based Explanation for How the 5’-Phosphate Group Activates the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bijoy J.; Wood, McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a ligand to orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by a conformational change from an open, inactive conformation (Eo) to a closed, active conformation (Ec). As the substrate traverses the reaction coordinate to form the stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate, interactions are enforced that destabilize the carboxylate group of the substrate as well as stabilize the intermediate (in the Ec•S‡ complex). Focusing on the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, the “remote” 5’-phosphate group of the substrate activates the enzyme 2.4 × 108-fold; the activation is equivalently described by an intrinsic binding energy (IBE) of 11.4 kcal/mol. We studied residues in the activation that 1) directly contact the 5’-phosphate group; 2) participate in a hydrophobic cluster near the base of the active site loop that sequesters the bound substrate from solvent; and 3) form hydrogen-bonding interactions across the interface between the “mobile” and “fixed” half-barrel domains of the (β/α8-barrel structure. Our data support a model in which the IBE provided by the 5’-phosphate group is used to enable interactions both near the N-terminus of the active site loop and across the domain interface that stabilize both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes relative to the Eo•S complex. The conclusion that the IBE of the 5’-phosphate group provides stabilization of both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes, not just the Ec•S‡ complex, is central to understanding the structural origins of enzymatic catalysis as well as the requirements for the de novo design of enzymes that catalyze novel reactions. PMID:23030629

  10. The extreme carboxyl terminus of the equine herpesvirus 1 homolog of herpes simplex virus VP16 is essential for immediate-early gene activation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G D

    1994-08-01

    Gene 12 of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP16 (alpha TIF, Vmw65), was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector by PCR and used in transactivation studies of both the EHV-1 and HSV-1 IE1 promoters. Results demonstrated that the product of gene 12 is a potent transactivator of immediate-early gene expression of both viruses, which requires sequences in the upstream HSV-1 promoter for activity. Mutational analysis of the gene 12 open reading frame indicated that removal of the C-terminal 7 amino acids, which contain a short region of homology with the extreme C terminus of VP16, inactivated the protein. Within this region, only a single methionine residue appeared to be essential for activity, implying that gene 12 may have a modular array of organization similar to that of VP16. However, fusion of the gene 12 C terminus to a truncated form of VP16, which contained the complex formation domain, did not restore activity to the HSV-1 protein. These data demonstrate that the EHV-1 immediate-early transactivator may not be functionally colinear with VP16, with transactivation requiring both the C terminus and another region(s) present within the N-terminal portion.

  11. Characterization of inhibitory mechanism and antifungal activity between group-1 and group-2 phytocystatins from taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Ming; Kumar, Senthil; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Venkatagiri, Shripathi; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-10-01

    Tarocystatin from Colocasia esculenta, a group-2 phytocystatin, is a defense protein against phytopathogenic nematodes and fungi. It is composed of a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is homological to group-1 cystatin, and a repetitive peptide at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant proteins of tarocystatin, such as full-length (FL), N-terminus (Nt) and C-terminus (Ct) peptides, were produced and their inhibitory activities against papain as well as their antifungal effects were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed that FL peptide exhibited mixed type inhibition (K(ia) = 0.098 microM and K(ib) = 0.252 microM) and Nt peptide showed competitive inhibition (K(i) = 0.057 microM), whereas Ct peptide possessed weak papain activation properties. A shift in the inhibitory pattern from competitive inhibition of Nt peptide alone to mixed type inhibition of FL peptide implied that the Ct peptide has an regulatory effect on the function of FL peptide. Based on the inhibitory kinetics of FL (group-2) and Nt (group-1) peptides on papain activity, an inhibitory mechanism of group-2 phytocystatins and a regulatory mechanism of extended Ct peptide have each been proposed. By contrast, the antifungal activity of Nt peptide appeared to be greater than that of FL peptide, and the Ct peptide showed no effect on antifungal activity, indicating that the antifungal effect is not related to proteinase inhibitory activity. The results are valid for most phytocystatins with respect to the inhibitory mechanism against cysteine proteinase.

  12. The sorting of blood group active proteins during enucleation.

    PubMed

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Bell, Amanda J; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-04-01

    Enucleation represents the critical stage during red blood cell development when the nucleus is extruded from an orthochromatic erythroblast in order to generate a nascent immature reticulocyte. Extrusion of the nucleus results in loss of a proportion of the erythroblast plasma membrane, which surrounds the nucleus, the bulk of the endoplasmic reticulum and a small region of cytoplasm. For this reason enucleation provides an important point in erythroblast differentiation at which proteins not required for the function of the erythrocyte can be lost, whilst those that are important for the structure-function properties of the mature erythrocyte must be efficiently retained in the reticulocyte plasma membrane. Disturbances in protein distribution during enucleation are envisaged to occur during human diseases such as Hereditary Spherocytosis. This article will discuss the current knowledge of erythroblast enucleation in the context of retention and loss of proteins that display antigenic blood group sites and that exist within multiprotein complexes within the erythrocyte membrane.

  13. Activation of mouse and human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha by perfluoroalkyl acids of different functional groups and chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Cynthia J; Takacs, Margy L; Schmid, Judith E; Lau, Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D

    2008-11-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are surfactants used in consumer products and persist in the environment. Some PFAAs elicit adverse effects on rodent development and survival. PFAAs can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and may act via PPARalpha to produce some of their effects. This study evaluated the ability of numerous PFAAs to induce mouse and human PPARalpha activity in a transiently transfected COS-1 cell assay. COS-1 cells were transfected with either a mouse or human PPARalpha receptor-luciferase reporter plasmid. After 24 h, cells were exposed to either negative controls (water or dimethyl sulfoxide, 0.1%); positive control (WY-14643, PPARalpha agonist); perfluorooctanoic acid or perfluorononanoic acid at 0.5-100 microM; perfluorobutanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluorohexane sulfonate, or perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) at 5-100 microM; or perfluorobutane sulfonate or perfluorooctane sulfonate at 1-250 microM. After 24 h of exposure, luciferase activity from the plasmid was measured. Each PFAA activated both mouse and human PPARalpha in a concentration-dependent fashion, except PFDA with human PPARalpha. Activation of PPARalpha by PFAA carboxylates was positively correlated with carbon chain length, up to C9. PPARalpha activity was higher in response to carboxylates compared to sulfonates. Activation of mouse PPARalpha was generally higher compared to that of human PPARalpha. We conclude that, in general, (1) PFAAs of increasing carbon backbone chain lengths induce increasing activity of the mouse and human PPARalpha with a few exceptions, (2) PFAA carboxylates are stronger activators of mouse and human PPARalpha than PFAA sulfonates, and (3) in most cases, the mouse PPARalpha appears to be more sensitive to PFAAs than the human PPARalpha in this model.

  14. [Activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels by ADP and K+ channel openers: homology model of sulfonylurea receptor carboxyl-termini].

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Matsuoka, T; Matsushita, K; Kurachi, Y

    2001-09-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP) are composed of Kir6.0 subunits and sulfonylurea receptors (SUR1, 2A and 2B). SUR2A and SUR2B are splice variants and differ only in the C-terminal 42 amino acid residue (C42). SURs are supposed to be the subunit that determines the different response of KATPs to intracellular nucleotides, K+ channel openers and inhibitors. In this study, we report that C42 of SURs plays critical roles in differential activation of various KATPs by ADP and K+ channel openers such as diazoxide and nicorandil. KATPs containing distinct SURs and Kir6.2 were reconstructed on HEK293T cells. Much higher concentrations of ADP were necessary to activate channels which SUR1 or SUR2B. In all KATPs containing different SUR, diazoxide increased the potency of ADP for channel activity without affecting its efficacy. From the electrophysiological data obtained from C-terminal chimeras and point mutants in the second nucleotide binding domain (NBDs), we developed the homology model of each SUR-NBD2 based on the crystallgraphically determined structure of HisP, a member of the ABC protein superfamily. In this model, C42 is located just beneath the Walker A motif of NBD2 and regulates the binding of nucleotide to NBD2 by affecting the 3-D construct of NBD2. This homology model well explains the different response of KATPs to ADP. Based on this model, it will be possible to develop new ligands for KATPs.

  15. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM.

  16. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Dwight J.; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues such as stimulus similarity lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA) is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual’s VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that, when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM. PMID:26018644

  17. Current activities of the Atmospheric Composition Sub-Group of the CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkov, Bojan

    The Atmospheric Sub-Group of the CEOS Calibration and Validation Working Group (CEOS WGCV/ASCG) was established in November 2001 with mission to ensure accurate and traceable calibration of remotely-sensed atmospheric chemistry radiance data and validation of higher level products, for application to atmospheric chemistry and climate research. This working-group, consisting of 15 members from space agencies and other relevant agencies and organizations with broad experience in calibration, modeling, algorithm development and validation, meet on an annual basis to promote international collaboration and technical exchanges, encourage interactions between mission scientists and data users, recommend network validation sites, develop comprehensive validation methodologies involving ground-based and space-borne assets, and specify comprehensive and consistent multi-mission validation datasets. Recent activities of the ACSG, including the recent ground-based intercomparisons, the ongoing NASA-ESA-NDACC validation data sharing activities, and the planned multi-agency CO2 validation efforts, will be presented.

  18. Comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of the carboxylate and amide forms of the HLDF-6 peptide in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bogachouk, Anna P; Storozheva, Zinaida I; Solovjeva, Olga A; Sherstnev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotarev, Yury A; Azev, Vyacheslav N; Rodionov, Igor L; Surina, Elena A; Lipkin, Valery M

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of two pharmaceutical substances, the HLDF-6 peptide (HLDF-6-OH) and its amide form (HLDF-6-NH2), was conducted. The study was performed in male rats using two models of a neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive deficit in rats was induced by injection of the beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (βA 25-35) into the giant-cell nucleus basalis of Meynert or by coinjection of βA 25-35 and ibotenic acid into the hippocampus. To evaluate cognitive functions in animals, three tests were used: the novel object recognition test, the conditioned passive avoidance task and the Morris maze. Comparative analysis of the data demonstrated that the neuroprotective activity of HLDF-6-NH2, evaluated by improvement of cognitive functions in animals, surpassed that of the native HLDF-6-OH peptide. The greater cognitive/ behavioral effects can be attributed to improved kinetic properties of the amide form of the peptide, such as the character of biodegradation and the half-life time. The effects of HLDF-6-NH2 are comparable to, or exceed, those of the reference compounds. Importantly, HLDF-6-NH2 exerts its effects at much lower doses than the reference compounds.

  19. AGN physics - A Chandra-Swift Census of AGN activity in Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2012-09-01

    We present a missing link in the study of AGN activity in compact groups of galaxies. The level of this activity in compact groups remains controversial, but has only been studied with optical and infrared diagnostics. We present the first systematic study of 40 compact group galaxies in 9 groups, combining Chandra and Swift data, and providing the first X-ray/UV view of galactic nuclei in compact groups. Our results provide independent evidence that the level of AGN activity in compact groups is representative of their unique environment, which is distinct to that of rich clusters and the field.

  20. New zinc(II), palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes of DL-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid; X-ray crystal structure of trans-[Zn2(μ-Ca)2(Hpa)2Cl6] and anticancer activity of some complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alie El-Deen, Afaf A.; El-Askalany, Abd El-Monem E.; Halaoui, Ruba; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Butler, Ian S.; Mostafa, Sahar I.

    2013-03-01

    New complexes of DL-piperidine-2-carboxylic acid (DL-H2pa), [Zn(Hpa)(AcO)(H2O)2], trans-[Zn2(μ-Ca)2(Hpa)2Cl6], [M(bpy)(Hpa)]Cl and [M(pa)(PPh3)2] (M(II) = Pd, Pt) have been prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivity and thermal measurements, IR, Raman, UV-Vis, NMR (1H and 31P) and mass spectroscopy. DL-Piperidine-2-carboxylic acids act as bidentate ligands, through the carboxyl oxygen and cyclic nitrogen atoms. The crystal structure of trans-[Zn2(μ-Ca)2(Hpa)2Cl6], obtained from the addition of ZnCl2 to DL-H2pa in either hard tap water or presence of CaCl2, has been determined by X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in a triclinic lattice with space group symmetry P1. The complex has two zinc atoms in tetrahedral geometry, each ligated by a carboxyl oxygen and three chlorine atoms. The other carboxyl oxygen atoms from the two Hpa- ligands are bridged by two calcium atoms, i.e., there are two Zn(Hpa-)Cl3 units bridged by two calcium atoms. The free DL-H2pa and its complexes, trans-[Zn2(μ-Ca)2(Hpa)2Cl6], [Pd(bpy)(Hpa)]Cl and [M(pa)(PPh3)2] (M(II) = Pd, Pt) have been tested against the serous ovarian cancer ascites, OV 90 cell line.

  1. Meta-Analysis of Group Learning Activities: Empirically Based Teaching Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Teaching researchers commonly employ group-based collaborative learning approaches in Teaching of Psychology teaching activities. However, the authors know relatively little about the effectiveness of group-based activities in relation to known psychological processes associated with group dynamics. Therefore, the authors conducted a meta-analytic…

  2. Engager and Avoider Behaviour in Types of Activities Performed by Out-of-Class Learning Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Louisa; Kember, David

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the out-of-class learning activities undertaken, at the students' volition, by groups of students. Data were gathered through 57 individual and 15 focus group interviews with university students in Hong Kong. Group activities reported included: copying, sharing material, consulting peers, consulting teachers, studying and…

  3. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional surfaces with tunable functional group pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, John M.; Kung, Mayfair; Kung, Harold H.

    2016-06-01

    Grafting of pairs of functional groups onto a silica surface was demonstrated by tethering both terminals of an organochlorosilane precursor molecule, Cl2(CH3)Si(CH2)4(CO)(OSi(i-Pr)2)(CH2)2Si(CH3)Cl2, that possess a cleavable silyl ester bond, onto a silica surface. Hydrolytic cleavage of the silyl ester bond of the grafted molecule resulted in the generation of organized pairs of carboxylic acid and organosilanol groups. This organosilanol moiety was easily transformed into other functional groups through condensation reactions to form, together with the neighboring acid group, pairs such as carboxylic acid/secondary amine, carboxylic acid/pyridine, and carboxylic acid/phosphine. In the case of carboxylic acid/amine pairing, there was evidence of the formation of amide. A sample grafted with amine-carboxylic acid pairs was three times more active (per free amine) than a sample without such pairs for the nitroaldol condensation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and nitromethane.

  4. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Triclinic modification of diaqua-bis-(5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ato-κ(2)N(3),O(4))iron(II).

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Eriko; Yoshida, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazumasa; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, [Fe(C(5)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], is a triclinic modification of a monoclinic form recently reported by Du et al. [Acta Cryst. (2011) ▶, E67, m997]. The Fe(II) ion lies at an inversion center and is coordinated by two N and two O atoms from two 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate ligands in trans positions, together with two water mol-ecules, completing a slightly distorted octahedral coordination. Inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the N-H group of the imidazole ring and the deprotonated carboxyl-ate group builds a chain of 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate anions along the [101] direction. The water molecules form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to O-C and O=C sites of the carboxylate group in adjacent layers.

  6. Partial androgen insensitivity with phenotypic variation caused by androgen receptor mutations that disrupt activation function 2 and the NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Charmian A; Tan, Jiann-an; He, Bin; Zhou, Zhong-xun; Mebarki, Farida; Morel, Yves; Forest, Maguelone G; Chatelain, Pierre; Ritzén, E Martin; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity with sex phenotype variation in two unrelated families was associated with missense mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene that disrupted the AR NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interaction. Each mutation caused a single amino acid change within the region of the ligand-binding domain that forms activation function 2 (AF2). In one family, the mutation I737T was in alpha helix 4 and in the other F725L was between helices 3 and 4. Neither mutation altered androgen binding as determined by assays of mutant AR in the patient's cultured genital skin fibroblasts or of recombinant mutant receptors transfected into COS cells. In transient cotransfection assays in CV1 cells, transactivation with the AR mutants at low concentrations of DHT was reduced several fold compared with wild-type AR but increased at higher concentrations. Defects in NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interactions were identified in mammalian two hybrid assays. In similar assays, there was reduced binding of the p160 coactivators TIF2/SRC2 and SRC1 to the mutant AR ligand binding domains (LBD). In the family with AR I737T, sex phenotype varied from severely defective masculinization in the proband to a maternal great uncle whose only manifestation of AIS was severe gynecomastia. He was fertile and passed the mutation to two daughters. The proband of the F725L family was also incompletely masculinized but was raised as a male while his half-sibling by a different father was affected more severely and reared as a female. These studies indicate that the function of an AR AF2 mutant in male development can vary greatly depending on the genetic background.

  7. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ.

  8. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  9. BRAIN REWARD ACTIVITY TO MASKED IN-GROUP SMILING FACES PREDICTS FRIENDSHIP DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-Hao A.; Whalen, Paul J.; Freeman, Jonathan B.; Taylor, James M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether neural responses in the ventral striatum (VS) to in-group facial expressions—presented without explicit awareness—could predict friendship patterns in newly arrived individuals from China six months later. Individuals who initially showed greater VS activity in response to in-group happy expressions during functional neuroimaging later made considerably more in-group friends, suggesting that VS activity might reflect reward processes that drive in-group approach behaviors. PMID:26185595

  10. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Purpero, Vince M; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2013-02-25

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction--reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five X-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (k(cat) comparison) than the wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over the wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83-times faster (k(cat) comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β(0)=170 vs. 160 M(-1)), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 vs. 62 U mg(-1)). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE, so that an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl-enzyme.

  11. Mechanisms of the anti-tumor activity of Methyl 2-(-5-fluoro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-1 H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxylate against breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hasanpourghadi, Mohadeseh; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Trivedi, Piyush; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2017-03-16

    Microtubule Targeting Agents (MTAs) induce cell death through mitotic arrest, preferentially affecting rapidly dividing cancer cells over slowly proliferating normal cells. Previously, we showed that Methyl 2-(-5-fluoro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxylate (MBIC) acts as a potential MTA. In this study, we demonstrated that MBIC exhibits greater toxicity towards non-aggressive breast cancer cell-line, MCF-7 (IC50 = 0.73 ± 0.0 μM) compared to normal fibroblast cell-line, L-cells (IC50 = 59.6 ± 2.5 μM). The IC50 of MBIC against the aggressive breast cancer cell-line, MDA-MB-231 was 20.4 ± 0.2 μM. We hypothesized that the relatively high resistance of MDA-MB-231 cells to MBIC is associated with p53 mutation. We investigated p53 and three of its downstream proteins: survivin, cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk1) and cyclin B1. Following treatment with MBIC, survivin co-immunoprecipitated with caspases with higher affinity in MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, silencing survivin caused a 4.5-fold increase in sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 cells to MBIC (IC50 = 4.4 ± 0.3). In addition, 4 weeks of MBIC administration in MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated BALB/c nude mice resulted in 79.7% reduction of tumor volume compared to the untreated group with no severe sign of toxicity. Our results demonstrated MBIC has multiple anti-tumor actions and could be a potential drug in breast cancer therapy.

  12. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  13. Atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids: microbial implication versus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaïtilingom, M.; Charbouillot, T.; Deguillaume, L.; Maisonobe, R.; Parazols, M.; Amato, P.; Sancelme, M.; Delort, A.-M.

    2011-02-01

    Clouds are multiphasic atmospheric systems in which the dissolved organic compounds, dominated by carboxylic acids, are subject to multiple chemical transformations in the aqueous phase. Among them, solar radiation, by generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH), is considered as the main catalyzer of the reactivity of organic species in clouds. We investigated to which extent the active biomass existing in cloud water represents an alternative route to the chemical reactivity of carboxylic acids. Pure cultures of seventeen bacterial strains (Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Frigoribacterium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Rhodococcus), previously isolated from cloud water and representative of the viable community of clouds were first individually incubated in two artificial bulk cloud water solutions at 17 °C and 5 °C. These solutions mimicked the chemical composition of cloud water from "marine" and "continental" air masses, and contained the major carboxylic acids existing in the cloud water (i.e. acetate, formate, succinate and oxalate). The concentrations of these carboxylic compounds were monitored over time and biodegradation rates were determined. In average, they ranged from 2 ×10-19 for succinate to 1 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 17 °C and from 4 × 10-20 for succinate to 6 × 10-19 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 5 °C, with no significant difference between "marine" and "continental" media. In parallel, irradiation experiments were also conducted in these two artificial media to compare biodegradation and photodegradation of carboxylic compounds. To complete this comparison, the photodegradation rates of carboxylic acids by •OH radicals were calculated from literature data. Inferred estimations suggested a significant participation of microbes to the transformation of carboxylic acids in cloud water, particularly for acetate and succinate (up to 90%). Furthermore, a natural cloud water sample was incubated (including its indigenous microflora

  14. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 3-quinoline carboxylic acids as new inhibitors of protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Syniugin, Anatolii R; Ostrynska, Olga V; Chekanov, Maksym O; Volynets, Galyna P; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the derivatives of 3-quinoline carboxylic acid were studied as inhibitors of protein kinase CK2. Forty-three new compounds were synthesized. Among them 22 compounds inhibiting CK2 with IC50 in the range from 0.65 to 18.2 μM were identified. The most active inhibitors were found among tetrazolo-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives.

  15. Chemical modification of the RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase by thiol-selective reagents: evidence for activation of the primary nucleophile of the beta-lactamase active site by adjacent functional groups.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1989-01-01

    The RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase (Sigal, I.S., Harwood, B.G., Arentzen, R., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79:7157-7160, 1982) is inactivated by thiol-selective reagents such as iodoacetamide, methyl methanethiosulfonate, and 4,4'-dipyridyldisulfide, which modify the active site thiol group. The pH-rate profiles of these inactivation reactions show that there are two nucleophilic forms of the enzyme, EH2 and EH, both of which, by analogy with the situation with cysteine proteinases, probably contain the active site nucleophile in the thiolate form. The pKa of the active site thiol is therefore shown by the data to be below 4.0. This low pKa is thought to reflect the presence of adjacent functionality which stabilizes the thiolate anion. The low nucleophilicity of the thiolate in both EH2 and EH, with respect to that of cysteine proteinases and model compounds, suggests that the thiolate of the thiol beta-lactamase is stabilized by two hydrogen-bond donors. One of these, of pKa greater than 9.0, is suggested to be the conserved and essential Lys-73 ammonium group, while the identity of the other group, of pKa around 6.7, is less clear, but may be the conserved Glu-166 carboxylic acid. beta-Lactamase activity is associated with the EH2 form, and thus the beta-lactamase active site is proposed to contain one basic or nucleophilic group (the thiolate in the thiol beta-lactamase) and two acidic (hydrogen-bond donor) groups (one of which is likely to be the above-mentioned lysine ammonium group).

  16. Application of palladium-catalyzed carboxyl anhydride-boronic acid cross coupling in the synthesis of novel bile acids analogs with modified side chains.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2015-09-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of 4-methoxycarbonyl phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions was activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded the cross coupled compounds, which were converted in novel side chain modified bile acids by one pot carbonyl reduction/removal of the protecting acetyl groups by Wolff-Kishner reduction. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals and crystal characterization of the heretofore unknown compounds are provided.

  17. Latex of immunodiagnosis for detecting the Chagas disease. I. Synthesis of the base carboxylated latex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Verónica D G; Gugliotta, Luis M; Meira, Gregorio R

    2008-02-01

    This article investigates the synthesis of two (monodisperse, carboxylated, and core-shell) latexes, through a batch and a semibatch emulsion copolymerizations of styrene (St) and methacrylic acid (MAA) onto polystyrene latex seeds. A mathematical model of the process was developed that predicts conversion, average particle size, and surface density of carboxyl groups. The model was adjusted to the batch reaction measurements, and then it was used in the design of the semibatch experiment. The semibatch reaction involved an initial homopolymerization of St followed by instantaneous addition of MAA-St-initiator. Compared with the batch reaction results, the semibatch policy more than doubled the surface density of carboxyl groups. The second part of this series describes the development of an immunodiagnosis latex-protein complex for detecting the Chagas disease, by coupling an antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi onto the produced carboxylated latexes.

  18. Plastic scintillators with high loading of one or more metal carboxylates

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine; Sanner, Robert Dean

    2016-01-12

    In one embodiment, a material includes at least one metal compound incorporated into a polymeric matrix, where the metal compound includes a metal and one or more carboxylate ligands, where at least one of the one or more carboxylate ligands includes a tertiary butyl group, and where the material is optically transparent. In another embodiment, a method includes: processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from a scintillator material; and outputting a result of the processing, where the scintillator material comprises at least one metal compound incorporated into a polymeric matrix, the at least one metal compound including a metal and one or more carboxylate ligands, where at least one of the one or more carboxylate ligands has a tertiary butyl group, and where the scintillator material is optically transparent and has an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 20%.

  19. Influence of surface oxygenated groups on the formation of active Cu species and the catalytic activity of Cu/AC catalyst for the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Li, Zhong; Zheng, Huayan; Hao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jiajun

    2016-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) supported Cu catalysts are employed to study the influence of surface oxygenated groups on the formation of active Cu species and the catalytic activity of Cu/AC catalyst for oxidative carbonylation of methanol to dimethyl carbonate (DMC). The AC supports are thermal treated under different temperatures in order to adjust the levels of surface oxygenated groups. The AC supports are characterized by BET, TPD-MS and XRD, and the Cu/AC catalysts are characterized by BET, XRD, TEM, XPS, AAS, CH3OH-TPD and N2O chemisorption. The results show that as the treatment temperature is below 800 °C, the BET surface area of the corresponding AC supports are nearly unchanged and close to that of the original AC (1529.6 m2/g). But as the thermal treatment temperature is elevated from 1000 to 1600 °C, the BET surface area of AC supports gradually decreases from 1407.6 to 972.2 m2/g. After loading of Cu, the BET surface area of copper catalysts is in the range of 834.4 to 1545.3 m2/g, which is slightly less than that of the respective supports. When AC is thermal treated at 400 and 600 °C, the unstable carboxylic acid and anhydrides groups are selectively removed, which has weakened the mobility and agglomeration of Cu species during the calcination process, and thus improve the Cu species dispersion over AC support. But as the treatment temperature is elevated from 600 °C to 1200 °C, the Cu species dispersion begins to decline suggesting further removal of stable surface oxygenated groups is unfavorable for Cu species dispersion. Moreover, higher thermal treatment temperature (above 1200 °C) promotes the graphitization degree of AC and leds to the decrease of Cu loading on AC support. Meanwhile, the removal of surface oxygenated groups by thermal treatment is conducive to the formation of more π-sites, and thus promote the reduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ and Cu0 as active centers. The specific surface area of (Cu+ + Cu0) is improved by thermal treatment of AC

  20. Exploring Group Dynamics of Primary 6 Students Engaged in Mathematical Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eric, Chan Chun Ming

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the group dynamics among three groups of students involved in collaborative learning in mathematical modelling activities. It reports how group dynamics were established and their influence on the students' mathematical problem-solving endeavours. Through video analyses, discourse structures were identified to suggest the…

  1. The Effect of Science Activities on Concept Acquisition of Age 5-6 Children Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogru, Mustafa; Seker, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    Present research aims to determine the effect of science activities on concept development of preschool period age 5-6 children groups. Parallel to research objective, qualitative research pattern has been the selected method. Study group comprises of collectively 48 children from 5-6 age group attending to a private education institution in city…

  2. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-08-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout.

  3. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6–8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions’ similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. PMID:24089423

  4. Direct enantioselective conjugate addition of carboxylic acids with chiral lithium amides as traceless auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Jackson, Jeffrey J; Eickhoff, John A; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-01-21

    Michael addition is a premier synthetic method for carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond formation. Using chiral dilithium amides as traceless auxiliaries, we report the direct enantioselective Michael addition of carboxylic acids. A free carboxyl group in the product provides versatility for further functionalization, and the chiral reagent can be readily recovered by extraction with aqueous acid. The method has been applied in the enantioselective total synthesis of the purported structure of pulveraven B.

  5. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  6. Electrocarboxylation: towards sustainable and efficient synthesis of valuable carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Matthessen, Roman; Fransaer, Jan; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The near-unlimited availability of CO2 has stimulated a growing research effort in creating value-added products from this greenhouse gas. This paper presents the trends on the most important methods used in the electrochemical synthesis of carboxylic acids from carbon dioxide. An overview is given of different substrate groups which form carboxylic acids upon CO2 fixation, including mechanistic considerations. While most work focuses on the electrocarboxylation of substrates with sacrificial anodes, this review considers the possibilities and challenges of implementing other synthetic methodologies. In view of potential industrial application, the choice of reactor setup, electrode type and reaction pathway has a large influence on the sustainability and efficiency of the process. PMID:25383120

  7. Substrate Specificity within a Family of Outer Membrane Carboxylate Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Liu, Jiaming; Cheneke, Belete R.; Touw, Debra S.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Indic, Mridhu; Movileanu, Liviu; van den Berg, Bert; Dutzler, Raimund

    2012-01-17

    Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM) that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  8. Highly visible-light luminescence properties of the carboxyl-functionalized short and ultrashort MWNTs

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Yongsong Xia Xiaohong; Liang Ying; Zhang Yonggang; Ren Qinfeng; Li Jialin Jia Zhijie; Tang Yiwen

    2007-06-15

    Luminescence of the short multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) conjugated with carboxylic acid groups has been studied. The results show that the carboxyl-functionalized short MWNTs could emit luminescence and the emission peak appears at 500 nm with a corresponding optimal excitation wavelength centering at 310 nm. When the short MWNTs are filtered through 0.15 {mu}m polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane, the ultrashort MWNTs are obtained from the filtrate. An interesting feature for the ultrashort MWNTs is that the emission intensity is strengthened and the peak is slightly blue shifted to 460 nm. This result indicates that the luminescence properties of MWNTs are strongly affected by the tube length. After chemical oxidization cutting, defects and carboxylic acid groups at the tube end and/or sidewall can be produced; the more shorten of MWNTs, the better dispersion and carboxylic passivation of the nanotubes, and the more intense luminescence emissions. The broad emissions are logically attributed to the trapping of excitation energy by defect sites in the carboxyl-functionalized nanotube structure. - Graphical abstract: Luminescence of the short and ultrashort multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) conjugated with carboxylic acid groups, which is logically attributed to the trapping of excitation energy by defect sites, has been studied.

  9. Carbodiimide-mediated immobilization of serratiopeptidase on amino-, carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and characterization for target delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Jana, Asim K.; Maiti, Mithu; Dhamija, Isha

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid biomaterial of serratiopeptidase enzyme was prepared with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via carboxyl and amino-functionalization and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) for direct immobilization. The average size of prepared MNPs was found to be 15.05 ± 3.06 nm. Attachment of amino and carboxyl groups was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction confirmed the purity and phase integrity of Fe3O4. The MNPs and enzyme-loaded-MNPs (EMNPs) were of saturation magnetization 58 and 50 emu g-1, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis of EDC-MNPs and EMNPs showed the presence of organic coating over MNPs. Serratiopeptidase immobilized on amino-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles showed loss of enzyme activity due to crosslinking of enzyme, while serratiopeptidase immobilized on carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was better and gave 115.78 mg protein g-1 MNPs, enzyme loading 168.32 U g-1 MNPs at optimized MNPs-to-enzyme ratio 1.0 mg mg-1. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that EMNPs with magnetic targeting is more effective in drug permeation and reduction in edema than free enzyme.

  10. DFT, IR, Raman and NMR study of the coordination ability of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to Pr(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Ivelina; Kostova, Irena; Trendafilova, Natasha; Rastogi, Vinod K.; Kiefer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    A new complex of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) with Pr(III) is synthesized and its structure and molecular properties are investigated by elemental analysis, IR, Raman, NMR measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The elemental analysis suggested the general formula Pr(CCA) 2(NO 3)(H 2O). The HCCA ligand possesses two donor groups (deprotonated carboxylic and carbonylic) and can act as a bidentate ligand in two different binding modes. According to the complex general formula, two model Pr(III) structures accounting for the two binding modes of the ligand are modeled in gas phase and in solvent environment (DMSO). Geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and Raman activities as well as 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of HCCA and the two model Pr(III) structures are calculated with DFT method at B3LYP/SVP and B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) levels. The comparative vibrational and NMR analyses, based on both experimental and theoretical data of the ligand and the two model Pr(III) structures predict a bidentate binding of the HCCA ligands to Pr(III) through the deprotonated carboxylic oxygen and the carbonylic oxygen. Vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR data able to distinguish the bidentate ligand binding modes are established.

  11. Carboxylator: incorporating solvent-accessible surface area for identifying protein carboxylation sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Shu-An; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2011-10-01

    In proteins, glutamate (Glu) residues are transformed into γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues in a process called carboxylation. The process of protein carboxylation catalyzed by γ-glutamyl carboxylase is deemed to be important due to its involvement in biological processes such as blood clotting cascade and bone growth. There is an increasing interest within the scientific community to identify protein carboxylation sites. However, experimental identification of carboxylation sites via mass spectrometry-based methods is observed to be expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Thus, we were motivated to design a computational method for identifying protein carboxylation sites. This work aims to investigate the protein carboxylation by considering the composition of amino acids that surround modification sites. With the implication of a modified residue prefers to be accessible on the surface of a protein, the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA) around carboxylation sites is also investigated. Radial basis function network is then employed to build a predictive model using various features for identifying carboxylation sites. Based on a five-fold cross-validation evaluation, a predictive model trained using the combined features of amino acid sequence (AA20D), amino acid composition, and ASA, yields the highest accuracy at 0.874. Furthermore, an independent test done involving data not included in the cross-validation process indicates that in silico identification is a feasible means of preliminary analysis. Additionally, the predictive method presented in this work is implemented as Carboxylator (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/Carboxylator/), a web-based tool for identifying carboxylated proteins with modification sites in order to help users in investigating γ-glutamyl carboxylation.

  12. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Dickson, Todd Jay

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  13. The physical activity profiles of South Asian ethnic groups in England

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Prachi; Townsend, Nick; Shaw, Alison; Foster, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify what types of activity contribute to overall physical activity in South Asian ethnic groups and how these vary according to sex and age. We used the White British ethnic group as a comparison. Methods Self-reported physical activity was measured in the Health Survey for England 1999 and 2004, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey that boosted ethnic minority samples in these years. We merged the two survey years and analysed data from 19 476 adults. The proportions of total physical activity achieved through walking, housework, sports and DIY activity were calculated. We stratified by sex and age group and used analysis of variances to examine differences between ethnic groups, adjusted for the socioeconomic status. Results There was a significant difference between ethnic groups for the contributions of all physical activity domains for those aged below 55 years, with the exception of walking. In women aged 16–34 years, there was no significant difference in the contribution of walking to total physical activity (p=0.38). In the 35–54 age group, Bangladeshi males have the highest proportion of total activity from walking (30%). In those aged over 55 years, the proportion of activity from sports was the lowest in all South Asian ethnic groups for both sexes. Conclusions UK South Asians are more active in some ways that differ, by age and sex, from White British, but are similarly active in other ways. These results can be used to develop targeted population level interventions for increasing physical activity levels in adult UK South Asian populations. PMID:26677257

  14. Nonclinical Pharmacokinetics of Oseltamivir and Oseltamivir Carboxylate in the Central Nervous System▿

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gerhard; Funk, Christoph; Fowler, Stephen; Otteneder, Michael B.; Breidenbach, Alexander; Rayner, Craig R.; Chu, Tom; Prinssen, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Oseltamivir, a potent and selective inhibitor of influenza A and B virus neuraminidases, is a prodrug that is systemically converted into the active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate. In light of reported neuropsychiatric events in influenza patients, including some taking oseltamivir, and as part of a full assessment to determine whether oseltamivir could contribute to, or exacerbate, such events, we undertook a series of nonclinical studies. In particular, we investigated (i) the distribution of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in the central nervous system of rats after single intravenous doses of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate and oral doses of oseltamivir, (ii) the active transport of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in vitro by transporters located in the blood-brain barrier, and (iii) the extent of local conversion of oseltamivir to oseltamivir carboxylate in brain fractions. In all experiments, results showed that the extent of partitioning of oseltamivir and especially oseltamivir carboxylate to the central nervous system was low. Brain-to-plasma exposure ratios were approximately 0.2 for oseltamivir and 0.01 for oseltamivir carboxylate. Apart from oseltamivir being a good substrate for the P-glycoprotein transporter, no other active transport processes were observed. The conversion of the prodrug to the active metabolite was slow and limited in human and rat brain S9 fractions. Overall, these studies indicate that the potential for oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate to reach the central nervous system in high quantities is low and, together with other analyses and studies, that their involvement in neuropsychiatric events in influenza patients is unlikely. PMID:19721074

  15. Synthesis of Carboxylated-Graphenes by the Kolbe-Schmitt Process.

    PubMed

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Pumera, Martin

    2017-02-28

    Graphene oxide is an oxidized form of graphene containing a large variety of oxygen groups. Although past models have suggested carboxylic acids to be present in significant amounts, recent evidence has shown otherwise. Toward the production of carboxyl-graphene, a synthetic method is presented herein based on the Kolbe-Schmitt process. A modified procedure of heating graphite oxide in the presence of a KOH/CaO mixture results in up to 11 atom % of carboxylic groups. The graphite oxide starting material and reaction temperature were investigated as two important factors, where a crumpled morphology of graphite oxide flakes and a lower 220 °C temperature preferentially led to greater carboxyl functionalization. Successful carboxylation caused a band gap opening of ∼2.5 eV in the smallest carboxyl-graphene particles, which also demonstrated a yellow fluorescence under UV light unseen in its counterpart produced at 500 °C. These results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations showing band gap opening and spin polarization of impurity states. This demonstrates the current synthetic process as yet another approach toward tuning the physical properties of graphene.

  16. Psychosocial mediators of group cohesion on physical activity intention of older adults.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina; Mummery, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    Considerable evidence has indicated that group-based physical activity may be a promising approach to reducing and preventing age-related illness. However, this research has not examined the mechanisms by which cohesion may impact on behaviour. The purpose of the present research was to utilise the theory of planned behaviour to investigate the mechanism by which group cohesion may affect physical activity intention. Participants were recruited from an existing physical activity intervention studying the effects of group cohesion on physical activity behaviour. The outcomes of this intervention are reported elsewhere. This paper presents data from a sub-sample of the intervention population (N=74) that examined the mediating relationships between the theory of planned behaviour and group cohesion on physical activity intention. Analyses showed that attitude and perceived behavioural control mediated the relationship between specific group cohesion concepts and physical activity intention. The direct measure of subjective norm failed to display a mediating relationship. The mediating relationships displayed between attitude and perceived behavioural control and physical activity intention provide insight into potential mechanisms by which group cohesion may affect behaviour.

  17. Encapsulation of Acyclovir in new carboxylated cyclodextrin-based nanosponges improves the agent's antiviral efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lembo, David; Swaminathan, Shankar; Donalisio, Manuela; Civra, Andrea; Pastero, Linda; Aquilano, Dino; Vavia, Pradeep; Trotta, Francesco; Cavalli, Roberta

    2013-02-25

    Cyclodextrin-based nanosponges (NS) are solid nanoparticles, obtained from the cross-linking of cyclodextrins that have been proposed as delivery systems for many types of drugs. Various NS derivatives are currently under investigation in order that their properties might be tuned for different applications. In this work, new carboxylated cyclodextrin-based nanosponges (Carb-NS) carrying carboxylic groups within their structure were purposely designed as novel Acyclovir carriers. TEM measurements revealed their spherical shape and size of about 400 nm. The behaviour of Carb-NS, with respect to the incorporation and delivery of Acyclovir, was compared to that of NS, previously investigated as a drug carrier. DSC, XRPD and FTIR analyses were used to investigate the two NS formulations. The results confirm the incorporation of the drug into the NS structure and NS-Acyclovir interactions. The Acyclovir loading into Carb-NS was higher than that obtained using NS, reaching about 70% (w/w). In vitro release studies showed the release kinetics of Acyclovir from Carb-NS to be prolonged in comparison with those observed with NS, with no initial burst effect. The NS uptake into cells was evaluated using fluorescent Carb-NS and revealed the nanoparticle internalisation. Enhanced antiviral activity against a clinical isolate of HSV-1 was obtained using Acyclovir loaded in Carb-NS.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of carboxylated starch-chitosan bioactive scaffold for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shahriarpanah, Sepideh; Nourmohammadi, Jhamak; Amoabediny, Ghassem

    2016-12-01

    This study offers new bioactive composite scaffolds from carboxylated starch-chitosan for bone regeneration. In order to introduce COOH groups into the scaffolds, chitosan was first dissolved in citric acid and then mixed with different amounts of starch. Various characterization techniques were used to analyze the structure, morphology, compressive strength, and apatite mineralization of the composites, which were compared to pure chitosan scaffolds. The results indicated that chitosan scaffolds showed the highest pore size and porosity, while no apatite deposition was observed even after 14days of soaking in simulated body fluid. For composite samples, the pore size and porosity decreased as the starch content increased. In spite of such decrease, the pore size measurements were in the optimal range for bone regeneration. The bone-like apatite mineralization, compressive strength, carboxyl content, and swelling ratio of the composites increased with additional starch. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that higher starch content can enhance proliferation, ALP activity, and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells (MG63).

  19. The Relationship between Students' Small Group Activities, Time Spent on Self-Study, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp, Rachelle J. A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van Berkel, Henk J. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the contributions students make to the problem-based tutorial group process as observed by their peers, self-study time and achievement. To that end, the Maastricht Peer Activity Rating Scale was administered to students participating in Problem-Based Learning tutorial groups.…

  20. DHPG Activation of Group 1 mGluRs in BLA Enhances Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Jerry W.; Matus-Amat, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors are known to play an important role in both synaptic plasticity and memory. We show that activating these receptors prior to fear conditioning by infusing the group 1 mGluR agonist, (R.S.)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), into the basolateral region of the amygdala (BLA) of adult Sprague-Dawley rats…

  1. Need for Cognition and Active Information Search in Small Student Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curseu, Petru Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 213 students organized in 44 groups this study tests the impact of need for cognition on active information search by using a multilevel analysis. The results show that group members with high need for cognition seek more advice in task related issues than those with low need for cognition and this pattern of information exchange is…

  2. What Do We Want Small Group Activities For? Voices from EFL Teachers in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental issue of why small group activities are utilized in the language learning classroom. Although these activities have gained popularity in the field of Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), supported by a sound theoretical base, few studies have so far examined the reasons why language teachers are…

  3. Fostering an Active Learning Environment for Undergraduates: Peer-to-Peer Interactions in a Research Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Christopher E.; Matthews, Michael A.; Thompson, Nancy S.

    2007-01-01

    The benefits of active learning in the traditional classroom setting are well established among engineering educators; however, this learning model can thrive in other settings, namely in a research group. This work presents findings from an educational research project specifically designed to foster active learning among undergraduates and…

  4. Work group IV: Future directions for measures of the food and physical activity environments.

    PubMed

    Story, Mary; Giles-Corti, Billie; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus; Cummins, Steven; Frank, Lawrence Douglas; Huang, Terry T-K; Lewis, LaVonna Blair

    2009-04-01

    Much progress has been made in the past 5 to 10 years in measuring and understanding the impact of the food and physical activity environments on behavioral outcomes. Nevertheless, this research is in its infancy. A work group was convened to identify current evidence gaps and barriers in food and physical activity environments and policy research measures, and develop recommendations to guide future directions for measurement and methodologic research efforts. A nominal group process was used to determine six priority areas for food and physical activity environments and policy measures to move the field forward by 2015, including: (1) identify relevant factors in the food and physical activity environments to measure, including those most amenable to change; (2) improve understanding of mechanisms for relationships between the environment and physical activity, diet, and obesity; (3) develop simplified measures that are sensitive to change, valid for different population groups and settings, and responsive to changing trends; (4) evaluate natural experiments to improve understanding of food and physical activity environments and their impact on behaviors and weight; (5) establish surveillance systems to predict and track change over time; and (6) develop standards for adopting effective health-promoting changes to the food and physical activity environments. The recommendations emanating from the work group highlight actions required to advance policy-relevant research related to food and physical activity environments.

  5. Integration of Structured Expressive Activities within a Humanistic Group Play Therapy Format for Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratton, Sue C.; Ceballos, Peggy L.; Ferebee, Kelly Webb

    2009-01-01

    The integration of expressive activities in play groups with preadolescents encourages them to reach more deeply into their own resources, enabling them to handle future challenges more effectively. Developmental and therapeutic rationale, along with research support, is given for the integration of creative activities into a humanistic play group…

  6. Upper Elementary Boys' Participation during Group Singing Activities in Single-Sex and Coeducational Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzy, Zadda M.

    2010-01-01

    As boys in the upper elementary grades become increasingly influenced by peer pressure, many are less likely to participate in singing activities because singing is considered a "feminine" activity. The purpose of this research was to explore if there was an effect on upper elementary boys' level of participation during group singing activities…

  7. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  8. Group cohesion and between session homework activities predict self-reported cognitive-behavioral skill use amongst participants of SMART Recovery groups.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P; Baker, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    SMART Recovery groups are cognitive-behaviorally oriented mutual support groups for individuals with addictions. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which the quality of group facilitation, group cohesion and the use of between session homework activities contribute to self-rated use of cognitive-behavioral skills amongst group participants. Participants attending SMART Recovery groups in Australia completed a cross sectional survey (N=124). The survey included measures of cognitive and behavioral skill utilization, group cohesion, quality of group facilitation and a rating of how frequently participants leave group meetings with an achievable between session homework plan. On average, participants had been attending SMART Recovery meetings for 9 months. Participants were most likely to attend SMART Recovery for problematic alcohol use. Regression analyses indicated that group cohesion significantly predicted use of cognitive restructuring, but that only provision of homework at the end of each group session predicted self-reported behavioral activation. Both group cohesion and leaving a group with an achievable homework plan predicted participant use of cognitive behavioral skills. The concrete actions associated with homework activities may facilitate behavioral activation. There is a need for longitudinal research to examine the relationship between the utilization of cognitive and behavioral skills and participant outcomes (e.g. substance use, mental health) for people attending SMART Recovery groups.

  9. Polycarboxylation of carbon nanofibers under Friedel-Crafts condition: A simple route to direct binding of carboxylic functionalities to graphitic π-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiancheng; Cai, Hualun; Xu, Kai; Fu, Zien; Liu, Xin; Chen, Mingcai; Zhang, Xiuju

    2012-11-01

    The functionalization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with oxalyl chloride, via Friedel-Crafts reaction in the presence of aluminum chloride, was first demonstrated as an efficient way to introduce carboxyl groups onto the nanofiber sidewalls. Octa-aminophenylsilsesquioxane (OASQ) was then covalently attached to the carboxylated nanocarbon CNF-(COOH)n through amide linkage. Taking into account the nature of the electrophilic aromatic substitution, this chemical functionalization may involve formation of conjugated carboxylic acid moiety. Structural analysis combined with electron microscopy observation of the robust octasilsesquioxane species show that carboxyl groups are uniformly distributed on the nanofibers surface.

  10. [Cellulase and xylanase activities of Fusarium Lk:Fr. genus fungi of different trophic groups].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Sokolova, O V; Zhdanova, N M; Iarynchyn, A M; Iovenko, O M

    2008-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cellulase and xylanase activities of 26 fungal strains of phytopathogenic, saprophytic and endophytic Fusarium species has been realized using the qualitative reactions. The rare of their linear growth on the media with carboxymethyl cellulose or xylane has been studied. It was shown that the fungi of genus Fusarium belonging to different trophic groups possessed low activities of investigated enzymes as a whole, but in endophytic strains their levels were lower than in phytopathogenic ones. At the same time the distinct strain dependence of cellulase and xylanase activities was fixed in the fungi of different trophic groups. As far as the cellulase and xylanase activities in phytopathogenic isolates varied from complete absence to high levels, and since the activity maximum for each of the investigated strains was observed in different growth terms the conclusion was made that the cellulase and xylanase activities could not be considered as possible markers of the fungal isolate pathogenicity on the strain level.

  11. Discovery of novel BTK inhibitors with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolei; Wang, James; Liu, Jian; Guiadeen, Deodial; Krikorian, Arto; Boga, Sobhana Babu; Alhassan, Abdul-Basit; Selyutin, Oleg; Yu, Wensheng; Yu, Younong; Anand, Rajan; Liu, Shilan; Yang, Chundao; Wu, Hao; Cai, Jiaqiang; Cooper, Alan; Zhu, Hugh; Maloney, Kevin; Gao, Ying-Duo; Fischmann, Thierry O; Presland, Jeremy; Mansueto, My; Xu, Zangwei; Leccese, Erica; Zhang-Hoover, Jie; Knemeyer, Ian; Garlisi, Charles G; Bays, Nathan; Stivers, Peter; Brandish, Philip E; Hicks, Alexandra; Kim, Ronald; Kozlowski, Joeseph A

    2017-03-15

    We report the design and synthesis of a series of novel Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitors with a carboxylic acid moiety in the ribose pocket. This series of compounds has demonstrated much improved off-target selectivities including adenosine uptake (AdU) inhibition compared to the piperidine amide series. Optimization of the initial lead compound 4 based on BTK enzyme inhibition, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMC) and human whole blood (hWB) activity led to the discovery of compound 40, with potent BTK inhibition, reduced off target activities, as well as favorable pharmacokinetic profile in both rat and dog.

  12. Variant for estimating the activity of tropical cyclone groups in the world ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshevich, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    It is especially important to know the character and the intensity level of tropical cyclone (TC) activity when the system for estimating the cyclonic danger and risk is formed. During seasons of increased cyclonic activity, when several TCs are simultaneously active, the total energy effect of the cyclone group joint action is not estimated numerically. Cyclonic activity is as a rule characterized by the number of TCs that occur in the considered zone. A variant of the criterion, according to which relative cyclonic activity is estimated, is presented.

  13. Mutualistic Benefits Generate an Unequal Distribution of Risky Activities Among Unrelated Group Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuk, Penelope F.; Ward, Seamus A.; Jozwiak, Amy

    Recent studies provide a new challenge to the adequacy of theories concerning the evolution of cooperation among nonrelatives: some individuals perform high-risk activities while others do not. We examined a communal hymenopteran species, Lasioglossum(Chilalictus)hemichalceum, to determine why group members engaged in demonstrably risky activities (foraging) tolerate the selfish behavior (remaining in the nest) of unrelated nestmates. Experimental removal of adult females indicated that their presence is required for the protection of brood from ant predators. Nonforagers ensure the continued presence of adults in the nest if the risk-taking foragers die, thereby safeguarding the survival of forager offspring. This results in an unequal distribution of risky activities within social groups in which avoidance of risky activities by some group members is ultimately beneficial to risk takers.

  14. Poly[triaquabis­(μ2-3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ato)dilithium(I)

    PubMed Central

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, [Li2(C6H3N2O4)2(H2O)3]n, the coordination number for both independent Li+ cations is five. One of the Li+ ions has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol­ecules, and an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand. The other Li+ ion also has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol­ecule and two 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the water mol­ecules and carboxyl­ate O atoms. PMID:21201874

  15. Group 14 hydrides with low valent elements for activation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Swadhin K; Roesky, Herbert W

    2012-02-21

    Transition metal compounds are well known as activators of small molecules, and they serve as efficient catalysts for a variety of homogeneous and heterogeneous transformations. In contrast, there is a general feeling that main group compounds cannot act as efficient catalysts because of their inability to activate small molecules. Traditionally, the activation of small molecules is considered one of the key steps during a catalytic cycle with transition metals. As a consequence, researchers have long neglected the full range of possibilities in harnessing main group elements for the design of efficient catalysts. Recent developments, however, have made it possible to synthesize main group compounds with low-valent elements capable of activating small molecules. In particular, the judicious use of sterically appropriate ligands has been successful in preparing and stabilizing a variety of Group 14 hydrides with low-valent elements. In this Account, we discuss recent advances in the synthesis of Group 14 hydrides with low-valent elements and assess their potential as small-molecule activators. Group 14, which comprises the nonmetal C, the semimetals Si and Ge, and the metals Sn and Pb, was for years a source of hydrides with the Group 14 element almost exclusively in tetravalent form. Synthetic difficulties and the low stability of Group 14 hydrides in lower oxidation states were difficult to overcome. But in 2000, a divalent Sn(II) hydride was prepared as a stable compound through the incorporation of sterically encumbered aromatic ligands. More recently, the stabilization of GeH(2) and SnH(2) complexes using an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) as a donor and BH(3) or a metal carbonyl complex as an acceptor was reported. A similar strategy was also employed to synthesize the Si(II) hydride. This class of hydrides may be considered coordinatively saturated, with the lone pair of electrons on the Group 14 elements taking part in coordination. We discuss the large

  16. Novel chiral derivatization reagents possessing a pyridylthiourea structure for enantiospecific determination of amines and carboxylic acids in high-throughput liquid chromatography and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry for chiral metabolomics identification.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Ryuji; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Mochizuki, Toshiki; Takayama, Takahiro; Kuwabara, Tomohiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2013-06-28

    This paper reports the synthesis and the application of novel derivatization reagents possessing a pyridylthiourea structure for the enantiospecific determination of chiral amines and carboxylic acids in high-throughput LC-ESI-MS/MS. The novel reagents, i.e., (R)-N-(3-pyridylthiocarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (PyT-C) and (S)-3-amino-1-(3-pyridylthiocarbamoyl)pyrrolidine (PyT-N), were evaluated as chiral derivatization reagents for the enantiomeric determination of chiral amines and carboxylic acids, respectively, in terms of separation efficiency by reversed-phase chromatography and detection sensitivity by ESI-MS/MS. The chiral amines and carboxylic acids were easily labeled with PyT-C and PyT-N, respectively, at 60°C in 60min in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl disulfide (DPDS) and triphenylphosphine (TPP) as the activation reagents. The resulting diastereomers were completely separated by reversed-phase chromatography using a small particle (1.7μm) ODS column (Rs=3.54-6.00 for carboxylic acids and Rs=3.07-4.75 for amines). A highly sensitive detection at the sub-fmol level was also obtained from the SRM chromatograms at a single monitoring ion, m/z 137.0 (0.72-1.46fmol for carboxylic acids and 0.55-1.89fmol for amines). The proposed procedure using PyT-C and PyT-N was applied to the determination of chiral amines and carboxylic acids spiked into human saliva, as a model study of chiral metabonomics identification. dl-Amino acid methyl esters and N-acetyl dl-amino acids, which are the representatives as the chiral amines and carboxylic acids, in the saliva were clearly identified by the present method. Because the same product ion at m/z 137.0 was obtained from collision-induced dissociation (CID) of protonated molecular ions of all the derivatives, the proposed procedure using both reagents (i.e., PyT-C and PyT-N) seems to be useful for chiral metabolomics identification having selected functional groups (i.e., amines and carboxylic acids).

  17. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia.

  18. Isolation and characterization of Exodus-2, a novel C-C chemokine with a unique 37-amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Kim, C H; Klemsz, M; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Cooper, S; Schnizlein-Bick, C; Broxmeyer, H E

    1997-09-15

    Chemokines are a group of small, homologous proteins that regulate leukocyte migration, hemopoiesis, and HIV-1 absorption. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel murine and human C-C chemokine termed Exodus-2 for its similarity to Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, and its chemotactic ability. This novel chemokine has a unique 36 or 37 (murine and human, respectively) amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension not seen in any other chemokine family member. Purified recombinant Exodus-2 was found to have two activities classically associated with chemokines: inhibiting hemopoiesis and stimulating chemotaxis. However, Exodus-2 also had unusual characteristics for C-C chemokines. It selectively stimulated the chemotaxis of T-lymphocytes and was preferentially expressed in lymph node tissue. The combination of these characteristics may be a functional correlate for the unique carboxyl-terminal structure of Exodus-2.

  19. Spectral and in vitro antimicrobial properties of 2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhankar, Raksha P.; Rahatgaonkar, Anjali M.; Chorghade, Mukund S.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2-oxo-4-phenyl-6-styryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-pyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid (ADP) was complexed with acetates of Mn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by microanalysis, IR, NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and TGA-DTA analyses. Octahedral and square planar geometries were suggested for the complexes in which the central metal ion coordinated with sbnd O donors of ligand and acetate ions. Each ligand binds the metal using carboxylate oxygens. The ligand and complexes were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities against different species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The present novel pyrimidine containing complexes could constitute a new group of antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  20. Promoting Physical Activity With Group Pictures. Affiliation-Based Visual Communication for High-Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Reifegerste, Doreen; Rossmann, Constanze

    2017-02-01

    Past research in social and health psychology has shown that affiliation motivation is associated with health behavior, especially for high-risk populations, suggesting that targeting this motivation could be a promising strategy to promote physical activity. However, the effects that affiliation appeals (e.g., pictures depicting companionship during physical activities) and accompanying slogans have on motivating physical activity have been largely unexplored. Hence, our two studies experimentally tested the effects of exposure to affiliation-based pictures for overweight or less active people, as well as the moderating effect of affiliation motivation. The results of these two studies give some indication that group pictures (with or without an accompanying slogan) can be an effective strategy to improve high-risk populations' attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to engage in physical activity. Affiliation motivation as a personality trait did not interact with these effects, but was positively associated with attitudes, independent of the group picture effect.

  1. Predicted group II intron lineages E and F comprise catalytically active ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Vivien; Pirakitikulr, Nathan; Zhou, Katherine Ismei; Chillón, Isabel; Luo, Jerome; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-09-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing, retrotransposable ribozymes that contribute to gene expression and evolution in most organisms. The ongoing identification of new group II introns and recent bioinformatic analyses have suggested that there are novel lineages, which include the group IIE and IIF introns. Because the function and biochemical activity of group IIE and IIF introns have never been experimentally tested and because these introns appear to have features that distinguish them from other introns, we set out to determine if they were indeed self-splicing, catalytically active RNA molecules. To this end, we transcribed and studied a set of diverse group IIE and IIF introns, quantitatively characterizing their in vitro self-splicing reactivity, ionic requirements, and reaction products. In addition, we used mutational analysis to determine the relative role of the EBS-IBS 1 and 2 recognition elements during splicing by these introns. We show that group IIE and IIF introns are indeed distinct active intron families, with different reactivities and structures. We show that the group IIE introns self-splice exclusively through the hydrolytic pathway, while group IIF introns can also catalyze transesterifications. Intriguingly, we observe one group IIF intron that forms circular intron. Finally, despite an apparent EBS2-IBS2 duplex in the sequences of these introns, we find that this interaction plays no role during self-splicing in vitro. It is now clear that the group IIE and IIF introns are functional ribozymes, with distinctive properties that may be useful for biotechnological applications, and which may contribute to the biology of host organisms.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chairat, Kalayanee; Jittamala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to compare the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and its active antiviral metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese individuals and to determine the effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate. Methods The population pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated in 12 obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m−2) and 12 non‐obese (BMI <30 kg m−2) Thai adult volunteers receiving a standard dose of 75 mg and a double dose of 150 mg in a randomized sequence. Concentration–time data were collected and analysed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling. Results The pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were described simultaneously by first‐order absorption, with a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir, followed by a metabolism compartment and a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir carboxylate. Creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of oseltamivir carboxylate clearance {3.84% increase for each 10 ml min−1 increase in creatinine clearance [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.178%, 8.02%]}. Obese individuals had an approximately 25% (95% CI 24%, 28%) higher oseltamivir clearance, 20% higher oseltamivir volume of distribution (95% CI 19%, 23%) and 10% higher oseltamivir carboxylate clearance (95% CI 9%, 11%) compared with non‐obese individuals. However, these altered pharmacokinetic properties were small and did not change the overall exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate. Conclusions The results confirmed that a dose adjustment for oseltamivir in obese individuals is not necessary on the basis of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26810861

  3. Hydrodecarboxylation of Carboxylic and Malonic Acid Derivatives via Organic Photoredox Catalysis: Substrate Scope and Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jeremy D; Zeller, Mary A; Nicewicz, David A

    2015-09-09

    A direct, catalytic hydrodecarboxylation of primary, secondary, and tertiary carboxylic acids is reported. The catalytic system consists of a Fukuzumi acridinium photooxidant with phenyldisulfide acting as a redox-active cocatalyst. Substoichiometric quantities of Hünig's base are used to reveal the carboxylate. Use of trifluoroethanol as a solvent allowed for significant improvements in substrate compatibilities, as the method reported is not limited to carboxylic acids bearing α heteroatoms or phenyl substitution. This method has been applied to the direct double decarboxylation of malonic acid derivatives, which allows for the convenient use of dimethyl malonate as a methylene synthon. Kinetic analysis of the reaction is presented showing a lack of a kinetic isotope effect when generating deuterothiophenol in situ as a hydrogen atom donor. Further kinetic analysis demonstrated first-order kinetics with respect to the carboxylate, while the reaction is zero-order in acridinium catalyst, consistent with another finding suggesting the reaction is light limiting and carboxylate oxidation is likely turnover limiting. Stern-Volmer analysis was carried out in order to determine the efficiency for the carboxylates to quench the acridinium excited state.

  4. How to lead a group--practical principles and experiences of conducting a promotional group in health-related physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rinne, M; Toropainen, E

    1998-04-01

    In this article the different roles and styles of instruction for the leader of a promotional group in physical activity are described. The promotional group is defined as one in which group dynamics is used to its maximum in order to facilitate permanent change in the members' health-related physical activities. Thus e.g., the group forms its own goals on the basis of its members' individual needs and aspirations and the group members provide feedback, behavioural models and encouragement to each other in their pursuit of change. The leader-instructor works in a stepwise fashion from assessment to evaluation to reformulation of plans made and monitors closely the stages of adoption of physical activity in his or her group. As the group advances the instructor should be ready to transfer more and more responsibility to the members.

  5. On the intermediacy of carboxyphosphate in biotin-dependent carboxylations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogita, Takeshi ); Knowles, J.R. )

    1988-10-18

    In the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin that is catalyzed by most biotin-dependent carboxylases, a fundamental mechanistic question is whether the ATP activates bicarbonate (via the formation of carboxyphosphate as an intermediate) or whether the ATP activates biotin (via the formation of O-phosphobiotin). The authors have resorted to three mechanistic tests using the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Escherichia coli: positional isotope exchange, intermediate trapping, and {sup 18}O tracer experiments on the ATPase activity. First, no catalysis of positional isotope exchange in adenosine 5{prime}-(({alpha},{beta}-{sup 18}O,{beta},{beta}-{sup 18}O{sub 2})triphosphate) was observed when either biotin or bicarbonate was absent, nor was any exchange seen in the presence of both N-1-methylbiotin and bicarbonate. Second, the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate could not be trapped as its trimethyl ester, under conditions of incubation and analysis where the authentic triester was shown to be adequately stable. In the third test, however, they showed that the ATPase activity of biotin carboxylase that is seen in the absence of biotin, an activity that is known to parallel the normal carboxylase reaction when biotin is present, occurs with the transfer of an {sup 18}O label directly from ({sup 18}O)bicarbonate into the product P{sub i}. This result suggests that the bicarbonate-dependent biotin-independent ATPase reaction catalyzed by biotin carboxylase goes via carboxyphosphate and that the carboxylation of biotin itself may proceed analogously.

  6. The effect of thiazolidin carboxylic acid (ThCA) on the redox equilibrium maintaining in the rat hepatocyte with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartoc, R; Oancia, M; Pirvănescu, L

    1978-01-01

    The variation of the activities of glutathion peroxidase, glutathion reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as of the concentrations of lipid peroxides and -SH groups of nonproteic nature, was followed up in the hepatocyte of normal rats, of those with, streptozotocin-induced-diabetes, and of diabetic rats treated with thiazolidin carboxylic (ThCA) acid. Free peroxides and glutathion peroxidase were increased in the diabetic animals as against the normals, whereas glutathion reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the -SH groups of nonproteic nature had lower values. A return to normal of these parameters was noticed in the animals treated with ThCA.

  7. Synthesis, Aqueous Reactivity, and Biological Evaluation of Carboxylic Acid Ester-Functionalized Platinum–Acridine Hybrid Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leigh A.; Suryadi, Jimmy; West, Tiffany K.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of platinum–acridine hybrid agents containing carboxylic acid ester groups is described. The most active derivatives and the unmodified parent compounds showed up to 6-fold higher activity in ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-23) cell lines than cisplatin. Inhibition of cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations was observed in pancreatic (PANC-1) and non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC, NCI-H460) of 80- and 150-fold, respectively. Introduction of the ester groups did not affect the cytotoxic properties of the hybrids, which form the same monofunctional–intercalative DNA adducts as the parent compounds, as demonstrated in a plasmid unwinding assay. In-line high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESMS) shows that the ester moieties undergo platinum-mediated hydrolysis in a chloride concentration-dependent manner to form carboxylate chelates. Potential applications of the chloride-sensitive ester hydrolysis as a self-immolative release mechanism for tumor-selective delivery of platinum–acridines are discussed. PMID:22871158

  8. Work group I: Measures of the food and physical activity environment: instruments.

    PubMed

    Saelens, Brian E; Glanz, Karen

    2009-04-01

    A work group was convened to identify the core challenges, content gaps, and corresponding possible solutions for improving food- and physical activity-environment instrumentation. Identified challenges included instrument proliferation, the scaling or grain of instruments and appropriate aggregation to the neighborhood or community level, and unknown sensitivity to change of most instruments. Solutions for addressing these challenges included establishing an interactive and real-time instrument repository, developing and enforcing high standards for instrument reporting, increasing community-researcher collaborations, and implementing surveillance of food and physical activity environment. Solid instrumentation will accelerate a better understanding of food- and physical activity-environment effects on eating and physical activity behaviors.

  9. Synthesis of Functionalized Dialkyl Ketones From Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Wotal, Alexander C.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Unsymmetrical dialkyl ketones can be directly prepared by the nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of carboxylic acid chlorides or (2-pyridyl)thioesters with alkyl iodides or benzylic chlorides. A wide variety of functional groups are tolerated by this process, including common nitrogen protecting groups and C-B bonds. Even hindered ketones flanked by tertiary and secondary centers can be formed. The mechanism is proposed to involve the reaction of a (L)Ni(alkyl)2 intermediate with the carboxylic acid derivative. PMID:22360350

  10. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR) profiling and computational studies on methyl 5-methoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate: A potential precursor to biologically active molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutairi, Maha S.; Xavier, S.; Sathish, M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Sebastian, S.; Periandy, S.; Al-Wabli, Reem I.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2017-04-01

    Methyl 5-methoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (MMIC) was prepared via esterification of commercially available 5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. The title molecule MMIC was characterised using FT-IR and FT-Raman in the ranges of 4000-500 and 4000-50 cm-1, respectively. The fundamental modes of the vibrations were assigned and the UV-visible spectrum of the MMIC molecule was recorded in the range of 200-400 nm to explore its electronic nature. The HOMO-LUMO energy distribution was calculated and the bonding and anti-bonding structures of the title molecule were studied and analysed using the natural bond orbital (NBO) approach. The reactivity of the MMIC molecule was also investigated and both the positive and negative centres of the molecule were identified using chemical descriptors and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. The chemical shifts of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra were noted and the magnetic field environment of the MMIC molecule are discussed. The non-linear optical (NLO) properties of the title molecule were studied based on its calculated values of polarisability and hyperpolarisability. All computations were obtained by DFT methods using the 6-311++G (d,p) basis set.

  11. Industrial Hygiene Group: 1986 Annual report on research and special activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, H.J.

    1987-11-01

    This report details all the 1986 research activities and some selected operational programs of the Industrial Hygiene Group. During 1986, research studies were directed at: respiratory protection, personal protective clothing, applied industrial hygiene, and aerosols and air cleaning. In several instances, the transfer of technology, previously developed by the Industrial Hygiene Group, is described together with the application of research developments to operational health protection programs.

  12. Highly versatile catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic and carbonic acid derivatives using a Ru-triphos complex: molecular control over selectivity and substrate scope.

    PubMed

    vom Stein, Thorsten; Meuresch, Markus; Limper, Dominik; Schmitz, Marc; Hölscher, Markus; Coetzee, Jacorien; Cole-Hamilton, David J; Klankermayer, Jürgen; Leitner, Walter

    2014-09-24

    The complex [Ru(Triphos)(TMM)] (Triphos = 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane, TMM = trimethylene methane) provides an efficient catalytic system for the hydrogenation of a broad range of challenging functionalities encompassing carboxylic esters, amides, carboxylic acids, carbonates, and urea derivatives. The key control factor for this unique substrate scope results from selective activation to generate either the neutral species [Ru(Triphos)(Solvent)H2] or the cationic intermediate [Ru(Triphos)(Solvent)(H)(H2)](+) in the presence of an acid additive. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies demonstrated together with DFT investigations that the neutral species generally provides lower energy pathways for the multistep reduction cascades comprising hydrogen transfer to C═O groups and C-O bond cleavage. Carboxylic esters, lactones, anhydrides, secondary amides, and carboxylic acids were hydrogenated in good to excellent yields under these conditions. The formation of the catalytically inactive complexes [Ru(Triphos)(CO)H2] and [Ru(Triphos)(μ-H)]2 was identified as major deactivation pathways. The former complex results from substrate-dependent decarbonylation and constitutes a major limitation for the substrate scope under the neutral conditions. The deactivation via the carbonyl complex can be suppressed by addition of catalytic amounts of acids comprising non-coordinating anions such as HNTf2 (bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide). Although the corresponding cationic cycle shows higher overall barriers of activation, it provides a powerful hydrogenation pathway at elevated temperatures, enabling the selective reduction of primary amides, carbonates, and ureas in high yields. Thus, the complex [Ru(Triphos)(TMM)] provides a unique platform for the rational selection of reaction conditions for the selective hydrogenation of challenging functional groups and opens novel synthetic pathways for the utilization of renewable carbon sources.

  13. A one-dimensional carboxylate-bridged helical copper(II) complex containing (quinolin-8-yloxy)acetate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hong; Lu, Fang

    2004-11-01

    The title compound, catena-poly[[bromocopper(II)]-mu-(quinolin-8-yloxy)acetato-kappa(4)N,O,O':O''], [CuBr(C(11)H(8)NO(3))](n), is a novel carboxylate-bridged one-dimensional helical copper(II) polymer. The metal ion exhibits an approximately square-pyramidal CuBrNO(3) coordination environment, with the three donor atoms of the ligand and the bromide ion occupying the basal positions, and an O atom belonging to the carboxylate group of an adjacent molecule in the apical site. Carboxylate groups are mutually cis oriented, and each anti-anti carboxylate group bridges two copper(II) ions via one apical and one basal position [Cu...Cu = 5.677 (1) A], resulting in the formation of a helical chain along the crystallographic b axis.

  14. Salivary alpha amylase activity in human beings of different age groups subjected to psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Gopal K; Upadhyay, Seema; Panna, Shradha M

    2014-10-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been proposed as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker for stress-induced changes in the body that reflect the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Though several experiments have been conducted to determine the validity of this salivary component as a reliable stress marker in human subjects, the effect of stress induced changes on sAA level in different age groups is least studied. This article reports the activity of sAA in human subjects of different age groups subjected to psychological stress induced through stressful video clip. Differences in sAA level based on sex of different age groups under stress have also been studied. A total of 112 subjects consisting of both the male and female subjects, divided into two groups on basis of age were viewed a video clip of corneal transplant surgery as stressor. Activity of sAA from saliva samples of the stressed subjects were measured and compared with the activity of the samples collected from the subjects before viewing the clip. The age ranges of subjects were 18-25 and 40-60 years. The sAA level increased significantly in both the groups after viewing the stressful video. The increase was more pronounced in the younger subjects. The level of sAA was comparatively more in males than females in the respective groups. No significant change in sAA activity was observed after viewing the soothed video clip. Significant increase of sAA level in response to psychological stress suggests that it might act as a reliable sympathetic activity biochemical marker in different stages of human beings.

  15. Group D prothrombin activators from snake venom are structural homologues of mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Veena S; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2003-01-01

    Procoagulant venoms of several Australian elapids contain proteinases that specifically activate prothrombin; among these, Group D activators are functionally similar to coagulation factor Xa (FXa). Structural information on this class of prothrombin activators will contribute significantly towards understanding the mechanism of FXa-mediated prothrombin activation. Here we present the purification of Group D prothrombin activators from three Australian snake venoms (Hoplocephalus stephensi, Notechis scutatus scutatus and Notechis ater niger) using a single-step method, and their N-terminal sequences. The N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain of hopsarin D (H. stephensi) revealed that a fully conserved Cys-7 was substituted with a Ser residue. We therefore determined the complete amino acid sequence of hopsarin D. Hopsarin D shows approximately 70% similarity with FXa and approximately 98% similarity with trocarin D, a Group D prothrombin activator from Tropidechis carinatus. It possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains and a serine proteinase domain. All residues important for catalysis are conserved, as are most regions involved in interactions with factor Va and prothrombin. However, there are some structural differences. Unlike FXa, hopsarin D is glycosylated in both its chains: in light-chain residue 52 and heavy-chain residue 45. The glycosylation on the heavy chain is a large carbohydrate moiety adjacent to the active-site pocket. Overall, hopsarin D is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian coagulation FXa. PMID:12403650

  16. Site-restricted plasminogen activation mediated by group A streptococcal streptokinase variants.

    PubMed

    Cook, Simon M; Skora, Amanda; Walker, Mark J; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L; McArthur, Jason D

    2014-02-15

    SK (streptokinase) is a secreted plasminogen activator and virulence factor of GAS (group A Streptococcus). Among GAS isolates, SK gene sequences are polymorphic and are grouped into two sequence clusters (cluster type-1 and cluster type-2) with cluster type-2 being further classified into subclusters (type-2a and type-2b). In the present study, we examined the role of bacterial and host-derived cofactors in SK-mediated plasminogen activation. All SK variants, apart from type-2b, can form an activator complex with Glu-Plg (Glu-plasminogen). Specific ligand-binding-induced conformational changes in Glu-Plg mediated by fibrinogen, PAM (plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein), fibrinogen fragment D or fibrin, were required for type-2b SK to form a functional activator complex with Glu-Plg. In contrast with type-1 and type-2a SK, type-2b SK activator complexes were inhibited by α2-antiplasmin unless bound to fibrin or to the GAS cell-surface via PAM in combination with fibrinogen. Taken together, these data suggest that type-2b SK plasminogen activation may be restricted to specific microenvironments within the host such as fibrin deposits or the bacterial cell surface through the action of α2-antiplasmin. We conclude that phenotypic SK variation functionally underpins a pathogenic mechanism whereby SK variants differentially focus plasminogen activation, leading to specific niche adaption within the host.

  17. Carboxylate metabolism changes induced by Fe deficiency in barley, a Strategy II plant species.

    PubMed

    López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Javier

    2012-07-15

    The effects of iron (Fe) deficiency on carboxylate metabolism were investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) using two cultivars, Steptoe and Morex, which differ in their Fe efficiency response. In both cultivars, root extracts of plants grown in Fe-deficient conditions showed higher activities of enzymes related to organic acid metabolism, including citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, compared to activities measured in root extracts of Fe-sufficient plants. Accordingly, the concentration of total carboxylates was higher in Fe-deficient roots of both cultivars, with citrate concentration showing the greatest increase. In xylem sap, the concentration of total carboxylates was also higher with Fe deficiency in both cultivars, with citrate and malate being the major organic acids. Leaf extracts of Fe-deficient plants also showed increases in citric acid concentration and in the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and fumarase activities, and decreases in aconitase activity. Our results indicate that changes in root carboxylate metabolism previously reported in Strategy I species also occur in barley, a Strategy II plant species, supporting the existence of anaplerotic carbon fixation via increases in the root activities of these enzymes, with citrate playing a major role. However, these changes occur less intensively than in Strategy I plants. Activities of the anaerobic metabolism enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase and lactate dehydrogenase did not change in barley roots with Fe deficiency, in contrast to what occurs in Strategy I plants, suggesting that these changes may be Strategy I-specific. No significant differences were observed in overall carboxylate metabolism between cultivars, for plants challenged with high or low Fe treatments, suggesting that carboxylate metabolism changes are not behind the Fe-efficiency differences between these cultivars. Citrate synthase was the only measured enzyme with

  18. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Richard L.

    2004-09-01

    Perfluoro ionomer membranes are tetrafluoro ethylene-based materials with microheterogeneous structures consisting of a hydrophobic polymer backbone and a hydrophilic side-chain cluster region. Due to the ionomer cluster morphology, these films exhibit unique transport properties. Recent investigations with perfluoro sulfonate and perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate composite polymers have demonstrated their value in the dehydration of nitric acid and they show potential as an alternative to conventional, energy intensive unit operations in the concentration of acid feeds. As a result, investigations were conducted to determine the feasibility of using pure perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films for the dehydration of nitric acid because of the speculation of improved water selectivity of the carboxylate pendant chain. During the first phase of these investigations the effort was focused on generating a thin, solution cast perfluoro carboxylate ionomer film, to evaluate the general, chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer, and to assess the material's aqueous transport performance (flux and nitrate separation efficiencies) in pervaporation and high-pressure environments. Results demonstrated that generating robust solution-cast films was difficult yet a number of membranes survived high trans-membrane pressures up to 700 psig. General characterization of the solution cast product showed reduced ion exchange capacities when compared with thicker, ''as received'' perfluoro carboxylate and similar sulfonate films. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis results suggested that the solution cast carboxylate films contained a small fraction of sulfonate terminated side-chains. Aqueous transport experimentation showed that permeate fluxes for both pure water and nitric acid were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller for the carboxylate solution cast membranes when compared to their sulfonate counterparts of similar thickness

  19. The working group ``Science with the SRT'': tasks, activities, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Felli, M.

    The Working Group Science with the SRT was formed in May 2004, with the aim of providing scientific input to the Board of the SRT, in order to plan the focal plane instrumentation development of the SRT. In the present contribution, tasks and activities of the Working Group are outlined, and the main indications and results are briefly summarized. For a detailed discussion we refer to the IRA Internal Report ``The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). Science and Technical Requirements'' produced by the members of the Working Group.

  20. In-vehicle group activity modeling and simulation in sensor-based virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Telagamsetti, Durga; Poshtyar, Azin; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-05-01

    Human group activity recognition is a very complex and challenging task, especially for Partially Observable Group Activities (POGA) that occur in confined spaces with limited visual observability and often under severe occultation. In this paper, we present IRIS Virtual Environment Simulation Model (VESM) for the modeling and simulation of dynamic POGA. More specifically, we address sensor-based modeling and simulation of a specific category of POGA, called In-Vehicle Group Activities (IVGA). In VESM, human-alike animated characters, called humanoids, are employed to simulate complex in-vehicle group activities within the confined space of a modeled vehicle. Each articulated humanoid is kinematically modeled with comparable physical attributes and appearances that are linkable to its human counterpart. Each humanoid exhibits harmonious full-body motion - simulating human-like gestures and postures, facial impressions, and hands motions for coordinated dexterity. VESM facilitates the creation of interactive scenarios consisting of multiple humanoids with different personalities and intentions, which are capable of performing complicated human activities within the confined space inside a typical vehicle. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of VESM in terms of its capabilities to seamlessly generate time-synchronized, multi-source, and correlated imagery datasets of IVGA, which are useful for the training and testing of multi-source full-motion video processing and annotation. Furthermore, we demonstrate full-motion video processing of such simulated scenarios under different operational contextual constraints.

  1. Circadian activity rhythm in pre-pubertal and pubertal marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) living in family groups.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula R; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Menezes, Alexandre A L; Azevedo, Carolina V M

    2016-03-01

    In marmosets, a phase advance was observed in activity onset in pubertal animals living in captivity under semi-natural conditions which had stronger correlation with the times of sunrise over the course of the year than the age of the animal. In order to evaluate the effect of puberty on the circadian activity rhythm in male and female marmosets living in family groups in controlled lighting conditions, the activity of 5 dyads of twins (4 ♀/♂ and 1 ♂/♂) and their respective parents was continuously monitored by actiwatches between the 4th and 12th months of age. The families were kept under LD 12:12 h with constant humidity and temperature. The onset of puberty was identified by monitoring fecal steroids. Juveniles showed higher totals of daily activity and differences in the daily distribution of activity in relation to parents, in which the bimodal profile was characterized by higher levels in evening activity in relation to morning activity. Regarding the phase, the activity onset and offset, occurred later in relation to parents. After entering puberty, the activity onset and offset occurred later and there was an increase in total daily activity. On the other hand, when assessing the effect of sex, only females showed a delay in the activity offset and an increase in total daily activity. Therefore, the circadian activity rhythm in marmosets has peculiar characteristics in the juvenile stage in relation to the total of daily activity, the onset and offset of the active phase, and the distribution of activity during this phase. Besides, the entering puberty was associated with a phase delay and increase on total daily activity, with differences between sexes, possibly due to hormonal influences and/or social modulation on rhythm.

  2. Weapons in disguise--activating mechanisms and protecting group chemistry in nature.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Jason C; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-11-22

    Bioactive natural products often possess uniquely functionalized structures with unusual modes of action; however, the natural product itself is not always the active species. We discuss molecules that draw on protecting group chemistry or else require activation to unmask reactive centers, illustrating that nature is not only a source of complex structures but also a guide for elegant chemical transformations which provides ingenious chemical solutions for drug delivery.

  3. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.

  4. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  5. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption.

  6. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Interaction of isozymes I, II, IV, V, and IX with carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessio; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Casey, Joseph R; Supuran, Claudiut

    2005-02-01

    A detailed inhibition study of five carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes with carboxylates including aliphatic (formate, acetate), dicarboxylic (oxalate, malonate), hydroxy/keto acids (l-lactate, l-malate, pyruvate), tricarboxylic (citrate), or aromatic (benzoate, tetrafluorobenzoate) representatives, some of which are important intermediates in the Krebs cycle, is presented. The cytosolic isozyme hCA I was strongly activated by acetate, oxalate, pyruvate, l-lactate, and citrate (K(A) around 0.1 microM), whereas formate, malonate, malate, and benzoate were weaker activators (K(A) in the range 0.1-1mM). The cytosolic isozyme hCA II was weakly inhibited by all the investigated anions, with inhibition constants in the range of 0.03-24 mM. The membrane-associated isozyme hCA IV was the most sensitive to inhibition by carboxylates, showing a K(I) of 99 nM for citrate and oxalate, of 2.8 microM for malonate and of 14.5 microM for pyruvate among others. The mitochondrial isozyme hCA V was weakly inhibited by all these carboxylates (K(I)s in the range of 1.67-25.9 mM), with the best inhibitor being citrate (K(I) of 1.67 mM), whereas this is the most resistant CA isozyme to pyruvate inhibition (K(I) of 5.5mM), which may be another proof that CA V is the isozyme involved in the transfer of acetyl groups from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the provision of substrate(s) for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, the relative resistance of CA V to inhibition by pyruvate may be an evolutionary adaptation of this mitochondrial isozyme to the presence of high concentrations of this anion within this organelle. The transmembrane, tumor-associated isozyme hCA IX was similar to isozyme II in its slight inhibition by all these anions (K(I) in the range of 1.12-7.42 mM), except acetate, lactate, and benzoate, which showed a K(I)>150 mM. The lactate insensitivity of CA IX also represents an interesting finding, since it is presumed that this isozyme evolved in such a way as to

  7. Novel method for the preparation of polymethacrylates with nonlinear optically active side groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohriegl, Peter; Mueller, Harry; Nuyken, Oskar

    1993-01-01

    Because of their excellent optical properties, a variety of polymethacrylates with pendant NLO-chromophores has been prepared and investigated by different research groups. The method normally used for the synthesis of these polymers is the free radical polymerization of the corresponding methacrylates with NLO-active side groups. However, the NLO- chromophores, usually large conjugated molecules with an electron donor and an electron acceptor substituent, often contain a number of functional groups, e.g., nitro- or azo groups. These may act as retarders or inhibitors in a free radical polymerization. So in many cases the yields are not quantitative and the molecular weights are quite low. We present an alternative method for the preparation of polymethacrylates with pendant NLO-chromophores, the polymeranalogous esterification of poly(methacryloyl chloride). In a first step, reactive prepolymers are prepared by the free radical polymerization of methacryloyl chloride (MAC1) or by copolymerization of MAC1 with methyl methacrylate (MMA). These prepolymers are esterified using NLO-active side groups with a hydroxy-terminated spacer. Well defined, high molecular weight polymethacrylates with high dye contents can be prepared by this method. A copolymer with 19 mole% of azochromophores exhibits an electro-optical coefficient of 9 pm/V at 1300 mm after poling, whereas 19 pm/V (1500 nm) were measured for a polymer with 90 mole% of NLO active azobenzene side groups. In addition, the novel method provides easy access to some novel copolymers with both NLO-active azobenzene units and photocrosslinkable cinnamoyl groups.

  8. A method to quantify movement activity of groups of animals using automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianyu; Yu, Haizhen; Liu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Most physiological and environmental changes are capable of inducing variations in animal behavior. The behavioral parameters have the possibility to be measured continuously in-situ by a non-invasive and non-contact approach, and have the potential to be used in the actual productions to predict stress conditions. Most vertebrates tend to live in groups, herds, flocks, shoals, bands, packs of conspecific individuals. Under culture conditions, the livestock or fish are in groups and interact on each other, so the aggregate behavior of the group should be studied rather than that of individuals. This paper presents a method to calculate the movement speed of a group of animal in a enclosure or a tank denoted by body length speed that correspond to group activity using computer vision technique. Frame sequences captured at special time interval were subtracted in pairs after image segmentation and identification. By labeling components caused by object movement in difference frame, the projected area caused by the movement of every object in the capture interval was calculated; this projected area was divided by the projected area of every object in the later frame to get body length moving distance of each object, and further could obtain the relative body length speed. The average speed of all object can well respond to the activity of the group. The group activity of a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) school to high (2.65 mg/L) levels of unionized ammonia (UIA) concentration were quantified based on these methods. High UIA level condition elicited a marked increase in school activity at the first hour (P<0.05) exhibiting an avoidance reaction (trying to flee from high UIA condition), and then decreased gradually.

  9. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  10. Physical activity and beverage consumption in preschoolers: focus groups with parents and teachers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is a method in which new ideas and strategies can be discovered. This qualitative study aimed to investigate parents’ and teachers’ opinions on physical activity and beverage consumption of preschool children. Through separate, independent focus groups, they expressed their perceptions on children’s current physical activity and beverage consumption levels, factors that influence and enhance these behaviours, and anticipated barriers to making changes. Methods Multi-cultural and multi-geographical focus groups were carried out in six European countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain). In total, twenty-four focus groups with 122 parents and eighteen focus groups with 87 teachers were conducted between October 2010 and January 2011. Based on a semi-structured interview guide, questions on preschoolers’ physical activity (opinions on preschoolers’ physical activity, how to increase physical activity, facilitators and barriers of physical activity) and beverage consumption (rules and policies, factors influencing promotion of healthy drinking, recommendations for future intervention development) were asked. The information was analyzed using qualitative data analysis software (NVivo8). Results The focus group results indicated misperceptions of caregivers on preschoolers’ physical activity and beverage consumption levels. Caregivers perceived preschoolers as sufficiently active; they argue that children need to learn to sit still in preparation for primary school. At most preschools, children can drink only water. In some preschools sugar-sweetened beverages like chocolate milk or fruit juices, are also allowed. It was mentioned that sugar-sweetened beverages can be healthy due to mineral and vitamin content, although according to parents their daily intake is limited. These opinions resulted in low perceived needs to change behaviours. Conclusions Although previous research shows need of change in

  11. Structural basis of substrate selectivity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1): semialdehyde chain length.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Travis A; Tanner, John J

    2013-10-01

    The enzyme Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (aka P5CDH and ALDH4A1) is an aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of γ-glutamate semialdehyde to l-glutamate. The crystal structures of mouse P5CDH complexed with glutarate, succinate, malonate, glyoxylate, and acetate are reported. The structures are used to build a structure-activity relationship that describes the semialdehyde carbon chain length and the position of the aldehyde group in relation to the cysteine nucleophile and oxyanion hole. Efficient 4- and 5-carbon substrates share the common feature of being long enough to span the distance between the anchor loop at the bottom of the active site and the oxyanion hole at the top of the active site. The inactive 2- and 3-carbon semialdehydes bind the anchor loop but are too short to reach the oxyanion hole. Inhibition of P5CDH by glyoxylate, malonate, succinate, glutarate, and l-glutamate is also examined. The Ki values are 0.27 mM for glyoxylate, 58 mM for succinate, 30 mM for glutarate, and 12 mM for l-glutamate. Curiously, malonate is not an inhibitor. The trends in Ki likely reflect a trade-off between the penalty for desolvating the carboxylates of the free inhibitor and the number of compensating hydrogen bonds formed in the enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  12. One step synthesis of Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@carboxylate-rich carbon spheres with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Lingling; Luo, Zhijun; Tang, Chao

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Functional groups of sodium gluconate play synergetic roles in the formation of Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@carboxylate-rich carbon core–shell nanosturctures (Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs). Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs exhibits significant enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • One step synthesis of Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@carboxylate-rich carbon spheres. • Functional groups of sodium gluconate play synergetic roles in the formation of Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs. • Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs exhibits enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. - Abstract: Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@carboxylate-rich carbon core-shell nanosturctures (Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs) have been synthesized via a one-step method. The core–shell nanosturctures of the as-prepared samples were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The formation of Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs core–shell nanosturctures should attribute to the synergetic roles of different functional groups of sodium gluconate. Bi@Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}@CRCSs exhibits significant enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) and shows an O{sub 2}-dependent feature. According to trapping experiments of radicals and holes, hydroxyl radicals were not the main active oxidative species in the photocatalytic degradation of MB, but O{sub 2}·{sup −} are the main active oxidative species.

  13. The Conversion of Carboxylic Acids to Ketones: A Repeated Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Wilson, Alan D.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones is a useful chemical transformation with a long history. Several chemists have claimed that they discovered the conversion of carboxylic acids to ketones yet in fact the reaction is actually known for centuries.

  14. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On July 30, 2010, the Secretary of the Air Force, acting as Executive Agent of the Secretary of Defense...'' for purposes of all laws administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). FOR...

  15. Bill Gates' Great-Great-Granddaughter's Honeymoon: An Astronomy Activity for Several Different Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    When students finish a unit or course on the planets these days, they are often overwhelmed with facts, comparisons, and images. A good culminating activity, to help them organize their thinking (and review), is to have them divide into small groups (travel agencies) and come up with their top ten solar system "tourist sights" for future space…

  16. Active Group Learning: A Selective Study of Effective Public Humanities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Charles C., Jr.

    A study of active group learning that occurred during 61 state humanities programs in 35 states is discussed, and 11 recommendations to state humanities councils are offered. Information was obtained from a mail survey and review of state council proposals and narrative reports. Definitions of learning and information on the following learning…

  17. Effects of Cooperative Group Work Activities on Pre-School Children's Pattern Recognition Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarim, Kamuran

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is twofold; to investigate the effects of cooperative group-based work activities on children's pattern recognition skills in pre-school and to examine the teachers' opinions about the implementation process. In line with this objective, for the study, 57 children (25 girls and 32 boys) were chosen from two private schools…

  18. When Talking Won't Work: Implementing Experiential Group Activities with Addicted Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Hirshhorn, Meredith A.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional talk therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral techniques, are often ineffective when working with addicted clients for many reasons. By tapping into the power of the group modality, experiential activities can serve as a powerful facilitator of insight and behavior change. The authors provide a brief review of the literature followed…

  19. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  20. Activating Group Recycling in Action: A Rhodium-Catalyzed Carbothiolation Route to Substituted Isoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new rhodium(I) catalyst allows practical and efficient alkyne carbothiolation reactions to be achieved on synthetically useful ketone-bearing aryl methyl sulfides. The carbothiolation adducts, featuring a ‘recycled methyl sulfide’ activating group, are convenient precursors to highly substituted isoquinolines. PMID:24083625

  1. 78 FR 75905 - Credit for Increasing Research Activities: Intra-Group Gross Receipts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-13

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BE14 Credit for Increasing Research Activities: Intra-Group Gross Receipts AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of... under section 41 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) relating to the treatment of qualified...

  2. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  3. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  4. Use of a Wiki-Based Software to Manage Research Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ting; Vezenov, Dmitri V.; Simboli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses use of the wiki software Confluence to organize research group activities and lab resources. Confluence can serve as an electronic lab notebook (ELN), as well as an information management and collaboration tool. The article provides a case study in how researchers can use wiki software in "home-grown" fashion to…

  5. An Investigation of the Structure of Group Activities in ELT Coursebooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, George M.; Ball, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    Reports a study examining the use of group activities in 10 randomly selected English-language teaching coursebooks published since 1990. Results are discussed in light of theory and research on cooperative learning; task-based language teaching; and the roles of learners, teachers, and coursebooks. (26 references) (Author/CK)

  6. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  7. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  8. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  9. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  10. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  11. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-05

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R2(2)(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31++G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4kcal/mol.

  12. A Small-Group Activity Introducing the Use and Interpretation of BLAST †

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Fricker, Ashwana D.; Roco, Constance Armanda; Chandrangsu, Pete; Merkel, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    As biological sequence data are generated at an ever increasing rate, the role of bioinformatics in biological research also grows. Students must be trained to complete and interpret bioinformatic searches to enable them to effectively utilize the trove of sequence data available. A key bioinformatic tool for sequence comparison and genome database searching is BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool). BLAST identifies sequences in a database that are similar to the entered query sequence, and ranks them based on the length and quality of the alignment. Our goal was to introduce sophomore and junior level undergraduate students to the basic functions and uses of BLAST with a small group activity lasting a single class period. The activity provides students an opportunity to perform a BLAST search, interpret the data output, and use the data to make inferences about bacterial cell envelope structure. The activity consists of two parts. Part 1 is a handout to be completed prior to class, complete with video tutorial, that reviews cell envelope structure, introduces key terms, and allows students to familiarize themselves with the mechanics of a BLAST search. Part 2 consists of a hands-on, web-based small group activity to be completed during the class period. Evaluation of the activity through student performance assessments suggests that students who complete the activity can better interpret the BLAST output parameters % query coverage and % max identity. While the topic of the activity is bacterial cell wall structure, it could be adapted to address other biological concepts. PMID:24358388

  13. Pre-Session Satiation as a Treatment for Stereotypy During Group Activities.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Mandy; Camargo, Síglia Hoher; Neely, Leslie; Gerow, Stephanie; Lang, Russell; Goodwyn, Fara; Ninci, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities may engage in automatically reinforced behaviors that may interfere with learning opportunities. Manipulation of motivating operations has been shown to reduce automatically maintained behavior in some individuals. Considering behavioral indicators of satiation may assist in identifying the point at which an abolishing operation has begun to effect behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of pre-session satiation of automatic reinforcement on subsequent levels of stereotypy and activity engagement during group activities for three males ages 5 to 13 years with developmental disabilities. Following functional analyses with analogue conditions, an alternating treatment design compared a pre-session access to stereotypy condition with a no-pre-session access condition prior to group activity sessions. Results indicated that pre-session satiation of the putative reinforcer produced by stereotypy was effective in decreasing stereotypy and increasing activity engagement during subsequent group activities for all participants. These findings add to the literature supporting the effectiveness of abolishing operations to decrease automatically maintained stereotypy.

  14. Townes Group Activities from 1983-2000: Personal Recollections of William Danchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2015-01-01

    I arrived in Berkeley in October 1983 as a post-doc, and my appointment was at the Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL). During that time the group was very large, with multiple activities led by Charlie himself and also by Senior Fellows such as John Lacy, Dan Jaffe, and Al Betz at the top of the hill at Space Sciences. Another significant contingent of the Townes group was housed in Birge Hall on campus, led by Reinhard Genzel when he was an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department. Although the group encompassed two separate locations, it functioned as one large group. Either we rode with Charlie up and down the hill, or (if we were concerned about our safety!) we took the bus.

  15. “Convivência” Groups: Building Active and Healthy Communities of Older Adults in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Tânia R. Bertoldo; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J.

    2012-01-01

    In old age, social groups can be a crucial component for health and well-being. In 2009-2010, a follow-up survey was carried out in Florianópolis, Brazil to understand the impact of a variety of programs established since 2002 that were designed to enhance social activities among the older adult population. This study employed two surveys within the population of older adults in Florianópolis. The first survey interviewed a total of 875 older adults in 2002, and the second survey involved 1,705 older adults between 2009 and 2010. By 2010, many new programs were offered in the community and the enrollment of older adults in social programs followed similar trends. “Convivência” groups stood out as extremely popular social groups among this population. This paper discusses some of the potential outcomes associated with participation in “convivência” groups. PMID:22830022

  16. Effects of sulfate group in red seaweed polysaccharides on anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wanai; Mao, Xuan; Peng, Xiaohui; Tang, Shunqing

    2014-01-30

    In this paper, the structural effects of two main red seaweed polysaccharides (agarose and carrageenan) and their sulfated derivatives on the anticoagulant activity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The substitution position rather than the substitution degree of sulfate groups shows the biggest impact on both the anticoagulant activity and the cell proliferation. Among them, C-2 of 3,6-anhydro-α-d-Galp is the most favorable position for substitution, whereas C-6 of β-d-Galp is the most disadvantageous. Moreover, the secondary structures of glycans also play a key role in biological activities. These demonstrations warrant that the red seaweed polysaccharides should be seriously considered in biomedical applications after carefully tailoring the sulfate groups.

  17. Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Rugama, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

  18. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  19. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of articles intended for use in contact...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl...

  17. Modeling the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrational modes of aqueous carboxylate anions.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Catherine C R; Franks, George V; da Silva, Gabriel

    2015-01-05

    The infrared spectra of six aqueous carboxylate anions have been calculated at the M05-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory with the SMD solvent model, and validated against experimental data from the literature over the region of 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1); this region corresponds to the stretching modes of the carboxylate group, and is often interrogated when probing bonding of carboxylates to other species and surfaces. The anions studied here were formate, acetate, oxalate, succinate, glutarate and citrate. For the lowest energy conformer of each anion, the carboxylate moiety antisymmetric stretching peak was predicted with a mean signed error of only 4 cm(-1) using the SMD solvent model, while the symmetric peak was slightly overestimated. Performing calculations in vacuum and scaling was found to generally over-predict the antisymmetric vibrational frequencies and under predict the symmetric peak. Different conformers of the same anion were found to have only slightly different spectra in the studied region and the inclusion of explicit water molecules was not found to significantly change the calculated spectra when the implicit solvent model is used. Overall, the use of density functional theory in conjunction with an implicit solvent model was found to result in infra-red spectra that are the best reproduction of the features found experimentally for the aqueous carboxylate ions in the important 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1) region. The development of validated model chemistries for simulating the stretching modes of aqueous carboxylate ions will be valuable for future studies that investigate how carboxylate anions complex with multivalent metal cations and related species in solution.

  18. Density Functional Theory Study on the Interactions of Metal Ions with Long Chain Deprotonated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Koch, Henrik; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-10-08

    In this work, interactions between carboxylate ions and calcium or sodium ions are investigated via density functional theory (DFT). Despite the ubiquitous presence of these interactions in natural and industrial chemical processes, few DFT studies on these systems exist in the literature. Special focus has been placed on determining the influence of the multibody interactions (with up to 4 carboxylates and one metal ion) on an effective pair-interaction potential, such as those used in molecular mechanics (MM). Specifically, DFT calculations are employed to quantify an effective pair-potential that implicitly includes multibody interactions to construct potential energy curves for carboxylate-metal ion pairs. The DFT calculated potential curves are compared to a widely used molecular mechanics force field (OPLS-AA). The calculations indicate that multibody effects do influence the energetic behavior of these ionic pairs and the extent of this influence is determined by a balance between (a) charge transfer from the carboxylate to the metal ions which stabilizes the complex and (b) repulsion between carboxylates, which destabilizes the complex. Additionally, the potential curves of the complexes with 1 and 2 carboxylates and one counterion have been examined to higher separation distance (20 Å) by the use of relaxed scan optimization and constrained density functional theory (CDFT). The results from the relaxed scan optimization indicate that near the equilibrium distance, the charge transfer between the metal ion and the deprotonated carboxylic acid group is significant and leads to non-negligible differences between the DFT and MM potential curves, especially for calcium. However, at longer separation distances the MM calculated interaction potential functions converge to those calculated with CDFT, effectively indicating the approximate domain of the separation distance coordinate where charge transfer between the ions is occurring.

  19. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  20. Detection and comparison of neuraminidase activities in human and bovine group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Ismail Hakki; Gurturk, Kemal; Ilhan, Ziya; Ekin, Suat; Borum, Ayse Ebru; Arabaci, Cigdem; Yesilova, Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    Human and bovine group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates were serotyped and amounts of released N-acetylneuraminic acid from N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose by extracellular neuraminidase were colorimetrically assessed. According to serotyping by co-agglutination method, 30 of bovine GBS and 43 of human GBS could be serotyped (ST) by monospecific antisera coated with protein A. The remaining GBS strains were designated as nontypeable (NT). The released N-acetylneuraminic acid was determined in 90.9% of bovine GBS and 47.1% of human GBS isolates. The differences between the total bovine and human GBS isolates were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In comparison with detected N-acetylneuraminic acid level in bovine and human groups, significant decrease was observed in the bovine NT group according to increased human NT (p < 0.01) and bovine ST groups (p < 0.01). However, N-acetylneuraminic acid level in bovine ST and bovine total groups significantly (p < 0.001) increased with respect to the human ST group and human total group. Neuraminidase activity was detected more frequently in bovine GBS isolates. Considerable differentiations were observed between typeable and nontypeable isolates.